Date   

Marriage record #general

Hendrik Mulder <henkmulder@...>
 

According to my wife's cousin, my wife's grandparents were married
in the First Roumanian American Congregation at Rivingston Street
in New York in 1914. When I asked the New York City dep. of archives
they could not find any marriage record in 1914 in the 5 boroughs.
Does anyone knows what happened to the papers >from the congregation.
According to my wife's cousin it was not possible
to get a copy of the original marriage certificate >from the congregation.

Henk Mulder


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Marriage record #general

Hendrik Mulder <henkmulder@...>
 

According to my wife's cousin, my wife's grandparents were married
in the First Roumanian American Congregation at Rivingston Street
in New York in 1914. When I asked the New York City dep. of archives
they could not find any marriage record in 1914 in the 5 boroughs.
Does anyone knows what happened to the papers >from the congregation.
According to my wife's cousin it was not possible
to get a copy of the original marriage certificate >from the congregation.

Henk Mulder


Scoring with JGFF -- My Story, Some Lessons, and a Suggestion #general

Shlomo Katz <SKATZ@...>
 

I first listed some of my family names on JGFF in March 1999 and now have 49
different town and surname combinations listed (including alternate spellings).
These represent both mine and my wife's families. In January 2002 (I think)
I received an email >from someone -- I'll call her "Miriam" -- suggesting a
possible relationship. Indeed, it turned out that our great-great-grandfathers
were brothers. I already had her name on my family tree (which I had started
decades earlier when she was five years old), but had never had contact with
her immediate family. We have met several times and, by combining my
information with hers, I have been able to do follow up research that took our
mutual ancestry back to the 1700s. On top of that, our families have become
good friends. So, Lesson #1 -- Sign up on JGFF.

But there's more...

Flashback to July 1999, when I spent a Shabbat in Budapest. (That itself was
unplanned, and clearly fortuitous.) In shul (synagogue) on Shabbat, another
tourist sitting next to me found a piece of paper in his Chumash (bible) that
appeared to be a list of former members of the community. Probably, it had
once been used to call people to the Torah. Scanning the list, I saw the name
"Yochanan Eliezer ben (son of) Yaakov Chaim Katz." Pretty amazing, because I
knew that my great-grandfather had a cousin who lived near Budapest whose name
was "Yaakov Chaim ben Eliezer Katz." It was not hard to guess that the person
on the list was the son my great-grandfather's cousin, i.e., my grandfather's
second cousin. I asked one of the old timers in the shul if he knew this
"Yochanan Eliezer Katz," and was told, "He moved to America."

At that point, I figured I was at a dead end. Try to find a "Katz" in America!!
(This leads to the suggestion I offer below.) But fast forward again to 2002.
In my exchanges with "Miriam" (who is *not* related to my Katz side, but through
a different ancestor), she mentioned that her father's family came >from
Budapest. (I am related to her mother's side, not her father's.) I asked, "Has
he ever heard the name Yochanan Eliezer Katz"? Believe it or not, "Miriam's"
mother's best friend was a Mrs. Katz who had a son Yochanan Eliezer. A phone
call revealed that this young man was a grandson of the person I was seeking.
(The older Y.E. Katz had died in the 60s.) This lead to a joyous "reunion" with
the descendants of my great-grandfather's cousin, a branch that had never known
any Katz relatives. Again, I not only expanded my family tree both horizontally
and vertically, but I made great friends. They even came to my son's bar
mitzvah, which was the first time some of them had left New York since coming
from Hungary in the 1960s. Ironically, I had had evidence of these cousins in
my own house for years, as they have sponsored the publication of many
contemporary Jewish religious volumes that I own copies of. (I am not referring
to rare works, but rather ordinary contemporary Torah commentaries.) So--
Lesson #2 -- Don't overlook the most obscure clue, be it a scrap of paper in an
out-of-the-way synagogue or mundane book dedications. (Incidentally, in older
books, these lists are called "prenumeranten" or "advance buyers" and they are
a valuable genealogical source.)
Lesson #3 --, Don't be embarrassed to ask someone >from a town or even a big
city you are interested in, "Do you know so-and-so."

Now the suggestion. Say I am trying to find descendants of my great-uncle
Mendel Katz who settled in Montreal a century ago. Searching JGFF for a Katz
in Montreal is of limited value because the name is so common. Perhaps the
database could be modified to allow searching "Katz in Montreal >from Viseul de
Sus, Romania?" Also, the utility of JGFF is limited by the changes in borders
and town names. Since my great-uncle settled in Montreal in 1900, he would have
told his descendants that he came >from Visheve, Hungary. They might never make
a connection to Viseul de Sus, Romania. Can anything be done about this?

Those are my musings, hopefully helpful to someone. (I am *not* looking for
lots of responses on how to find Katzes in Montreal. I have already worked
with the most experienced genealogical minds in Montreal on this. Of course,
if you have non-standard suggestions or you happen to be my cousin or to know
him or her, please write.)

Oh, one more lesson -- When all else fails, do it the old fashioned way. I
was once looking for a different second cousin of my grandfather. All I knew
was that his first initial was "M." and he might live in New Jersey. I was
then a student and single and had more time, so I called or wrote every single
"M. Katz" in New Jersey. Believe it or not, I did find the cousin in New
Jersey. (We tried this in Montreal, with no luck.)

Happy hunting,
Shlomo Katz
Silver Spring, Maryland

MODERATOR NOTE: Shlomo, I hope you don't mind, but I'm forwarding your JGFF
suggestion directly to our Support Desk. And a little reminder to everyone,
if you have ideas for additions or improvements to JewishGen, the Support
Desk's e-mail address is <support@jewishgen.org>. Keep in mind that changes
can't made overnight, and always depend on resources and volunteers, but we
are always trying to make JewishGen better and we appreciate your ideas.

For more information on helping JewishGen continue to work for you, please
take a look at our volunteer opportunities at
<http://www2.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/Volunteer.html>
and our donation page at
<http://www2.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/>.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Scoring with JGFF -- My Story, Some Lessons, and a Suggestion #general

Shlomo Katz <SKATZ@...>
 

I first listed some of my family names on JGFF in March 1999 and now have 49
different town and surname combinations listed (including alternate spellings).
These represent both mine and my wife's families. In January 2002 (I think)
I received an email >from someone -- I'll call her "Miriam" -- suggesting a
possible relationship. Indeed, it turned out that our great-great-grandfathers
were brothers. I already had her name on my family tree (which I had started
decades earlier when she was five years old), but had never had contact with
her immediate family. We have met several times and, by combining my
information with hers, I have been able to do follow up research that took our
mutual ancestry back to the 1700s. On top of that, our families have become
good friends. So, Lesson #1 -- Sign up on JGFF.

But there's more...

Flashback to July 1999, when I spent a Shabbat in Budapest. (That itself was
unplanned, and clearly fortuitous.) In shul (synagogue) on Shabbat, another
tourist sitting next to me found a piece of paper in his Chumash (bible) that
appeared to be a list of former members of the community. Probably, it had
once been used to call people to the Torah. Scanning the list, I saw the name
"Yochanan Eliezer ben (son of) Yaakov Chaim Katz." Pretty amazing, because I
knew that my great-grandfather had a cousin who lived near Budapest whose name
was "Yaakov Chaim ben Eliezer Katz." It was not hard to guess that the person
on the list was the son my great-grandfather's cousin, i.e., my grandfather's
second cousin. I asked one of the old timers in the shul if he knew this
"Yochanan Eliezer Katz," and was told, "He moved to America."

At that point, I figured I was at a dead end. Try to find a "Katz" in America!!
(This leads to the suggestion I offer below.) But fast forward again to 2002.
In my exchanges with "Miriam" (who is *not* related to my Katz side, but through
a different ancestor), she mentioned that her father's family came >from
Budapest. (I am related to her mother's side, not her father's.) I asked, "Has
he ever heard the name Yochanan Eliezer Katz"? Believe it or not, "Miriam's"
mother's best friend was a Mrs. Katz who had a son Yochanan Eliezer. A phone
call revealed that this young man was a grandson of the person I was seeking.
(The older Y.E. Katz had died in the 60s.) This lead to a joyous "reunion" with
the descendants of my great-grandfather's cousin, a branch that had never known
any Katz relatives. Again, I not only expanded my family tree both horizontally
and vertically, but I made great friends. They even came to my son's bar
mitzvah, which was the first time some of them had left New York since coming
from Hungary in the 1960s. Ironically, I had had evidence of these cousins in
my own house for years, as they have sponsored the publication of many
contemporary Jewish religious volumes that I own copies of. (I am not referring
to rare works, but rather ordinary contemporary Torah commentaries.) So--
Lesson #2 -- Don't overlook the most obscure clue, be it a scrap of paper in an
out-of-the-way synagogue or mundane book dedications. (Incidentally, in older
books, these lists are called "prenumeranten" or "advance buyers" and they are
a valuable genealogical source.)
Lesson #3 --, Don't be embarrassed to ask someone >from a town or even a big
city you are interested in, "Do you know so-and-so."

Now the suggestion. Say I am trying to find descendants of my great-uncle
Mendel Katz who settled in Montreal a century ago. Searching JGFF for a Katz
in Montreal is of limited value because the name is so common. Perhaps the
database could be modified to allow searching "Katz in Montreal >from Viseul de
Sus, Romania?" Also, the utility of JGFF is limited by the changes in borders
and town names. Since my great-uncle settled in Montreal in 1900, he would have
told his descendants that he came >from Visheve, Hungary. They might never make
a connection to Viseul de Sus, Romania. Can anything be done about this?

Those are my musings, hopefully helpful to someone. (I am *not* looking for
lots of responses on how to find Katzes in Montreal. I have already worked
with the most experienced genealogical minds in Montreal on this. Of course,
if you have non-standard suggestions or you happen to be my cousin or to know
him or her, please write.)

Oh, one more lesson -- When all else fails, do it the old fashioned way. I
was once looking for a different second cousin of my grandfather. All I knew
was that his first initial was "M." and he might live in New Jersey. I was
then a student and single and had more time, so I called or wrote every single
"M. Katz" in New Jersey. Believe it or not, I did find the cousin in New
Jersey. (We tried this in Montreal, with no luck.)

Happy hunting,
Shlomo Katz
Silver Spring, Maryland

MODERATOR NOTE: Shlomo, I hope you don't mind, but I'm forwarding your JGFF
suggestion directly to our Support Desk. And a little reminder to everyone,
if you have ideas for additions or improvements to JewishGen, the Support
Desk's e-mail address is <support@jewishgen.org>. Keep in mind that changes
can't made overnight, and always depend on resources and volunteers, but we
are always trying to make JewishGen better and we appreciate your ideas.

For more information on helping JewishGen continue to work for you, please
take a look at our volunteer opportunities at
<http://www2.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/Volunteer.html>
and our donation page at
<http://www2.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/>.


Edward - please re-send message re:Drohobycz record translation #poland

Mark Jacobson
 

A reader named Edward sent a reply to my request for
translation of a Drohobycz Galician death record, but
his e-mail was deleted accidentally before I was able
to read it. If you are reading this, could you please
re-send your message (privately, of course). Thanks!

Mark Jacobson
Boca Raton, FL

=====
DOGULOV/DOVGALEVSKY - Belaya Tserkov/Kiev Ukraine;
COHEN/KANA/KAHAN - Belaya Tserkov, Ukraine;
JACOBSON - Polotsk, Belarus; COBLENTZ - Polotsk, Belarus;
KAMERMAN - Drohobycz, Galicia;
KOPPEL - Stebnik/Drohobycz, Galicia;
JACOBI - Stratyn/Rohatyn, Galicia; ROTHLEIN - Stratyn/Rohatyn, Galicia;
TUCHFELD - Rzeszow/Stryj/Lvov, Galicia; GOLDSTEIN - Ranizow, Galicia


JRI Poland #Poland Edward - please re-send message re:Drohobycz record translation #poland

Mark Jacobson
 

A reader named Edward sent a reply to my request for
translation of a Drohobycz Galician death record, but
his e-mail was deleted accidentally before I was able
to read it. If you are reading this, could you please
re-send your message (privately, of course). Thanks!

Mark Jacobson
Boca Raton, FL

=====
DOGULOV/DOVGALEVSKY - Belaya Tserkov/Kiev Ukraine;
COHEN/KANA/KAHAN - Belaya Tserkov, Ukraine;
JACOBSON - Polotsk, Belarus; COBLENTZ - Polotsk, Belarus;
KAMERMAN - Drohobycz, Galicia;
KOPPEL - Stebnik/Drohobycz, Galicia;
JACOBI - Stratyn/Rohatyn, Galicia; ROTHLEIN - Stratyn/Rohatyn, Galicia;
TUCHFELD - Rzeszow/Stryj/Lvov, Galicia; GOLDSTEIN - Ranizow, Galicia


Lithuanian birth certificate #general

duniamac@...
 

Hi to all the Genners out there,
Is there any way I could get my g'father's birth certificate in Lithuania
or any info about how to go about it? Isaac Louie WITTEN was born in
Panevezys, Lithuania in 1892, went to UK with
his brother Harry then came to SA.
Please, is there any one out there who could help
me or shed some light on this??????
from
Dunia McMaster


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Lithuanian birth certificate #general

duniamac@...
 

Hi to all the Genners out there,
Is there any way I could get my g'father's birth certificate in Lithuania
or any info about how to go about it? Isaac Louie WITTEN was born in
Panevezys, Lithuania in 1892, went to UK with
his brother Harry then came to SA.
Please, is there any one out there who could help
me or shed some light on this??????
from
Dunia McMaster


Re: Shimel and Shloma #belarus

Sally M. Bruckheimer <sallybru@...>
 

These are 2 questions which cannot be answered 'yes or no'.

Shim is usually >from the name which is Simon in English, so Shimel would be
a diminutive of that. Shloima would be >from the name which is Solomon in
English. So, at first glance the 2 would be different. However, often in
Europe, people had 'double names' (not a first and middle name as we use in
the US today). My great grandfather was Abraham Samuel; some called him Abe
and some called him Sam. What a headache for genealogists. Yours could be
Shimon Sholom. What you need to determine is whether the records in the
towns show that the surname is common or rare, whether Shim and Shloim have
the same wife's name and kids' names at the same time-something like that.
The more the two have in common, the more likely they are the same guy; even
if they were both married to Esther, for example, one in 1900 in some birth
of a child and the other in 1896 in some other birth-the wive's surnames
might be different!

Similarly, looking for John Smith in New York would be a problem, but
looking for Sally Bruckheimer in Chatham, NJ would not-rare name and small
town.

Be cautious, however, as an overall uncommon name can be common in a small
area-and the holders might or might not be related to each other. And since
babies were usually named for a recently deceased relative, it would not be
uncommon for first cousins born about the same time to have the same
name-for their grandfather who died just before the births, for example.
Sometimes 3 or more kids were named for the same guy, the same year.

Sally Bruckheimer
Chatham, NJ


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Shimel and Shloma #general

Sally M. Bruckheimer <sallybru@...>
 

These are 2 questions which cannot be answered 'yes or no'.

Shim is usually >from the name which is Simon in English, so Shimel would be
a diminutive of that. Shloima would be >from the name which is Solomon in
English. So, at first glance the 2 would be different. However, often in
Europe, people had 'double names' (not a first and middle name as we use in
the US today). My great grandfather was Abraham Samuel; some called him Abe
and some called him Sam. What a headache for genealogists. Yours could be
Shimon Sholom. What you need to determine is whether the records in the
towns show that the surname is common or rare, whether Shim and Shloim have
the same wife's name and kids' names at the same time-something like that.
The more the two have in common, the more likely they are the same guy; even
if they were both married to Esther, for example, one in 1900 in some birth
of a child and the other in 1896 in some other birth-the wive's surnames
might be different!

Similarly, looking for John Smith in New York would be a problem, but
looking for Sally Bruckheimer in Chatham, NJ would not-rare name and small
town.

Be cautious, however, as an overall uncommon name can be common in a small
area-and the holders might or might not be related to each other. And since
babies were usually named for a recently deceased relative, it would not be
uncommon for first cousins born about the same time to have the same
name-for their grandfather who died just before the births, for example.
Sometimes 3 or more kids were named for the same guy, the same year.

Sally Bruckheimer
Chatham, NJ


Re: port of Baltimore #general

Sally M. Bruckheimer <sallybru@...>
 

But more helpful than NARA in Philadelphia or Washington, US passenger lists
are available at any Mormon Family History Library in the world, so you
don't have to go to Philadelphia to see the lists-researchers in Arizona can
find a FHL in Arizona.

Sally Bruckheimer
Chatham, NJ


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen re: port of Baltimore #general

Sally M. Bruckheimer <sallybru@...>
 

But more helpful than NARA in Philadelphia or Washington, US passenger lists
are available at any Mormon Family History Library in the world, so you
don't have to go to Philadelphia to see the lists-researchers in Arizona can
find a FHL in Arizona.

Sally Bruckheimer
Chatham, NJ


Re: Shimel and Shloma, Isaac/Aisik #belarus

LinJim Morzillo <jmorzil1@...>
 

Fran wrote: "...since I know my ggrandfather's name was Isaac Brevda, and I
found a listing for an Aisik Brevda in Volkavysk which is where my
grandmother came from, people (including some on this list) are telling me
that I've likely found my ggrandfather. Was everyone with the same surname
in the same town related? Were names THAT unique that they were rarely
duplicated?" Also: "Is there any relationship between the names Shimel and
Shloma?"

Well, Fran, I think your theory of Isaac/Aisik should be accepted until
proven otherwise. Here is a discussion of a couple of things:

1. In my case, I thought my GGF David SHNEYDER (Schneider) was listed in
the All Lithuanian Database (same guessing and verifying as with the Belarus
Database), as living in Vidukle and his father was named Geisel. I was so
excited to find him in the ALD, but my first-cousin-once-removed who knew
my GGM, his wife, said that his father was Lipa/Lipman. I am coming up with
three explanations:

a. David used a different name for his father at the time he paid box
taxes, failed to register for the draft, etc. Or maybe my David just wasn't
listed, people did not trust the authorities.

b. The listing was that of a possible cousin named for the same ancestor or
even a nonrelative. With the draft avoidance, it seems unlikely that it's
the same David SHNEYDER because when this list was compiled around 1915 he
was no longer alive or if he was, he'd be about 50 years old.

c. The DNA studies have shown that not all people with the same last name
in a town share a common ancestor. Please look at the DNA discussion
archives for some input on this.

2. Sometimes names get transformed (Isaac and Aisik would sound the same),
in the translation. My maternal grandfather is listed in the metrical books
in Rostov-on-Don as Shleyma, he was known as Sam/Samuel after immigration,
his stone has Shmuel, but on a certificate commemorating a tree planting in
then-Palestine, my grandmother (who would know this) wrote his name as
Shlomo! Other Jewishgenners have commented that Shleyma is the Yiddish form
of Shlomo. My grandmother died before he did and I think my mother and her
siblings could not remember that his Hebrew name was Shlomo. He used Samuel
as his legal first name so they thought his Hebrew name was Shmuel. My
grandparents were not particularly religious, did not attend synagogue,
neither of my mother's brothers celebrated their Bar Mitzvahs, so how would
they have that knowledge readily available.

Maybe your Shimel and Shloma question should be answered "yes" until you can
prove otherwise. Good luck!

Linda Morzillo

Saratoga Springs, NY

Jmorzil1@nycap.rr.com



Researching:



PRESS and SCHNEIDER in Vidukle and other Raseiniai towns

AMCHISLAVSKY and ERLICHMAN in Rostov-on-Don and previously Kozelsk and
Oster, Chernigov Gubernia

COHEN/KAGAN and BORNSTEIN in Oshmiany, Lida and France

KOSOFSKY in Stuchin/Szczuczyn/Shchuchyn/Scucyn

SWOTINSKY in Grodno Gubernia Poland/Russia/Belarus


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: Shimel and Shloma, Isaac/Aisik #belarus

LinJim Morzillo <jmorzil1@...>
 

Fran wrote: "...since I know my ggrandfather's name was Isaac Brevda, and I
found a listing for an Aisik Brevda in Volkavysk which is where my
grandmother came from, people (including some on this list) are telling me
that I've likely found my ggrandfather. Was everyone with the same surname
in the same town related? Were names THAT unique that they were rarely
duplicated?" Also: "Is there any relationship between the names Shimel and
Shloma?"

Well, Fran, I think your theory of Isaac/Aisik should be accepted until
proven otherwise. Here is a discussion of a couple of things:

1. In my case, I thought my GGF David SHNEYDER (Schneider) was listed in
the All Lithuanian Database (same guessing and verifying as with the Belarus
Database), as living in Vidukle and his father was named Geisel. I was so
excited to find him in the ALD, but my first-cousin-once-removed who knew
my GGM, his wife, said that his father was Lipa/Lipman. I am coming up with
three explanations:

a. David used a different name for his father at the time he paid box
taxes, failed to register for the draft, etc. Or maybe my David just wasn't
listed, people did not trust the authorities.

b. The listing was that of a possible cousin named for the same ancestor or
even a nonrelative. With the draft avoidance, it seems unlikely that it's
the same David SHNEYDER because when this list was compiled around 1915 he
was no longer alive or if he was, he'd be about 50 years old.

c. The DNA studies have shown that not all people with the same last name
in a town share a common ancestor. Please look at the DNA discussion
archives for some input on this.

2. Sometimes names get transformed (Isaac and Aisik would sound the same),
in the translation. My maternal grandfather is listed in the metrical books
in Rostov-on-Don as Shleyma, he was known as Sam/Samuel after immigration,
his stone has Shmuel, but on a certificate commemorating a tree planting in
then-Palestine, my grandmother (who would know this) wrote his name as
Shlomo! Other Jewishgenners have commented that Shleyma is the Yiddish form
of Shlomo. My grandmother died before he did and I think my mother and her
siblings could not remember that his Hebrew name was Shlomo. He used Samuel
as his legal first name so they thought his Hebrew name was Shmuel. My
grandparents were not particularly religious, did not attend synagogue,
neither of my mother's brothers celebrated their Bar Mitzvahs, so how would
they have that knowledge readily available.

Maybe your Shimel and Shloma question should be answered "yes" until you can
prove otherwise. Good luck!

Linda Morzillo

Saratoga Springs, NY

Jmorzil1@nycap.rr.com



Researching:



PRESS and SCHNEIDER in Vidukle and other Raseiniai towns

AMCHISLAVSKY and ERLICHMAN in Rostov-on-Don and previously Kozelsk and
Oster, Chernigov Gubernia

COHEN/KAGAN and BORNSTEIN in Oshmiany, Lida and France

KOSOFSKY in Stuchin/Szczuczyn/Shchuchyn/Scucyn

SWOTINSKY in Grodno Gubernia Poland/Russia/Belarus


Re: No family name ideas #general

Sally M. Bruckheimer <sallybru@...>
 

I disagree with Avigdor; Unknown for a surname is correct for an unknown
surname. If you put anything else, you imply that the surname is whatever
you put: husband's first name, 'Moshewife, Miriamhusband, father's name.

If you have the wife's information (as a 3d gr aunt who married somebody but
you don't know who), I put her maiden name as her name and Unknown for the
husband.

You should also realize that the husband and wife do not necessarily use the
same surname-not only now, but long in the past as well. Sometimes Spanish
women kept their maiden name, sometimes the family name for the pair
changed, sometimes you get some of each. You have to do what 'they' did to
be most informative. Yes, families sort better if you call them what you
want, but if that is not what they did, you are causing problems for anyone
using your information.

However, as in all genealogy, this is not high school; you do what you think
is best, but try to determine what will be most useful and cause least
confusion-especially if you send someone else a gedcom or other information.
If Miriam's husband is unknown, then he is unknown.

Sally Bruckheimer
Chatham, NJ


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: No family name ideas #general

Sally M. Bruckheimer <sallybru@...>
 

I disagree with Avigdor; Unknown for a surname is correct for an unknown
surname. If you put anything else, you imply that the surname is whatever
you put: husband's first name, 'Moshewife, Miriamhusband, father's name.

If you have the wife's information (as a 3d gr aunt who married somebody but
you don't know who), I put her maiden name as her name and Unknown for the
husband.

You should also realize that the husband and wife do not necessarily use the
same surname-not only now, but long in the past as well. Sometimes Spanish
women kept their maiden name, sometimes the family name for the pair
changed, sometimes you get some of each. You have to do what 'they' did to
be most informative. Yes, families sort better if you call them what you
want, but if that is not what they did, you are causing problems for anyone
using your information.

However, as in all genealogy, this is not high school; you do what you think
is best, but try to determine what will be most useful and cause least
confusion-especially if you send someone else a gedcom or other information.
If Miriam's husband is unknown, then he is unknown.

Sally Bruckheimer
Chatham, NJ


Success with Names Not in Baron De Hirsch Cemetery Montreal database #general

Valerie Fox
 

Dear Jenners,

Success at last! Not all names are computerized in the Baron de Hirsch
Cemetery in Montreal on de la Savane.
In the Baron de Hirsch Section # 1 *only*, there are people interred without
headstones. I just found out that those without headstones are not in the
database; but the information is recorded in a book. The BDH Cemetery has
the names and information regarding these people.

This is how I found the information. Over the years I have always asked if
they have the names of Abraham and William GALLAY who died in their teens in
Hawkesbury, Ontario. When they computerized their database, I tried again.
No luck. This time, I was very successful.

I was in BDH Section #1 and looking for another grave. I stopped my car at
the end of the road where the office is, located (for those who are familiar
with the cemetery). I then walked to my left of the monument dedicated to
the unnamed 300 children. But I could not find her grave. So I then walked a
couple of rows further back and then to the left, away >from the road. We
could see headstones dating back to the early 1900s. We came upon "markers"
in the ground, which had no headstones. Eventually we came upon a "marker"
with a number on it!

We went back to the office and enquired about them. We were told that they
were indeed graves without headstones. The office has a book made up of
plasticized sheets. The information about those buried under the "markers"
is in this book.

When I got back to home, I knew the deaths of these two people because I had
their death records >from the Ontario Archives. I gave them the dates of
death. Sure enough, they had the records for the two GALLAY brothers aged 19
and 15, who I have been searching for--over 5 years.

They were able to give me the age, place of birth, (country), last place of
residence (town), one was incorrect, and dates of burial and parents' names.

I just wanted to share my information.

Valerie Miller Fox

Toronto (GTA) Canada


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Success with Names Not in Baron De Hirsch Cemetery Montreal database #general

Valerie Fox
 

Dear Jenners,

Success at last! Not all names are computerized in the Baron de Hirsch
Cemetery in Montreal on de la Savane.
In the Baron de Hirsch Section # 1 *only*, there are people interred without
headstones. I just found out that those without headstones are not in the
database; but the information is recorded in a book. The BDH Cemetery has
the names and information regarding these people.

This is how I found the information. Over the years I have always asked if
they have the names of Abraham and William GALLAY who died in their teens in
Hawkesbury, Ontario. When they computerized their database, I tried again.
No luck. This time, I was very successful.

I was in BDH Section #1 and looking for another grave. I stopped my car at
the end of the road where the office is, located (for those who are familiar
with the cemetery). I then walked to my left of the monument dedicated to
the unnamed 300 children. But I could not find her grave. So I then walked a
couple of rows further back and then to the left, away >from the road. We
could see headstones dating back to the early 1900s. We came upon "markers"
in the ground, which had no headstones. Eventually we came upon a "marker"
with a number on it!

We went back to the office and enquired about them. We were told that they
were indeed graves without headstones. The office has a book made up of
plasticized sheets. The information about those buried under the "markers"
is in this book.

When I got back to home, I knew the deaths of these two people because I had
their death records >from the Ontario Archives. I gave them the dates of
death. Sure enough, they had the records for the two GALLAY brothers aged 19
and 15, who I have been searching for--over 5 years.

They were able to give me the age, place of birth, (country), last place of
residence (town), one was incorrect, and dates of burial and parents' names.

I just wanted to share my information.

Valerie Miller Fox

Toronto (GTA) Canada


Munich City Directory 1934 Available for Lookups #general

petiealznauer@earthlink.net <petiealznauer@...>
 

Someone asked about a particular family in Munich before WWII and I posted
the following in response. I thought I would post it here too so that a
larger group of people who might benefit would see this:

For some time now I have intended to post and let people know that I have
the City Directory (Stadtbuch) for Munchen (Munich), Germany >from the year
1934. I bought it at an antiquariat dealer in Munich in 1985 or 86 when I
was a graduate student at the university.

In the frontispiece there is a full page photo of the Reichschancellor,
Hitler, and his home address, telephone and occupation are listed inside
along with Thomas Mann, the Nobel prize winning author and other worthier
Germans.

I would be glad to look up information on the SUFRIN and any other
individuals or families >from this directory *but* I cannot do it right now
because the directory is in storage until I finish having my apartment
renovated.

Please email me privately if you need a lookup.

Alexandra Alznauer
San Francisco, CA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Munich City Directory 1934 Available for Lookups #general

petiealznauer@earthlink.net <petiealznauer@...>
 

Someone asked about a particular family in Munich before WWII and I posted
the following in response. I thought I would post it here too so that a
larger group of people who might benefit would see this:

For some time now I have intended to post and let people know that I have
the City Directory (Stadtbuch) for Munchen (Munich), Germany >from the year
1934. I bought it at an antiquariat dealer in Munich in 1985 or 86 when I
was a graduate student at the university.

In the frontispiece there is a full page photo of the Reichschancellor,
Hitler, and his home address, telephone and occupation are listed inside
along with Thomas Mann, the Nobel prize winning author and other worthier
Germans.

I would be glad to look up information on the SUFRIN and any other
individuals or families >from this directory *but* I cannot do it right now
because the directory is in storage until I finish having my apartment
renovated.

Please email me privately if you need a lookup.

Alexandra Alznauer
San Francisco, CA