Date   

Re: "Israelites" #belarus

Steve Orlen
 

Dear Cousins,

It is possible that "Israelites" referred to the Old Believers, that group
who abandoned the Russian Orthodox Church and took on many of the beliefs
of the Jews?

Best, Steve Orlen
Tucson, Arizona


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: "Israelites" #belarus

Steve Orlen
 

Dear Cousins,

It is possible that "Israelites" referred to the Old Believers, that group
who abandoned the Russian Orthodox Church and took on many of the beliefs
of the Jews?

Best, Steve Orlen
Tucson, Arizona


Report From Mogilev 10/8/03 #belarus

David M. Fox <davefox73@...>
 

I just received a message >from Alexander Litin in Mogilev and want to share
some of the information he provided. As some of you who have been
subscribed to the Belarus SIG for awhile know, Alexander in the editor of a
book published (in Russian) in late 2002 about the history of the Jews of
Belarus >from the Middle Ages to the 1917 Revolution. I will refer to this as
"Volume I". Someone who is not a member of the Belarus SIG, but who is
fluent in Russian, is writing a book review in English. It is almost
complete and will be published in the Belarus SIG On Line Newsletter
<http://www.jewishgen.org/Belarus/newsletter/bnl_index.htm>. If we have any
SIG members who are connected with university with a Russian studies program
and might be able to get them to translate the entire book using grant funds
or as part of a graduate student project, please contact me by private
email.

Alexander has almost completed his research for Volume II of the history of
the Mogilev Jews. This book will cover the period after the Russian
Revolution, including the Holocaust times and after. Mr. Litin is using a
laptop donated by one of our SIG members to expedite his work in completing
Volume II.

Alexander has compiled a "census" of the inscriptions on the grave
stones/monuments in the Mogilev Jewish cemetery. However, this census is
limited to monuments with Russian inscriptions, as there is no one left in
Mogilev with the necessary Hebrew skills. I have asked Alexander to send me
this census so that the SIG can get these translated into English and put
into a database. If we have any volunteers who would like to do this
translation, please contact me by private email. In addition, I have asked
Alexander if he can get all the monuments with Hebrew or Yiddish
photographed with a digital camera. These are >from the earlier burials
before the Soviet influence that encouraged the use of Russian rather then
Hebrew inscriptions. If Alexander is able to send a CD with the digital photos, we
would like to find volunteers to translate the Hebrew inscriptions into
English and also into Russian. Hopefully, some of our SIG members in Israel
will be able to help with this effort. If anyone is interested in this
effort, please let me know by private email.

Prior reports >from Belarus have reported that Jewish graves in the Mogilev
cemetery have been dug up to make room for Christian burials. I saw this
with my own eyes when I visited this cemetery in 1999. I tried then to
encourage the Jewish community to try and stop these actions and certain
efforts were made. However, reports during 2003 indicated that the
practices I saw in 1999 were still occurring. Alexander indicates that
problem still exists despite the efforts of Naum Yoffe, the leader of the
Mogilev Jewish community.

Dave
--
David Fox
Mail to: davefox@jewishgen.org
Belarus SIG Coordinator
Arnold, MD USA
http://www.jewishgen.org/belarus


Belarus SIG #Belarus Report From Mogilev 10/8/03 #belarus

David M. Fox <davefox73@...>
 

I just received a message >from Alexander Litin in Mogilev and want to share
some of the information he provided. As some of you who have been
subscribed to the Belarus SIG for awhile know, Alexander in the editor of a
book published (in Russian) in late 2002 about the history of the Jews of
Belarus >from the Middle Ages to the 1917 Revolution. I will refer to this as
"Volume I". Someone who is not a member of the Belarus SIG, but who is
fluent in Russian, is writing a book review in English. It is almost
complete and will be published in the Belarus SIG On Line Newsletter
<http://www.jewishgen.org/Belarus/newsletter/bnl_index.htm>. If we have any
SIG members who are connected with university with a Russian studies program
and might be able to get them to translate the entire book using grant funds
or as part of a graduate student project, please contact me by private
email.

Alexander has almost completed his research for Volume II of the history of
the Mogilev Jews. This book will cover the period after the Russian
Revolution, including the Holocaust times and after. Mr. Litin is using a
laptop donated by one of our SIG members to expedite his work in completing
Volume II.

Alexander has compiled a "census" of the inscriptions on the grave
stones/monuments in the Mogilev Jewish cemetery. However, this census is
limited to monuments with Russian inscriptions, as there is no one left in
Mogilev with the necessary Hebrew skills. I have asked Alexander to send me
this census so that the SIG can get these translated into English and put
into a database. If we have any volunteers who would like to do this
translation, please contact me by private email. In addition, I have asked
Alexander if he can get all the monuments with Hebrew or Yiddish
photographed with a digital camera. These are >from the earlier burials
before the Soviet influence that encouraged the use of Russian rather then
Hebrew inscriptions. If Alexander is able to send a CD with the digital photos, we
would like to find volunteers to translate the Hebrew inscriptions into
English and also into Russian. Hopefully, some of our SIG members in Israel
will be able to help with this effort. If anyone is interested in this
effort, please let me know by private email.

Prior reports >from Belarus have reported that Jewish graves in the Mogilev
cemetery have been dug up to make room for Christian burials. I saw this
with my own eyes when I visited this cemetery in 1999. I tried then to
encourage the Jewish community to try and stop these actions and certain
efforts were made. However, reports during 2003 indicated that the
practices I saw in 1999 were still occurring. Alexander indicates that
problem still exists despite the efforts of Naum Yoffe, the leader of the
Mogilev Jewish community.

Dave
--
David Fox
Mail to: davefox@jewishgen.org
Belarus SIG Coordinator
Arnold, MD USA
http://www.jewishgen.org/belarus


BOF #belarus

Albert Kaganovitch <kaganov@...>
 

Raiskii, Aronov, Shkolnikov - Gomel, gubernia - Mogilev
Khvoinitskii - Gorval, uezd - Rechitsa, gubernia - Minsk
Kaganovich, Rapoport,
Tsirulnikov, Slobodskiy, Zilbert - Rechitsa, gubernia - Minsk

Thanks,
Albert Kaganovitch,
Jerusalem


Belarus SIG #Belarus BOF #belarus

Albert Kaganovitch <kaganov@...>
 

Raiskii, Aronov, Shkolnikov - Gomel, gubernia - Mogilev
Khvoinitskii - Gorval, uezd - Rechitsa, gubernia - Minsk
Kaganovich, Rapoport,
Tsirulnikov, Slobodskiy, Zilbert - Rechitsa, gubernia - Minsk

Thanks,
Albert Kaganovitch,
Jerusalem


Vacation #scandinavia

Elsebeth Paikin
 

I just want to let you know that I'll be on vacation 13th - 27th October
and "out of reach".

One of my fellow JewishGen moderators has promised to look after the
mailing list while I'm away.

Best regards


---------------------------------------
Elsebeth Paikin, Copenhagen, Denmark
Coordinator & webmaster of JewishGen's
SCANDINAVIA SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/scandinavia
http://home.worldonline.dk/~epaikin/
mailto:elsebeth@paikin.dk
---------------------------------------


Scandinavia SIG #Scandinavia Vacation #scandinavia

Elsebeth Paikin
 

I just want to let you know that I'll be on vacation 13th - 27th October
and "out of reach".

One of my fellow JewishGen moderators has promised to look after the
mailing list while I'm away.

Best regards


---------------------------------------
Elsebeth Paikin, Copenhagen, Denmark
Coordinator & webmaster of JewishGen's
SCANDINAVIA SIG
http://www.jewishgen.org/scandinavia
http://home.worldonline.dk/~epaikin/
mailto:elsebeth@paikin.dk
---------------------------------------


Re: 1921 Berlin Burial - "Other Ideas?" #germany

Roger Lustig <trovato@...>
 

E. Randol Schoenberg wrote:
Thanks to everyone who suggested I contact the Jewish cemetery in
Weissensee. I received a reply >from them that said the grave of my
great-grandmother Pauline SCHOENBERG / SCHONBERG (o umlaut)
(d. 12 Oct 1921 Berlin) is not there. Now what? Does anyone have any
other ideas?

Hi, Randy!

First question: are you sure this was a Jewish burial? If not, the
possibilities multiply. Many German Jews, some of them relatively
observant, chose to be buried in places other than Jewish cemeteries.
My great-grandfather Eugen LUSTIG (d. 1929) and his wife (d. 1916) were
both cremated, and their remains buried in the Urnenfriedhof Zittau. He
had been the president of the Gleiwitz congregation for many years.
(Note that Zittau is nowhere near Gleiwitz.)

Next, do you have any death notices >from Berlin newspapers? They might
provide a clue.

Finally, if the burial *was* part of Berlin's Jewish life, there may be
records. The Centrum Judaicum has many German synagogue records in its
archive, though most are not of the "vital records" type.

http://www.cjudaicum.de/ for basic information. The CJ's holdings are
catalogued in _Quellen zur Geschichte der Juden in den Archiven der
neuen Bundeslaender / herausgegeben von Stefi Jersch-Wenzel und Reinhard
Ruerup._ München ; New Providence : K. G. Saur, 1996- Bd. 6. Stiftung
Neue Synagoge Berlin - Centrum Judaicum (2 vv.)

For the record, the other five available volumes of this series may be
useful to others as well:
Bd. 1. Eine Bestandsuebersicht
Bd. 2. Geheimes Staatsarchiv Preussischer Kulturbesitz T. 1.
Bd. 3. Staatliche Archive der Laender Berlin, Brandenburg und
Sachsen-Anhalt
Bd. 4. Staatliche Archiv der Laender Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Sachsen und
Thueringen
Bd. 5. Geheimes Staatsarchiv Preussischer Kulturbesitz. T. 2.
Sonderverwaltungen der Uebergangszeit 1806-1815

Best, Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ trovato@verizon.net


German SIG #Germany Re: 1921 Berlin Burial - "Other Ideas?" #germany

Roger Lustig <trovato@...>
 

E. Randol Schoenberg wrote:
Thanks to everyone who suggested I contact the Jewish cemetery in
Weissensee. I received a reply >from them that said the grave of my
great-grandmother Pauline SCHOENBERG / SCHONBERG (o umlaut)
(d. 12 Oct 1921 Berlin) is not there. Now what? Does anyone have any
other ideas?

Hi, Randy!

First question: are you sure this was a Jewish burial? If not, the
possibilities multiply. Many German Jews, some of them relatively
observant, chose to be buried in places other than Jewish cemeteries.
My great-grandfather Eugen LUSTIG (d. 1929) and his wife (d. 1916) were
both cremated, and their remains buried in the Urnenfriedhof Zittau. He
had been the president of the Gleiwitz congregation for many years.
(Note that Zittau is nowhere near Gleiwitz.)

Next, do you have any death notices >from Berlin newspapers? They might
provide a clue.

Finally, if the burial *was* part of Berlin's Jewish life, there may be
records. The Centrum Judaicum has many German synagogue records in its
archive, though most are not of the "vital records" type.

http://www.cjudaicum.de/ for basic information. The CJ's holdings are
catalogued in _Quellen zur Geschichte der Juden in den Archiven der
neuen Bundeslaender / herausgegeben von Stefi Jersch-Wenzel und Reinhard
Ruerup._ München ; New Providence : K. G. Saur, 1996- Bd. 6. Stiftung
Neue Synagoge Berlin - Centrum Judaicum (2 vv.)

For the record, the other five available volumes of this series may be
useful to others as well:
Bd. 1. Eine Bestandsuebersicht
Bd. 2. Geheimes Staatsarchiv Preussischer Kulturbesitz T. 1.
Bd. 3. Staatliche Archive der Laender Berlin, Brandenburg und
Sachsen-Anhalt
Bd. 4. Staatliche Archiv der Laender Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Sachsen und
Thueringen
Bd. 5. Geheimes Staatsarchiv Preussischer Kulturbesitz. T. 2.
Sonderverwaltungen der Uebergangszeit 1806-1815

Best, Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ trovato@verizon.net


The October 2003 Issue of Sharsheret Hadorot. #rabbinic

Yocheved Klausner
 

This issue is rather diverse. In the area of genealogical research of
one's family, we have an article of Mr. Ilan Borovic, discussing his
family during World War II, the item by Mr. Eli Samson telling of a
combination of peculiar events and experiences during his research and
the piece by Mr. Joseph Covo focusing on the origin of his family
name and its metamorphosis.

In Mathilde Tagger's well-detailed and organized article, we are
presented with another aspect in the study of names - the family names
of the Jews of Bulgaria. Ms. Tagger skillfully leads us through the
various types of family names according to their origins and shows us
how they reflect the history of the Jews of the country.

Three essays deal with what we can call 'genealogical aids.' Ms. Carol
Edan recommends that we record family trees on CDs and explains how to
do it; Ms. Zippi Rosenne discusses the "Visual Documentation Center"
at the Diaspora Museum and Dr. Yehuda Klausner continues his series of
short chapters on ways to record genealogical data.

The area of history, the longstanding companion of genealogy, is
represented in this issue by the comprehensive article by Dr. Martha
Lev-Zion on Jewish life in central Europe in the 16th and 17th
centuries. Dr. Lev-Zion spreads out a wide scope in which she covers
the daily life including customs of marriage and brit mila, as well as
the education of children and their study of Torah. She also discusses
local customs - all of this on the background of frequent expulsions
and the Thirty Years War.

Mathilde Tagger relates a short story on the names of two of her
forbearers. I am sure that in every family, legends, anecdotes,
humorous stories and proverbs, pass >from generation to generation. We
ask our members to share their stories with us. A new contributor to
Sharsheret Hadorot is Mr. Shlomo David >from our Haifa branch. He shows
us, how according to Rashi's interpretation of a verse in the Book of
Numbers, even in ancient times our ancestors maintained family trees
and when the census was taken in the desert, they presented them
before all of the people.

Our librarian, Harriet Kasow, continues her reports on new books,
which have been added to our library, on the continuing activity of
IGS and on conferences and meetings that have taken place in Israel
over the past few months.

A summary of foreign journals has been provided, as always, by Ms.
Mathilde Tagger (Hebrew) and Mr. Harold Lewin (English).

We are pleased to announce that beginning with next year, 2004,
Sharsheret Hadorot will become a quarterly, appearing four times a
year. In anticipation of this change, this copy is expanded and its
issue number appears as 17/3-4, 2003.

With the beginning of the new Jewish year of 5764, I wish to extend,
in the name of the editorial board, heartfelt greetings to all, with
the hope that it be an interesting year with success in genealogical
research.

Best wishes and Shana Tova,

Yocheved Klausner, Editor
Sharsheret Hadorot


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic The October 2003 Issue of Sharsheret Hadorot. #rabbinic

Yocheved Klausner
 

This issue is rather diverse. In the area of genealogical research of
one's family, we have an article of Mr. Ilan Borovic, discussing his
family during World War II, the item by Mr. Eli Samson telling of a
combination of peculiar events and experiences during his research and
the piece by Mr. Joseph Covo focusing on the origin of his family
name and its metamorphosis.

In Mathilde Tagger's well-detailed and organized article, we are
presented with another aspect in the study of names - the family names
of the Jews of Bulgaria. Ms. Tagger skillfully leads us through the
various types of family names according to their origins and shows us
how they reflect the history of the Jews of the country.

Three essays deal with what we can call 'genealogical aids.' Ms. Carol
Edan recommends that we record family trees on CDs and explains how to
do it; Ms. Zippi Rosenne discusses the "Visual Documentation Center"
at the Diaspora Museum and Dr. Yehuda Klausner continues his series of
short chapters on ways to record genealogical data.

The area of history, the longstanding companion of genealogy, is
represented in this issue by the comprehensive article by Dr. Martha
Lev-Zion on Jewish life in central Europe in the 16th and 17th
centuries. Dr. Lev-Zion spreads out a wide scope in which she covers
the daily life including customs of marriage and brit mila, as well as
the education of children and their study of Torah. She also discusses
local customs - all of this on the background of frequent expulsions
and the Thirty Years War.

Mathilde Tagger relates a short story on the names of two of her
forbearers. I am sure that in every family, legends, anecdotes,
humorous stories and proverbs, pass >from generation to generation. We
ask our members to share their stories with us. A new contributor to
Sharsheret Hadorot is Mr. Shlomo David >from our Haifa branch. He shows
us, how according to Rashi's interpretation of a verse in the Book of
Numbers, even in ancient times our ancestors maintained family trees
and when the census was taken in the desert, they presented them
before all of the people.

Our librarian, Harriet Kasow, continues her reports on new books,
which have been added to our library, on the continuing activity of
IGS and on conferences and meetings that have taken place in Israel
over the past few months.

A summary of foreign journals has been provided, as always, by Ms.
Mathilde Tagger (Hebrew) and Mr. Harold Lewin (English).

We are pleased to announce that beginning with next year, 2004,
Sharsheret Hadorot will become a quarterly, appearing four times a
year. In anticipation of this change, this copy is expanded and its
issue number appears as 17/3-4, 2003.

With the beginning of the new Jewish year of 5764, I wish to extend,
in the name of the editorial board, heartfelt greetings to all, with
the hope that it be an interesting year with success in genealogical
research.

Best wishes and Shana Tova,

Yocheved Klausner, Editor
Sharsheret Hadorot


contact with SIGger from Chile #belarus

Elina Smirnova <smirnova-elina@...>
 

Dear SIGers
Is anybody of you in contact with Sebastian Pando Yankeliovich >from Chile?
His e-mail address rejects my mails. Does he
have another one?
Elina Smirnova


I´m Sebastian Yankeliovich.
I took your mail >from a Delarus Digest that they send to me. I must find
my relatives in Moldavia or Russia, and you could be one of my
connections there


Belarus SIG #Belarus contact with SIGger from Chile #belarus

Elina Smirnova <smirnova-elina@...>
 

Dear SIGers
Is anybody of you in contact with Sebastian Pando Yankeliovich >from Chile?
His e-mail address rejects my mails. Does he
have another one?
Elina Smirnova


I´m Sebastian Yankeliovich.
I took your mail >from a Delarus Digest that they send to me. I must find
my relatives in Moldavia or Russia, and you could be one of my
connections there


Viewmate #belarus

agutenkauf@enc.k12.il.us <agutenkauf@...>
 

I would appreciate someone who is able to translate Polish going to a
letter I posted on Viewmate at VM2946
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=2946

It is >from the Polish Archives regarding a register page they copied for
me. I owe them money but am not sure how much or how or where to send it.

Thanks,
Alice Rifkind Gutenkauf
Morton Grove, Illinois

researching: RIFKIND/RIVKIN Rogachev, Belarus; POLLACK/POPLACK/POPLAR=20
Rokishiki Lithuania; SUPERFINE/CUPROFIN/TZUPROFIN Tomaszow Mazowiecki Pola=
nd


Belarus SIG #Belarus Viewmate #belarus

agutenkauf@enc.k12.il.us <agutenkauf@...>
 

I would appreciate someone who is able to translate Polish going to a
letter I posted on Viewmate at VM2946
http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=2946

It is >from the Polish Archives regarding a register page they copied for
me. I owe them money but am not sure how much or how or where to send it.

Thanks,
Alice Rifkind Gutenkauf
Morton Grove, Illinois

researching: RIFKIND/RIVKIN Rogachev, Belarus; POLLACK/POPLACK/POPLAR=20
Rokishiki Lithuania; SUPERFINE/CUPROFIN/TZUPROFIN Tomaszow Mazowiecki Pola=
nd


Re: Shtetl Research Project Needs Shtetl Leaders #belarus

Joy Weaver <joyweave@...>
 

Marlene,

Should be assume that if the uyzed of interest to us is not listed, there is
already someone who has volunteered as a leader?

Joy Weaver,
Islip, NY, USA

Grodno, Brest uyzed

MODERATOR NOTE: Please remember not to include the entire previous
message in your response!


Re: Sharkhovshyzna (Re: belarus digest: Sept.29 -03 #belarus

NFatouros@...
 

In a message dated 9/30/03 Zalman Lachman (zalman@lachman.et wrote in part:

<< My families, LACHMAN and LEVIN(E) came >from Sharkhovshyzna,(today in
Belarus. It was in Disna of Vilna province. If anyone has any information
about that shtetl I would be pleased to share.>>

"Where We Once Walked" entry for Sharkovshchina, has the alternate spellings:
Sakovchizna Sarkeyschina, Sarkeystsene, Sharkotsina, Sharkoyshchina, and
Szarkowszczyna. This reference says that it had a pre-WWII Jewish population of
615, and is 170 kilometers north of Minsk.

My 1968 Columbia-Lippincott Gazetteer (C-L) says of this place that in 1939
its total population was over 500. It is located on the Dizna River, 19 miles
north northwest of Glubokoye. Its inhabitants did fruit gardening, and grew
rye, flax and potatos.

Chester G. Cohen's Shtetl Finder Gazetteer adds to the above that Rafel Yosef
Ginzburg, b. 1847, was rabbi, and that the town is mentioned in the yizkor
book "Churban glubok," 1956.

I didn't check Jewishgen's listings for yizkor books which have been
translated in part or in their entirety, so I don't know whether the Glubok book has
been translated, nor did I try the "search this website box on Jewishgen's
main page. In addition to checking these possibilities for more information
about his ancestral town, Mr. Lachman may want to try a search on the "google"
search engine, doing separate searches for each of the above six spellings in the
C-L Gazetteer.


Naomi Fatouros (nee FELDMAN)
Bloomington, Indiana
NFatouros@aol.com
Researching: BELKOWSKY and BIELKOWSKY, Odessa,St. Petersburg and
Berdichev;ROTHSTEIN, Kremenchug; FELDMAN, Pinsk; SCHUTZ, RETTIG, WAHL, Shcherets; LEVY,
WEIL, Mulhouse; SAS or SASS,Podwolochisk; RAPOPORT, Tarnopol, Podwolochisk,
Berdichev; BEHAM, Salok and Kharkov; WOLPIANSKY, Ostryna.


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: Shtetl Research Project Needs Shtetl Leaders #belarus

Joy Weaver <joyweave@...>
 

Marlene,

Should be assume that if the uyzed of interest to us is not listed, there is
already someone who has volunteered as a leader?

Joy Weaver,
Islip, NY, USA

Grodno, Brest uyzed

MODERATOR NOTE: Please remember not to include the entire previous
message in your response!


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: Sharkhovshyzna (Re: belarus digest: Sept.29 -03 #belarus

NFatouros@...
 

In a message dated 9/30/03 Zalman Lachman (zalman@lachman.et wrote in part:

<< My families, LACHMAN and LEVIN(E) came >from Sharkhovshyzna,(today in
Belarus. It was in Disna of Vilna province. If anyone has any information
about that shtetl I would be pleased to share.>>

"Where We Once Walked" entry for Sharkovshchina, has the alternate spellings:
Sakovchizna Sarkeyschina, Sarkeystsene, Sharkotsina, Sharkoyshchina, and
Szarkowszczyna. This reference says that it had a pre-WWII Jewish population of
615, and is 170 kilometers north of Minsk.

My 1968 Columbia-Lippincott Gazetteer (C-L) says of this place that in 1939
its total population was over 500. It is located on the Dizna River, 19 miles
north northwest of Glubokoye. Its inhabitants did fruit gardening, and grew
rye, flax and potatos.

Chester G. Cohen's Shtetl Finder Gazetteer adds to the above that Rafel Yosef
Ginzburg, b. 1847, was rabbi, and that the town is mentioned in the yizkor
book "Churban glubok," 1956.

I didn't check Jewishgen's listings for yizkor books which have been
translated in part or in their entirety, so I don't know whether the Glubok book has
been translated, nor did I try the "search this website box on Jewishgen's
main page. In addition to checking these possibilities for more information
about his ancestral town, Mr. Lachman may want to try a search on the "google"
search engine, doing separate searches for each of the above six spellings in the
C-L Gazetteer.


Naomi Fatouros (nee FELDMAN)
Bloomington, Indiana
NFatouros@aol.com
Researching: BELKOWSKY and BIELKOWSKY, Odessa,St. Petersburg and
Berdichev;ROTHSTEIN, Kremenchug; FELDMAN, Pinsk; SCHUTZ, RETTIG, WAHL, Shcherets; LEVY,
WEIL, Mulhouse; SAS or SASS,Podwolochisk; RAPOPORT, Tarnopol, Podwolochisk,
Berdichev; BEHAM, Salok and Kharkov; WOLPIANSKY, Ostryna.