Date   

Nizhniye Veretski, CZ #general

Vivian Kahn
 

Czechoslovakia didn't exist until after WWI. I think that you're
looking for Alsovereczke (accent on the o), Hungary, which is what this
place was called in 1912 when your grandmother was born.
Alsovereczke was in Bereg megye. According to a presentation that Alex
Dunai made at the conference in Washington, the Ukranian name of the
place formerly called Nizni verecky is now Nyzhni vorota. Any records
that exist are probably in the archives in Uzhgorod, which has been a
very difficult place to access.

Vivian Kahn, H-SIG Coordinator

Subject: Searching for fate of family >from Nizhniye Veretski, CZ
From: "Felicia P. Zieff" <tzippy_chs@msn.com>
Date: Mon, 01 Dec 2003 05:27:55 -0600
X-Message-Number: 4

My grandmother, RECHTER, Debora was born in Nizhnye Veretzki,
Czechoslovakia in 1912. Her parents were RECHTER, Jozef and
FISCHER, Rosa. I have been looking for many years for any
information about what happened to her parents and siblings
who were in this town when the Nazis invaded. The Nazis
deported the residents of this town to a death camp in 1944,
but I don't know which one. Before the war, this town was part
of Czechoslovakia, during the war it became part of Hungary,
currently it is in the Ukraine.

What I am specifically looking for are Transport Lists or
other documents that have my great-grandparents and their adult
children's names on them. If these do not exist, then any
documents that state the deportation date and destination of the
residents of this town. I know this is not an easy request.
Any help this group can provide would be most appreciated.
Below is all the information I know about this town.

Felicia P. Zieff
Chicago, IL, USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Nizhniye Veretski, CZ #general

Vivian Kahn
 

Czechoslovakia didn't exist until after WWI. I think that you're
looking for Alsovereczke (accent on the o), Hungary, which is what this
place was called in 1912 when your grandmother was born.
Alsovereczke was in Bereg megye. According to a presentation that Alex
Dunai made at the conference in Washington, the Ukranian name of the
place formerly called Nizni verecky is now Nyzhni vorota. Any records
that exist are probably in the archives in Uzhgorod, which has been a
very difficult place to access.

Vivian Kahn, H-SIG Coordinator

Subject: Searching for fate of family >from Nizhniye Veretski, CZ
From: "Felicia P. Zieff" <tzippy_chs@msn.com>
Date: Mon, 01 Dec 2003 05:27:55 -0600
X-Message-Number: 4

My grandmother, RECHTER, Debora was born in Nizhnye Veretzki,
Czechoslovakia in 1912. Her parents were RECHTER, Jozef and
FISCHER, Rosa. I have been looking for many years for any
information about what happened to her parents and siblings
who were in this town when the Nazis invaded. The Nazis
deported the residents of this town to a death camp in 1944,
but I don't know which one. Before the war, this town was part
of Czechoslovakia, during the war it became part of Hungary,
currently it is in the Ukraine.

What I am specifically looking for are Transport Lists or
other documents that have my great-grandparents and their adult
children's names on them. If these do not exist, then any
documents that state the deportation date and destination of the
residents of this town. I know this is not an easy request.
Any help this group can provide would be most appreciated.
Below is all the information I know about this town.

Felicia P. Zieff
Chicago, IL, USA


Program re Jewish genetics #general

Naidia Woolf <rnwoolf@...>
 

Dear Group,

I'm posting the following notice on behalf of my synagogue in San Francisco
-- a wonderful little, haimische conservative shul in San Francisco founded
by German/Jewish who were confined to the Shanghai ghetto during WWII
(about which I wrote an article which appeared in Shemot, the JGSGB's
quarterly). As noted below, Dr. Neil Risch (a long-term and highly
respected member of my shul) will be discussing the genetics of Jewish
populations & related genetic diseases, among other issues relevant and of
great potential interest to those interested in the evolution of Jewish
populations, including social & medical issues such as those surrounding
human genetics.

I have no financial interest in Dr. Risch's research, nor in the program
being presented at my synagogue.

Dr. Neil Risch, Professor of Genetics at Stanford University School of
Medicine, will speak on the topic:
A Human Genetic Perspective on Jewish History

Sunday, January 25, 2004 >from 2:00 to 4:00 p.m. (free)
at Congregation B’nai Emunah, 3595 Taraval St. @46th Ave., San Francisco.

Dr. Risch is world renowned for his work in human genetics and his work has
been featured in the New York Times and numerous research publications over
the last two years. He is also an adjunct investigator at the Division of
Research, Kaiser Permanente, Oakland, CA. His particular interest is in
the genetics of Jewish populations and Jewish genetic diseases, which will
be the focus of his talk. After providing some background information on
human genetics, Dr. Risch will explain in layperson’s terms the presence
and reasons for genetic diseases observed in the Jewish population, the
origins of the Ashkenazi Jews, and other related issues.

Naidia Woolf
Former >from Birmingham, England
Now living in San Francisco, CA

Researching:

DROZDIAS (or variants), Karczew, Poland, Preston, England
RAUS (or variants), Karczew, Poland
SAFIRSTEIN (or variants), Karczew, Poland, Preston, England
KUJAWSKI (or variants), Lodz, Poland, Birmingham, England
ISAACS (family of Solomon and Sarah), Poland, town near Warsaw, Birmingham,
England
SHORN (family of Morris and Yetta), Poland?, London, England


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Program re Jewish genetics #general

Naidia Woolf <rnwoolf@...>
 

Dear Group,

I'm posting the following notice on behalf of my synagogue in San Francisco
-- a wonderful little, haimische conservative shul in San Francisco founded
by German/Jewish who were confined to the Shanghai ghetto during WWII
(about which I wrote an article which appeared in Shemot, the JGSGB's
quarterly). As noted below, Dr. Neil Risch (a long-term and highly
respected member of my shul) will be discussing the genetics of Jewish
populations & related genetic diseases, among other issues relevant and of
great potential interest to those interested in the evolution of Jewish
populations, including social & medical issues such as those surrounding
human genetics.

I have no financial interest in Dr. Risch's research, nor in the program
being presented at my synagogue.

Dr. Neil Risch, Professor of Genetics at Stanford University School of
Medicine, will speak on the topic:
A Human Genetic Perspective on Jewish History

Sunday, January 25, 2004 >from 2:00 to 4:00 p.m. (free)
at Congregation B’nai Emunah, 3595 Taraval St. @46th Ave., San Francisco.

Dr. Risch is world renowned for his work in human genetics and his work has
been featured in the New York Times and numerous research publications over
the last two years. He is also an adjunct investigator at the Division of
Research, Kaiser Permanente, Oakland, CA. His particular interest is in
the genetics of Jewish populations and Jewish genetic diseases, which will
be the focus of his talk. After providing some background information on
human genetics, Dr. Risch will explain in layperson’s terms the presence
and reasons for genetic diseases observed in the Jewish population, the
origins of the Ashkenazi Jews, and other related issues.

Naidia Woolf
Former >from Birmingham, England
Now living in San Francisco, CA

Researching:

DROZDIAS (or variants), Karczew, Poland, Preston, England
RAUS (or variants), Karczew, Poland
SAFIRSTEIN (or variants), Karczew, Poland, Preston, England
KUJAWSKI (or variants), Lodz, Poland, Birmingham, England
ISAACS (family of Solomon and Sarah), Poland, town near Warsaw, Birmingham,
England
SHORN (family of Morris and Yetta), Poland?, London, England


Re: Hungarian-Czech war #hungary

mirda <mirda@...>
 

The answer probably lies in the war against the communist regime which was raised with the
leadership of Bela Kun, at the end of the WWI in 1919 and lasted for less, than a year. The
Hungarian "Kommun" was defeated by the forces of the neighboring countries, including Romania and
Czehoslovakia.
Miryam & David Gordon
Rehovot, Israel

----- Original Message -----
From: Israel P <isai8v10@actcom.co.il>
To: H-SIG <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: 30 ðåáîáø 2003 18:04
Subject: [h-sig] Hungarian-Czech war


: The following came in >from a new-found Baum cousin in the US, writing
: about his father. The father was born 1898 in in Vidrany (near Medzilaborce) and
: went to the US in 1922, having always lived in the town of his birth.
:
: "He was conscripted into the Hungarian army during a border
: war with Czechosolvakia---served a short period of time and, shortly
: afterward, came to the United States..."
:
: Does anyone know what war he is talking about? In WWI, the Czechs and the
: Hungarians were on the same side. And in any case, no one ever called WWI "a
: border war." Did they fight after WWI? If so, why would someone >from near
: Medzilaborce been on the Hungarian side?
:
: Israel Pickholtz


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Hungarian-Czech war #hungary

mirda <mirda@...>
 

The answer probably lies in the war against the communist regime which was raised with the
leadership of Bela Kun, at the end of the WWI in 1919 and lasted for less, than a year. The
Hungarian "Kommun" was defeated by the forces of the neighboring countries, including Romania and
Czehoslovakia.
Miryam & David Gordon
Rehovot, Israel

----- Original Message -----
From: Israel P <isai8v10@actcom.co.il>
To: H-SIG <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: 30 ðåáîáø 2003 18:04
Subject: [h-sig] Hungarian-Czech war


: The following came in >from a new-found Baum cousin in the US, writing
: about his father. The father was born 1898 in in Vidrany (near Medzilaborce) and
: went to the US in 1922, having always lived in the town of his birth.
:
: "He was conscripted into the Hungarian army during a border
: war with Czechosolvakia---served a short period of time and, shortly
: afterward, came to the United States..."
:
: Does anyone know what war he is talking about? In WWI, the Czechs and the
: Hungarians were on the same side. And in any case, no one ever called WWI "a
: border war." Did they fight after WWI? If so, why would someone >from near
: Medzilaborce been on the Hungarian side?
:
: Israel Pickholtz


November 2003 report for Yizkor Book Project #hungary

Joyce Field
 

November 2003 was another productive month for the Yizkor Book
Project. We put online 19 updates, 5 new entries, and 2 new books.
All translations are listed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. You can check
whether there is a yizkor book for a particular town at the Yizkor
Book Database, http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/database.html.
Necrologies >from translated yizkor books can be searched at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/yizkor/.

New books:

-Kralovsky Chlmec, Slovakia
-Wyszkow, Poland

New entries:

-Bukowina, Geschichte der Juden in der Bukowina
-History of Heatid in Czernowitz
-History of Heatid in Israel
-Pinkas HaKehillot, Poland
-Jezupol (Zhovten), Ukraine, volume 2
-Ratno, Ukraine, volume 5
-Pinkas HaKehillot, Romania
-Birlad, Romania, volume 1

Updates:

-Bobruisk, Belarus
-Chelm, Poland
-Ciechanowiec, Poland
-Czestochowa, Poland
-Dusetos, Lithuania
-Gorodenka, Ukraine
-Janow, Belarus
-Krynki, Poland
-Lida, Belarus
-Losice, Poland
-Rokiskis, Lithuania
-Sokolka, Poland
-Sokoly, Poland
-Sosnowiec, Poland
-Tarnobrzeg, Poland
-Volozhin, Belarus
-Wysokie-Mazowieckie, Poland
-Zaglembia, Poland
-Zgierz, Poland

There are many books yet to be translated, waiting only for an eager
volunteer to step up to coordinate the translation project. Our
Yizkor Book Project staff is available to help you through the
process. Please contact me if you are willing and able to coordinate
a translation project. Or, if you have Hebrew or Yiddish translation
skills, you might want to start by volunteering to translate a
chapter >from the Pinkas HaKehillot on your ancestral town. We also
need a person with librarian experience to help us coordinate the
Yizkor Book Library Infofile at
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/yizlibs.html. Please contact me
privately if you can help in any way.

Many of our projects are fundraising projects. You can help by
contributing money to pay to have these books professionally
translated. The current fundraising projects are listed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/YizkorTrans.html.

We wish to take this opportunity to thank the wonderful volunteers
who donate their time to coordinate projects, to translate, and to
staff the Yizkor Book Project, and to wish all of you a Happy New
Year.

Joyce Field
jfield@jewishgen.org
Yizkor Book Project Manager
JewishGen, VP, Research


Re: Patroha #hungary

Doug Cohen
 

Accordingto WOWW, Patroha, Hung, Jewish population before WWII = 141; 91km E of Miskolc; 48o10'/22o00'.

Doug Cohen
Lexington, MA
DMC@dmcohen.com

----- Original Message -----
From: "Katz, Itzik" <Itzik.Katz@kla-tencor.com>
To: "H-SIG" <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Friday, November 28, 2003 4:53 AM
Subject: [h-sig] Patroha


Hell H-SIGers,
One of my relatives, Sandor Katz born1897, is mentioned in Joszef Buscko
book "The Jews of Ujfeherto" as having a big farm in Patroha "Katz
Sandor -
farmer in Patroha. B.Ujfeherto, 1897, old landowner family. Had 100 hold
farm since 1928, m. Gluck Helen, ch. Maria, Zsuzsanna." (translated from
Hungarian).
Does anyone know where Patroha is?
Does anyone know why Buscko stated "old landowner family" in his book?
Better, though, does anyone know anything about this "old landowner"
family?
Thank you
Itzik Katz
Resarching:
*Katz-Ujfeherto, Mihalifalva (Transilvania, Romania)
*Goldstein-Ujfeherto (Hungary)
Fogel-Ujfeherto (Hungary)
Wizner-Ujfeherto and Buj (Hungary)
*Schwartz-Nyiracsad (Hungary)
Berger-any (Hungary)
*Kupferstein-Ujfeherto (Hungary)
Gyamant-Ujfhererto and Ujvaros (Hungary)
Kovacs-Nyiracsad (Hungary)
Galos-Nyiracsad and Nyiregyhaza (Hungary)
Klein-Ujfeherto (Hungary)
Grunfeld-Ujfeherto (Hungary)
Feldman-Mihalifalva (Transilvania, Romania) and Jerusalem (Israel)
Roth-Mihalyfalva (Transilvania, Romania) and Israel
Weiszhausz-Bogati (Hungary)


I already have information about the families marked with (*) and looking
for information about the others. I'd appreciate any contribution you
could
make here

Moderator VK: Patroha is about 11 km southwest of Kisvarda.


Hungary SIG #Hungary November 2003 report for Yizkor Book Project #hungary

Joyce Field
 

November 2003 was another productive month for the Yizkor Book
Project. We put online 19 updates, 5 new entries, and 2 new books.
All translations are listed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html. You can check
whether there is a yizkor book for a particular town at the Yizkor
Book Database, http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/database.html.
Necrologies >from translated yizkor books can be searched at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/yizkor/.

New books:

-Kralovsky Chlmec, Slovakia
-Wyszkow, Poland

New entries:

-Bukowina, Geschichte der Juden in der Bukowina
-History of Heatid in Czernowitz
-History of Heatid in Israel
-Pinkas HaKehillot, Poland
-Jezupol (Zhovten), Ukraine, volume 2
-Ratno, Ukraine, volume 5
-Pinkas HaKehillot, Romania
-Birlad, Romania, volume 1

Updates:

-Bobruisk, Belarus
-Chelm, Poland
-Ciechanowiec, Poland
-Czestochowa, Poland
-Dusetos, Lithuania
-Gorodenka, Ukraine
-Janow, Belarus
-Krynki, Poland
-Lida, Belarus
-Losice, Poland
-Rokiskis, Lithuania
-Sokolka, Poland
-Sokoly, Poland
-Sosnowiec, Poland
-Tarnobrzeg, Poland
-Volozhin, Belarus
-Wysokie-Mazowieckie, Poland
-Zaglembia, Poland
-Zgierz, Poland

There are many books yet to be translated, waiting only for an eager
volunteer to step up to coordinate the translation project. Our
Yizkor Book Project staff is available to help you through the
process. Please contact me if you are willing and able to coordinate
a translation project. Or, if you have Hebrew or Yiddish translation
skills, you might want to start by volunteering to translate a
chapter >from the Pinkas HaKehillot on your ancestral town. We also
need a person with librarian experience to help us coordinate the
Yizkor Book Library Infofile at
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/yizlibs.html. Please contact me
privately if you can help in any way.

Many of our projects are fundraising projects. You can help by
contributing money to pay to have these books professionally
translated. The current fundraising projects are listed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/YizkorTrans.html.

We wish to take this opportunity to thank the wonderful volunteers
who donate their time to coordinate projects, to translate, and to
staff the Yizkor Book Project, and to wish all of you a Happy New
Year.

Joyce Field
jfield@jewishgen.org
Yizkor Book Project Manager
JewishGen, VP, Research


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Patroha #hungary

Doug Cohen
 

Accordingto WOWW, Patroha, Hung, Jewish population before WWII = 141; 91km E of Miskolc; 48o10'/22o00'.

Doug Cohen
Lexington, MA
DMC@dmcohen.com

----- Original Message -----
From: "Katz, Itzik" <Itzik.Katz@kla-tencor.com>
To: "H-SIG" <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Friday, November 28, 2003 4:53 AM
Subject: [h-sig] Patroha


Hell H-SIGers,
One of my relatives, Sandor Katz born1897, is mentioned in Joszef Buscko
book "The Jews of Ujfeherto" as having a big farm in Patroha "Katz
Sandor -
farmer in Patroha. B.Ujfeherto, 1897, old landowner family. Had 100 hold
farm since 1928, m. Gluck Helen, ch. Maria, Zsuzsanna." (translated from
Hungarian).
Does anyone know where Patroha is?
Does anyone know why Buscko stated "old landowner family" in his book?
Better, though, does anyone know anything about this "old landowner"
family?
Thank you
Itzik Katz
Resarching:
*Katz-Ujfeherto, Mihalifalva (Transilvania, Romania)
*Goldstein-Ujfeherto (Hungary)
Fogel-Ujfeherto (Hungary)
Wizner-Ujfeherto and Buj (Hungary)
*Schwartz-Nyiracsad (Hungary)
Berger-any (Hungary)
*Kupferstein-Ujfeherto (Hungary)
Gyamant-Ujfhererto and Ujvaros (Hungary)
Kovacs-Nyiracsad (Hungary)
Galos-Nyiracsad and Nyiregyhaza (Hungary)
Klein-Ujfeherto (Hungary)
Grunfeld-Ujfeherto (Hungary)
Feldman-Mihalifalva (Transilvania, Romania) and Jerusalem (Israel)
Roth-Mihalyfalva (Transilvania, Romania) and Israel
Weiszhausz-Bogati (Hungary)


I already have information about the families marked with (*) and looking
for information about the others. I'd appreciate any contribution you
could
make here

Moderator VK: Patroha is about 11 km southwest of Kisvarda.


Re: Jewish Societies in US #ukraine

Doug Cohen
 

Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society (HIAS) was the principal group of this type
with branches both in the US and in Europe. Ronald Sanders' book "Shores of
Refuge -- A Hundred Years of Jewish Emigration" gives more details about the
organizations which dealt with Jewish immigration to the US and elsewhere,
and talks about the organizations which assisted in the process.

Doug Cohen
Lexington, MA
DMC@dmcohen.com

----- Original Message -----
From: <TaxTroll@aol.com>
Sent: Wednesday, November 26, 2003 7:38 AM
Subject: [ukraine] Jewish Societies in US

I'm not sure if this is the correct forum for this question but I didn't
know where else to start.

I have ancestors who emigrated >from Kiev gubernia ca 1905. I was recently
contacted by someone who is most likely my 4th cousin whose ancesters also
came >from Kiev gubernia. The story they tell me is that my gg-uncle
C. Israel LUTSKY went to Paris in 1918 as a representative of one of
the Jewish societies here in the US to meet and escort a large group
of cousins (and maybe other immigrants) to the US.

I was wondering if anyone else had experiences with this in their families
or knows which societies in the NYC/Brooklyn area offered this assistance.
Did the membership of these societies mainly consist of immigrants with
common background, >from the same town/city/region? If yes, does anyone
have any ideas which society might have been involved here with these
Kiev immigrants? Are any records available to substantiate and add detail
to these stories?

thanks in advance for any help

Sharon Klein
Acworth, GA


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: Jewish Societies in US #ukraine

Doug Cohen
 

Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society (HIAS) was the principal group of this type
with branches both in the US and in Europe. Ronald Sanders' book "Shores of
Refuge -- A Hundred Years of Jewish Emigration" gives more details about the
organizations which dealt with Jewish immigration to the US and elsewhere,
and talks about the organizations which assisted in the process.

Doug Cohen
Lexington, MA
DMC@dmcohen.com

----- Original Message -----
From: <TaxTroll@aol.com>
Sent: Wednesday, November 26, 2003 7:38 AM
Subject: [ukraine] Jewish Societies in US

I'm not sure if this is the correct forum for this question but I didn't
know where else to start.

I have ancestors who emigrated >from Kiev gubernia ca 1905. I was recently
contacted by someone who is most likely my 4th cousin whose ancesters also
came >from Kiev gubernia. The story they tell me is that my gg-uncle
C. Israel LUTSKY went to Paris in 1918 as a representative of one of
the Jewish societies here in the US to meet and escort a large group
of cousins (and maybe other immigrants) to the US.

I was wondering if anyone else had experiences with this in their families
or knows which societies in the NYC/Brooklyn area offered this assistance.
Did the membership of these societies mainly consist of immigrants with
common background, >from the same town/city/region? If yes, does anyone
have any ideas which society might have been involved here with these
Kiev immigrants? Are any records available to substantiate and add detail
to these stories?

thanks in advance for any help

Sharon Klein
Acworth, GA


Cultural Marriage Habits #ukraine

raanan1@...
 

BS"D
Not to speak badly of Jews (G-d Forbid) but if you looked at civil
records today, you might see the same things....
If a person has a civil ceremony or not means nothing to Jews.
The main ceremony, with Chuppah and Kiddushin is all that matters.
If people go through a civil ceremony today, it is for other things that
they need, ie: bank accounts, credit, civiil services or immigration
purposes.
I myself got "offiially" married 3 months after my actual marriage.
Now my son was born 8 months later.
I am sure that some researcher years >from now will look at this with
raised-eyebrows.
I suspect that in some countries, there was even an advantage to not get
civilly married at all. Which would explain why children would have
taken on the name of the mothers family.
Bebrachot,
Raanan Isseroff
Brooklyn, USA

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Hi,
I have been looking at some of the translations I am getting
associated
with birth records form the city of Lviv and found that in some
cases the
recording of the marriage is some time after the birth.

I understand the reasoning behind only recording the birth in
religious
records and not on the civil records. What would be the reasoning of
not
recording the marriage in the civil records and what would force the

recording in the civil records at a future date?

What could I expect to see on a marriage record if I tried to get
copies
of them?

Thanks,

Errol Schneegurt LI NY ESLVIV@AOL.COM


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Cultural Marriage Habits #ukraine

raanan1@...
 

BS"D
Not to speak badly of Jews (G-d Forbid) but if you looked at civil
records today, you might see the same things....
If a person has a civil ceremony or not means nothing to Jews.
The main ceremony, with Chuppah and Kiddushin is all that matters.
If people go through a civil ceremony today, it is for other things that
they need, ie: bank accounts, credit, civiil services or immigration
purposes.
I myself got "offiially" married 3 months after my actual marriage.
Now my son was born 8 months later.
I am sure that some researcher years >from now will look at this with
raised-eyebrows.
I suspect that in some countries, there was even an advantage to not get
civilly married at all. Which would explain why children would have
taken on the name of the mothers family.
Bebrachot,
Raanan Isseroff
Brooklyn, USA

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Hi,
I have been looking at some of the translations I am getting
associated
with birth records form the city of Lviv and found that in some
cases the
recording of the marriage is some time after the birth.

I understand the reasoning behind only recording the birth in
religious
records and not on the civil records. What would be the reasoning of
not
recording the marriage in the civil records and what would force the

recording in the civil records at a future date?

What could I expect to see on a marriage record if I tried to get
copies
of them?

Thanks,

Errol Schneegurt LI NY ESLVIV@AOL.COM


Re: Fraenckel entries.. #france

Daniel Teichman <daniel.teichman@...>
 

In response to the question of Daniel Teichman regarding a seeming
anomaly in the dates of contracts, the answer is in the Preliminary
Notes of Fraenckel found on p. XXV. The civil dates given are those
when the contract was deposited with the Notary. The Hebrew date is
that of the actual signing of the contract (i.e.marriage or betrothal).
What a shame, I did know that, but simply forgot about it! Thank you very
much, Rosanne, for pointing this out.
And of course this also means that there is probably no mistake in that
entry, but the chronology for the couple mentioned in entry 386 n is as
follows:

03.08.1745: Signing of the contract
14.12.1746: Wedding (probably)
10.08.1747: The contract was deposited.

But this also means that >from the given civil date I never know when the
contract was signed, but have always to check and calculate the Hebrew date,
which I think is rather complicated and also unclear >from the entries in the
book. In a new edition of the book it would be great to have both civil
dates with the entry.

Best regards

Daniel Teichman
Zurich, Switzerland


French SIG #France RE: Fraenckel entries.. #france

Daniel Teichman <daniel.teichman@...>
 

In response to the question of Daniel Teichman regarding a seeming
anomaly in the dates of contracts, the answer is in the Preliminary
Notes of Fraenckel found on p. XXV. The civil dates given are those
when the contract was deposited with the Notary. The Hebrew date is
that of the actual signing of the contract (i.e.marriage or betrothal).
What a shame, I did know that, but simply forgot about it! Thank you very
much, Rosanne, for pointing this out.
And of course this also means that there is probably no mistake in that
entry, but the chronology for the couple mentioned in entry 386 n is as
follows:

03.08.1745: Signing of the contract
14.12.1746: Wedding (probably)
10.08.1747: The contract was deposited.

But this also means that >from the given civil date I never know when the
contract was signed, but have always to check and calculate the Hebrew date,
which I think is rather complicated and also unclear >from the entries in the
book. In a new edition of the book it would be great to have both civil
dates with the entry.

Best regards

Daniel Teichman
Zurich, Switzerland


More on the Latvian Directory from 1936 #latvia

martha <martha@...>
 

I was just informed that the Archives of the Latvians and Estonians
at Shefayim also possess a copy in English of 1936 Directory >from
Latvia. So any of you living in Israel is in luck, as are all of you
who decide to come to the 24th IAJGS International Conference on
Jewish Genealogy in Jerusalem (July 4-9, 2004).

Martha Lev-Zion


Latvia SIG #Latvia More on the Latvian Directory from 1936 #latvia

martha <martha@...>
 

I was just informed that the Archives of the Latvians and Estonians
at Shefayim also possess a copy in English of 1936 Directory >from
Latvia. So any of you living in Israel is in luck, as are all of you
who decide to come to the 24th IAJGS International Conference on
Jewish Genealogy in Jerusalem (July 4-9, 2004).

Martha Lev-Zion


Re: The City that Has All #rabbinic

LR <lreich@...>
 

We should be grateful to Rabbi Heilbrunn for generously providing us
with his translation of the article but one way or another a few
errors have crept in.

1) R' Shachne was the (first) father-in-law of the ReMo, not his
son-in-law. By the way, R' (Sholom) Shachne had little to do with
Cracow. He lived in Lublin where he (& later his son) had a
Yeshivah. His grave there has many vistors.

2) The BaCH, R' Yoel Sirka's, was the father-in-law of the TaZ, not
his son-in-law.

3) One needs to distinguish between R' Aryeh Leib the Great (der
hoicher Reb Leib and R' Zechariah "Hanovi." The first was the
grandson of the second. The second is supposed to emigrated to
Eretz Yisroel.

4) The Be'er Haytiv mentioned (of Belz) was the author of one of
the several commentaries of that name on Shulchan Aroch.

Incidentally the euphuistic (rabbinic) accolades in the first
paragraph (I can only surmise the Hebrew original) are better
translated as "He who is desired by Israel" (see the threnody
in Samuel II, 1:19) and "The leader of the Diaspora."

Leslie Reich


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Re: The City that Has All #rabbinic

LR <lreich@...>
 

We should be grateful to Rabbi Heilbrunn for generously providing us
with his translation of the article but one way or another a few
errors have crept in.

1) R' Shachne was the (first) father-in-law of the ReMo, not his
son-in-law. By the way, R' (Sholom) Shachne had little to do with
Cracow. He lived in Lublin where he (& later his son) had a
Yeshivah. His grave there has many vistors.

2) The BaCH, R' Yoel Sirka's, was the father-in-law of the TaZ, not
his son-in-law.

3) One needs to distinguish between R' Aryeh Leib the Great (der
hoicher Reb Leib and R' Zechariah "Hanovi." The first was the
grandson of the second. The second is supposed to emigrated to
Eretz Yisroel.

4) The Be'er Haytiv mentioned (of Belz) was the author of one of
the several commentaries of that name on Shulchan Aroch.

Incidentally the euphuistic (rabbinic) accolades in the first
paragraph (I can only surmise the Hebrew original) are better
translated as "He who is desired by Israel" (see the threnody
in Samuel II, 1:19) and "The leader of the Diaspora."

Leslie Reich