Date   

PUGATCH Pictures VM4772 & VM4774 Do you recognize? #general

Barry E Chernick
 

The PUGATCH family are "cousins" to my CHERNICK family, we just are not
sure how. If you recognize anyone in theses pictures please let me know.

http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=4772
http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=4774
Respond privately.
Barry Chernick
Bellevue, WA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen PUGATCH Pictures VM4772 & VM4774 Do you recognize? #general

Barry E Chernick
 

The PUGATCH family are "cousins" to my CHERNICK family, we just are not
sure how. If you recognize anyone in theses pictures please let me know.

http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=4772
http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=4774
Respond privately.
Barry Chernick
Bellevue, WA


Jews in China: Kaifeng #general

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@...>
 

I have a passing interest in the Jewish community in the town of Kaifeng, in
China. Innumerable web sites are devoted to the subject. In what part of
China is Kaifeng located? Is it perhaps in the eastern part, near
Xhengzhou?

Daniel Kazez < dkazez@wittenberg.edu >
Springfield, Ohio USA
http://www.kazez.com/~dan/fam-ent/


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jews in China: Kaifeng #general

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@...>
 

I have a passing interest in the Jewish community in the town of Kaifeng, in
China. Innumerable web sites are devoted to the subject. In what part of
China is Kaifeng located? Is it perhaps in the eastern part, near
Xhengzhou?

Daniel Kazez < dkazez@wittenberg.edu >
Springfield, Ohio USA
http://www.kazez.com/~dan/fam-ent/


Donations to JewishGen NOW Tax Deductible for Canadian Residents #unitedkingdom

Susan E. King <susan.king@...>
 

MODERATOR NOTE: Whilst it is not the policy of JCR-UK to post non UK and non genealogical
orientated messages we are making an exception for this posting >from JewishGen
aimed at any Canadian members of our group.
*****

Dear Canadian friends,

We are pleased to advise all our Canadian JewishGenners that as a result
of the dedicated efforts of the JGS of Canada (Toronto), a tax qualified
charity in Canada, donations to JewishGen are NOW tax deductible for
Canadian residents.

To simplify giving, we have prepared a form which you can print out,
type or print all the information requested, make your cheque payable to
the JGS of Canada (Toronto) and mail to the address on the form.

We do hope that with the availability of tax credits, you will be
comfortable in making regular financial donations to JewishGen.=20

We thank you in advance for your consideration and participation in
supporting JewishGen.=20

You will find the Canadian Tax Deduction form at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/Canada.html


Susan E. King, Managing Director
JewishGen, Inc.


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Donations to JewishGen NOW Tax Deductible for Canadian Residents #unitedkingdom

Susan E. King <susan.king@...>
 

MODERATOR NOTE: Whilst it is not the policy of JCR-UK to post non UK and non genealogical
orientated messages we are making an exception for this posting >from JewishGen
aimed at any Canadian members of our group.
*****

Dear Canadian friends,

We are pleased to advise all our Canadian JewishGenners that as a result
of the dedicated efforts of the JGS of Canada (Toronto), a tax qualified
charity in Canada, donations to JewishGen are NOW tax deductible for
Canadian residents.

To simplify giving, we have prepared a form which you can print out,
type or print all the information requested, make your cheque payable to
the JGS of Canada (Toronto) and mail to the address on the form.

We do hope that with the availability of tax credits, you will be
comfortable in making regular financial donations to JewishGen.=20

We thank you in advance for your consideration and participation in
supporting JewishGen.=20

You will find the Canadian Tax Deduction form at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/Canada.html


Susan E. King, Managing Director
JewishGen, Inc.


U.S. Old Street Names #general

Joel Weintraub <jweintraub@...>
 

There was a recent post asking about the existence of a street (Mechanic) in
a U.S. City (New Rochelle) that cannot be found on a current street map. I
responded privately to that individual, but a general response to the group
is warranted. First, as cities grow, new street names occur, and duplicate
street names are eliminated. In addition, some street names (Radium,
Electric, Mechanic) go out of style and are replaced. Keeping up with
changing street names is a challenge in any city. We have made it a little
easier at: http://www.stevemorse.org/census/changes.html by finding links to
new/old street names utilities on the Internet, and by generating such
tables ourselves (project in progress). Source material for such tables
come >from things like old city directories, and street guides. For example,
we have transcribed two sources for street name changes for Queens, New York
that are up on the site. There are close to 9,000 street names on our
tables for Queens. I'm always interested in finding new resources for the
website. But all such tables are usually time specific, and incomplete.

Another resource is: http://www.stevemorse.org/census/index.html This
utility was meant to use addresses in the 1930 and 1910 Census for selected
cities to find Census enumeration district numbers. For 1930 that means all
U.S. cities of 25,000 or more people. We tried to transcribe the street
names for those databases >from source material as close to 1930 as possible.
Some of that material are maps circa 1930 (to recent maps, if we couldn't
find resources). The utility shows all possible street names for each city
(with the variable the year of the resource we used). So, looking up the
target street, Mechanic, on the One Step Utility for 1930 in Rochelle (names
transcribed off a 1933 map) we find that that street crossed two enumeration
districts. It's possible to see the other streets within those two
districts on the utility, and assuming that most of the names still exist
today, with a current map find what area of the city the street was in.

A third source, also used for the 1930 One Step Utility, is the National
Archives T1224 series. For large cities in 1930, the Census district
descriptions on T1224 included a block by block description of the street
names on the north/east/south/and west side of each block within each Census
district. Knowing the 1930 Census district the "old" street name was in,
and having a city that has a block by block census description on T1224, one
can find the exact blocks the street is on.
Joel Weintraub, Dana Point, CA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen U.S. Old Street Names #general

Joel Weintraub <jweintraub@...>
 

There was a recent post asking about the existence of a street (Mechanic) in
a U.S. City (New Rochelle) that cannot be found on a current street map. I
responded privately to that individual, but a general response to the group
is warranted. First, as cities grow, new street names occur, and duplicate
street names are eliminated. In addition, some street names (Radium,
Electric, Mechanic) go out of style and are replaced. Keeping up with
changing street names is a challenge in any city. We have made it a little
easier at: http://www.stevemorse.org/census/changes.html by finding links to
new/old street names utilities on the Internet, and by generating such
tables ourselves (project in progress). Source material for such tables
come >from things like old city directories, and street guides. For example,
we have transcribed two sources for street name changes for Queens, New York
that are up on the site. There are close to 9,000 street names on our
tables for Queens. I'm always interested in finding new resources for the
website. But all such tables are usually time specific, and incomplete.

Another resource is: http://www.stevemorse.org/census/index.html This
utility was meant to use addresses in the 1930 and 1910 Census for selected
cities to find Census enumeration district numbers. For 1930 that means all
U.S. cities of 25,000 or more people. We tried to transcribe the street
names for those databases >from source material as close to 1930 as possible.
Some of that material are maps circa 1930 (to recent maps, if we couldn't
find resources). The utility shows all possible street names for each city
(with the variable the year of the resource we used). So, looking up the
target street, Mechanic, on the One Step Utility for 1930 in Rochelle (names
transcribed off a 1933 map) we find that that street crossed two enumeration
districts. It's possible to see the other streets within those two
districts on the utility, and assuming that most of the names still exist
today, with a current map find what area of the city the street was in.

A third source, also used for the 1930 One Step Utility, is the National
Archives T1224 series. For large cities in 1930, the Census district
descriptions on T1224 included a block by block description of the street
names on the north/east/south/and west side of each block within each Census
district. Knowing the 1930 Census district the "old" street name was in,
and having a city that has a block by block census description on T1224, one
can find the exact blocks the street is on.
Joel Weintraub, Dana Point, CA


Do we all have a common ancestor? #general

Michael Meshenberg
 

The current issue of Nature magazine has an article that argues, based on
computer modeling, that all people alive today have a common ancestor who
lived just 3,500 years ago.

from the first paragraph:
"The most recent common ancestor of all humanity lived just a few thousand
years ago, according to a computer model of our family tree. Researchers
have calculated that the mystery person, >from whom everyone alive today is
directly descended, probably lived around 1,500 BC in eastern Asia."

See summary of "Human Populations are Tightly Interwoven"
http://www.nature.com/news/2004/040927/full/040927-10.html. (Links to full
article at the end.)

Mike Meshenberg
Chicago


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Do we all have a common ancestor? #general

Michael Meshenberg
 

The current issue of Nature magazine has an article that argues, based on
computer modeling, that all people alive today have a common ancestor who
lived just 3,500 years ago.

from the first paragraph:
"The most recent common ancestor of all humanity lived just a few thousand
years ago, according to a computer model of our family tree. Researchers
have calculated that the mystery person, >from whom everyone alive today is
directly descended, probably lived around 1,500 BC in eastern Asia."

See summary of "Human Populations are Tightly Interwoven"
http://www.nature.com/news/2004/040927/full/040927-10.html. (Links to full
article at the end.)

Mike Meshenberg
Chicago


Obits in the New York Times #general

HeyJudy123@...
 

The question has been raised as to whether obits in the *New York Times* can be
fertile territory for researching the deceased.

My experience with the Times' has been that only their editorial obits are
archived.

Explicitly, this means that the hundreds of classified (paid for) notices that
appear there every week--which, in my lifetime, always have had a large percentage
of Jewish people included--are not archived.

So, unless the death of the person being researched was deemed by the *Times* to
be of sufficient general interest to be worthy of mention as a news item, one
could not expect to find that person in the Times' archive.

Judy Segal
New York City


NYC Family History Center #general

Joy Rich <joyrichny@...>
 

See the page on the website of the Jewish Genealogical Society (New York) at
http://www.jgsny.org/fhc2.htm for a list of about 2,000 indefinite loan
microfilms and microfiche that were transferred >from the FHC in Manhattan to
the newly-opened FHC in Woodside, Queens.

Joy Rich
Brooklyn, NY
joyrichny@earthlink.net

The NYC Family History Center has been closed for several years. When
will it re-open?
If not, has the Center donated or lent its microfilm and other material
to another NY city organization so that genealogists can continue to do
research?
Thanks,
Sy Pearlman


NYC Family History Center material now in Woodside #general

Renee Steinig <rsteinig@...>
 

Sy Pearlman wrote...

<< The NYC Family History Center has been closed for several years. When will
it re-open? If not, has the Center donated or lent its microfilm and other
material to another NY city organization so that genealogists can continue
to do research? >>

The Jewish Genealogy Society of Long Island has the following blurb ready to
go out in JGSLI Online, the electronic newsletter we send to our members
(with thanks to Dorot, the JGSNY newsletter, for their report on the move):

Nearly 2,000 microfilm rolls and microfiche formerly housed at the LDS
(Mormon) Family History Center in Manhattan have been moved to a new Family
History Center in Woodside. Some of the important resources now available in
Woodside are Viennese Jewish vital records and indexes, the 1938 German
census of minority groups, Hamburg passenger lists, and various U.S. and
European vital records. A list of the center's microform holdings is posted
at www.jgsny.org/fhc2.htm . The cataloging and numbering follows the LDS
Family History Library Catalog in Salt Lake City. More details on each item
can be found by doing a "Call Number Search" on the Family History Library
catalog, at www.familysearch.org .

The center is located at 40-24 62nd Street -- two short blocks >from the LIRR
Woodside station and the 62nd St-Woodside station of the #7 subway line, and
near the Northern Blvd. exit of the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway. Ample free
parking is available in a lot adjacent to the building.

Hours currently are:

Mondays 10 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Tuesdays 1:00 - 7:00 p.m.
Thursdays 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Fridays 2:00 - 6:30 p.m.

with hopes of adding Saturday hours and longer evening hours at least once a
week. The facility currently has six microfilm readers and expects to add
two more.

The Manhattan FHC, near Lincoln Center, closed for construction in Dec.
2002. It is not expected to reopen for at least another year, possibly at
another location.

Renee

Renee Stern Steinig
Membership Vice President
JGSLI@suffolk.lib.ny.us
www.jewishgen.org/jgsli


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Obits in the New York Times #general

HeyJudy123@...
 

The question has been raised as to whether obits in the *New York Times* can be
fertile territory for researching the deceased.

My experience with the Times' has been that only their editorial obits are
archived.

Explicitly, this means that the hundreds of classified (paid for) notices that
appear there every week--which, in my lifetime, always have had a large percentage
of Jewish people included--are not archived.

So, unless the death of the person being researched was deemed by the *Times* to
be of sufficient general interest to be worthy of mention as a news item, one
could not expect to find that person in the Times' archive.

Judy Segal
New York City


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen NYC Family History Center #general

Joy Rich <joyrichny@...>
 

See the page on the website of the Jewish Genealogical Society (New York) at
http://www.jgsny.org/fhc2.htm for a list of about 2,000 indefinite loan
microfilms and microfiche that were transferred >from the FHC in Manhattan to
the newly-opened FHC in Woodside, Queens.

Joy Rich
Brooklyn, NY
joyrichny@earthlink.net

The NYC Family History Center has been closed for several years. When
will it re-open?
If not, has the Center donated or lent its microfilm and other material
to another NY city organization so that genealogists can continue to do
research?
Thanks,
Sy Pearlman


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen NYC Family History Center material now in Woodside #general

Renee Steinig <rsteinig@...>
 

Sy Pearlman wrote...

<< The NYC Family History Center has been closed for several years. When will
it re-open? If not, has the Center donated or lent its microfilm and other
material to another NY city organization so that genealogists can continue
to do research? >>

The Jewish Genealogy Society of Long Island has the following blurb ready to
go out in JGSLI Online, the electronic newsletter we send to our members
(with thanks to Dorot, the JGSNY newsletter, for their report on the move):

Nearly 2,000 microfilm rolls and microfiche formerly housed at the LDS
(Mormon) Family History Center in Manhattan have been moved to a new Family
History Center in Woodside. Some of the important resources now available in
Woodside are Viennese Jewish vital records and indexes, the 1938 German
census of minority groups, Hamburg passenger lists, and various U.S. and
European vital records. A list of the center's microform holdings is posted
at www.jgsny.org/fhc2.htm . The cataloging and numbering follows the LDS
Family History Library Catalog in Salt Lake City. More details on each item
can be found by doing a "Call Number Search" on the Family History Library
catalog, at www.familysearch.org .

The center is located at 40-24 62nd Street -- two short blocks >from the LIRR
Woodside station and the 62nd St-Woodside station of the #7 subway line, and
near the Northern Blvd. exit of the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway. Ample free
parking is available in a lot adjacent to the building.

Hours currently are:

Mondays 10 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Tuesdays 1:00 - 7:00 p.m.
Thursdays 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Fridays 2:00 - 6:30 p.m.

with hopes of adding Saturday hours and longer evening hours at least once a
week. The facility currently has six microfilm readers and expects to add
two more.

The Manhattan FHC, near Lincoln Center, closed for construction in Dec.
2002. It is not expected to reopen for at least another year, possibly at
another location.

Renee

Renee Stern Steinig
Membership Vice President
JGSLI@suffolk.lib.ny.us
www.jewishgen.org/jgsli


Re: NY obit search question #general

Joy Rich <joyrichny@...>
 

I've joined the Godfrey Memorial Library, located in Middletown,
Connecticut, to get access to a myriad of sources. For $35.00 a year, I have
online access >from home through its website for The New York Times,
1851-2001, L.A. Times, 1881-1984, and Washington Post, 1877-1988 (all three
newspapers are >from ProQuest). I also have access to the federal censuses
(>from Heritage Quest), Newspaper Archive Elite (>from Ebsco), which has
newspapers >from around the US (I found articles with my mother's surname
back to 1904), and PERSI (Periodical Source Index, >from ProQuest), and the
full text of more than 25,000 books (>from Heritage Quest).

It's a great buy for the price.

Joy Rich
Brooklyn, NY
joyrichny@earthlink.net

Sara Lynns wrote:

I am searching obituaries for NY 1965-1985 >from my experience, the obits
online are not comprehensive.

What would be a good source? NY times? NY Jewish newspapers?

todah
Jackie Lerner-Aderman
saralynn7@yahoo.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: NY obit search question #general

Joy Rich <joyrichny@...>
 

I've joined the Godfrey Memorial Library, located in Middletown,
Connecticut, to get access to a myriad of sources. For $35.00 a year, I have
online access >from home through its website for The New York Times,
1851-2001, L.A. Times, 1881-1984, and Washington Post, 1877-1988 (all three
newspapers are >from ProQuest). I also have access to the federal censuses
(>from Heritage Quest), Newspaper Archive Elite (>from Ebsco), which has
newspapers >from around the US (I found articles with my mother's surname
back to 1904), and PERSI (Periodical Source Index, >from ProQuest), and the
full text of more than 25,000 books (>from Heritage Quest).

It's a great buy for the price.

Joy Rich
Brooklyn, NY
joyrichny@earthlink.net

Sara Lynns wrote:

I am searching obituaries for NY 1965-1985 >from my experience, the obits
online are not comprehensive.

What would be a good source? NY times? NY Jewish newspapers?

todah
Jackie Lerner-Aderman
saralynn7@yahoo.com


Records in Palestine #general

Rose Feldman <rosef@...>
 

Dear Linda,
My mother's documents are in Turkish, even though they were issued in 1922
before she traveled abroad >from Palestine.
I suggest you read this article (pdf file) we have posted for the conference
that was in Jerusalem in July.
It may help you.
Censuses in Eretz Yisrael End of 19th Century - 20th Century - Shmuel Shamir
http://www.isragen.org.il/NROS/BIB/SHD/Shamir/Shamir-Censuses-E2.pdf
You can also have someone with the CD >from the conference with the database
of the burials on the Mt. of Olives check for you. It includes most of the
tombstone inscriptions >from 1740 to 1906.
Good luck
Rose Feldman

Secretary Tel-Aviv Branch of the Israel Genealogical Society
rosef@post.tau.ac.il

Join the Israel Genealogical Society (IGS)
and receive our Journal "Sharsheret Hadorot"
Society branches are in Jerusalem, Tel Aviv, Haifa, Negev (Beer Sheva),
Netanya.
Visit our forum in hebrew at the ynet SITE - www.ynet.co.il/shorashim
"To help and be helped"


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Records in Palestine #general

Rose Feldman <rosef@...>
 

Dear Linda,
My mother's documents are in Turkish, even though they were issued in 1922
before she traveled abroad >from Palestine.
I suggest you read this article (pdf file) we have posted for the conference
that was in Jerusalem in July.
It may help you.
Censuses in Eretz Yisrael End of 19th Century - 20th Century - Shmuel Shamir
http://www.isragen.org.il/NROS/BIB/SHD/Shamir/Shamir-Censuses-E2.pdf
You can also have someone with the CD >from the conference with the database
of the burials on the Mt. of Olives check for you. It includes most of the
tombstone inscriptions >from 1740 to 1906.
Good luck
Rose Feldman

Secretary Tel-Aviv Branch of the Israel Genealogical Society
rosef@post.tau.ac.il

Join the Israel Genealogical Society (IGS)
and receive our Journal "Sharsheret Hadorot"
Society branches are in Jerusalem, Tel Aviv, Haifa, Negev (Beer Sheva),
Netanya.
Visit our forum in hebrew at the ynet SITE - www.ynet.co.il/shorashim
"To help and be helped"