Date   

photo of CUKIERMAN in Philadelphia museum #general

AJSAL64@...
 

There is a photo of Binim Cukierman & Edzia his wife in The Last Album a
photo exhibit at the Gershman Y (JCC) Broad Streeet, Philadelphia. There
are many other people named and many unnamed as well. This exhibit,
assembled by Ann Weiss, will be at the Y until November 21, 2003. It is a
collection of 2400 snapshots and portraits taken >from people who were
taken to Auschwitz. I was very moved by the photos.

Judy Salomon
New Jersey

Researching: FELDMAUS >from Lezajsk, FREUND >from Pruchnik, GOLDBERG >from
Mostiska and SULTAN >from Husiatyn


Need to contact researcher Shirley Flaum #general

Don and Debby Painter <painter@...>
 

Does any one have Shirley Flaum's current e-mail address? The one I have
and is listed on Jewishgen no longer works.

Thank you in advance,
Debby Gincig Painter


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen photo of CUKIERMAN in Philadelphia museum #general

AJSAL64@...
 

There is a photo of Binim Cukierman & Edzia his wife in The Last Album a
photo exhibit at the Gershman Y (JCC) Broad Streeet, Philadelphia. There
are many other people named and many unnamed as well. This exhibit,
assembled by Ann Weiss, will be at the Y until November 21, 2003. It is a
collection of 2400 snapshots and portraits taken >from people who were
taken to Auschwitz. I was very moved by the photos.

Judy Salomon
New Jersey

Researching: FELDMAUS >from Lezajsk, FREUND >from Pruchnik, GOLDBERG >from
Mostiska and SULTAN >from Husiatyn


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Need to contact researcher Shirley Flaum #general

Don and Debby Painter <painter@...>
 

Does any one have Shirley Flaum's current e-mail address? The one I have
and is listed on Jewishgen no longer works.

Thank you in advance,
Debby Gincig Painter


Re: Significant Other and Same Sex Couples #general

Barbara Harris <maybug@...>
 

Hi,

Personally, I think that these "sensitive" issues should all be included.
They are often the most interesting things about our family members and
demonstrate those areas that were important enough to them that they broke
from the prescribed familial and societal molds. It's easy to do the things
that we're "supposed" to do, to brag about our successes. Big whoop. I went
to college. Big whoop. I went to work and made some money, etc. I had a
couple kids who turned out well. Big whoop.These are all the things that
everyone expects us to do. I'm considering writing a small memoir of my
life to leave to my grandchildren in which I tell them about all my
indiscretions, as I know that my children won't tell even about the ones
they know. :) I recently had occasion to talk to someone about his
deceased father He knew his father had had a first wife and a child by that
wife, but hadn't know about the second one, perhaps because of the light it
might have thrown on his parents' history.. People bowdlerize their bios;
it's a shame. If we/they had the guts or gall to do the deeds, why hide
it. Even our mistakes are ours.

As for same sex couples. Until 1888, women in England couldn't control
their own money, even after they were legally separated >from their
husbands! In the US we had slavery til the 1860's and women couldn't vote
til well into the 20th century. Today they're kicking up a fuss about an
openly gay man being made an Episcopal Bishop, but Canada allows gay
marriage. Things change. What seems sensitive one day is ho hum the next.
But when we excise something >from our history, it may be gone forever.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Significant Other and Same Sex Couples #general

Barbara Harris <maybug@...>
 

Hi,

Personally, I think that these "sensitive" issues should all be included.
They are often the most interesting things about our family members and
demonstrate those areas that were important enough to them that they broke
from the prescribed familial and societal molds. It's easy to do the things
that we're "supposed" to do, to brag about our successes. Big whoop. I went
to college. Big whoop. I went to work and made some money, etc. I had a
couple kids who turned out well. Big whoop.These are all the things that
everyone expects us to do. I'm considering writing a small memoir of my
life to leave to my grandchildren in which I tell them about all my
indiscretions, as I know that my children won't tell even about the ones
they know. :) I recently had occasion to talk to someone about his
deceased father He knew his father had had a first wife and a child by that
wife, but hadn't know about the second one, perhaps because of the light it
might have thrown on his parents' history.. People bowdlerize their bios;
it's a shame. If we/they had the guts or gall to do the deeds, why hide
it. Even our mistakes are ours.

As for same sex couples. Until 1888, women in England couldn't control
their own money, even after they were legally separated >from their
husbands! In the US we had slavery til the 1860's and women couldn't vote
til well into the 20th century. Today they're kicking up a fuss about an
openly gay man being made an Episcopal Bishop, but Canada allows gay
marriage. Things change. What seems sensitive one day is ho hum the next.
But when we excise something >from our history, it may be gone forever.


AJHS YT article #yiddish

Jonina Duker <jonina.duker@...>
 

On page 26 of the American Jewish Historical Society's newsletter
Heritage (fall / winter 2003, vol. 1:2) there is an article about Yiddish
theater in America and page 27 has color reprints of 5 posters. Shavua
Tov. Jonina Duker:
BEIDICK (~Minsk), DUKER (~Minsk), GOLDBERG & GORODINSKY (Minsk), KATZ
(Riga?), LEVINE (~Minsk?), RACHMAN (Salakas/Simferopol), RYMER, SCHMUELI
ITZ (~ Minsk?), SIEGEL (Uzpaliai?), STRAUSS (Vilna?) & for her descendant
ARLICK (Oshmyany), BARNA (Satu Mare), FRIEDLER (Soljataznan), GOLDSTEIN,
LICHTMAN (Csenger/Satu Mare), LITZKY (Golshany), RAPAPORT
(Kemenesmihalyfa), SCHLESINGER


Yiddish Theatre and Vadeville #YiddishTheatre AJHS YT article #yiddish

Jonina Duker <jonina.duker@...>
 

On page 26 of the American Jewish Historical Society's newsletter
Heritage (fall / winter 2003, vol. 1:2) there is an article about Yiddish
theater in America and page 27 has color reprints of 5 posters. Shavua
Tov. Jonina Duker:
BEIDICK (~Minsk), DUKER (~Minsk), GOLDBERG & GORODINSKY (Minsk), KATZ
(Riga?), LEVINE (~Minsk?), RACHMAN (Salakas/Simferopol), RYMER, SCHMUELI
ITZ (~ Minsk?), SIEGEL (Uzpaliai?), STRAUSS (Vilna?) & for her descendant
ARLICK (Oshmyany), BARNA (Satu Mare), FRIEDLER (Soljataznan), GOLDSTEIN,
LICHTMAN (Csenger/Satu Mare), LITZKY (Golshany), RAPAPORT
(Kemenesmihalyfa), SCHLESINGER


Running away from the Russian Draft #belarus

Michelle Frager <lulu_brooks@...>
 

Irene Newhouse's extremely interesting post contained one subject
that my own research suggests wasn't necessarily the case. As Irene
wrote, it wasn't easy to leave; true, but it was accomplished
frequently.

In private research for our family, very few Reviskii Skazski pages
do not show at least one man marked as having run away or
disappeared. (The pages of course show more than just my family, as
do the US Censuses and I imagine others.)

The pages run >from the 1830s to 1875, in Podolia. While this was a
western frontier area with a constantly changing border, it still
took quite a bit of doing, both practically and physically, (or
strategically and tactically if you prefer), to get out, which
doesnt't seem to have deterred large numbers >from going ahead.
Fortunately for us, they succeeded.


Michelle Frager, NY
=Belarus/Lith: FRAKT, WOLFSON, LIFSHITZ
=Ukraine/Rom: TREIGER, SIROTA, ZEKTSER, BRONSHTEIN, ZIBELBERG


Belarus SIG #Belarus Running away from the Russian Draft #belarus

Michelle Frager <lulu_brooks@...>
 

Irene Newhouse's extremely interesting post contained one subject
that my own research suggests wasn't necessarily the case. As Irene
wrote, it wasn't easy to leave; true, but it was accomplished
frequently.

In private research for our family, very few Reviskii Skazski pages
do not show at least one man marked as having run away or
disappeared. (The pages of course show more than just my family, as
do the US Censuses and I imagine others.)

The pages run >from the 1830s to 1875, in Podolia. While this was a
western frontier area with a constantly changing border, it still
took quite a bit of doing, both practically and physically, (or
strategically and tactically if you prefer), to get out, which
doesnt't seem to have deterred large numbers >from going ahead.
Fortunately for us, they succeeded.


Michelle Frager, NY
=Belarus/Lith: FRAKT, WOLFSON, LIFSHITZ
=Ukraine/Rom: TREIGER, SIROTA, ZEKTSER, BRONSHTEIN, ZIBELBERG


Re: WW II Reconnaissance Photos #belarus

Hillary Farkas <hillarystanfarkas@...>
 

To discover the existence of specific German reconnaissance photos over
Europe, contact Gerry Luchansky (Gerry.Luchansky@nara.gov) who is head
of the Cartographic Branch at NARA II in College Park, Maryland.

During the DC conference earlier this year, many of us made the trip to
NARA II and discovered that the Archives contains a wealth of
information that very few people know about, including military and FBI
records.

The Cartographic Branch has a collection of 123K "cans" of aerial
reconnaissance films (some 18 million images). These include films >from
U-2 flyovers, civilian and agricultural films, and astoundingly, 12
million German Reconnaissance photos (group RG 373) that were of
significant interest to those of us who made the trip.

Mr. Luchansky is a very gracious man, and will eventually get back to
you with information as to whether the photographs you need are
available. CAVEAT: not all places in Europe were photographed; some of
the photos were taken >from very high altitudes making the features
barely recognizable beyond "moonscape" image; cloud cover was an
omnipresent issue, and many of the photos (originals, mostly 10" x 10")
were heavily marked-up by military personnel.

If you want to see the photos and are in the area, you can arrange a
visit (well-worthwhile), get a researchers card, and view these items
directly. Pre-arrangements for pulling those photos need to be done in
advance to your visit by contacting Mr. Luchansky. While there, you can
make photocopies or even take digital photos. You can also arrange to
have a professional service take digital photos, but this is somewhat
costly, and depends on the quality of the photographs.

You can also request to view captured German photographs taken in areas
of strategic importance during the 30's and 40's. I asked for
Lithuania, and was given one box that contained numerous photographs
from the 1935 election in Memel, Germany (now Klaipaida, Lithuania), and
one photo of Kaunas. Astonishingly, Memel is one of the cities of major
interest to me, but a total surprise when I opened the Lithuania box!

Hillary Farkas
Cupertino, CA
San Francisco Bay Area Jewish Genealogy Society (SFBAJGS)


Belarus SIG #Belarus RE: WW II Reconnaissance Photos #belarus

Hillary Farkas <hillarystanfarkas@...>
 

To discover the existence of specific German reconnaissance photos over
Europe, contact Gerry Luchansky (Gerry.Luchansky@nara.gov) who is head
of the Cartographic Branch at NARA II in College Park, Maryland.

During the DC conference earlier this year, many of us made the trip to
NARA II and discovered that the Archives contains a wealth of
information that very few people know about, including military and FBI
records.

The Cartographic Branch has a collection of 123K "cans" of aerial
reconnaissance films (some 18 million images). These include films >from
U-2 flyovers, civilian and agricultural films, and astoundingly, 12
million German Reconnaissance photos (group RG 373) that were of
significant interest to those of us who made the trip.

Mr. Luchansky is a very gracious man, and will eventually get back to
you with information as to whether the photographs you need are
available. CAVEAT: not all places in Europe were photographed; some of
the photos were taken >from very high altitudes making the features
barely recognizable beyond "moonscape" image; cloud cover was an
omnipresent issue, and many of the photos (originals, mostly 10" x 10")
were heavily marked-up by military personnel.

If you want to see the photos and are in the area, you can arrange a
visit (well-worthwhile), get a researchers card, and view these items
directly. Pre-arrangements for pulling those photos need to be done in
advance to your visit by contacting Mr. Luchansky. While there, you can
make photocopies or even take digital photos. You can also arrange to
have a professional service take digital photos, but this is somewhat
costly, and depends on the quality of the photographs.

You can also request to view captured German photographs taken in areas
of strategic importance during the 30's and 40's. I asked for
Lithuania, and was given one box that contained numerous photographs
from the 1935 election in Memel, Germany (now Klaipaida, Lithuania), and
one photo of Kaunas. Astonishingly, Memel is one of the cities of major
interest to me, but a total surprise when I opened the Lithuania box!

Hillary Farkas
Cupertino, CA
San Francisco Bay Area Jewish Genealogy Society (SFBAJGS)


Re: Aerial Photographs (belarus digest: October 20, 2003) #belarus

NFatouros@...
 

The New York Public Library at 42nd Street and Fifth Avenue also has aerial
photographs places in Europe. I once inquired about a aerial photograph of my
father's native town "Szczerzec" or now "Shchyrets." At first the librarian
found a place near Rawa Ruska, which is some distance >from Lviv, but I insisted
that the town I meant was the one very near Lviv. At last she did locate the
right one.



Naomi Fatouros (nee FELDMAN)
Bloomington, Indiana
NFatouros@aol.com
Researching: BELKOWSKY and BIELKOWSKY, Odessa,St. Petersburg and
Berdichev;ROTHSTEIN, Kremenchug; FELDMAN, Pinsk; SCHUTZ, RETTIG, WAHL, Shcherets; LEVY,
WEIL, Mulhouse; SAS or SASS,Podwolochisk; RAPOPORT, Tarnopol, Podwolochisk,
Berdichev; BEHAM, Salok and Kharkov; WOLPIANSKY, Ostryna.


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: Aerial Photographs (belarus digest: October 20, 2003) #belarus

NFatouros@...
 

The New York Public Library at 42nd Street and Fifth Avenue also has aerial
photographs places in Europe. I once inquired about a aerial photograph of my
father's native town "Szczerzec" or now "Shchyrets." At first the librarian
found a place near Rawa Ruska, which is some distance >from Lviv, but I insisted
that the town I meant was the one very near Lviv. At last she did locate the
right one.



Naomi Fatouros (nee FELDMAN)
Bloomington, Indiana
NFatouros@aol.com
Researching: BELKOWSKY and BIELKOWSKY, Odessa,St. Petersburg and
Berdichev;ROTHSTEIN, Kremenchug; FELDMAN, Pinsk; SCHUTZ, RETTIG, WAHL, Shcherets; LEVY,
WEIL, Mulhouse; SAS or SASS,Podwolochisk; RAPOPORT, Tarnopol, Podwolochisk,
Berdichev; BEHAM, Salok and Kharkov; WOLPIANSKY, Ostryna.


database of polish soldiers who died fighting in France at the beginning of WWII. #poland

Nicole Berline <Nicole.Berline@...>
 

Gazeta Beskid, the online polish newspaper in french , has a searchable
database of Polish soldiers who died fighting in France at the beginning of
WWII, with an interesting historical introduction.

Many Jewish names. When known, the precise location of the grave is indicated.

http://www.beskid.com/base/indexgb.php


Nicole Berline, Paris


JRI Poland #Poland database of polish soldiers who died fighting in France at the beginning of WWII. #poland

Nicole Berline <Nicole.Berline@...>
 

Gazeta Beskid, the online polish newspaper in french , has a searchable
database of Polish soldiers who died fighting in France at the beginning of
WWII, with an interesting historical introduction.

Many Jewish names. When known, the precise location of the grave is indicated.

http://www.beskid.com/base/indexgb.php


Nicole Berline, Paris


Konstantynow Project Raises $145 Needs $105 More! #poland

RobinnM@...
 

The Jewish Records Indexing - Poland transliteration team in Poland has just finished typing the 1879-1899 indexes for the Jewish records of Konstantynow nad Bugiem! Now, it's my task to raise the $250 needed to pay for this effort.

I'm pleased to report that $145 has already been raised since Rosh HaShanah... and I need your help to quickly raise the remaining $105. Can I count on your help?

Donations of any size are greatly appreciated. Donations of at least $50 will make a contributor eligible for a copy of the EXCEL spreadsheet of the index with a signed database sharing agreement.

The index will be posted on the Jewish Records Indexing - Poland database
when the $250 has been raised, but qualifying donors will receive their own copy via email once they sign a database sharing agreement... and will not have to wait until the index comes on-line.Here's how to make a donation:

Donations can be accepted by check, VISA or MasterCard! Please earmark your donation for the "Konstantynow PSA project". Mail checks to:

Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
c/o Sheila Salo
5607 Greenleaf Rd
Cheverly, MD 20785
USA

Visa and MasterCard contributions may be phoned to Sheila at (301) 341-1261.

Or print out the form at: http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/visa.htm by clicking on the VISA Card and fax or mail it to Sheila. The fax number is also (301) 341-1261. (8:00 AM to 8:00 PM Eastern time only, please.) For selected countries, JRI-Poland is able to accept bank drafts in a donor's local currency. Please check the JRI-Poland contributions web page for the list of countries. If your country is not on the list, and you do not wish to pay by credit card, please contact JRI-Poland Treasurer, Sheila Salo, for further help. The web site address is:

http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/contrib-non-us.htm

Best wishes for a Happy and Healthy New Year. I will keep you informed about the progress of this exciting project.

Yours truly,

Robinn Magid, Kensington, California
Lublin Archives Project Coordinator
Jewish Records Indexing - Poland

RobinnM@aol.com


JRI Poland #Poland Konstantynow Project Raises $145 Needs $105 More! #poland

RobinnM@...
 

The Jewish Records Indexing - Poland transliteration team in Poland has just finished typing the 1879-1899 indexes for the Jewish records of Konstantynow nad Bugiem! Now, it's my task to raise the $250 needed to pay for this effort.

I'm pleased to report that $145 has already been raised since Rosh HaShanah... and I need your help to quickly raise the remaining $105. Can I count on your help?

Donations of any size are greatly appreciated. Donations of at least $50 will make a contributor eligible for a copy of the EXCEL spreadsheet of the index with a signed database sharing agreement.

The index will be posted on the Jewish Records Indexing - Poland database
when the $250 has been raised, but qualifying donors will receive their own copy via email once they sign a database sharing agreement... and will not have to wait until the index comes on-line.Here's how to make a donation:

Donations can be accepted by check, VISA or MasterCard! Please earmark your donation for the "Konstantynow PSA project". Mail checks to:

Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
c/o Sheila Salo
5607 Greenleaf Rd
Cheverly, MD 20785
USA

Visa and MasterCard contributions may be phoned to Sheila at (301) 341-1261.

Or print out the form at: http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/visa.htm by clicking on the VISA Card and fax or mail it to Sheila. The fax number is also (301) 341-1261. (8:00 AM to 8:00 PM Eastern time only, please.) For selected countries, JRI-Poland is able to accept bank drafts in a donor's local currency. Please check the JRI-Poland contributions web page for the list of countries. If your country is not on the list, and you do not wish to pay by credit card, please contact JRI-Poland Treasurer, Sheila Salo, for further help. The web site address is:

http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/contrib-non-us.htm

Best wishes for a Happy and Healthy New Year. I will keep you informed about the progress of this exciting project.

Yours truly,

Robinn Magid, Kensington, California
Lublin Archives Project Coordinator
Jewish Records Indexing - Poland

RobinnM@aol.com


Re: marrying dead wife's sister #poland

Sharlene Kranz <skranz_99@...>
 

But it certainly did happen. My great-grandfather married his dead wife's sister. They lived in Czeszenow.

-sharlene kranz

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Subject: Re: Inter-family marriage question


I understand that if a man died, it was common for his brother to marry
the widow. I'm just wondering just how common this was in Eastern Europe
in the 1800s. Did it occur often?
Quite the opposite. Except in the specific case of the levirate marriage, a man may not marry his brother's wife, even if the brother is dead. This is specifically proscribed. And the levirate marriage is no longer in practice.

And was there a specific time period that the widow had to wait before
getting married again? What if she married a man not related to her
husband?
Accod\rsing to halacha, a widow may marry right after the thirty day mourning period. A man must wait for the entire holiday cycle to pass, unless he has small children, in which case, thirty days is sufficient.

What about the other way around? If a woman died, would her sister step
up and marry the widower?
Often, but certainly not dictated by halacha. After all, who better to raise the dead sisters kids? On another level, I had an uncle in the US who married his dead wife's widowed sister - she wanted to make sure that no "other woman" took their inheritance.

Israel Pickholtz


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Re: marrying dead wife's sister #poland

Sharlene Kranz <skranz_99@...>
 

But it certainly did happen. My great-grandfather married his dead wife's sister. They lived in Czeszenow.

-sharlene kranz

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Subject: Re: Inter-family marriage question


I understand that if a man died, it was common for his brother to marry
the widow. I'm just wondering just how common this was in Eastern Europe
in the 1800s. Did it occur often?
Quite the opposite. Except in the specific case of the levirate marriage, a man may not marry his brother's wife, even if the brother is dead. This is specifically proscribed. And the levirate marriage is no longer in practice.

And was there a specific time period that the widow had to wait before
getting married again? What if she married a man not related to her
husband?
Accod\rsing to halacha, a widow may marry right after the thirty day mourning period. A man must wait for the entire holiday cycle to pass, unless he has small children, in which case, thirty days is sufficient.

What about the other way around? If a woman died, would her sister step
up and marry the widower?
Often, but certainly not dictated by halacha. After all, who better to raise the dead sisters kids? On another level, I had an uncle in the US who married his dead wife's widowed sister - she wanted to make sure that no "other woman" took their inheritance.

Israel Pickholtz