Date   

Addendum: Jewish Memorial Hospital #general

ralph dannheisser
 

A followup to the note I just posted:

I'm still a bit handicapped by not knowing what the original questioner
wanted to know.

But, if the issue is (at least in part) the hospital's address, here's some
more guidance.

It occurs to me that a small synagogue, Congregation Ohav Sholaum, is
directly adjacent to the former hospital site, to the north. I checked the
address for that congregation on the net, and it's 4624 Broadway. That
means that the hospital, located at the intersection just southward,
probably would have been 4600. (Possibly someone at the synagogue would
have further information about the hospital; their phone number is shown as
212-567-0900.)

Enough!

Ralph Dannheisser
Silver Spring, MD.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Addendum: Jewish Memorial Hospital #general

ralph dannheisser
 

A followup to the note I just posted:

I'm still a bit handicapped by not knowing what the original questioner
wanted to know.

But, if the issue is (at least in part) the hospital's address, here's some
more guidance.

It occurs to me that a small synagogue, Congregation Ohav Sholaum, is
directly adjacent to the former hospital site, to the north. I checked the
address for that congregation on the net, and it's 4624 Broadway. That
means that the hospital, located at the intersection just southward,
probably would have been 4600. (Possibly someone at the synagogue would
have further information about the hospital; their phone number is shown as
212-567-0900.)

Enough!

Ralph Dannheisser
Silver Spring, MD.


Re: Jewish Memorial Hospital #general

ralph dannheisser
 

I'm afraid I missed the initial posting, so this message is based on Jane
Voge-Kohai's response, below:

Jewish Memorial Hospital was located at the intersection of Broadway and
196th St., not 193rd.

Of this I'm sure, since I grew up next door to the hospital, in a six story
apartment building at 609 W. 196th.

I can't be as precise as to the street address, as the main entrance was
angled toward the Broadway side, but it would have been approximately 4600
or 4700 Broadway. (The ambulance entrance was on the 196th St. side.)

FYI, the hospital opened in 1938 -- the same year that I did. As Jane
suggests, it has been replaced by a public elementary or middle school.

Ralph Dannheisser
Silver Spring, MD.

********************
Here is the text of Message 347260:

Date: Sat, 10 Jan 2004 14:14:31 +0200
From: Jane Vogel-Kohai & Ofer Kohai <vogelko@netvision.net.il>
Subject: Jewish Memorial Hospital

Jewish Memorial Hospital was located in upper Manahttan, on Broadway at
approximately 193rd St. (don't know the building number, but it was on
the east side of Broadway). It closed about 20 years ago, I don't know
of any merger. The building was torn down, there is a school there now,
I think.
Good luck -
Jane Vogel-Kohai
Jerusalem, Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re:Jewish Memorial Hospital #general

ralph dannheisser
 

I'm afraid I missed the initial posting, so this message is based on Jane
Voge-Kohai's response, below:

Jewish Memorial Hospital was located at the intersection of Broadway and
196th St., not 193rd.

Of this I'm sure, since I grew up next door to the hospital, in a six story
apartment building at 609 W. 196th.

I can't be as precise as to the street address, as the main entrance was
angled toward the Broadway side, but it would have been approximately 4600
or 4700 Broadway. (The ambulance entrance was on the 196th St. side.)

FYI, the hospital opened in 1938 -- the same year that I did. As Jane
suggests, it has been replaced by a public elementary or middle school.

Ralph Dannheisser
Silver Spring, MD.

********************
Here is the text of Message 347260:

Date: Sat, 10 Jan 2004 14:14:31 +0200
From: Jane Vogel-Kohai & Ofer Kohai <vogelko@netvision.net.il>
Subject: Jewish Memorial Hospital

Jewish Memorial Hospital was located in upper Manahttan, on Broadway at
approximately 193rd St. (don't know the building number, but it was on
the east side of Broadway). It closed about 20 years ago, I don't know
of any merger. The building was torn down, there is a school there now,
I think.
Good luck -
Jane Vogel-Kohai
Jerusalem, Israel


Re: A Mystery Found in London Synagogue Marriage Registers (JewishGen 1/10/2004) #general

Judith27
 

Could it be that this one couple -- Simon Henry and Harriet / Hannah
Saunders -- was married twice? They might have been married a first time when it
was thought the bride was unquestionably Jewish (i.e. as Yetta bat Dovid), and
a second time shortly thereafter, when the marriage -- or marriage ketuba --
was redone to indicate that she, Sarah bat Avraham Avinu, was a convert??
Converts are usually known as a child of Avraham Avinu, our father Abraham.
I hope this suggestion is of some help to you as you puzzle over those
mysterious entries that were discovered during the computerization of the
marriage registers of the Great Synagogue in London.
Shalom,
Judi Langer-Surnamer Caplan
Long Beach, NY

In a message dated 1/11/2004 1:40:23 AM Eastern Standard Time,
jewishgen@lyris.jewishgen.org writes:

<< Subject: A Mystery Found in London Synagogue Marriage Registers
From: "Harold Lewin" <harmir@bezeqint.net>
Date: Sat, 10 Jan 2004 21:43:49 +0200
X-Message-Number: 24

Can anyone suggest a solution to the following mysterious entries discovered
during computerization of the marriage registers of the Great Synagogue,
London?

The two sources were the photocopy of the marriage certificate found in
another microfilm and the synagogue register.

1. >from the certificate: On 4th February 1863, Simon Henry 21, son of Henry
Henry, was married to Harriet Saunders 19, daughter of David Saunders.

2. >from the register: On 4th February 1863, Simon Henry (patronymic in
Hebrew script: Shimon ben Zvi Hirsch) was married to Hannah Saunders
(patronymic in Hebrew script: Yetta bat Dovid).

3. >from a later entry in the register: On 7th May 1863, Simon Henry
(patronymic in Hebrew script: Shimon ben Zvi Hirsch) was married to Harriet
Saunders (patronymic in Hebrew script: Sarah bat Avraham Avinu).

Can anyone solve the mystery? Harold Lewin - Jerusalem >>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: A Mystery Found in London Synagogue Marriage Registers (JewishGen 1/10/2004) #general

Judith27
 

Could it be that this one couple -- Simon Henry and Harriet / Hannah
Saunders -- was married twice? They might have been married a first time when it
was thought the bride was unquestionably Jewish (i.e. as Yetta bat Dovid), and
a second time shortly thereafter, when the marriage -- or marriage ketuba --
was redone to indicate that she, Sarah bat Avraham Avinu, was a convert??
Converts are usually known as a child of Avraham Avinu, our father Abraham.
I hope this suggestion is of some help to you as you puzzle over those
mysterious entries that were discovered during the computerization of the
marriage registers of the Great Synagogue in London.
Shalom,
Judi Langer-Surnamer Caplan
Long Beach, NY

In a message dated 1/11/2004 1:40:23 AM Eastern Standard Time,
jewishgen@lyris.jewishgen.org writes:

<< Subject: A Mystery Found in London Synagogue Marriage Registers
From: "Harold Lewin" <harmir@bezeqint.net>
Date: Sat, 10 Jan 2004 21:43:49 +0200
X-Message-Number: 24

Can anyone suggest a solution to the following mysterious entries discovered
during computerization of the marriage registers of the Great Synagogue,
London?

The two sources were the photocopy of the marriage certificate found in
another microfilm and the synagogue register.

1. >from the certificate: On 4th February 1863, Simon Henry 21, son of Henry
Henry, was married to Harriet Saunders 19, daughter of David Saunders.

2. >from the register: On 4th February 1863, Simon Henry (patronymic in
Hebrew script: Shimon ben Zvi Hirsch) was married to Hannah Saunders
(patronymic in Hebrew script: Yetta bat Dovid).

3. >from a later entry in the register: On 7th May 1863, Simon Henry
(patronymic in Hebrew script: Shimon ben Zvi Hirsch) was married to Harriet
Saunders (patronymic in Hebrew script: Sarah bat Avraham Avinu).

Can anyone solve the mystery? Harold Lewin - Jerusalem >>


Death Certificate translation from Russian to English needed, please #general

BABYCAT3 <babycat3@...>
 

If anyone would like to attempt translation of this death certificate from
Russian to English for me, I would be greatful. The more details you can give
me >from it, the better, as I am hoping that I can connect this person to my
KAFLOWITZ family line.

Here is the site, please respond privately, and thank you for you assistance:

http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=3390

Barbara Meyers
NJ, USA
Researching KAFLOWITZ >from Bielsk, Bialystok areas thus far
babycat3@aol.com


A Mystery Found in London Synagogue Marriage Registers #general

Eddy Fraifeld <efraifeld@...>
 

I have a possible answer to your mystery.
I had a similar problem a few years ago that a David Lewin in London(Is he a
relative?)helped me solve.
It was not an uncommon practice in the 1800's for a sister to mary the widow
of her deceased sister.
If the "Certificate" was a document issued by the state and the "Register"
is the records >from the Synagogue I offer to you that Both men are the same
in the Register entries. That the 1st either died or...something happened
and that he then married a 2nd woman. Given the facts of the women's names
however, I'd say they were not sisters, Maybe they were cousins.

The certificate however lists the bride's father's name as "David" and
father's name as "Dovid". I think both women in the "Certificate" and the
"Register" with the February 4, 1863 date are the same person. Maybe it is
how the were called formally and informally.

Eddy Fraifeld
Danville, Virginia
efraifeld@mindspring.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Death Certificate translation from Russian to English needed, please #general

BABYCAT3 <babycat3@...>
 

If anyone would like to attempt translation of this death certificate from
Russian to English for me, I would be greatful. The more details you can give
me >from it, the better, as I am hoping that I can connect this person to my
KAFLOWITZ family line.

Here is the site, please respond privately, and thank you for you assistance:

http://data.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=3390

Barbara Meyers
NJ, USA
Researching KAFLOWITZ >from Bielsk, Bialystok areas thus far
babycat3@aol.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen A Mystery Found in London Synagogue Marriage Registers #general

Eddy Fraifeld <efraifeld@...>
 

I have a possible answer to your mystery.
I had a similar problem a few years ago that a David Lewin in London(Is he a
relative?)helped me solve.
It was not an uncommon practice in the 1800's for a sister to mary the widow
of her deceased sister.
If the "Certificate" was a document issued by the state and the "Register"
is the records >from the Synagogue I offer to you that Both men are the same
in the Register entries. That the 1st either died or...something happened
and that he then married a 2nd woman. Given the facts of the women's names
however, I'd say they were not sisters, Maybe they were cousins.

The certificate however lists the bride's father's name as "David" and
father's name as "Dovid". I think both women in the "Certificate" and the
"Register" with the February 4, 1863 date are the same person. Maybe it is
how the were called formally and informally.

Eddy Fraifeld
Danville, Virginia
efraifeld@mindspring.com


london synagogue names #general

haviva <havival@...>
 

Hi Genners,
Harold Lewin asks for help in solving a puzzle of three entries for a London
marriage for what seems to be the same couple. He writes:
"1. >from the certificate: On 4th February 1863, Simon Henry 21, son of Henry
Henry, was married to Harriet Saunders 19, daughter of David Saunders.

2. >from the register: On 4th February 1863, Simon Henry (patronymic in
Hebrew script: Shimon ben Zvi Hirsch) was married to Hannah Saunders
(patronymic in Hebrew script: Yetta bat Dovid).

3. >from a later entry in the register: On 7th May 1863, Simon Henry
(patronymic in Hebrew script: Shimon ben Zvi Hirsch) was married to Harriet
Saunders (patronymic in Hebrew script: Sarah bat Avraham Avinu)."

The names of the groom are the same in all three, he is Simon Henry. It is
the name of the bride that is a puzzle. In entries one and two, made on the
same day, the first entry shows their names in English, and the second entry
their names in Hebrew. I would guess that the name Hannah was Hebrew for
Harriet, a Yiddish name Yetta also existed, and her father's name was David.

Entry 3, some three months later, might be a correction. The name "Sarah
bat Avraham Avinu", translated as Sarah, the daughter of our father Abraham,
is a name often taken by a convert to Judaism. Someone might have realized
that Harriet Saunders was a convert, and that the Hebrew name listed on the
second entry, Hannah or Yetta bat David, was not appropriate. I doubt that
a conversion could have taken place in the three months between entries. It
might simply be that in entry two a logical name was assigned to her, and in
entry three it was corrected to reflect her conversion.

Haviva Dolgin Langenauer
Palm Beach, Florida


Re: Proper form of address & how to find towns and counties in the US #general

Dream Builder <dreambuilder@...>
 

Go to http://www.yahoo.com and scroll down the page to their "Web Site
Directory". Click on "US States" under "Regional". This takes you to a page
with a list of states. Click on the state that you are interested in and
scroll down and click on "Counties and Regions". This will take you to a
page that lists all the counties for that state. Clicking on a county will
take you to websites with more information about that county.

Vicki Ina Friedman
Ball Ground, GA, USA
dreambuilder@tds.net

Researching: BECK, CHORNEY, DUBIN(SKY), FRIEDMAN, LISANSKY, RECHMAN,
SK(O)LOFF, THURLIN / TURCHIN, ZEIDELMAN Russian Empire to USA 1870-1910

----- Original Message -----
From: "hanna" <hannakg@optonline.net>
To: "JewishGen Discussion Group" <jewishgen@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Friday, January 09, 2004 7:40 PM
Subject: Proper form of address & how to find towns and counties in the US

A posting on 1/8, regarding proper form of addresses, leads me to repeat
the question I have been unsuccessful in posting

Where to find US counties in which towns and cities are located. I have
found a site for Massachusetts which lists the counties and all their
towns (not alpha by town, unfortunately) but nothing comparable for any
other state. Any suggestions?

Hanna Grossman
Cornwall, CT


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen london synagogue names #general

haviva <havival@...>
 

Hi Genners,
Harold Lewin asks for help in solving a puzzle of three entries for a London
marriage for what seems to be the same couple. He writes:
"1. >from the certificate: On 4th February 1863, Simon Henry 21, son of Henry
Henry, was married to Harriet Saunders 19, daughter of David Saunders.

2. >from the register: On 4th February 1863, Simon Henry (patronymic in
Hebrew script: Shimon ben Zvi Hirsch) was married to Hannah Saunders
(patronymic in Hebrew script: Yetta bat Dovid).

3. >from a later entry in the register: On 7th May 1863, Simon Henry
(patronymic in Hebrew script: Shimon ben Zvi Hirsch) was married to Harriet
Saunders (patronymic in Hebrew script: Sarah bat Avraham Avinu)."

The names of the groom are the same in all three, he is Simon Henry. It is
the name of the bride that is a puzzle. In entries one and two, made on the
same day, the first entry shows their names in English, and the second entry
their names in Hebrew. I would guess that the name Hannah was Hebrew for
Harriet, a Yiddish name Yetta also existed, and her father's name was David.

Entry 3, some three months later, might be a correction. The name "Sarah
bat Avraham Avinu", translated as Sarah, the daughter of our father Abraham,
is a name often taken by a convert to Judaism. Someone might have realized
that Harriet Saunders was a convert, and that the Hebrew name listed on the
second entry, Hannah or Yetta bat David, was not appropriate. I doubt that
a conversion could have taken place in the three months between entries. It
might simply be that in entry two a logical name was assigned to her, and in
entry three it was corrected to reflect her conversion.

Haviva Dolgin Langenauer
Palm Beach, Florida


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Proper form of address & how to find towns and counties in the US #general

Dream Builder <dreambuilder@...>
 

Go to http://www.yahoo.com and scroll down the page to their "Web Site
Directory". Click on "US States" under "Regional". This takes you to a page
with a list of states. Click on the state that you are interested in and
scroll down and click on "Counties and Regions". This will take you to a
page that lists all the counties for that state. Clicking on a county will
take you to websites with more information about that county.

Vicki Ina Friedman
Ball Ground, GA, USA
dreambuilder@tds.net

Researching: BECK, CHORNEY, DUBIN(SKY), FRIEDMAN, LISANSKY, RECHMAN,
SK(O)LOFF, THURLIN / TURCHIN, ZEIDELMAN Russian Empire to USA 1870-1910

----- Original Message -----
From: "hanna" <hannakg@optonline.net>
To: "JewishGen Discussion Group" <jewishgen@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Friday, January 09, 2004 7:40 PM
Subject: Proper form of address & how to find towns and counties in the US

A posting on 1/8, regarding proper form of addresses, leads me to repeat
the question I have been unsuccessful in posting

Where to find US counties in which towns and cities are located. I have
found a site for Massachusetts which lists the counties and all their
towns (not alpha by town, unfortunately) but nothing comparable for any
other state. Any suggestions?

Hanna Grossman
Cornwall, CT


RUDINER of Pinsk [was: SCHATZKES and YOFFE families] #rabbinic

Association GenAmi <asso.genami@...>
 

On 2003.01.10, Yoni Ben-Ari <yrcdi@netvision.net.il> wrote:

My great great uncle, Chaim Dov KANTOR, of the Moshav Meir Shfeya
in Israel, born in Pinsk (or Karlin), writes in his diary of a
rabbinical figure in his family (probably during the first half
of the 19th cent. in Pinsk or Karlin) named Mordechai (RUDINER
or RUZINER), possibly being an AB"D there.
I am very interested because this rabbi or his father could be the
one I heard of in my family.

My grand mother was born in Pinsk-Karlin about 1877. She was the
daughter of Mosche (son of Peisach) VISSOTSKY (1836-1917) who
married Dobruska BREGMAN and then her sister Leie. whose first
husband was a Moshe "der Radivine"(?) JASELMAN probably a famous
rabbi or son of a rabbi there, because the descendants are very
proud of him. But the former generation disappeared, nobody wrote
anything and we cannot know more. Moshe probably died before 1883.
I know only one son, Morduck (Mordechai) JASELMAN, my cousins'
ancestor (1859 Pinsk - 1949 Paris-Sartrouville).

Micheline Gutmann, Paris, France
mailto:asso.genami@free.fr
http://asso.genami.free.fr


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic RUDINER of Pinsk [was: SCHATZKES and YOFFE families] #rabbinic

Association GenAmi <asso.genami@...>
 

On 2003.01.10, Yoni Ben-Ari <yrcdi@netvision.net.il> wrote:

My great great uncle, Chaim Dov KANTOR, of the Moshav Meir Shfeya
in Israel, born in Pinsk (or Karlin), writes in his diary of a
rabbinical figure in his family (probably during the first half
of the 19th cent. in Pinsk or Karlin) named Mordechai (RUDINER
or RUZINER), possibly being an AB"D there.
I am very interested because this rabbi or his father could be the
one I heard of in my family.

My grand mother was born in Pinsk-Karlin about 1877. She was the
daughter of Mosche (son of Peisach) VISSOTSKY (1836-1917) who
married Dobruska BREGMAN and then her sister Leie. whose first
husband was a Moshe "der Radivine"(?) JASELMAN probably a famous
rabbi or son of a rabbi there, because the descendants are very
proud of him. But the former generation disappeared, nobody wrote
anything and we cannot know more. Moshe probably died before 1883.
I know only one son, Morduck (Mordechai) JASELMAN, my cousins'
ancestor (1859 Pinsk - 1949 Paris-Sartrouville).

Micheline Gutmann, Paris, France
mailto:asso.genami@free.fr
http://asso.genami.free.fr


NY Municipal Archives, new user Q #general

Peter&Karen <sicesp@...>
 

I recently tried for the first time to request a birth and a death cert.
from the NY Municipal Archives site. As you know, you pay the same fee
whether they find the requested document, or just send you a "not found"
notice.

Two days after posting my request, I received two "not found"s. Of course
that is frustrating but would have been a little less so had a couple of
weeks passed before the reply.

I am interested in the experience others have had getting records >from the
archives. I wonder if there might be circumstances in which a record might
be called "not found" although it may be in the archive. Thanks,

Peter Sices, sicesp@michianaweb.com

SICES; T,IZES (Bucharest); EDELMAN (Nagy-varad); BRAUN and SCHOEN (Hungary)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen NY Municipal Archives, new user Q #general

Peter&Karen <sicesp@...>
 

I recently tried for the first time to request a birth and a death cert.
from the NY Municipal Archives site. As you know, you pay the same fee
whether they find the requested document, or just send you a "not found"
notice.

Two days after posting my request, I received two "not found"s. Of course
that is frustrating but would have been a little less so had a couple of
weeks passed before the reply.

I am interested in the experience others have had getting records >from the
archives. I wonder if there might be circumstances in which a record might
be called "not found" although it may be in the archive. Thanks,

Peter Sices, sicesp@michianaweb.com

SICES; T,IZES (Bucharest); EDELMAN (Nagy-varad); BRAUN and SCHOEN (Hungary)


Re: jewishgen digest: January 10, 2004 #general

Nathan Reiss <nreiss@...>
 

Stephen Esrati writes:

I went to college with Louise G and asked her to marry me.
That was 50 years ago. She said no.
It was fortunate.
I have just learned >from a cousin in Israel that Louise G
belongs in my family through a link to Henriette G.
I immediately called Louise. She said she had a lot of
relatives named Henriette.
Actually, it's unfortunate! Contrary to popular belief, there's
no Jewish restriction on marriages between cousins, not even
between first cousins. The Shulchan Aruch (Code of Jewish Law)
doesn't actually mention cousin marriages, but it does indicate
that it's a mitzvah for a man to marry his sister's daughter or
his brother's daughter. I hasten to add that marrying your cousin
would, however, be a problem under Jewish law if the cousin were
also related to you in some way that violated the prohibited
unions listed in Leviticus (Vayikra) XVIII:6 et seq.

Cousin marriages are not too much of a problem genetically
either, unless it happens very frequently. While siblings have
1/4 of their genetic material in common, for first cousins it's
only 1/16, for second cousins it's 1/64, etc.

Nathan Reiss
Highland Park, NJ
reiss@rci.rutgers.edu

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately if you wish to talk about
Jewish law in further depth.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: jewishgen digest: January 10, 2004 #general

Nathan Reiss <nreiss@...>
 

Stephen Esrati writes:

I went to college with Louise G and asked her to marry me.
That was 50 years ago. She said no.
It was fortunate.
I have just learned >from a cousin in Israel that Louise G
belongs in my family through a link to Henriette G.
I immediately called Louise. She said she had a lot of
relatives named Henriette.
Actually, it's unfortunate! Contrary to popular belief, there's
no Jewish restriction on marriages between cousins, not even
between first cousins. The Shulchan Aruch (Code of Jewish Law)
doesn't actually mention cousin marriages, but it does indicate
that it's a mitzvah for a man to marry his sister's daughter or
his brother's daughter. I hasten to add that marrying your cousin
would, however, be a problem under Jewish law if the cousin were
also related to you in some way that violated the prohibited
unions listed in Leviticus (Vayikra) XVIII:6 et seq.

Cousin marriages are not too much of a problem genetically
either, unless it happens very frequently. While siblings have
1/4 of their genetic material in common, for first cousins it's
only 1/16, for second cousins it's 1/64, etc.

Nathan Reiss
Highland Park, NJ
reiss@rci.rutgers.edu

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately if you wish to talk about
Jewish law in further depth.