Date   

JewishGen Education offers popular class #unitedkingdom

Nancy Holden
 

JewishGen offers the popular three-week class, "Brick Wall or Dead End",
starting April 9, 2018.

Frustrated and at a Loss? Are you at a Dead End or just experiencing a
Brick Wall? Are you stumped by a small detail or is there a major avenue
you can't get past?

Take a class. Work with an expert to review and analyze your data. If
you feel you have you exhausted all approaches and want new solutions,
this class offers one-on-one mentoring in an educational private forum
setting open 24/7.

April 9 - April 29 The Tuition is $150. Registration will open 2 weeks
before class. Enrollment is limited.
To Register: www.JewishGen.org/education

Requirements: Students must have done enough research to have reached a
point where help is needed. Students should feel comfortable with
computers and Internet searches.

In preparation for this class we suggest that after you register, you
send the instructor an introduction to your project (names, dates and
places) and pinpoint your brick wall or dead end.

Send questions to Nancy Holden Instruction Manager

Nancy Holden, Instruction Manager
jewishgen-education@lyris.jewishgen.org


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom JewishGen Education offers popular class #unitedkingdom

Nancy Holden
 

JewishGen offers the popular three-week class, "Brick Wall or Dead End",
starting April 9, 2018.

Frustrated and at a Loss? Are you at a Dead End or just experiencing a
Brick Wall? Are you stumped by a small detail or is there a major avenue
you can't get past?

Take a class. Work with an expert to review and analyze your data. If
you feel you have you exhausted all approaches and want new solutions,
this class offers one-on-one mentoring in an educational private forum
setting open 24/7.

April 9 - April 29 The Tuition is $150. Registration will open 2 weeks
before class. Enrollment is limited.
To Register: www.JewishGen.org/education

Requirements: Students must have done enough research to have reached a
point where help is needed. Students should feel comfortable with
computers and Internet searches.

In preparation for this class we suggest that after you register, you
send the instructor an introduction to your project (names, dates and
places) and pinpoint your brick wall or dead end.

Send questions to Nancy Holden Instruction Manager

Nancy Holden, Instruction Manager
jewishgen-education@lyris.jewishgen.org


JewishGen Education offers popular class #bessarabia

Nancy Holden
 

JewishGen offers the popular three-week class, "Brick Wall or Dead End",
starting April 9, 2018.

Frustrated and at a Loss? Are you at a Dead End or just experiencing a
Brick Wall? Are you stumped by a small detail or is there a major avenue
you can't get past?

Take a class. Work with an expert to review and analyze your data. If
you feel you have you exhausted all approaches and want new solutions,
this class offers one-on-one mentoring in an educational private forum
setting open 24/7.

April 9 - April 29 The Tuition is $150. Registration will open 2 weeks
before class. Enrollment is limited.
To Register: www.JewishGen.org/education

Requirements: Students must have done enough research to have reached a
point where help is needed. Students should feel comfortable with
computers and Internet searches.

In preparation for this class we suggest that after you register, you
send the instructor an introduction to your project (names, dates and
places) and pinpoint your brick wall or dead end.

Send questions to Nancy Holden Instruction Manager

Nancy Holden, Instruction Manager
jewishgen-education@lyris.jewishgen.org


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia JewishGen Education offers popular class #bessarabia

Nancy Holden
 

JewishGen offers the popular three-week class, "Brick Wall or Dead End",
starting April 9, 2018.

Frustrated and at a Loss? Are you at a Dead End or just experiencing a
Brick Wall? Are you stumped by a small detail or is there a major avenue
you can't get past?

Take a class. Work with an expert to review and analyze your data. If
you feel you have you exhausted all approaches and want new solutions,
this class offers one-on-one mentoring in an educational private forum
setting open 24/7.

April 9 - April 29 The Tuition is $150. Registration will open 2 weeks
before class. Enrollment is limited.
To Register: www.JewishGen.org/education

Requirements: Students must have done enough research to have reached a
point where help is needed. Students should feel comfortable with
computers and Internet searches.

In preparation for this class we suggest that after you register, you
send the instructor an introduction to your project (names, dates and
places) and pinpoint your brick wall or dead end.

Send questions to Nancy Holden Instruction Manager

Nancy Holden, Instruction Manager
jewishgen-education@lyris.jewishgen.org


Book Cite: Juden in Mittweida by Dr. Juergen Nitsche #germany

Stephen Falk <sfalkjd@...>
 

Mittweida is a town in Central Saxony in eastern Germany, about 20 km
north of Chemnitz. After the War it was in the DDR. Dr. Juergen
Nitsche (http://juergen-nitsche.com), a local historian, is the
co-author of "Juden in Chemnitz: Die Geschichte der Gemeinde und des
Juedischen Friedhofs - (2002) and many many other works on the history
of Jewish communities and notable Jewish residents of Central Saxony.

Dr. Juergen NITSCHE has just published "Juden in Mittweida" (Jews in
Mittweida"). To date, the history of the Jews of Mittweida has been
largely unexplored. This new book vividly tells the story of the
Jewish men, women and children living in Mittweida and the surrounding
area between 1888 and 1987, or studying there between 1870 and 1938,
and after 1949.

As early as 1870, the first Jewish student was enrolled at the
technical center. By 1938, more than 1,800 Jews were studying at the
engineering school.

At the end of the 1880s, the first Jewish merchants settled in
Mittweida. Subsequently the KOSTERLITZ, BACH, JACOBSOHN, LEWIN and
HALPERN families settled permanently in this industrial town in
central Saxony. Moses LESSER, a naturopath also settled in Mittweida.
More tradesmen and freelancers followed him. In the 1920s, the
Mittweida Jews founded their own association. But they were still
part of the Chemnitz Jewish community. The dead were buried in the
Jewish cemetery in Chemnitz-Altendorf.

The Mittweida nursing home housed both young people with mental or
emotional troubles and poor elderly Jews. Three residents of this home
were murdered in the Nazi euthanasia program in Pirna-Sunstone.
Between 1933 and 1939, many Mittweida Jews emigrated or relocated to
Berlin and Leipzig. The remaining Jews of Mittweida were murdered in
the ghettos, concentration camps and extermination camps.

After the War, only Klara FIEDLER and Alexander KOSTERLITZ returned to
Mittweida. Klara FIELDER ALDER and her nephew Eduard ADLER were among
the Jews who re-established the Jewish community in Chemnitz in
September 1945. After 1945, Nikolai HEYKING, Gert LILIENFELD and
Alfons KUTNER settled in the city. Since 2008, Stolpersteine
(stumbling Stones) serve as a reminded of the murdered Jews of
Mittweida. In November 2017, a memorial plaque was installed to
memorialize Herbert BACH, a local merchant who committed suicide.

With this impressive 608-page comprehensive work-up, the Mittweidaer
Jews receive belated appreciation. D escendants of Mittweida Jewish
families have been very pleased with this work and some of the more
than 500 illustrations in the book were provided by them.

(I have no interest in this work, though I did have the pleasure of
providing occasional research assistance to the author.)

Best regards, Stephen Falk, Point Roberts, WA, sfalkjd@gmail.com

Moderator Note: Stephen Falk was GerSIG's invited guest speaker at
the 2016 IAJGS Conference in Seattle.


German SIG #Germany Book Cite: Juden in Mittweida by Dr. Juergen Nitsche #germany

Stephen Falk <sfalkjd@...>
 

Mittweida is a town in Central Saxony in eastern Germany, about 20 km
north of Chemnitz. After the War it was in the DDR. Dr. Juergen
Nitsche (http://juergen-nitsche.com), a local historian, is the
co-author of "Juden in Chemnitz: Die Geschichte der Gemeinde und des
Juedischen Friedhofs - (2002) and many many other works on the history
of Jewish communities and notable Jewish residents of Central Saxony.

Dr. Juergen NITSCHE has just published "Juden in Mittweida" (Jews in
Mittweida"). To date, the history of the Jews of Mittweida has been
largely unexplored. This new book vividly tells the story of the
Jewish men, women and children living in Mittweida and the surrounding
area between 1888 and 1987, or studying there between 1870 and 1938,
and after 1949.

As early as 1870, the first Jewish student was enrolled at the
technical center. By 1938, more than 1,800 Jews were studying at the
engineering school.

At the end of the 1880s, the first Jewish merchants settled in
Mittweida. Subsequently the KOSTERLITZ, BACH, JACOBSOHN, LEWIN and
HALPERN families settled permanently in this industrial town in
central Saxony. Moses LESSER, a naturopath also settled in Mittweida.
More tradesmen and freelancers followed him. In the 1920s, the
Mittweida Jews founded their own association. But they were still
part of the Chemnitz Jewish community. The dead were buried in the
Jewish cemetery in Chemnitz-Altendorf.

The Mittweida nursing home housed both young people with mental or
emotional troubles and poor elderly Jews. Three residents of this home
were murdered in the Nazi euthanasia program in Pirna-Sunstone.
Between 1933 and 1939, many Mittweida Jews emigrated or relocated to
Berlin and Leipzig. The remaining Jews of Mittweida were murdered in
the ghettos, concentration camps and extermination camps.

After the War, only Klara FIEDLER and Alexander KOSTERLITZ returned to
Mittweida. Klara FIELDER ALDER and her nephew Eduard ADLER were among
the Jews who re-established the Jewish community in Chemnitz in
September 1945. After 1945, Nikolai HEYKING, Gert LILIENFELD and
Alfons KUTNER settled in the city. Since 2008, Stolpersteine
(stumbling Stones) serve as a reminded of the murdered Jews of
Mittweida. In November 2017, a memorial plaque was installed to
memorialize Herbert BACH, a local merchant who committed suicide.

With this impressive 608-page comprehensive work-up, the Mittweidaer
Jews receive belated appreciation. D escendants of Mittweida Jewish
families have been very pleased with this work and some of the more
than 500 illustrations in the book were provided by them.

(I have no interest in this work, though I did have the pleasure of
providing occasional research assistance to the author.)

Best regards, Stephen Falk, Point Roberts, WA, sfalkjd@gmail.com

Moderator Note: Stephen Falk was GerSIG's invited guest speaker at
the 2016 IAJGS Conference in Seattle.


Clarification: English translation of Russian map #romania

Patricia Klindienst <epk13@...>
 

Dear Genners,

I should have been clearer in my posting. Some of you have already generously
sent me links to maps of Bessarabia in English. I appreciate this greatly. But
what I am actually hoping for is someone who will translate this particular map,
so I can use it in a book and point my readers who don't know Russian to places
in the text, in English. The book will accompany my traveling exhibition about a
family migration >from Bessarabia beginning in 1906
(pklindienst.com/NoOneRemembersAlone).

I love the beauty of this old map: the colors, fonts, design. Once I get an
English translation, I hope to make a twin of this one, copying the colors and
layout using an old font. If I get such a map made, I'll be happy to share it
with the SIGs.

If anyone is interested in helping me with this project, please reply via the
ViewMate form.

Thank you!

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM65968


Patricia Klindienst
Guilford, CT
USA

SPIWAK /SPIVAK of Orgeyev & Kishinev, Bessarabia; Mendoza, Argentina; and Queens.
SCHAPOSCHNIK / ZAPOSNEK of Orgeyev, Kishinev, Elisavetgrad, or Mendoza, and their
related names, SHAPIN, SHAPIRO of Mendoza, Argentina, Chile, Canada, and the US.
SCHOCHETMAN of Odessa (who became SCHACHT in the US). MILSTEIN of Orgeyev &
Kishinev. WOLMAN / VOLLMAN of Orgeyev, Kishinev, Capresti.
TSAREVKAN/CIRIFCAN/SARAFCONN of Orgeyev, Teleneshti, Uruguay, becoming COHEN in
the US. BELINKSY of Odessa and Philadelphia. KALIK of Orgeyev, Kishinev,
Argentina. LICHT of Briceva.


Romania SIG #Romania Clarification: English translation of Russian map #romania

Patricia Klindienst <epk13@...>
 

Dear Genners,

I should have been clearer in my posting. Some of you have already generously
sent me links to maps of Bessarabia in English. I appreciate this greatly. But
what I am actually hoping for is someone who will translate this particular map,
so I can use it in a book and point my readers who don't know Russian to places
in the text, in English. The book will accompany my traveling exhibition about a
family migration >from Bessarabia beginning in 1906
(pklindienst.com/NoOneRemembersAlone).

I love the beauty of this old map: the colors, fonts, design. Once I get an
English translation, I hope to make a twin of this one, copying the colors and
layout using an old font. If I get such a map made, I'll be happy to share it
with the SIGs.

If anyone is interested in helping me with this project, please reply via the
ViewMate form.

Thank you!

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM65968


Patricia Klindienst
Guilford, CT
USA

SPIWAK /SPIVAK of Orgeyev & Kishinev, Bessarabia; Mendoza, Argentina; and Queens.
SCHAPOSCHNIK / ZAPOSNEK of Orgeyev, Kishinev, Elisavetgrad, or Mendoza, and their
related names, SHAPIN, SHAPIRO of Mendoza, Argentina, Chile, Canada, and the US.
SCHOCHETMAN of Odessa (who became SCHACHT in the US). MILSTEIN of Orgeyev &
Kishinev. WOLMAN / VOLLMAN of Orgeyev, Kishinev, Capresti.
TSAREVKAN/CIRIFCAN/SARAFCONN of Orgeyev, Teleneshti, Uruguay, becoming COHEN in
the US. BELINKSY of Odessa and Philadelphia. KALIK of Orgeyev, Kishinev,
Argentina. LICHT of Briceva.


Houses in Tarnopol area in early 1900s #galicia

Rishy Savin <rlsavin@...>
 

Hello,

I was wondering if anyone can tell me the type of homes and streets
that existed in Tarnopol but specifically Mikulince, Strusov and
Trembowla. Were the floors wood planked? Were the homes typical one
or two story? Were there outhouses? My grandmother was born in
Mikulince in 1909 and left in 1921. I never asked her specifics about her
home and physical surroundings there and now I'm curious.

Thank you.

Rishy Savin


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Houses in Tarnopol area in early 1900s #galicia

Rishy Savin <rlsavin@...>
 

Hello,

I was wondering if anyone can tell me the type of homes and streets
that existed in Tarnopol but specifically Mikulince, Strusov and
Trembowla. Were the floors wood planked? Were the homes typical one
or two story? Were there outhouses? My grandmother was born in
Mikulince in 1909 and left in 1921. I never asked her specifics about her
home and physical surroundings there and now I'm curious.

Thank you.

Rishy Savin


Bessarabian relatives we can't locate #bessarabia

avivahpinski <avivahpinski@...>
 

Subject: Bessarabian relatives we can't locate
Date: Sun, 18 Mar 2018 17:09:45 -0400
From: avivahpinski <avivahpinski@verizon.net>
To: bessarabia@lyris.jewishgen.org

We are at a brick wall in connection with my husband's family in
Bessarabia. Any input or suggestions would be welcome.  Here is what we
know:

My husband's great grandfather, born in the 19th century, lived in
Bessarabia.  We have no vital records >from him or his wife, but do know
that his children were born in Sokiryany and possibly other nearby towns
in  Bessarabia.
Here is the information that we have about the children of Hensel/Gensel
and Ita.
Sokiryany is in Hotin Province, now in Ukraine. Lipkany, a few miles
away, is now in Moldava.

1.  Udla Koifman - My husband's grandmother.  She was born in 1875. 
According to her marriage certificate in Switzerland in 1897,  she was
born in Sokiryany, Bessarabia. Her father's name was Hensel (Gensel in
Russia) Koyfman..
Her mother's name was Ita Familiant.  In 1897, she lists her father as
deceased.  Is it possible that he was still alive and that she listed
him as deceased to avoid some kind of paperwork? We know nothing about
the marriage requirements in Geneva Switzerland at that time and were
surprised to find this record, since we knew that they were living in
Berlin where they were students at the university. My father-in-law was
born in Berlin in 1898.

2. Azriel Koifman - A son - We found his Duma voting record for 1906
and 1907 in Hotin, Ukraine.  Hotin was a district in Bessarabia and is
presentloy in the Ukraine. The Duma voting record lists his patronym as
Genselev.
We have a picture of his family in the early 20th century in Bar Ukraine
(a few miles north), and correspondence to NYC until about 1917.  After
that, except for a postcard >from his daughter in 1925 that
she had gotten married.  The letters between 1914 and 1917 thanked the
family in New York for sending money, but many letters seem to have not
reached them.  The family has disappeared.

3. Bassya Koifman - daughter. Got married in Warsaw in the 1880s and
came to the US in about 1922 with her husband.  They had no children.
We have her boat records and various census records in the US.
No records >from Bessarabia or Warsaw.

4. Female - There was one other daughter, whose name is unknown.  She
was probably the oldest, since her daughter  was born in 1881 and is 
about the same age as her aunts and uncles, whom she lived with in
Warsaw and Berlin.
She came to the US in about 1900, but we can't find her boat record. 
We have a lot of information about the daughter/niece in the US, since
we knew her and her family.  However,  all we have is her father's
last name (Grossman) and no birth records for her in Bessarabia.

5. There is one potential son. No birth records. Boat record gives
birth as  abt 1878, 1930 census gives birth date as 1882, birthplace as
Lipcany, a few miles away >from Sokiryany.
However, we have no documents showing that he is a son.  We also have a
potential Duma voting record for this potential son that lists his
father in 1906 as Yankelevich in 1906 and Yankelef in 1907.
We know that he is a relative,  but have no records to tell us whether 
he is a son of Hensel, or possibly a nephew.

In checking the name Hensel,  we found Hensel on a list of names on
Ancestry.com, connecting the name with Ukraine. Has anyone come across
the name of Hensel/Gensel ?
Could that be his European nameand he had the name of Yankl in Hebrew?
Or could that be another name that he had? Any thoughts are welcome.

We have further records for the family members who came to the United
States, but can't trace records back.
Does anyone have any suggestions as to how or where we might locate any
birth records or other documents for this family in Bessarabia ?

Avivah R. Z. Pinski
near Philadelphia, USA

Researching: Zuchman in Sarnaki, Karczew, and Warsaw Poland
Reznik in Drohiczyn, Siemiatische, Poland
Kopekin & Rifczes in Lemberg, Vienna, Polatsk, and Besonkovich
Familiant and Koifman in Bessarabia and Ukraine
Sondak in Vitebsk, Belarus and Rehitza, Latvia
Aginsky and Slonimsky in Minsk


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia Fwd: Bessarabian relatives we can't locate #bessarabia

avivahpinski <avivahpinski@...>
 

Subject: Bessarabian relatives we can't locate
Date: Sun, 18 Mar 2018 17:09:45 -0400
From: avivahpinski <avivahpinski@verizon.net>
To: bessarabia@lyris.jewishgen.org

We are at a brick wall in connection with my husband's family in
Bessarabia. Any input or suggestions would be welcome.  Here is what we
know:

My husband's great grandfather, born in the 19th century, lived in
Bessarabia.  We have no vital records >from him or his wife, but do know
that his children were born in Sokiryany and possibly other nearby towns
in  Bessarabia.
Here is the information that we have about the children of Hensel/Gensel
and Ita.
Sokiryany is in Hotin Province, now in Ukraine. Lipkany, a few miles
away, is now in Moldava.

1.  Udla Koifman - My husband's grandmother.  She was born in 1875. 
According to her marriage certificate in Switzerland in 1897,  she was
born in Sokiryany, Bessarabia. Her father's name was Hensel (Gensel in
Russia) Koyfman..
Her mother's name was Ita Familiant.  In 1897, she lists her father as
deceased.  Is it possible that he was still alive and that she listed
him as deceased to avoid some kind of paperwork? We know nothing about
the marriage requirements in Geneva Switzerland at that time and were
surprised to find this record, since we knew that they were living in
Berlin where they were students at the university. My father-in-law was
born in Berlin in 1898.

2. Azriel Koifman - A son - We found his Duma voting record for 1906
and 1907 in Hotin, Ukraine.  Hotin was a district in Bessarabia and is
presentloy in the Ukraine. The Duma voting record lists his patronym as
Genselev.
We have a picture of his family in the early 20th century in Bar Ukraine
(a few miles north), and correspondence to NYC until about 1917.  After
that, except for a postcard >from his daughter in 1925 that
she had gotten married.  The letters between 1914 and 1917 thanked the
family in New York for sending money, but many letters seem to have not
reached them.  The family has disappeared.

3. Bassya Koifman - daughter. Got married in Warsaw in the 1880s and
came to the US in about 1922 with her husband.  They had no children.
We have her boat records and various census records in the US.
No records >from Bessarabia or Warsaw.

4. Female - There was one other daughter, whose name is unknown.  She
was probably the oldest, since her daughter  was born in 1881 and is 
about the same age as her aunts and uncles, whom she lived with in
Warsaw and Berlin.
She came to the US in about 1900, but we can't find her boat record. 
We have a lot of information about the daughter/niece in the US, since
we knew her and her family.  However,  all we have is her father's
last name (Grossman) and no birth records for her in Bessarabia.

5. There is one potential son. No birth records. Boat record gives
birth as  abt 1878, 1930 census gives birth date as 1882, birthplace as
Lipcany, a few miles away >from Sokiryany.
However, we have no documents showing that he is a son.  We also have a
potential Duma voting record for this potential son that lists his
father in 1906 as Yankelevich in 1906 and Yankelef in 1907.
We know that he is a relative,  but have no records to tell us whether 
he is a son of Hensel, or possibly a nephew.

In checking the name Hensel,  we found Hensel on a list of names on
Ancestry.com, connecting the name with Ukraine. Has anyone come across
the name of Hensel/Gensel ?
Could that be his European nameand he had the name of Yankl in Hebrew?
Or could that be another name that he had? Any thoughts are welcome.

We have further records for the family members who came to the United
States, but can't trace records back.
Does anyone have any suggestions as to how or where we might locate any
birth records or other documents for this family in Bessarabia ?

Avivah R. Z. Pinski
near Philadelphia, USA

Researching: Zuchman in Sarnaki, Karczew, and Warsaw Poland
Reznik in Drohiczyn, Siemiatische, Poland
Kopekin & Rifczes in Lemberg, Vienna, Polatsk, and Besonkovich
Familiant and Koifman in Bessarabia and Ukraine
Sondak in Vitebsk, Belarus and Rehitza, Latvia
Aginsky and Slonimsky in Minsk


(UK) Imperial War Museum and Findmypast Collaborate with Lives of the First World War #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Lives of the First World War project was launched in 2014 as part of the WW
I digital centenary project, and it was announced today that they will
cease taking submissions on the 18th March 2019. This project is a
collaboration between Findmypast and the Imperial War Museum (IWM). As of
March 23, 2018, the IWM will be acting as the custodian of the millions of
contributions made by members of the public, creating a digital memorial
that will always remain free to access. Currently, it has stories of 7.6
million men and women >from across the Commonwealth and Britain who served
during World War I.

The Findmypast and IWM are asking the public to help preserve as many
stories as possible by joining the Lives of the First World War
https://livesofthefirstworldwar.org/ and uploading scans of photos, letters,
diaries, by researching a name on a local war memorial, or by sharing
anecdotes passed down through generations.

To sign up for free go to: https://livesofthefirstworldwar.org/ .
To see the list of free records go to:
https://livesofthefirstworldwar.org/ww1-records#azrecordsets
Premium records require a paid subscription. Annual subscriptions will no
longer be available >from 30th March 2018 and all automatic renewals will be
cancelled. Monthly subscriptions can still be purchased until 1st March
2019.

One can search by name, first and last, military service, rank and
corps/regiment. I tried several searches with "Jewish" sounding names and
received many "hits"

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen (UK) Imperial War Museum and Findmypast Collaborate with Lives of the First World War #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Lives of the First World War project was launched in 2014 as part of the WW
I digital centenary project, and it was announced today that they will
cease taking submissions on the 18th March 2019. This project is a
collaboration between Findmypast and the Imperial War Museum (IWM). As of
March 23, 2018, the IWM will be acting as the custodian of the millions of
contributions made by members of the public, creating a digital memorial
that will always remain free to access. Currently, it has stories of 7.6
million men and women >from across the Commonwealth and Britain who served
during World War I.

The Findmypast and IWM are asking the public to help preserve as many
stories as possible by joining the Lives of the First World War
https://livesofthefirstworldwar.org/ and uploading scans of photos, letters,
diaries, by researching a name on a local war memorial, or by sharing
anecdotes passed down through generations.

To sign up for free go to: https://livesofthefirstworldwar.org/ .
To see the list of free records go to:
https://livesofthefirstworldwar.org/ww1-records#azrecordsets
Premium records require a paid subscription. Annual subscriptions will no
longer be available >from 30th March 2018 and all automatic renewals will be
cancelled. Monthly subscriptions can still be purchased until 1st March
2019.

One can search by name, first and last, military service, rank and
corps/regiment. I tried several searches with "Jewish" sounding names and
received many "hits"

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Calling off the search for Stanley Ginsberg #general

Tsiporah Trom
 

Thank you to those who kindly responded.

And especially to Allan Jordan, Gershon Lehrer
and Renee Steinig who have been a tremendous help in tracking my Greenbaum
family in New York.

Stanley Ginsberg (cousin of Sonia Greenbaum-Ginsberg) has been found.
He sadly passed away in 2001.
But his granddaughter, Caitlin, is on Ancestry and has responded to my
message.

I wish you all a happy Passover,

Tsiporah Trom
Antwerp, Belgium


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Calling off the search for Stanley Ginsberg #general

Tsiporah Trom
 

Thank you to those who kindly responded.

And especially to Allan Jordan, Gershon Lehrer
and Renee Steinig who have been a tremendous help in tracking my Greenbaum
family in New York.

Stanley Ginsberg (cousin of Sonia Greenbaum-Ginsberg) has been found.
He sadly passed away in 2001.
But his granddaughter, Caitlin, is on Ancestry and has responded to my
message.

I wish you all a happy Passover,

Tsiporah Trom
Antwerp, Belgium


This week's Yizkor book excerpt on JewishGen's FB page #general

Bruce Drake <BDrake@...>
 

"Koze Street" >from the Yizkor book of Sokolow Podlaski, Poland explores
in great detail the lives of the poor in a Jewish shtetl and their
struggles when it came to obtaining the essentials of life with the
proprietors who did business there. "The people on the street worked
hard all week, as hard as the Jews in Egypt...Laboring, toiling, they
went the whole week like a horse in harness," scraping by during the
week to put food on the table in order to "bring home a little flour,
kasha, a chicken; often a fish, in order to create comfort for the wife
and children on shabes." The chapter reads almost like a play, with
running dialogues between the "pani" - the main proprietors of that
street - and the people to whom they showed little generosity. If there
is a happy ending to this, it's the joy the poor took in celebrating
the Sabbath.

URL: https://www.facebook.com/JewishGen.org/posts/1708409369181211

Bruce Drake
Silver Spring, MD

Researching: DRACH, EBERT, KIMMEL, ZLOTNICK
Towns: Wojnilow, Kovel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen This week's Yizkor book excerpt on JewishGen's FB page #general

Bruce Drake <BDrake@...>
 

"Koze Street" >from the Yizkor book of Sokolow Podlaski, Poland explores
in great detail the lives of the poor in a Jewish shtetl and their
struggles when it came to obtaining the essentials of life with the
proprietors who did business there. "The people on the street worked
hard all week, as hard as the Jews in Egypt...Laboring, toiling, they
went the whole week like a horse in harness," scraping by during the
week to put food on the table in order to "bring home a little flour,
kasha, a chicken; often a fish, in order to create comfort for the wife
and children on shabes." The chapter reads almost like a play, with
running dialogues between the "pani" - the main proprietors of that
street - and the people to whom they showed little generosity. If there
is a happy ending to this, it's the joy the poor took in celebrating
the Sabbath.

URL: https://www.facebook.com/JewishGen.org/posts/1708409369181211

Bruce Drake
Silver Spring, MD

Researching: DRACH, EBERT, KIMMEL, ZLOTNICK
Towns: Wojnilow, Kovel


Re: Ancestry DNA #dna

Arlene Beare
 

Thanks Adam I do agree with you. However with the DMT programme I can see
how many cM's in each match >from A-c or B-c and lots of other details which
help me decide if Jewish Endogamy is at work.

It is not an exact science just a helpful tool.

Arlene Beare

-----Original Message-----

From: "Adam Cherson" <adam.cherson@gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 22 Mar 2018 09:00:07 -0400

In regards to Arlene's triangulation post, I would like to add that
triangulation is not always as clear as one would hope. I have a pair of dna
results that I often use as triangulation guideposts. One kit is my aunt's
and the other is her paternal first cousin. One would think that anyone that
matches my aunt but not her paternal first cousin would clearly be related
to my aunt on her on her maternal side. The problem is that even a known
maternal 2nd cousin of hers also matches her paternal 1st cousin. When you
add the fact that the amount of gene sharing among cousins of equal
genealogical distance can vary considerably, one is left with often
ambiguous results. The point is of course that dna analysis triangulations
involving potential relatives who are greater than 4 steps away (i.e.
further than 1st cousins), and especially in highly endogamous populations,
are difficult if not impossible to interpret in the absence of additional
and supporting genealogical information. Beware of isolated triangulation!


DNA Research #DNA Re: Ancestry DNA #dna

Arlene Beare
 

Thanks Adam I do agree with you. However with the DMT programme I can see
how many cM's in each match >from A-c or B-c and lots of other details which
help me decide if Jewish Endogamy is at work.

It is not an exact science just a helpful tool.

Arlene Beare

-----Original Message-----

From: "Adam Cherson" <adam.cherson@gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 22 Mar 2018 09:00:07 -0400

In regards to Arlene's triangulation post, I would like to add that
triangulation is not always as clear as one would hope. I have a pair of dna
results that I often use as triangulation guideposts. One kit is my aunt's
and the other is her paternal first cousin. One would think that anyone that
matches my aunt but not her paternal first cousin would clearly be related
to my aunt on her on her maternal side. The problem is that even a known
maternal 2nd cousin of hers also matches her paternal 1st cousin. When you
add the fact that the amount of gene sharing among cousins of equal
genealogical distance can vary considerably, one is left with often
ambiguous results. The point is of course that dna analysis triangulations
involving potential relatives who are greater than 4 steps away (i.e.
further than 1st cousins), and especially in highly endogamous populations,
are difficult if not impossible to interpret in the absence of additional
and supporting genealogical information. Beware of isolated triangulation!

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