Date   

The Arenda System Research Project #galicia

Alan Weiser <alanboy@...>
 

Because the arenda system(a system of leasing) significantly affected
the socioeconomic life of Jews in Polish and Lithuanian frontier lands
from about the 14th century, the Kolomea Research Group (KRG) has
commenced The Arenda Research Project (TARP). The objectives of TARP
are to:
1. Describe the arenda system
2. Identify arendars (one who purchased a lease)
3. Identify what lands, industrial activities, and service
establishments were covered by arendas.
4. Identify the terms and conditions of arendas
5. Describe the socioeconomic impacts >from arendas
6. Provide clues to determine if one's ancestors may have been
arendars.

A report of initial research has been posted at
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/kolomea/kolomad.htm, click on
Arenda under History in the subject index to reach the report.
Research is continuing and needs volunteer researchers especially some
with Polish, Lithuanian, and Ukrainian language skills with English.
See the noted report for details on the project and contact
information. You do not have to be a member of KRG to participate in
this important project.

Alan Weiser, Coordinator
Kolomea Research Group & Web Site
alanboy@starpower.net
Silver Spring


The Galitzianer - Call for Articles, Etc. #galicia

Edward Goldstein
 

(REPLY TO Editor.TheGalitzianer@verizon.net)
----------------------------------------------------------
The next issue of The Galitzianer will be published in mid-May.

We are looking for all kinds of material relevant to Galician
genealogy: historical sketches of towns or organizations, family
reminiscences, old letters, pictures, etc. The work need not be
original, but be sure to obtain permission of any copyright holders.
Previously published material is acceptable.

If possible, submitted work should be in electronic format, attached
to emails. WORD format is preferred. Short articles may be submitted
in the body of an email or even, in exceptional circumstances, in
typed or handwritten form.

We would also like material for our "Family Album" department: family
pictures, group pictures, etc., with some explanation of who or what
is presented. Again, the material must be relevant to Galicia. All
photographs must be in electronic format and be submitted as an email
attachment.

Before submitting material, please get in touch with me so that we
can discuss the scope of the material, space required, etc.

You need not be a member of Gesher Galicia in order to submit material.

All submissions should be in my hands before 15 April.

Looking forward to hearing >from you!

Edward Goldstein
Editor, The Galitzianer


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia The Arenda System Research Project #galicia

Alan Weiser <alanboy@...>
 

Because the arenda system(a system of leasing) significantly affected
the socioeconomic life of Jews in Polish and Lithuanian frontier lands
from about the 14th century, the Kolomea Research Group (KRG) has
commenced The Arenda Research Project (TARP). The objectives of TARP
are to:
1. Describe the arenda system
2. Identify arendars (one who purchased a lease)
3. Identify what lands, industrial activities, and service
establishments were covered by arendas.
4. Identify the terms and conditions of arendas
5. Describe the socioeconomic impacts >from arendas
6. Provide clues to determine if one's ancestors may have been
arendars.

A report of initial research has been posted at
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/kolomea/kolomad.htm, click on
Arenda under History in the subject index to reach the report.
Research is continuing and needs volunteer researchers especially some
with Polish, Lithuanian, and Ukrainian language skills with English.
See the noted report for details on the project and contact
information. You do not have to be a member of KRG to participate in
this important project.

Alan Weiser, Coordinator
Kolomea Research Group & Web Site
alanboy@starpower.net
Silver Spring


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia The Galitzianer - Call for Articles, Etc. #galicia

Edward Goldstein
 

(REPLY TO Editor.TheGalitzianer@verizon.net)
----------------------------------------------------------
The next issue of The Galitzianer will be published in mid-May.

We are looking for all kinds of material relevant to Galician
genealogy: historical sketches of towns or organizations, family
reminiscences, old letters, pictures, etc. The work need not be
original, but be sure to obtain permission of any copyright holders.
Previously published material is acceptable.

If possible, submitted work should be in electronic format, attached
to emails. WORD format is preferred. Short articles may be submitted
in the body of an email or even, in exceptional circumstances, in
typed or handwritten form.

We would also like material for our "Family Album" department: family
pictures, group pictures, etc., with some explanation of who or what
is presented. Again, the material must be relevant to Galicia. All
photographs must be in electronic format and be submitted as an email
attachment.

Before submitting material, please get in touch with me so that we
can discuss the scope of the material, space required, etc.

You need not be a member of Gesher Galicia in order to submit material.

All submissions should be in my hands before 15 April.

Looking forward to hearing >from you!

Edward Goldstein
Editor, The Galitzianer


Kossowers of Tarnopol? #poland

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Further to my message yesterday:

Marilyn COSSEVER asks about the family name KOSSOWER and comments that she
has been unable to discover anything about her great-grandmother CHAVA
"CHACELOW" KOSSOWER, born circa 1868.

I am surprised that she could find no possible references to her gt
grandmother - of course I do not know if this is the right person but if she
searches the JRI-Poland data base under Galicia she will find a Chaja KOZOWER
with a husband Hersz BIRNBAUM giving birth to a number of children in the
town of Dubowce, Tarnopol - then in the Ukraine. I have not checked any of
the other regions.

Paulina 1892 - Dubowce father Hersz Leib BIRNBAUM mother Chaja KOZOWER
Maurycy 1894 - Dubowce father Hersz Leib BIRNBAUM mother Chaja KOZOWER
Juliusz 1895 - Jagielnica / Dubowce father Hersz BIRNBAUM mother Chaja
KOZOWER
Amalia 1901 - Dubowce father Hersch BIRNBAUM mother Chaja KOZOWER

If Marilyn is not sure of the birth date and has perhaps misinterpreted her
first name then these are possible candidates for the birth of her gt
grandmother :

Gittel 1866 father Jakob Meschyl BROCH mother Ruchyl KOSSOWER
Sura Rifka 1869 father Jakob Meschyl BRACH mother Ruchyl KASSOWER

The child might have taken the mother's family name which was quite common.
On the JRI-Poland database she will find many spelling variants of the name
KOSSOWER.


Celia MALE [UK]


JRI Poland #Poland Kossowers of Tarnopol? #poland

Celia Male <celiamale@...>
 

Further to my message yesterday:

Marilyn COSSEVER asks about the family name KOSSOWER and comments that she
has been unable to discover anything about her great-grandmother CHAVA
"CHACELOW" KOSSOWER, born circa 1868.

I am surprised that she could find no possible references to her gt
grandmother - of course I do not know if this is the right person but if she
searches the JRI-Poland data base under Galicia she will find a Chaja KOZOWER
with a husband Hersz BIRNBAUM giving birth to a number of children in the
town of Dubowce, Tarnopol - then in the Ukraine. I have not checked any of
the other regions.

Paulina 1892 - Dubowce father Hersz Leib BIRNBAUM mother Chaja KOZOWER
Maurycy 1894 - Dubowce father Hersz Leib BIRNBAUM mother Chaja KOZOWER
Juliusz 1895 - Jagielnica / Dubowce father Hersz BIRNBAUM mother Chaja
KOZOWER
Amalia 1901 - Dubowce father Hersch BIRNBAUM mother Chaja KOZOWER

If Marilyn is not sure of the birth date and has perhaps misinterpreted her
first name then these are possible candidates for the birth of her gt
grandmother :

Gittel 1866 father Jakob Meschyl BROCH mother Ruchyl KOSSOWER
Sura Rifka 1869 father Jakob Meschyl BRACH mother Ruchyl KASSOWER

The child might have taken the mother's family name which was quite common.
On the JRI-Poland database she will find many spelling variants of the name
KOSSOWER.


Celia MALE [UK]


Bedzin #poland

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@...>
 

I have heard an exciting story regarding my grandfather's first cousin:

"Izrael Salomon Wajshaus, born in Plawno in 1850, played trumpet in the
Russian Army and fought in the Russo-Turkish War in the 1870s. He saved
the life of a Russian general and was then promoted to the rank of corporal.
In 1905, he put on his corporal's uniform and stopped the Cossack attack on
the Jews of Bedzin in 1905."

Surely it will be difficult to document all of this! But what about the
1905 "Cossack attack on the Jews of Bedzin"? Can anyone at least confirm
that this event actually took place?


Daniel Kazez <dkazez@wittenberg.edu>
Professor of Music / Wittenberg University / Springfield, Ohio USA

Poland: TALMAN, ENGLANDER, JURKIEWICZ, STRAUSBERG, KIFER, BRODA, SZEWCZYK,
LEWKOWICZ, SZPALTYN, OFMAN, ZYLBERBERG, KRZEPICKI, LUKS, MOSZKOWICZ, STROZ,
SZWIMER, GUTMAN, PESACH, FEYNER/FEINER/FAYNER, BORZYKOWSKI, SZEWCZYK,
SZWARCBERG, HILLER, FEDERMAN, WAJSHAUS, WAJSBERG, GELBART, FINGERHUT, PLOTEK
http://www.kazez.com/~dan/talman/


JRI Poland #Poland Bedzin #poland

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@...>
 

I have heard an exciting story regarding my grandfather's first cousin:

"Izrael Salomon Wajshaus, born in Plawno in 1850, played trumpet in the
Russian Army and fought in the Russo-Turkish War in the 1870s. He saved
the life of a Russian general and was then promoted to the rank of corporal.
In 1905, he put on his corporal's uniform and stopped the Cossack attack on
the Jews of Bedzin in 1905."

Surely it will be difficult to document all of this! But what about the
1905 "Cossack attack on the Jews of Bedzin"? Can anyone at least confirm
that this event actually took place?


Daniel Kazez <dkazez@wittenberg.edu>
Professor of Music / Wittenberg University / Springfield, Ohio USA

Poland: TALMAN, ENGLANDER, JURKIEWICZ, STRAUSBERG, KIFER, BRODA, SZEWCZYK,
LEWKOWICZ, SZPALTYN, OFMAN, ZYLBERBERG, KRZEPICKI, LUKS, MOSZKOWICZ, STROZ,
SZWIMER, GUTMAN, PESACH, FEYNER/FEINER/FAYNER, BORZYKOWSKI, SZEWCZYK,
SZWARCBERG, HILLER, FEDERMAN, WAJSHAUS, WAJSBERG, GELBART, FINGERHUT, PLOTEK
http://www.kazez.com/~dan/talman/


Hungarian Jewish Communities URL #hungary

Gábor Hirsch <hirsch@...>
 

I am sorry if it caused any inconvenience, friday I was able to use the
URL, Sunday it didn't work and today the Uj Elet informs, that the new
address of the Jewish communities is http://www.mazsihisz.com even the
two latest issue of the "Uj Elet" can be found under ujsagok. It is easy
to confuse it wit hhttp://www.mazsihisz.hu, which belongs to the Makkabi
publisher. I checked it and it works. God luck.

Best regards
Gabor Hirsch


Hungary SIG #Hungary Hungarian Jewish Communities URL #hungary

Gábor Hirsch <hirsch@...>
 

I am sorry if it caused any inconvenience, friday I was able to use the
URL, Sunday it didn't work and today the Uj Elet informs, that the new
address of the Jewish communities is http://www.mazsihisz.com even the
two latest issue of the "Uj Elet" can be found under ujsagok. It is easy
to confuse it wit hhttp://www.mazsihisz.hu, which belongs to the Makkabi
publisher. I checked it and it works. God luck.

Best regards
Gabor Hirsch


Jacob=Karoly #hungary

Bernard Weill
 

Dear Researchers,

Perhaps I am not understanding some basic theories in
genealogy and therefore, someone can assist me.

Every now and then, there seems to be lots of
discussion as to whether a given Hebrew name is
"equal" to that of a secular name. IS this serious
research upon which to base one's family roots. Is it
stated somewhere that Jacob must equal Yaakov?

After all, one can attach any secular name they want
to any Hebrew name or vice versa. I never quite
understand the importance given to Hebrew names being
"equal" to a secular name. Please enlighten me. Thank
you.

Bernard ("Bezalel") Weill
Brooklyn, New York
(my parents could have named me Barry, Bob, Bill, etc.)

Moderator VK: When researching individuals who came to English-speaking countries >from Hungary it it helpful to know what names they were likely to have assumed in their new homes. Although these equivalents are often accurate, they are by no means the only names that immigrants may have selected. I was interested to learn, for example, about the frequency of Gisela/Katie occurences, despite the fact that there appears to be little if any onomastic basis for this pairing.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Jacob=Karoly #hungary

Bernard Weill
 

Dear Researchers,

Perhaps I am not understanding some basic theories in
genealogy and therefore, someone can assist me.

Every now and then, there seems to be lots of
discussion as to whether a given Hebrew name is
"equal" to that of a secular name. IS this serious
research upon which to base one's family roots. Is it
stated somewhere that Jacob must equal Yaakov?

After all, one can attach any secular name they want
to any Hebrew name or vice versa. I never quite
understand the importance given to Hebrew names being
"equal" to a secular name. Please enlighten me. Thank
you.

Bernard ("Bezalel") Weill
Brooklyn, New York
(my parents could have named me Barry, Bob, Bill, etc.)

Moderator VK: When researching individuals who came to English-speaking countries >from Hungary it it helpful to know what names they were likely to have assumed in their new homes. Although these equivalents are often accurate, they are by no means the only names that immigrants may have selected. I was interested to learn, for example, about the frequency of Gisela/Katie occurences, despite the fact that there appears to be little if any onomastic basis for this pairing.


Equivalent of JANOS in English? #hungary

Susanna Vendel <svendel@...>
 

What could be equivalents en English for the first name JANOS for a person who
lived in US between 1920-1953?

Susanna Vendel,
Stockholm, Sweden

Moderator VK: John is the only equivalent that I know of.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Equivalent of JANOS in English? #hungary

Susanna Vendel <svendel@...>
 

What could be equivalents en English for the first name JANOS for a person who
lived in US between 1920-1953?

Susanna Vendel,
Stockholm, Sweden

Moderator VK: John is the only equivalent that I know of.


Re: MOR-first name or title? #hungary

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

Avraham Ofek posted as follows:

"I've come across names like MOR WINTNER, MOR LEFKOVIC and others only in
Slovakia.
So what is it? Only a name or a title meaning teacher like in +ACI-Mori
veRabi+ACI-
or the Yemenite +ACI-Mori+ACI-"


MOR is a Hungarian secular given name (not a nickname) used also by Jews in
Hungary during the 19th century and earlier. It corresponds to the German
secular names MORIC and MORITZ also used by Jews in Germany as well as in
Poland and Hungary. German secular names became very popular in several
Eastern European countries during the 19th century, after they were adopted
by German Jews who actively sought integration into German society during
the latter part of the Enlightenment. These names correspond to the names
Morris and Maurice that were used in English-speaking countries.

It was common among Jews to adopt secular names which began with the same
consonant sound as the man's Hebrew or Yiddish name, as well as for other
reasons. Some secular names became so closely associated with a particular
Hebrew name that the rabbis noted this in their law books about
divorces. For example, the German secular name Markus was closely
associated with the Hebrew name Mordekhai in Hungary; in this case, they
would be written as follows in a Get (Jewish divorce contract): Mordekhai
haMechune Markus (all in Hebrew characters). "hamechune" means the same as
"also known as" or "alias".

The three secular names MOR, MORIC, and MORITZ were authorized by the
rabbis to be written in a Get in Hebrew characters, if it was known that a
Jewish man had one or more of these names in addition to his Hebrew and
Yiddish names. And this applied not only to "favorite" Hebrew names but to
_any_ Hebrew name which had been given to the man who had an accepted
German or Hungarian secular name. So, for example, the German secular
name ABRAHAM was commonly adopted by Jews who had the Hebrew name
"AVRAHAM", but was also adopted by men who had other Hebrew names like
Moshe, Mordekhai, Shlomo, etc.

Shavu'a tov,

Jerry
---
Prof. G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: MOR-first name or title? #hungary

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

Avraham Ofek posted as follows:

"I've come across names like MOR WINTNER, MOR LEFKOVIC and others only in
Slovakia.
So what is it? Only a name or a title meaning teacher like in +ACI-Mori
veRabi+ACI-
or the Yemenite +ACI-Mori+ACI-"


MOR is a Hungarian secular given name (not a nickname) used also by Jews in
Hungary during the 19th century and earlier. It corresponds to the German
secular names MORIC and MORITZ also used by Jews in Germany as well as in
Poland and Hungary. German secular names became very popular in several
Eastern European countries during the 19th century, after they were adopted
by German Jews who actively sought integration into German society during
the latter part of the Enlightenment. These names correspond to the names
Morris and Maurice that were used in English-speaking countries.

It was common among Jews to adopt secular names which began with the same
consonant sound as the man's Hebrew or Yiddish name, as well as for other
reasons. Some secular names became so closely associated with a particular
Hebrew name that the rabbis noted this in their law books about
divorces. For example, the German secular name Markus was closely
associated with the Hebrew name Mordekhai in Hungary; in this case, they
would be written as follows in a Get (Jewish divorce contract): Mordekhai
haMechune Markus (all in Hebrew characters). "hamechune" means the same as
"also known as" or "alias".

The three secular names MOR, MORIC, and MORITZ were authorized by the
rabbis to be written in a Get in Hebrew characters, if it was known that a
Jewish man had one or more of these names in addition to his Hebrew and
Yiddish names. And this applied not only to "favorite" Hebrew names but to
_any_ Hebrew name which had been given to the man who had an accepted
German or Hungarian secular name. So, for example, the German secular
name ABRAHAM was commonly adopted by Jews who had the Hebrew name
"AVRAHAM", but was also adopted by men who had other Hebrew names like
Moshe, Mordekhai, Shlomo, etc.

Shavu'a tov,

Jerry
---
Prof. G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel


Re: MOR-first name or title? #hungary

tom klein <h-sig@...>
 

it may also be a nickname for moritz, if used as a secular (hungarian) name.

its use as a title would only make sense in hebrew, such as on a gravestone, etc., in which case you would expect one or two apostrophes between the mem and the vav.

the context (such as a scan of the document it appeared in) would be helpful, as always.


....... tom klein, toronto

Moderator VK: Everyone seems to agree that Mor can be a nickname for Moricz, Mordche, and related names. This thread is ended unless someone has new info that will be helpful to those researching Hungarian roots.


Avraham <avrofek@netvision.net.il> wrote:


I've come across names like MOR WINTNER, MOR LEFKOVIC and others only
in Slovakia. So what is it? Only a name or a title meaning teacher
like in +ACI-Mori veRabi+ACI- or the Yemenite +ACI-Mori+ACI- Can
anyone enlighten me? Avraham Ofek Netanya, Israel

Moderator VK: Mor is not an honorary title but rather a short version
of Mordechai or Mordche. My great-grandfather Markus MOSKOVITS, who
was probably born in Ungvar in about 1840 and lived in Szobrancz, was
known as Mordche and Mor. Mor seems to be a very common masculine
"nickname" in areas of Hungary now located in eastern Slovakia.


* Meaning of Mor #hungary

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

Actually Mor (with an acute accent on the 'o') is the Hungarian short
form of Moritz or Moricz or Moric (corresponding to the
English-French Maurice, derived >from the Latin name Mauritius). It is
sometimes - but not always - associated with the Hebrew given name
Mordechai.
Tom

At 00:00 -0600 21.02.04, H-SIG digest wrote:
Subject: MOR-first name or title?
From: Avraham <avrofek@netvision.net.il>
Date: Thu, 19 Feb 2004 02:08:32 +0200
X-Message-Number: 3

I've come across names like MOR WINTNER, MOR LEFKOVIC and others only in
Slovakia.
So what is it?

Moderator VK: Mor is not an honorary title but rather a short
version of Mordechai or Mordche.
--
-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-
Tom Venetianer <mailto:tom.vene@uol.com.br>
Sao Paulo - Brazil


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: MOR-first name or title? #hungary

tom klein <h-sig@...>
 

it may also be a nickname for moritz, if used as a secular (hungarian) name.

its use as a title would only make sense in hebrew, such as on a gravestone, etc., in which case you would expect one or two apostrophes between the mem and the vav.

the context (such as a scan of the document it appeared in) would be helpful, as always.


....... tom klein, toronto

Moderator VK: Everyone seems to agree that Mor can be a nickname for Moricz, Mordche, and related names. This thread is ended unless someone has new info that will be helpful to those researching Hungarian roots.


Avraham <avrofek@netvision.net.il> wrote:


I've come across names like MOR WINTNER, MOR LEFKOVIC and others only
in Slovakia. So what is it? Only a name or a title meaning teacher
like in +ACI-Mori veRabi+ACI- or the Yemenite +ACI-Mori+ACI- Can
anyone enlighten me? Avraham Ofek Netanya, Israel

Moderator VK: Mor is not an honorary title but rather a short version
of Mordechai or Mordche. My great-grandfather Markus MOSKOVITS, who
was probably born in Ungvar in about 1840 and lived in Szobrancz, was
known as Mordche and Mor. Mor seems to be a very common masculine
"nickname" in areas of Hungary now located in eastern Slovakia.


Hungary SIG #Hungary * Meaning of Mor #hungary

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

Actually Mor (with an acute accent on the 'o') is the Hungarian short
form of Moritz or Moricz or Moric (corresponding to the
English-French Maurice, derived >from the Latin name Mauritius). It is
sometimes - but not always - associated with the Hebrew given name
Mordechai.
Tom

At 00:00 -0600 21.02.04, H-SIG digest wrote:
Subject: MOR-first name or title?
From: Avraham <avrofek@netvision.net.il>
Date: Thu, 19 Feb 2004 02:08:32 +0200
X-Message-Number: 3

I've come across names like MOR WINTNER, MOR LEFKOVIC and others only in
Slovakia.
So what is it?

Moderator VK: Mor is not an honorary title but rather a short
version of Mordechai or Mordche.
--
-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-
Tom Venetianer <mailto:tom.vene@uol.com.br>
Sao Paulo - Brazil