Date   
Seeking descendents of ROSNER family New York #general

Annette Sterlin <as358@...>
 

On the behalf of a relative in Israel, I am seeking the descendents of Abe
and Sadie Rosner and Sam & Bertha Rosner.

Abe had a sons Mo & Hy and daugther Kate who married NESTLE & had a son
Gilbert.

Sam had daughters Miriam (or Mary), Sylvia & Vivian. They lived in Brooklyn
on the 1930 census.

Thank you
A. Sterlin

LUWISCH of Karapciu #romania

Maya Elbaz <elbazm@...>
 

Dear Rom-SIG,

I have just joined your list.
I am trying to locate my grandfather's roots. He was born in
Galicia (Kolomyya), and his grandfather's LUWISCH family (3
brothers and 1 sister, born 1830-1850) came >from Bukovina, >from a
small town by the name of Karapciu, which I have located at 4189
by 2527 (there is another Karapciv nearby, but based on my
grandfather's statements that the town was closer to vaskivci
than cernivci, I think this is the correct location).
One of the 3 brothers mentioned above, a Moshe LUWISCH, remained
in the Bukowina region, and his only descendants known to us were
born in Roumania (Cernauti). Moshe had at least 8 children that
reached adulthood, but we have virtually no information on 7 of
them. records for this family could be anywhere in Roumania as
far as we know.

My question to the knowledgeable researchers is this:
where and how can I find any records for Karapciu? and how else
can I track down records in Roumania for my LUWISCH family, not
knowing exactly where they lived? (and given that the children
could have taken the mother's surname - which I do not know).

any help is much appreciated.

Maya Elbaz
Ramat-Gan, Israel

ReSearching: LUWISCH; HILSENRATH; SALPETER; ROSENAU; ERLICH;
NEWLAND (LEVI); NASH; RUVINSTEIN; WALLACH; ANDERMAN; HEGER;
LOEBEL; MEHER; NAGLER; STANDIG

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Seeking descendents of ROSNER family New York #general

Annette Sterlin <as358@...>
 

On the behalf of a relative in Israel, I am seeking the descendents of Abe
and Sadie Rosner and Sam & Bertha Rosner.

Abe had a sons Mo & Hy and daugther Kate who married NESTLE & had a son
Gilbert.

Sam had daughters Miriam (or Mary), Sylvia & Vivian. They lived in Brooklyn
on the 1930 census.

Thank you
A. Sterlin

Romania SIG #Romania LUWISCH of Karapciu #romania

Maya Elbaz <elbazm@...>
 

Dear Rom-SIG,

I have just joined your list.
I am trying to locate my grandfather's roots. He was born in
Galicia (Kolomyya), and his grandfather's LUWISCH family (3
brothers and 1 sister, born 1830-1850) came >from Bukovina, >from a
small town by the name of Karapciu, which I have located at 4189
by 2527 (there is another Karapciv nearby, but based on my
grandfather's statements that the town was closer to vaskivci
than cernivci, I think this is the correct location).
One of the 3 brothers mentioned above, a Moshe LUWISCH, remained
in the Bukowina region, and his only descendants known to us were
born in Roumania (Cernauti). Moshe had at least 8 children that
reached adulthood, but we have virtually no information on 7 of
them. records for this family could be anywhere in Roumania as
far as we know.

My question to the knowledgeable researchers is this:
where and how can I find any records for Karapciu? and how else
can I track down records in Roumania for my LUWISCH family, not
knowing exactly where they lived? (and given that the children
could have taken the mother's surname - which I do not know).

any help is much appreciated.

Maya Elbaz
Ramat-Gan, Israel

ReSearching: LUWISCH; HILSENRATH; SALPETER; ROSENAU; ERLICH;
NEWLAND (LEVI); NASH; RUVINSTEIN; WALLACH; ANDERMAN; HEGER;
LOEBEL; MEHER; NAGLER; STANDIG

LEVY and ZIFFREN Marriage Certificate #general

flbkfive@...
 

Does anyone have a Lewis Levy and Rose Anne Ziffren in family tree. I have
acquired a Marriage Certificate >from an old book. Date is 1934, 23rd
December. It is for the state of Illinois. Signed by Rabbi Solomon L.
Levitan, Witnessed by Herman A Ziffren LLB. If you have any one that
matches this please contact me, respond through private e-mail.
Thank you,
Michelle Koppel
flbkfive@...
Researching: Koppel, Levy, Burns, Meyersohn, Meyer

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen LEVY and ZIFFREN Marriage Certificate #general

flbkfive@...
 

Does anyone have a Lewis Levy and Rose Anne Ziffren in family tree. I have
acquired a Marriage Certificate >from an old book. Date is 1934, 23rd
December. It is for the state of Illinois. Signed by Rabbi Solomon L.
Levitan, Witnessed by Herman A Ziffren LLB. If you have any one that
matches this please contact me, respond through private e-mail.
Thank you,
Michelle Koppel
flbkfive@...
Researching: Koppel, Levy, Burns, Meyersohn, Meyer

Re: Orthodox observance by German Jews in USA #germany

Susan Tourgeman <stourgem@...>
 

MODERATOR NOTE:
Those GerSig members who have ancestors who came to the USA before
1880 should join the Early American SIG and contribute to discussion
of this kind in that forum.

This discussion is closed in this GerSig Forum except for messages clearly
describing their relevance to genealogy research. ============>

In response to "Kosher Observance by German Jews in the USA, 1738" my great
grandfather Susman KATZENSTEIN came to America in 1861 and joined the
original Rodeph Shalom Synagogue in New York City which was on Clinton
Street and which I believe was Orthodox at the time.

Today that original building still stands as the Chatam Sofer Synagogue
and is a historical landmark. I know there is a jubilee booklet published
around 1890 celebrating the first fifty years of this synagogue and it
goes into great detail about the synagogue and lists its members. An
original copy can be found at the Leo Baeck Institute Library in New York.

I also have original prayer books >from my great grandfather who came from
Schwarzenborn Hessen which were written in German and Hebrew (published in
New York City). They followed the Orthodox tradition. It is in my opinion
false to assume that all the German Jews threw away their Orthodoxy or
Kashrut upon arriving in the USA or Israel. I know of many German Jews
from small Hessan towns who are leaders in their Orthodox synagogues and
who are following the strict observances of their ancestors.

Suzi Plaut Tourgeman, Jerusalem Israel

German SIG #Germany Re: Orthodox observance by German Jews in USA #germany

Susan Tourgeman <stourgem@...>
 

MODERATOR NOTE:
Those GerSig members who have ancestors who came to the USA before
1880 should join the Early American SIG and contribute to discussion
of this kind in that forum.

This discussion is closed in this GerSig Forum except for messages clearly
describing their relevance to genealogy research. ============>

In response to "Kosher Observance by German Jews in the USA, 1738" my great
grandfather Susman KATZENSTEIN came to America in 1861 and joined the
original Rodeph Shalom Synagogue in New York City which was on Clinton
Street and which I believe was Orthodox at the time.

Today that original building still stands as the Chatam Sofer Synagogue
and is a historical landmark. I know there is a jubilee booklet published
around 1890 celebrating the first fifty years of this synagogue and it
goes into great detail about the synagogue and lists its members. An
original copy can be found at the Leo Baeck Institute Library in New York.

I also have original prayer books >from my great grandfather who came from
Schwarzenborn Hessen which were written in German and Hebrew (published in
New York City). They followed the Orthodox tradition. It is in my opinion
false to assume that all the German Jews threw away their Orthodoxy or
Kashrut upon arriving in the USA or Israel. I know of many German Jews
from small Hessan towns who are leaders in their Orthodox synagogues and
who are following the strict observances of their ancestors.

Suzi Plaut Tourgeman, Jerusalem Israel

Descendants of the GUTMANN family of Hamburg #germany

Association GenAmi <asso.genami@...>
 

A branch of our GUTMANN tree whose descendants I have not yet found :

Hermann GUTMANN (Hamburg 1860 - Manchester 1927) who married Rachel COHEN
from St Petersbourg.
Children : GOODMAN Harry, Bessie, Dora, Pauline, Fanny, Abraham, Sarah,
Jacob, Bertha, Bernard, Doris-Lea, all born at Manchester (GB)

Bessie mar. Joseph SINGER, went to Boston

Many others went to Boston also.
If you have some news about them, tell them to contact me, please. Thanks!

Micheline GUTMANN asso.genami@... http://asso.genami.free.fr

German SIG #Germany Descendants of the GUTMANN family of Hamburg #germany

Association GenAmi <asso.genami@...>
 

A branch of our GUTMANN tree whose descendants I have not yet found :

Hermann GUTMANN (Hamburg 1860 - Manchester 1927) who married Rachel COHEN
from St Petersbourg.
Children : GOODMAN Harry, Bessie, Dora, Pauline, Fanny, Abraham, Sarah,
Jacob, Bertha, Bernard, Doris-Lea, all born at Manchester (GB)

Bessie mar. Joseph SINGER, went to Boston

Many others went to Boston also.
If you have some news about them, tell them to contact me, please. Thanks!

Micheline GUTMANN asso.genami@... http://asso.genami.free.fr

Re: Kosher observance by German Jews in USA, 1738 #germany

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

Michael Bernet posted as follows:

"Many of us believe that the immigration to the USA of German Jews got
under way around 1840, and that the vast majority of German immigrants had
little respect for Orthodoxy or Kashrut. A news item in today's New York
Times, presents a contrary view:

"In Savannah, Ga., in 1738, a Lutheran minister, Martin Bolzius, wrote,
"The Spanish and Portuguese Jews are not so strict in so far as eating is
concerned as the others are . . . The German Jews on the other hand would
rather starve than eat meat they do not slaughter themselves."" ===>


Michael's statement about the "vast majority" of German immigrants and
their alienation >from Jewish religious practices is quite correct, and not
only for the immigrants, but also for most of the German Jews left behind
in Germany during this period. Never the less, it should be noted that
there was a small portion of German Jews, perhaps 10-20 %, who were very
observant religiously, both those who immigrated to the US and those who
remained behind in Germany.

During the Enlightenment and the 19th century, the Jews of Germany were
among the very first to adopt German secular given names widely, in
addition to or instead of Hebrew/Yiddish names. And this is reflected by
the fact that in archival documents in Germany, the given names of Jews
which appear in civil documents are mostly >from that set of about 500
German secular names which Jews adopted selectively. These names were
subsequently imported to other European countries like Poland and Hungary,
where they also appear in civil documents.

These names (e.g., Abraham, Georg, Bernhard, Jacob, Rosalie, Bertha,
Klara, Esther) can be found in the Germany Given Names Data Base found on
the web site < http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames/ >.

Professor G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel

MODERATOR NOTE: Discussion in this Forum should be related to genealogy
research. Further comments on this topic will be posted only if they
include an explaination of why this can be helpful in genealogy research.

German SIG #Germany Re: Kosher observance by German Jews in USA, 1738 #germany

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

Michael Bernet posted as follows:

"Many of us believe that the immigration to the USA of German Jews got
under way around 1840, and that the vast majority of German immigrants had
little respect for Orthodoxy or Kashrut. A news item in today's New York
Times, presents a contrary view:

"In Savannah, Ga., in 1738, a Lutheran minister, Martin Bolzius, wrote,
"The Spanish and Portuguese Jews are not so strict in so far as eating is
concerned as the others are . . . The German Jews on the other hand would
rather starve than eat meat they do not slaughter themselves."" ===>


Michael's statement about the "vast majority" of German immigrants and
their alienation >from Jewish religious practices is quite correct, and not
only for the immigrants, but also for most of the German Jews left behind
in Germany during this period. Never the less, it should be noted that
there was a small portion of German Jews, perhaps 10-20 %, who were very
observant religiously, both those who immigrated to the US and those who
remained behind in Germany.

During the Enlightenment and the 19th century, the Jews of Germany were
among the very first to adopt German secular given names widely, in
addition to or instead of Hebrew/Yiddish names. And this is reflected by
the fact that in archival documents in Germany, the given names of Jews
which appear in civil documents are mostly >from that set of about 500
German secular names which Jews adopted selectively. These names were
subsequently imported to other European countries like Poland and Hungary,
where they also appear in civil documents.

These names (e.g., Abraham, Georg, Bernhard, Jacob, Rosalie, Bertha,
Klara, Esther) can be found in the Germany Given Names Data Base found on
the web site < http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames/ >.

Professor G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel

MODERATOR NOTE: Discussion in this Forum should be related to genealogy
research. Further comments on this topic will be posted only if they
include an explaination of why this can be helpful in genealogy research.

The FEIT Family of Niederzissen, Rheinland #germany

Ralph Baer <RalphNBaer@...>
 

My sixth great-grandfather Jacob Faist was married to Rahel. I know
nothing else about him except that he had a son Faist (Uri) Jacob married
to Karoline (Kiedel) Gorschel. (Gorschel may have been a misreading.
Hirschel seems more likely.) Faist Jacob was born about 1728 in
Niederzissen and died there on 1 December 1800. I am, of course, very
interested in any information about these people and their ancestors.

Niederzissen is west of the Rhine river,
between Mayen and Bad Neuenahr-Ahrweiler.

*******MODERATOR NOTE: It is a l w a y s helpful to provide an exact
description of the location of an ancestral small town that you mention in
a message to this list as Mr. Baer has done above.******************

Faist Jacob and Karoline had the following known children:

1) Jacob Feist about 1756 Niederzissen - 21 April 1802 Niederzissen,
tradesman, married to ?

2) Meryem Feist (Marion FEIT) about 1758 Niederzissen - 19 May 1818
Niederzissen, married to Isac Abraham SOMMER, died before 1813, laborer

3) Isaac FEIT 1764 Niederzissen, butcher, lived in Sinzig since 1799,
listed as being rich in 1828, married 1785 to Rachael Joseph LEVI 1750

4) Simon (Seligmann) FEIT 10 April 1764 Niederzissen - 24 April 1833
Koenigsfeld, married to Clara GEISER (Sara Geisel) 7 October 1763 - before
1833 Oberzissen

5) Hermann FEIT (Heymann Faist) 26 April 1765 Niederzissen - 21 May 1845
Niederzissen, cattle trader, married to Elisabeth BECKER (Leids, Leitz,
or Leize Benjamin) 6 April 1776 - 10 June 1852 Niederzissen. Although a
record states that Elisabeth was also born in Niederzissen, this may be
wrong. (my fourth great-grandparents)

Any information about these people, their descendants, and other children
of Faist and Karoline interest me.

In order to keep this message of manageable length, I will just list the
children of Hermann and Elisabeth. Anything about the descendants of these
people is of interest.

1) Caroline (Keile) FEIT 7 September 1794 Niederzissen - 24 August 1867
Koblenz, married 1. 23 February 1814 Sieglar to Bonem HIRSCH, cattle
trader, lived in Bonn, divorced 6 June 1816, married 2. 4 March 1817
Koenigsfeld to Benedikt KAHN 24 September 1790 Kruft - 1 January 1866
Koblenz, cattle trader
2) Alexander (Benjamin) FEIT 25 September 1796 Niederzissen - 31 March 1848
Niederzissen, tradesman, representative of the Jewish community of
Niederzissen, married 1. 13 April 1814 to Sara BOCK 1 February 1796 Hersel,
married 2. 10 December 1822 Adendorf to Fratgen BERLIN (Veronica SCHMITZ) 2
May 1798 Meckenheim, married 3. about 5 March 1832 to Helena MARX

3) Josephine (Rachel, Regina) FEIT 14 March 1800 Niederzissen - 15 March
1829 Meckenheim, married 22 February 1825 Adendorf to Joseph SCHMITZ
(BERLIN) 28 September 1796 Meckenheim - 7 July 1880 Meckenheim, horse
trader (my third great-grandparents)

4) Ignaz (Feist, Ignace) FEIT 30 January 1803 Niederzissen - 11 March 1866
Niederzissen, apparently unmarried

5) Klemens (Isac, Clement) FEIT 9 August 1805 Niederzissen - 12 October
1819 Niederzissen

6) Moses FEIT 22 January 1808 Niederzissen - 24 January 1808 Niederzissen

7) Catherine FEIT 18 June 1809 Niederzissen - 16 February 1851 Muelheim,
married 2 June 1830 Bassenheim to David Amschel MARX 9 February 1803
Bassenheim - 17 August 1889 Detroit, grocer

8) Leopold FEIT 25 April 1812 Niederzissen - 27 March 1856 Niederzissen,
trader, married about 10 March 1836 to Caroline (Catherina) SIMON about
1808 Bassenheim - 26 December 1866 Niederzissen

9) Jacob FEIT 6 January 1815 Niederzissen - 7 January 1815 Niederzissen

10) Simon FEIT 25 May 1816 Niederzissen - 24 April 1833 Niederzissen

11) Gottschalk FEIT 25 March 1819 Niederzissen, tradesman and farmer,
married about 25 March 1856 to Maria Anna CAHN about 1823

12) Anschel FEIT about 1822 Niederzissen - Niederzissen, grocer and farmer,
married to Dina BERMANN about 1823 - Brohl

Ralph Baer Washington, DC RalphNBaer@...

German SIG #Germany The FEIT Family of Niederzissen, Rheinland #germany

Ralph Baer <RalphNBaer@...>
 

My sixth great-grandfather Jacob Faist was married to Rahel. I know
nothing else about him except that he had a son Faist (Uri) Jacob married
to Karoline (Kiedel) Gorschel. (Gorschel may have been a misreading.
Hirschel seems more likely.) Faist Jacob was born about 1728 in
Niederzissen and died there on 1 December 1800. I am, of course, very
interested in any information about these people and their ancestors.

Niederzissen is west of the Rhine river,
between Mayen and Bad Neuenahr-Ahrweiler.

*******MODERATOR NOTE: It is a l w a y s helpful to provide an exact
description of the location of an ancestral small town that you mention in
a message to this list as Mr. Baer has done above.******************

Faist Jacob and Karoline had the following known children:

1) Jacob Feist about 1756 Niederzissen - 21 April 1802 Niederzissen,
tradesman, married to ?

2) Meryem Feist (Marion FEIT) about 1758 Niederzissen - 19 May 1818
Niederzissen, married to Isac Abraham SOMMER, died before 1813, laborer

3) Isaac FEIT 1764 Niederzissen, butcher, lived in Sinzig since 1799,
listed as being rich in 1828, married 1785 to Rachael Joseph LEVI 1750

4) Simon (Seligmann) FEIT 10 April 1764 Niederzissen - 24 April 1833
Koenigsfeld, married to Clara GEISER (Sara Geisel) 7 October 1763 - before
1833 Oberzissen

5) Hermann FEIT (Heymann Faist) 26 April 1765 Niederzissen - 21 May 1845
Niederzissen, cattle trader, married to Elisabeth BECKER (Leids, Leitz,
or Leize Benjamin) 6 April 1776 - 10 June 1852 Niederzissen. Although a
record states that Elisabeth was also born in Niederzissen, this may be
wrong. (my fourth great-grandparents)

Any information about these people, their descendants, and other children
of Faist and Karoline interest me.

In order to keep this message of manageable length, I will just list the
children of Hermann and Elisabeth. Anything about the descendants of these
people is of interest.

1) Caroline (Keile) FEIT 7 September 1794 Niederzissen - 24 August 1867
Koblenz, married 1. 23 February 1814 Sieglar to Bonem HIRSCH, cattle
trader, lived in Bonn, divorced 6 June 1816, married 2. 4 March 1817
Koenigsfeld to Benedikt KAHN 24 September 1790 Kruft - 1 January 1866
Koblenz, cattle trader
2) Alexander (Benjamin) FEIT 25 September 1796 Niederzissen - 31 March 1848
Niederzissen, tradesman, representative of the Jewish community of
Niederzissen, married 1. 13 April 1814 to Sara BOCK 1 February 1796 Hersel,
married 2. 10 December 1822 Adendorf to Fratgen BERLIN (Veronica SCHMITZ) 2
May 1798 Meckenheim, married 3. about 5 March 1832 to Helena MARX

3) Josephine (Rachel, Regina) FEIT 14 March 1800 Niederzissen - 15 March
1829 Meckenheim, married 22 February 1825 Adendorf to Joseph SCHMITZ
(BERLIN) 28 September 1796 Meckenheim - 7 July 1880 Meckenheim, horse
trader (my third great-grandparents)

4) Ignaz (Feist, Ignace) FEIT 30 January 1803 Niederzissen - 11 March 1866
Niederzissen, apparently unmarried

5) Klemens (Isac, Clement) FEIT 9 August 1805 Niederzissen - 12 October
1819 Niederzissen

6) Moses FEIT 22 January 1808 Niederzissen - 24 January 1808 Niederzissen

7) Catherine FEIT 18 June 1809 Niederzissen - 16 February 1851 Muelheim,
married 2 June 1830 Bassenheim to David Amschel MARX 9 February 1803
Bassenheim - 17 August 1889 Detroit, grocer

8) Leopold FEIT 25 April 1812 Niederzissen - 27 March 1856 Niederzissen,
trader, married about 10 March 1836 to Caroline (Catherina) SIMON about
1808 Bassenheim - 26 December 1866 Niederzissen

9) Jacob FEIT 6 January 1815 Niederzissen - 7 January 1815 Niederzissen

10) Simon FEIT 25 May 1816 Niederzissen - 24 April 1833 Niederzissen

11) Gottschalk FEIT 25 March 1819 Niederzissen, tradesman and farmer,
married about 25 March 1856 to Maria Anna CAHN about 1823

12) Anschel FEIT about 1822 Niederzissen - Niederzissen, grocer and farmer,
married to Dina BERMANN about 1823 - Brohl

Ralph Baer Washington, DC RalphNBaer@...

Re: dating old photographs #general

Irene Newhouse <einew@...>
 

Although one has no other recourse for dating old photos about which one
knows next to nothing other than by the fashions the subject is wearing,
this need not be simple. The spread of new fashions was considerably
slower in previous centuries than now, so that the more remote the locality
in which the photo was taken, the greater the chance that fashions old in
the big cities were still current several years later. In fact, my own
grandparents, born in 1888 [grandfather] & 1890 had an exchange that amused
us no end when we were young. One day my grandfather was explaining to us
that his mother wore very long dresses that had a sort of handle she'd grab
in order to lift the skirts in front enough to allow her to climb stairs
safely. "NO!" my grandmother said crossly, "We're old, but we're not THAT
old!" The difference: she grew up in Breslau, now Wroclaw, while he lived
in Berent, now Koscierzyna, then quite a small town not too close to any
large cities.

I inherited a small amount of family jewelry. I knew of one piece that it
had belonged to my grandmother's grandmother, but I didn't know much about
the others. So I took them to a conservator of the costume displays at the
Rochester Museum & Science Center. She told me they had their origins in a
provincial area not close to the major fashion centers/ large cities. She
deduced that >from the fact that gems which had been fashionable in one
decade were treated in a motif that was fashionable in the next one, or vice
versa! As a result, she had a hard time dating the pieces, though obviously
they were not older than their most recent fashion feature. Yes, they had
been passed down in the family of my Breslauer grandmother.

Along similar lines, my father explained to me that the fact that the
Imperial Russian government was succeeded by a Communist regime was a
coincidence. Imperial Russia was extremely dysfunctional & propped up
primarily by force of arms. Every decade had had its revolutionaries, who
espoused the currently fashionable radical philosophy. [His mother's family
was part of the radical movement his its day; one of his uncles was exiled
to Siberia for his political activity, so this isn't an unsupported
opinion]. Since Russia was about 50 years behind western Europe, the
currently fashionable radical philosophy when one of these revolts finally
succeeded was Communism, which had had its vogue in western Europe some time
before...

Irene Newhouse
Kihei HI
USA

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen re: dating old photographs #general

Irene Newhouse <einew@...>
 

Although one has no other recourse for dating old photos about which one
knows next to nothing other than by the fashions the subject is wearing,
this need not be simple. The spread of new fashions was considerably
slower in previous centuries than now, so that the more remote the locality
in which the photo was taken, the greater the chance that fashions old in
the big cities were still current several years later. In fact, my own
grandparents, born in 1888 [grandfather] & 1890 had an exchange that amused
us no end when we were young. One day my grandfather was explaining to us
that his mother wore very long dresses that had a sort of handle she'd grab
in order to lift the skirts in front enough to allow her to climb stairs
safely. "NO!" my grandmother said crossly, "We're old, but we're not THAT
old!" The difference: she grew up in Breslau, now Wroclaw, while he lived
in Berent, now Koscierzyna, then quite a small town not too close to any
large cities.

I inherited a small amount of family jewelry. I knew of one piece that it
had belonged to my grandmother's grandmother, but I didn't know much about
the others. So I took them to a conservator of the costume displays at the
Rochester Museum & Science Center. She told me they had their origins in a
provincial area not close to the major fashion centers/ large cities. She
deduced that >from the fact that gems which had been fashionable in one
decade were treated in a motif that was fashionable in the next one, or vice
versa! As a result, she had a hard time dating the pieces, though obviously
they were not older than their most recent fashion feature. Yes, they had
been passed down in the family of my Breslauer grandmother.

Along similar lines, my father explained to me that the fact that the
Imperial Russian government was succeeded by a Communist regime was a
coincidence. Imperial Russia was extremely dysfunctional & propped up
primarily by force of arms. Every decade had had its revolutionaries, who
espoused the currently fashionable radical philosophy. [His mother's family
was part of the radical movement his its day; one of his uncles was exiled
to Siberia for his political activity, so this isn't an unsupported
opinion]. Since Russia was about 50 years behind western Europe, the
currently fashionable radical philosophy when one of these revolts finally
succeeded was Communism, which had had its vogue in western Europe some time
before...

Irene Newhouse
Kihei HI
USA

Seeking a cousin: Gretchen SHATZ, NY or Miami #general

Harriet Kasow <hkasow@...>
 

This is a bit of a long shot, but nothing ventured nothing gained.

Seeking a cousin:
Gretchen Shatz one time of NY or Miami
Born in the 40s
Daughter of Oscar and Natalie Shatz
Granddaughter of Max and Yetta Shatz who lived on Rochambeau Ave in the
Bronx
Harvey Kasow
Hkasow@...

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Seeking a cousin: Gretchen SHATZ, NY or Miami #general

Harriet Kasow <hkasow@...>
 

This is a bit of a long shot, but nothing ventured nothing gained.

Seeking a cousin:
Gretchen Shatz one time of NY or Miami
Born in the 40s
Daughter of Oscar and Natalie Shatz
Granddaughter of Max and Yetta Shatz who lived on Rochambeau Ave in the
Bronx
Harvey Kasow
Hkasow@...

Re: Marseille bombing 1940 #france

Lifshitz-Krams Anne
 

I have a
childhood recollection of a bombing in Marseille that took place in
November (plus or minus 1 month) 1940. I have seen reference to such
a bombing in a publication. However, I am not sure who bombed the
city or why. I thought that it might have been the British Air Force
bombing French naval ships to prevent them >from being used by the
Germans.
===
Thomas, I think you are mixing 2 or 3 separate events.
1- In may 1940 Marseille has been bombed by German and Italian air force.
2- July 3, 1940, In Mers El Kebir, Churchill gives the order to destroy the
French boats in order to prevent them to go back to Toulon
3- November 27, 1942 (and not 1940) french officers who did not want to join
Darlan in North Africa, but did not want Germans to take their boats
prefered scuttling, but this was in Toulon.

Cordially
Anne Lifshitz-Krams
CGJ - Paris France
www.genealoj.org

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Marseille bombing 1940 #general

Lifshitz-Krams Anne
 

I have a
childhood recollection of a bombing in Marseille that took place in
November (plus or minus 1 month) 1940. I have seen reference to such
a bombing in a publication. However, I am not sure who bombed the
city or why. I thought that it might have been the British Air Force
bombing French naval ships to prevent them >from being used by the
Germans.
===
Thomas, I think you are mixing 2 or 3 separate events.
1- In may 1940 Marseille has been bombed by German and Italian air force.
2- July 3, 1940, In Mers El Kebir, Churchill gives the order to destroy the
French boats in order to prevent them to go back to Toulon
3- November 27, 1942 (and not 1940) french officers who did not want to join
Darlan in North Africa, but did not want Germans to take their boats
prefered scuttling, but this was in Toulon.

Cordially
Anne Lifshitz-Krams
CGJ - Paris France
www.genealoj.org