Date   

Los Angeles Area Death Notices #general

Barry Finkel <b19141@...>
 

In what newspaper would one look to find death notices/obituaries
in the Los Angeles area? I have looked at the "Los Angeles Times"
on microfilm at the Chicago Public Library, and I do not see a large
number of obits in that paper (compared to the number in the
"Chicago Tribune").

Barry S. Finkel
Chicago, IL, USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Los Angeles Area Death Notices #general

Barry Finkel <b19141@...>
 

In what newspaper would one look to find death notices/obituaries
in the Los Angeles area? I have looked at the "Los Angeles Times"
on microfilm at the Chicago Public Library, and I do not see a large
number of obits in that paper (compared to the number in the
"Chicago Tribune").

Barry S. Finkel
Chicago, IL, USA


Volunteers needed for Polish to English translation #general

Ronald D. Doctor <rondoctor@...>
 

The Kremenets Shtetl CO-OP, part of Jewish Records Indexing-Poland
(JRI-Poland), is translating various records and documents that relate
to Kremenets Uyezd (Russian period) and Krzemieniec powiat (Polish
period). In the past few weeks we have been receiving many documents in
Polish. Our volunteer translators for Polish are overloaded and we need
a couple of additional volunteers to help get this very important
material translated. This is what we have so far (and there is more coming):

1. Extracts >from "Slownik Geograaficzny: Krolestwa
Polskiego" for the towns of Krzemieniec, Jampol,
Oleksiniets, Wisniowiec, and Szumsk.
... about 13 pages, typeset. These pages contain
important information about magnates who owned
these towns.
2. Extracts >from the website:
wolyn.republika.pl/wolyn/wdw/wdw.html
... less than 3 pages, typeset. This website
seems to list towns in each of the subdistricts
of each of the districts in Volhynia.
3. The website www.brozbar.neostrada.pl/przewodnik-wolyn
and the pages linked to it. These pages are "An
illustrated guide to Volyn" written in 1929. The
"guide" has 25 district and subdistrict links,
and it has 8 major sections that seem to have titles
like:
- overview
- inhabitants (population)
- history of Volhynia
- magnates
- administration of [Koscielna]
- artistic historic monuments
- practical pointers
I am interested primarily in the first four sections,
especially the section about magnates. These four
sections total about 26 pages (typeset), including
6 pages in the magnates section.

The linked towns in 3 above, that I especially need to get
translated are:
- Krzemieniec and Okolica (7 pages typeset)
- Wisniowiec and Oleksiniec (6 pages typeset)
and I also would like to add:
- Katerburg, Szumsk and Antonowce
- Poczajow (Pochayev)

If you can volunteer to help translate these pages, please contact me
privately. Once the pages are translated we will post them on the
Kremenets Shtetlinks website
(http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/).

Ron Doctor
Co-Coordinator, Kremenets Shtetl CO-OP/JRI-Poland
Co-Coordinator, Kremenets Yizkor Books Translation Project


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Volunteers needed for Polish to English translation #general

Ronald D. Doctor <rondoctor@...>
 

The Kremenets Shtetl CO-OP, part of Jewish Records Indexing-Poland
(JRI-Poland), is translating various records and documents that relate
to Kremenets Uyezd (Russian period) and Krzemieniec powiat (Polish
period). In the past few weeks we have been receiving many documents in
Polish. Our volunteer translators for Polish are overloaded and we need
a couple of additional volunteers to help get this very important
material translated. This is what we have so far (and there is more coming):

1. Extracts >from "Slownik Geograaficzny: Krolestwa
Polskiego" for the towns of Krzemieniec, Jampol,
Oleksiniets, Wisniowiec, and Szumsk.
... about 13 pages, typeset. These pages contain
important information about magnates who owned
these towns.
2. Extracts >from the website:
wolyn.republika.pl/wolyn/wdw/wdw.html
... less than 3 pages, typeset. This website
seems to list towns in each of the subdistricts
of each of the districts in Volhynia.
3. The website www.brozbar.neostrada.pl/przewodnik-wolyn
and the pages linked to it. These pages are "An
illustrated guide to Volyn" written in 1929. The
"guide" has 25 district and subdistrict links,
and it has 8 major sections that seem to have titles
like:
- overview
- inhabitants (population)
- history of Volhynia
- magnates
- administration of [Koscielna]
- artistic historic monuments
- practical pointers
I am interested primarily in the first four sections,
especially the section about magnates. These four
sections total about 26 pages (typeset), including
6 pages in the magnates section.

The linked towns in 3 above, that I especially need to get
translated are:
- Krzemieniec and Okolica (7 pages typeset)
- Wisniowiec and Oleksiniec (6 pages typeset)
and I also would like to add:
- Katerburg, Szumsk and Antonowce
- Poczajow (Pochayev)

If you can volunteer to help translate these pages, please contact me
privately. Once the pages are translated we will post them on the
Kremenets Shtetlinks website
(http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/).

Ron Doctor
Co-Coordinator, Kremenets Shtetl CO-OP/JRI-Poland
Co-Coordinator, Kremenets Yizkor Books Translation Project


*Article*: Ancient DNA reconstructs complete family tree #general

Schelly Dardashti <dardasht@...>
 

Dear Genners,

For those of you interested in DNA matters, here is a story of how German
anthropologists are the first to have used ancient DNA to completely
reconstruct a four-generation (and working on the fifth) family tree from
3,000-year-old Bonze Age human remains found in a cave, ranging >from babies
to 70-year-olds.
A project scientist said that analysis of ancient DNA has opened a new
window on prehistoric societies, providing information on everything from
hair and skin colour to cause of death, marriage patterns and related
matters of kinship.

http://www.abc.net.au/science/news/stories/s1158845.htm

Schelly Talalay Dardashti
Tel Aviv
schelly@allrelative.net

MODERATOR NOTE: DNA testing issues are considered off-topic to this list. The
Genealogy by Genetics mailing list is dedicated to Scientific
questions that go to the core of DNA technology, and its reliability.
Discussions encompass all areas relating to when and how to best utilize
DNA testing for your personal genealogical pursuits.
Genealogy by Genetics is located at: http://www.jewishgen.org/dna/


Re: The Kohen sign #general

Sally M. Bruckheimer <sallybru@...>
 

Spelling of surnames, in American English at least, does not follow any
specific rules. In the early days, often an immigrant was illiterate in
English, and whatever a census-taker (or similar official) wrote was how the
name was spelled. Different branches of a family might end up with the same
name spelled differently.

In German, most words starting with C were changed to a K, but not in
English. Among American Jews, I would think, anti-German feelings around
the World Wars would have tipped the scales in favor of the non-German C.
So, Kohn, Cohen, whatever-you can't tell whether a person is or isn't a
Cohen by the surname. Anyone could change any surname to Cohen or Kohen,
and it wouldn't change his/her heritage.

As for Katz, do you think that Catz looks right? It could exist, but
usually the name is spelled with a K.

Sally Bruckheimer
Harrison, NY

If I am not mistaken COHENs who are >from the tribe of Cohanim are in
English usually written with a C rather than K. Often the name Kohen and Kahn a9or
other variants) are not Cohanim >>>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen *Article*: Ancient DNA reconstructs complete family tree #general

Schelly Dardashti <dardasht@...>
 

Dear Genners,

For those of you interested in DNA matters, here is a story of how German
anthropologists are the first to have used ancient DNA to completely
reconstruct a four-generation (and working on the fifth) family tree from
3,000-year-old Bonze Age human remains found in a cave, ranging >from babies
to 70-year-olds.
A project scientist said that analysis of ancient DNA has opened a new
window on prehistoric societies, providing information on everything from
hair and skin colour to cause of death, marriage patterns and related
matters of kinship.

http://www.abc.net.au/science/news/stories/s1158845.htm

Schelly Talalay Dardashti
Tel Aviv
schelly@allrelative.net

MODERATOR NOTE: DNA testing issues are considered off-topic to this list. The
Genealogy by Genetics mailing list is dedicated to Scientific
questions that go to the core of DNA technology, and its reliability.
Discussions encompass all areas relating to when and how to best utilize
DNA testing for your personal genealogical pursuits.
Genealogy by Genetics is located at: http://www.jewishgen.org/dna/


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Re: The Kohen sign #general

Sally M. Bruckheimer <sallybru@...>
 

Spelling of surnames, in American English at least, does not follow any
specific rules. In the early days, often an immigrant was illiterate in
English, and whatever a census-taker (or similar official) wrote was how the
name was spelled. Different branches of a family might end up with the same
name spelled differently.

In German, most words starting with C were changed to a K, but not in
English. Among American Jews, I would think, anti-German feelings around
the World Wars would have tipped the scales in favor of the non-German C.
So, Kohn, Cohen, whatever-you can't tell whether a person is or isn't a
Cohen by the surname. Anyone could change any surname to Cohen or Kohen,
and it wouldn't change his/her heritage.

As for Katz, do you think that Catz looks right? It could exist, but
usually the name is spelled with a K.

Sally Bruckheimer
Harrison, NY

If I am not mistaken COHENs who are >from the tribe of Cohanim are in
English usually written with a C rather than K. Often the name Kohen and Kahn a9or
other variants) are not Cohanim >>>


Kohen / Levite status is dangerous for a genealogist?? #general

J Schamroth <jscham@...>
 

Michael Bernett wrote

"...whether a Jew was a Kohen or a Levi is, for genealogist, about as
important as knowing whether he was tall or short."

I must disagree wholeheartedly with Michael. Such knowlege can often prove
essential in tying up links between male lines sharing a common last name.
Furthermore, if two such common-surname lines came >from the same small
shtetl, it is highly likely that the two lines share a common ancestor.

Thus two apparantly un-related RIBINSKI'S who are both Kohanim, and who both
had ancestors >from the same Shtetl, are far more likely to be related than
unrelated. Certainly, the researcher would have to do some more homework,
but such knowlege is often essential in trying to track down relationships.
As genealogists, we are all familiar with seemingly impossible-to-connect
branches that were solved by some seemingly small bit of info.

Michael also wrote that

"...It would be dangerous and misleading for our research if we tried to
formalize this in a database."

Based on my comments above, I must also disagree with these sentiments. In
fact, such a database does exist and enables researchers to record the
tribal status of his ancestors... *together with* the town of origin and
source material. The database can be seen at www.shoreshim.org (click on
TribeFinder).

It seems absurd, but if we were to disregard male-linked tribal status data,
then we might as well disregard hemophilia and a whole range of other
male-linked genetic diseases. I think that any knowlege or technique that
helps one to trace a line backwards is an essential genealogical tool that
should not be overlooked.


J Schamroth
Jerusalem


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Kohen / Levite status is dangerous for a genealogist?? #general

J Schamroth <jscham@...>
 

Michael Bernett wrote

"...whether a Jew was a Kohen or a Levi is, for genealogist, about as
important as knowing whether he was tall or short."

I must disagree wholeheartedly with Michael. Such knowlege can often prove
essential in tying up links between male lines sharing a common last name.
Furthermore, if two such common-surname lines came >from the same small
shtetl, it is highly likely that the two lines share a common ancestor.

Thus two apparantly un-related RIBINSKI'S who are both Kohanim, and who both
had ancestors >from the same Shtetl, are far more likely to be related than
unrelated. Certainly, the researcher would have to do some more homework,
but such knowlege is often essential in trying to track down relationships.
As genealogists, we are all familiar with seemingly impossible-to-connect
branches that were solved by some seemingly small bit of info.

Michael also wrote that

"...It would be dangerous and misleading for our research if we tried to
formalize this in a database."

Based on my comments above, I must also disagree with these sentiments. In
fact, such a database does exist and enables researchers to record the
tribal status of his ancestors... *together with* the town of origin and
source material. The database can be seen at www.shoreshim.org (click on
TribeFinder).

It seems absurd, but if we were to disregard male-linked tribal status data,
then we might as well disregard hemophilia and a whole range of other
male-linked genetic diseases. I think that any knowlege or technique that
helps one to trace a line backwards is an essential genealogical tool that
should not be overlooked.


J Schamroth
Jerusalem


Obits #general

Thomas Lerman
 

Someone posted a message with a link to NewsBank where
it had a link to all sorts of obits. I cannot find
that message nor is it yet in the archives. Could
someone please send it to me privately? Thank you in advance.

MODERATOR NOTE: A search of the JewishGen Discussion Group Archives for "online
obits" or "obits URL" at
http://www.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.isa?jg~jgsys~archpop
yields the requested information. Don't forget ! The JewishGen Discussion Group
Archives are a great resource for information.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Obits #general

Thomas Lerman
 

Someone posted a message with a link to NewsBank where
it had a link to all sorts of obits. I cannot find
that message nor is it yet in the archives. Could
someone please send it to me privately? Thank you in advance.

MODERATOR NOTE: A search of the JewishGen Discussion Group Archives for "online
obits" or "obits URL" at
http://www.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.isa?jg~jgsys~archpop
yields the requested information. Don't forget ! The JewishGen Discussion Group
Archives are a great resource for information.


Re: Alternative names for Romny, Ukraine? #ukraine

NFatouros@...
 

In a message dated 7/22/04 10:49:09 PM, kledolph@duke.edu writes:

<< Was Romny ever called Ramin or Ramen (resh-mem-nun) particularly by the
Jewish inhabitants? Is there a source in print or on the web that lists
Jewish (or Yiddish) names for Ukrainian towns? Thanks for the help.

Dolph Klein
Chapel Hill, NC
>>

Yes. Romny was called Romen, acccording to Gary Mokotoff and Sally Amdur Sack
in their book "Where We Once Walked" which was recently republished in an
updated edition.

The alternative name "Romen" also appears in the entry for Romny in Chester
G. Cohen's "Shtetl Finder Gazetteer."

Naomi Fatouros (nee FELDMAN)
Bloomington, Indiana
NFatouros@aol.com
BELKOWSKY,BIELKOWSKY, BILKOWSKI, Odessa,St. Petersburg,Berdichev,
Kiev;ROTHSTEIN, Kremenchug;FRASCH,Kiev;LIBERMAN,Moscow;FELDMAN, Pinsk;
SCHUTZ, RETTIG, WAHL, Shcherets;LEVY, WEIL, Mulhouse; SAS/SASS,Podwolochisk;
RAPOPORT, Tarnopol, Podwolochisk, RADOMYSL?; BEHAM, Salok, Kharkov;
WOLPIANSKY, Ostryna.


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: Alternative names for Romny, Ukraine? #ukraine

NFatouros@...
 

In a message dated 7/22/04 10:49:09 PM, kledolph@duke.edu writes:

<< Was Romny ever called Ramin or Ramen (resh-mem-nun) particularly by the
Jewish inhabitants? Is there a source in print or on the web that lists
Jewish (or Yiddish) names for Ukrainian towns? Thanks for the help.

Dolph Klein
Chapel Hill, NC
>>

Yes. Romny was called Romen, acccording to Gary Mokotoff and Sally Amdur Sack
in their book "Where We Once Walked" which was recently republished in an
updated edition.

The alternative name "Romen" also appears in the entry for Romny in Chester
G. Cohen's "Shtetl Finder Gazetteer."

Naomi Fatouros (nee FELDMAN)
Bloomington, Indiana
NFatouros@aol.com
BELKOWSKY,BIELKOWSKY, BILKOWSKI, Odessa,St. Petersburg,Berdichev,
Kiev;ROTHSTEIN, Kremenchug;FRASCH,Kiev;LIBERMAN,Moscow;FELDMAN, Pinsk;
SCHUTZ, RETTIG, WAHL, Shcherets;LEVY, WEIL, Mulhouse; SAS/SASS,Podwolochisk;
RAPOPORT, Tarnopol, Podwolochisk, RADOMYSL?; BEHAM, Salok, Kharkov;
WOLPIANSKY, Ostryna.


Max Kobre Bank #belarus

Deborah Glassman <dgg2020@...>
 

Max Kobre Bank
An article on the collapse of this bank at the start of WW I was published Aug 9,
2002 in the Forward, citing earlier issues as the source.
http://www.forward.com/issues/2002/02.08.09/fast4.html

Another source says Max Kobre owned a steamship ticket company >from the
1890s which became a bank which specialized in financing steamship tickets.
Max Kobre died in 1916, never fully having recovered >from the assault on his
business in the bank run of 1914. He had several business addresses
including the longest running at 41 Canal Street.

Deborah Glassman
MODERATOR NOTE: Please sign all messages with your location!!!


Belarus SIG #Belarus Max Kobre Bank #belarus

Deborah Glassman <dgg2020@...>
 

Max Kobre Bank
An article on the collapse of this bank at the start of WW I was published Aug 9,
2002 in the Forward, citing earlier issues as the source.
http://www.forward.com/issues/2002/02.08.09/fast4.html

Another source says Max Kobre owned a steamship ticket company >from the
1890s which became a bank which specialized in financing steamship tickets.
Max Kobre died in 1916, never fully having recovered >from the assault on his
business in the bank run of 1914. He had several business addresses
including the longest running at 41 Canal Street.

Deborah Glassman
MODERATOR NOTE: Please sign all messages with your location!!!


Re: Meaning of "Rabbi (Emrei Sefer)" #rabbinic

LR <lreich@...>
 

On 2004.07.21, Avraham MALTHETE <avraham.malthete@aiu.org> wrote:

As title of a book, this is quite always in connection with the
first name of the author. 32 books have this title. Only one book
wears the title "Imrei Sefer", by Rabbi Abraham, son of Rabbi
Yehudah-Leib of Brody [...]
One of my bibliographical dictionaries lists 35 seforim with this
title including one by the Tzaddik R' Shmuel Fraenkal of Dorog,
Hungary, a G. Grandfather of my late Father-in-Law, Rabbi Yaakov
Zvi Katz of Hajduszoboszlo and Amsterdam, author of Leket Hakemach
Hachodosh (5 vols).

Leslie Reich


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Re: Meaning of "Rabbi (Emrei Sefer)" #rabbinic

LR <lreich@...>
 

On 2004.07.21, Avraham MALTHETE <avraham.malthete@aiu.org> wrote:

As title of a book, this is quite always in connection with the
first name of the author. 32 books have this title. Only one book
wears the title "Imrei Sefer", by Rabbi Abraham, son of Rabbi
Yehudah-Leib of Brody [...]
One of my bibliographical dictionaries lists 35 seforim with this
title including one by the Tzaddik R' Shmuel Fraenkal of Dorog,
Hungary, a G. Grandfather of my late Father-in-Law, Rabbi Yaakov
Zvi Katz of Hajduszoboszlo and Amsterdam, author of Leket Hakemach
Hachodosh (5 vols).

Leslie Reich


Ancient DNA uncovers complete family tree #dna

Schelly Dardashti <dardasht@...>
 

Dear Genners,

For those of you interested in DNA matters, here is a story of how
German anthropologists are the first to have used ancient DNA to
completely reconstruct a four-generation (and working on the fifth)
family tree >from 3,000-year-old Bonze Age human remains found in a
cave, ranging >from babies to 70-year-olds.

A project scientist said that analysis of ancient DNA has opened
a new window on prehistoric societies, providing information on
everything >from hair and skin colour to cause of death, marriage
patterns and related matters of kinship.

http://www.abc.net.au/science/news/stories/s1158845.htm

Schelly Talalay Dardashti
Tel Aviv
mailto:schelly@allrelative.net


DNA Research #DNA Ancient DNA uncovers complete family tree #dna

Schelly Dardashti <dardasht@...>
 

Dear Genners,

For those of you interested in DNA matters, here is a story of how
German anthropologists are the first to have used ancient DNA to
completely reconstruct a four-generation (and working on the fifth)
family tree >from 3,000-year-old Bonze Age human remains found in a
cave, ranging >from babies to 70-year-olds.

A project scientist said that analysis of ancient DNA has opened
a new window on prehistoric societies, providing information on
everything >from hair and skin colour to cause of death, marriage
patterns and related matters of kinship.

http://www.abc.net.au/science/news/stories/s1158845.htm

Schelly Talalay Dardashti
Tel Aviv
mailto:schelly@allrelative.net