Date   

Issue 133 of Genealo-J has just been published #germany

Georges Graner
 

Genealo-J, publication of the Jewish Genealogical Society of
France, Issue 133, Spring 2018, has just been published.

Known for the personalities who illustrated it in the 19th
century, the SEE family is less so for the previous century. This gap
was addressed by studying the two lineages >from Salomon SEE, who lived
in Wattwiller and Huningue (Alsace) in the late 17th and early 18th
centuries. One is that of Abraham See, an important lender, who was the
victim of a resounding lawsuit for usury in 1744 and whose son, Solomon,
was murdered two years later; the other is that of Hirtzel See, more
modest but less fertile in tragic destinies. >from sources often
unpublished, the article by Pierre-Andre Meyer traces the gradual
installation of this family in Bergheim (County of Ribeaupierre) >from
the beginning of the 18th century to the Revolution.

Imling is a small town located in the region of Sarrebourg
(department of Moselle) which had an important Jewish population in the
19th century. In 1845, the community rised to 120 persons in a total
population of 300. Like many other communities in the Lorraine area, it
vanished during the following century. The old synagogue is the only
remnant of that past. Some celebrities belong to the descendance of
those families who lived in Imling. Laurent Moyse has already found
1,700 descendents of Yehiel LEVY, mong which the aircraft industrialist
Marcel DASSAULT and his son Serge.

For a complete summary of the contents of Issue 133 send an Email
request to Georges Graner, georges.graner@wanadoo.fr www.genealoj.org


German SIG #Germany Issue 133 of Genealo-J has just been published #germany

Georges Graner
 

Genealo-J, publication of the Jewish Genealogical Society of
France, Issue 133, Spring 2018, has just been published.

Known for the personalities who illustrated it in the 19th
century, the SEE family is less so for the previous century. This gap
was addressed by studying the two lineages >from Salomon SEE, who lived
in Wattwiller and Huningue (Alsace) in the late 17th and early 18th
centuries. One is that of Abraham See, an important lender, who was the
victim of a resounding lawsuit for usury in 1744 and whose son, Solomon,
was murdered two years later; the other is that of Hirtzel See, more
modest but less fertile in tragic destinies. >from sources often
unpublished, the article by Pierre-Andre Meyer traces the gradual
installation of this family in Bergheim (County of Ribeaupierre) >from
the beginning of the 18th century to the Revolution.

Imling is a small town located in the region of Sarrebourg
(department of Moselle) which had an important Jewish population in the
19th century. In 1845, the community rised to 120 persons in a total
population of 300. Like many other communities in the Lorraine area, it
vanished during the following century. The old synagogue is the only
remnant of that past. Some celebrities belong to the descendance of
those families who lived in Imling. Laurent Moyse has already found
1,700 descendents of Yehiel LEVY, mong which the aircraft industrialist
Marcel DASSAULT and his son Serge.

For a complete summary of the contents of Issue 133 send an Email
request to Georges Graner, georges.graner@wanadoo.fr www.genealoj.org


Re: Senta #hungary

elenasc@...
 

From: Elena Schacherl
Sent: Tuesday, March 20, 2018 12:59 PM
Subject: Senta (Zenta)
from elenasc@shaw.ca
Dear Abraham and Peter:

About ten years ago, I made a trip to Europe researching my ancestors. My
great grandmother Ernestine Steinfeld had family in Senta, and my
grandfather Herman Schacherl and all his siblings were born there.

I visited Senta and searched the municipal records as well as the archives
in Belgrade and Szeged. In all three places there were records of births
and deaths in Senta, but none included my relatives.

Senta's records consisted of a shoebox of hand-written notes. I was told
there that the Germans confiscated many Jewish civil records during the war.

Some of the more formal paper records I found in the Szeged archives had
been damaged and were now declared missing including the years I was
searching for. Here's the online link to the Szeged archives, but I'm not
sure anyone there
speaks English: csml@csml.hu. In person, they were very friendly, but I
could only communicate with one of the staff and her English was very
limited. Of course this may have changed.

The Belgrade archives were all electronic. After my return, I hired a
Serbian speaking researcher to check out the Novi Sad records, but again,
nothing was found. Of course, that doesn't mean your family's records aren't
there. I'm afraid I also
don't know if what these archives have is any different >from the LDS
records.

Peter, do you have a contact for the Zombor archives, and if so, do you know
if they are able to communicate in English and are willing to help with
research?

I can certainly recommend a visit to Senta. A lovely town with friendly,
helpful residents.

Best regards,

Elena Schacherl,
Calgary, Alberta


-----Original Message-----


Subject: Zenta
From: pgbakos@hotmail.com
Date: Mon, 19 Mar 2018 11:27:37 +0000
X-Message-Number: 1

Weirdly enough I have been in Zombor/Sombor (the one in Serbia, not
Slovakia) where I used the archives (they were very friendly) and discovered
they also had information about Zenta, which is where some of my Podwinec
family lived. This is not logical, as one would expect that records would
be in Subotica, which is the local center or government, or in Novi Sad
which is the regional capital for the Vojvodina.

Novi Sad has a huge archive which is underfunded, so they don't know the
full extent of their holdings. But that too is worth a visit in the chance
that they hold records as well.

It would be delightful to discover that they have, hidden away, 1857 or 1867
Census sheets.

Don't know about LDS records, but Zombor is worth the visit. Picturesque,
lovely old town, not too horribly renovated or restored, or at least as of
2005 or so. Easy border crossing >from Baja in Hungary, if it hasn't been
closed by certain politicians.

Peter G. Bakos


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Senta #hungary

elenasc@...
 

From: Elena Schacherl
Sent: Tuesday, March 20, 2018 12:59 PM
Subject: Senta (Zenta)
from elenasc@shaw.ca
Dear Abraham and Peter:

About ten years ago, I made a trip to Europe researching my ancestors. My
great grandmother Ernestine Steinfeld had family in Senta, and my
grandfather Herman Schacherl and all his siblings were born there.

I visited Senta and searched the municipal records as well as the archives
in Belgrade and Szeged. In all three places there were records of births
and deaths in Senta, but none included my relatives.

Senta's records consisted of a shoebox of hand-written notes. I was told
there that the Germans confiscated many Jewish civil records during the war.

Some of the more formal paper records I found in the Szeged archives had
been damaged and were now declared missing including the years I was
searching for. Here's the online link to the Szeged archives, but I'm not
sure anyone there
speaks English: csml@csml.hu. In person, they were very friendly, but I
could only communicate with one of the staff and her English was very
limited. Of course this may have changed.

The Belgrade archives were all electronic. After my return, I hired a
Serbian speaking researcher to check out the Novi Sad records, but again,
nothing was found. Of course, that doesn't mean your family's records aren't
there. I'm afraid I also
don't know if what these archives have is any different >from the LDS
records.

Peter, do you have a contact for the Zombor archives, and if so, do you know
if they are able to communicate in English and are willing to help with
research?

I can certainly recommend a visit to Senta. A lovely town with friendly,
helpful residents.

Best regards,

Elena Schacherl,
Calgary, Alberta


-----Original Message-----


Subject: Zenta
From: pgbakos@hotmail.com
Date: Mon, 19 Mar 2018 11:27:37 +0000
X-Message-Number: 1

Weirdly enough I have been in Zombor/Sombor (the one in Serbia, not
Slovakia) where I used the archives (they were very friendly) and discovered
they also had information about Zenta, which is where some of my Podwinec
family lived. This is not logical, as one would expect that records would
be in Subotica, which is the local center or government, or in Novi Sad
which is the regional capital for the Vojvodina.

Novi Sad has a huge archive which is underfunded, so they don't know the
full extent of their holdings. But that too is worth a visit in the chance
that they hold records as well.

It would be delightful to discover that they have, hidden away, 1857 or 1867
Census sheets.

Don't know about LDS records, but Zombor is worth the visit. Picturesque,
lovely old town, not too horribly renovated or restored, or at least as of
2005 or so. Easy border crossing >from Baja in Hungary, if it hasn't been
closed by certain politicians.

Peter G. Bakos


US Holocaust Memorial Museum exhibit on Germany's annexation of Austria #germany

jplowens@...
 

The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum (USHMM) has a new exhibit,
"Eyewitnesses to Injustice", which is about Americans Ross and Helen
Baker who were in Austria during the Anschluss - annexation
of Austria by the Nazis in March 1938. Ross Baker was on sabbatical
studying in Austria when this occurred.
The Rosses broadened their focus and recorded the political and social
changes.

While the majority of the materials may only be seen at the Museum,
such as a diary and letters and extensive footage, they have placed
on line a 4 plus minute video that shows the annexation as it took place
and Jewish businesses place "Jude" on their store windows and Mrs. Ross
being prevented >from entering a Jewish store.

To read about the exhibit see:
https://www.ushmm.org/online/2016calendar/#march

To see the videos go to: https://tinyurl.com/ycgatfen
(Original URL):
http://efilms.ushmm.org/film_player?movieID=3D41&movieSig=3DEF-NS_041_USHMM
&movieSpeed=18

The Museum has additional information about the Anschluss which can be
accessed on the exhibit page mentioned above.

John P. Lowens, Suburban NYC with thanks to IAJGS


German SIG #Germany US Holocaust Memorial Museum exhibit on Germany's annexation of Austria #germany

jplowens@...
 

The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum (USHMM) has a new exhibit,
"Eyewitnesses to Injustice", which is about Americans Ross and Helen
Baker who were in Austria during the Anschluss - annexation
of Austria by the Nazis in March 1938. Ross Baker was on sabbatical
studying in Austria when this occurred.
The Rosses broadened their focus and recorded the political and social
changes.

While the majority of the materials may only be seen at the Museum,
such as a diary and letters and extensive footage, they have placed
on line a 4 plus minute video that shows the annexation as it took place
and Jewish businesses place "Jude" on their store windows and Mrs. Ross
being prevented >from entering a Jewish store.

To read about the exhibit see:
https://www.ushmm.org/online/2016calendar/#march

To see the videos go to: https://tinyurl.com/ycgatfen
(Original URL):
http://efilms.ushmm.org/film_player?movieID=3D41&movieSig=3DEF-NS_041_USHMM
&movieSpeed=18

The Museum has additional information about the Anschluss which can be
accessed on the exhibit page mentioned above.

John P. Lowens, Suburban NYC with thanks to IAJGS


Translation of Hebrew and Russian marriage record #belarus

Karen Amato
 

I've posted 2 images of a marriage record >from Mogilev, Belarus in
Hebrew, one magnified, for which I need a translation.
I've posted 1 image of the record in Russian, for which I need a
translation.

The Hebrew images are on ViewMate at the following addresses
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=3DVM64894
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=3DVM64898

The Russian equivalent is at this address:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=3DVM64896

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Thank you,
Karen Milstone Amato
ISAACSON, IZAKSON, KEYFETZ, PONARSKY (Mogilev, Msitslavl)


Belarus SIG #Belarus Translation of Hebrew and Russian marriage record #belarus

Karen Amato
 

I've posted 2 images of a marriage record >from Mogilev, Belarus in
Hebrew, one magnified, for which I need a translation.
I've posted 1 image of the record in Russian, for which I need a
translation.

The Hebrew images are on ViewMate at the following addresses
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=3DVM64894
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=3DVM64898

The Russian equivalent is at this address:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=3DVM64896

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Thank you,
Karen Milstone Amato
ISAACSON, IZAKSON, KEYFETZ, PONARSKY (Mogilev, Msitslavl)


Vital Records Polish, translation please #lodz #poland

Nomi Waksberg <nwaksberg@...>
 

Hello,

I've just posted 4 archival documents on ViewMate:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM64845
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM64846
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM64847
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM64848

I believe they are each part of my father's extended family.

Please respond using the online ViewMate form.

Thank you in advance for your valuable time and help.

Nomi Fiszenfeld Waksberg

FISZENFLED, BRAUN, WAKSBERG, ROZENBLAT,
FRYDMAN, ZINGER, WOLKOWICZ, RYGIEL, KLAJNBART (and variations of each
spelling)


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland Vital Records Polish, translation please #lodz #poland

Nomi Waksberg <nwaksberg@...>
 

Hello,

I've just posted 4 archival documents on ViewMate:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM64845
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM64846
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM64847
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM64848

I believe they are each part of my father's extended family.

Please respond using the online ViewMate form.

Thank you in advance for your valuable time and help.

Nomi Fiszenfeld Waksberg

FISZENFLED, BRAUN, WAKSBERG, ROZENBLAT,
FRYDMAN, ZINGER, WOLKOWICZ, RYGIEL, KLAJNBART (and variations of each
spelling)


Glucksberg-Lindeman - does my theory seem likely? #poland

rv Kaplan
 

My great great great great grandparents were Berek and Blume Lindeman
of Kutno in Poland. The death certificate of Blume in 1818 shows that
the death was registered by her widower Berek and by her son-in-law,
Michal Gluksberg.

I can find no marriage of Michal Gluksberg to a Lindeman bride in JRI-Poland.

However JRI-Poland does index a number of births of children of a
Michel Glucksberg and his wife Ryfka, daughter of Berek.

eg Dwoyra Glucksberg married Hersz Mylgrom in Warsaw in 1828.

Another child of Michel Glucksberg and his wife Ryfka, daughter of
Berek, was Abraham Glucksberg, married in 1833, aged 18, so born about
1815.

The Kutno birth records show that a Dwora Jenta Saak was born in 1811,
daughter of Michal Saak and Ryfke, daughter of Berek Lindeman.

Is it likely that Dwora Saak in 1811 was Dwoyra Glucksberg in 1828? Is
it likely that Michal Saak in 1811 had become Michal Glucksberg by
1815, when his son was born? This would explain Michal Glucksberg
being listed on the death certificate of Blume Lindeman as her son in
law.

(And Michal and Ryfka's youngest child in 1820 was named Blima -
perhaps after Ryfla's mother?).

I don't have 100% proof that Michael Gluksberg married Ryfka Lindeman,
sister of my great great great grandfather, but that is my theory.

Anyone have any comments?

thanks

Harvey Kaplan
Glasgow, Scotland

LINDERMAN, LINDEMAN - Kutno, Plock
SZLAKMAN, LOPATKA - Plock
FUX - Kutno


JRI Poland #Poland Glucksberg-Lindeman - does my theory seem likely? #poland

rv Kaplan
 

My great great great great grandparents were Berek and Blume Lindeman
of Kutno in Poland. The death certificate of Blume in 1818 shows that
the death was registered by her widower Berek and by her son-in-law,
Michal Gluksberg.

I can find no marriage of Michal Gluksberg to a Lindeman bride in JRI-Poland.

However JRI-Poland does index a number of births of children of a
Michel Glucksberg and his wife Ryfka, daughter of Berek.

eg Dwoyra Glucksberg married Hersz Mylgrom in Warsaw in 1828.

Another child of Michel Glucksberg and his wife Ryfka, daughter of
Berek, was Abraham Glucksberg, married in 1833, aged 18, so born about
1815.

The Kutno birth records show that a Dwora Jenta Saak was born in 1811,
daughter of Michal Saak and Ryfke, daughter of Berek Lindeman.

Is it likely that Dwora Saak in 1811 was Dwoyra Glucksberg in 1828? Is
it likely that Michal Saak in 1811 had become Michal Glucksberg by
1815, when his son was born? This would explain Michal Glucksberg
being listed on the death certificate of Blume Lindeman as her son in
law.

(And Michal and Ryfka's youngest child in 1820 was named Blima -
perhaps after Ryfla's mother?).

I don't have 100% proof that Michael Gluksberg married Ryfka Lindeman,
sister of my great great great grandfather, but that is my theory.

Anyone have any comments?

thanks

Harvey Kaplan
Glasgow, Scotland

LINDERMAN, LINDEMAN - Kutno, Plock
SZLAKMAN, LOPATKA - Plock
FUX - Kutno


More names from Gorlice (Gorlitz) school records #poland

Russ Maurer
 

Last September I posted here about my initial work indexing records of
Jewish students at four primary schools in Gorlice (Yiddish: Gorlitz),
located about 25 miles south of Tarnow. The records are held at the
Polish State Archive in Przemysl. At that time, I focused on students
in first grade, as most students who went to school in Gorlitz would
have passed through first grade in Gorlitz at some point.

I have now indexed the remaining records >from all the grades. Not
surprisingly, I found about 500 students not in the earlier index,
bringing the total number of students to nearly 3000. The new,
complete, index includes links to all the annual report cards for each
student, a total of 13,000 records over the period 1893-1925 (years of
birth >from about 1880 to World War I). Typically, the information
found in the report card included the student's full name, the date
and place of birth, and the name of at least one parent or guardian.
The occupation of the adult was also mentioned, but I have not indexed
the occupation.

The Excel spreadsheet I have created may be downloaded at this URL:
https://goo.gl/kEaAga . I recommend reviewing the Read Me tab for
further information. Given the lack of other records for Gorlice,
this is a precious resource for Gorlice researchers. I have donated a
copy to JRI-Poland, who have kindly agreed to add the information to
their free on-line database. JRI-Poland will make an announcement
when they do the upload.

Russ Maurer
Pepper Pike, Ohio
Researching RIEGER >from Gorlice


JRI Poland #Poland More names from Gorlice (Gorlitz) school records #poland

Russ Maurer
 

Last September I posted here about my initial work indexing records of
Jewish students at four primary schools in Gorlice (Yiddish: Gorlitz),
located about 25 miles south of Tarnow. The records are held at the
Polish State Archive in Przemysl. At that time, I focused on students
in first grade, as most students who went to school in Gorlitz would
have passed through first grade in Gorlitz at some point.

I have now indexed the remaining records >from all the grades. Not
surprisingly, I found about 500 students not in the earlier index,
bringing the total number of students to nearly 3000. The new,
complete, index includes links to all the annual report cards for each
student, a total of 13,000 records over the period 1893-1925 (years of
birth >from about 1880 to World War I). Typically, the information
found in the report card included the student's full name, the date
and place of birth, and the name of at least one parent or guardian.
The occupation of the adult was also mentioned, but I have not indexed
the occupation.

The Excel spreadsheet I have created may be downloaded at this URL:
https://goo.gl/kEaAga . I recommend reviewing the Read Me tab for
further information. Given the lack of other records for Gorlice,
this is a precious resource for Gorlice researchers. I have donated a
copy to JRI-Poland, who have kindly agreed to add the information to
their free on-line database. JRI-Poland will make an announcement
when they do the upload.

Russ Maurer
Pepper Pike, Ohio
Researching RIEGER >from Gorlice


News for Galitzianers -- New AGAD Archive Records #poland

Mark Halpern
 

Dear Fellow Galitzianers:

Over the last eight months, many hundreds of Jewish vital record
registers have been transferred >from the USC office (civil records
office) in Warsaw to the AGAD Archive in Warsaw. These registers are now
available to JRI-Poland for indexing. Many of these registers are for
marriages and deaths covering years 1917-1936. Actually a small number
of these registers have already been indexed and some of these will be
uploaded to our database in a month or two.

There a group of new towns - towns where no previous records have been
indexed by the AGAD indexing project - that might be of interest to my
fellow researchers.

Bohorodczany
Buczacz
Dunajow
Grzymalow
Halicz
Lysiec
Probuzna
Solotwina
Touste
Turka

In addition, the following towns have new records at AGAD ready for
indexing.

Bolechow, Bolszowce, Borszczow, Boryslaw, Bobrka, Brzezany, Budzanow,
Bursztyn, Chodorow, Czortkow, Drohobycz, Gliniany, Gologory, Grodek
Jagiellonski, Gwozdziec, Horodenka, Jagielnica, Janow Trembowelski,
Jaryczow Nowy, Jaworow, Kamionka Strumilowa, Kolomyja, Komarno,
Kopyczynce, Kosow, Kozlow, Kozowa, Lwow, Mielnica, Mikulince,
Monasterzyska, Mosty Wielkie, Nadworna, Narajow, Nawaria, Obertyn,
Podhajce, Podkamien, Podwoloczyska, Przemyslany, Rawa Ruska, Rohatyn,
Rozdol, Rudki, Sambor, Sasow, Skala, Skalat, Sniatyn, Skole, Sokal,
Sokolowka, Stanislawow, Stary Sambor, Strusow, Stryj, Szczerzec,
Tarnopol, Tartakow, Trembowla, Uhnow, Winniki, Zabie, Zablotow, Zalozse,
Zbaraz, Zborow, Zloczow, Zniesienie (Lwow), Zolkiew

As usual, we need the support of interested researchers to ensure that
these records will be indexed. Indexing usually is not started until a
base amount of contributions have been received for that town's indexing
project. If you are interested in supporting your town's indexing
project, please see http://www.jri-poland.org/support.htm for
instructions on how to make your contribution. Please make sure to apply
your contribution to AGAD-your town(s).

If you have any questions, please contact me at mark@halpern.com.

Mark Halpern
AGAD Archive Coordinator


JRI Poland #Poland News for Galitzianers -- New AGAD Archive Records #poland

Mark Halpern
 

Dear Fellow Galitzianers:

Over the last eight months, many hundreds of Jewish vital record
registers have been transferred >from the USC office (civil records
office) in Warsaw to the AGAD Archive in Warsaw. These registers are now
available to JRI-Poland for indexing. Many of these registers are for
marriages and deaths covering years 1917-1936. Actually a small number
of these registers have already been indexed and some of these will be
uploaded to our database in a month or two.

There a group of new towns - towns where no previous records have been
indexed by the AGAD indexing project - that might be of interest to my
fellow researchers.

Bohorodczany
Buczacz
Dunajow
Grzymalow
Halicz
Lysiec
Probuzna
Solotwina
Touste
Turka

In addition, the following towns have new records at AGAD ready for
indexing.

Bolechow, Bolszowce, Borszczow, Boryslaw, Bobrka, Brzezany, Budzanow,
Bursztyn, Chodorow, Czortkow, Drohobycz, Gliniany, Gologory, Grodek
Jagiellonski, Gwozdziec, Horodenka, Jagielnica, Janow Trembowelski,
Jaryczow Nowy, Jaworow, Kamionka Strumilowa, Kolomyja, Komarno,
Kopyczynce, Kosow, Kozlow, Kozowa, Lwow, Mielnica, Mikulince,
Monasterzyska, Mosty Wielkie, Nadworna, Narajow, Nawaria, Obertyn,
Podhajce, Podkamien, Podwoloczyska, Przemyslany, Rawa Ruska, Rohatyn,
Rozdol, Rudki, Sambor, Sasow, Skala, Skalat, Sniatyn, Skole, Sokal,
Sokolowka, Stanislawow, Stary Sambor, Strusow, Stryj, Szczerzec,
Tarnopol, Tartakow, Trembowla, Uhnow, Winniki, Zabie, Zablotow, Zalozse,
Zbaraz, Zborow, Zloczow, Zniesienie (Lwow), Zolkiew

As usual, we need the support of interested researchers to ensure that
these records will be indexed. Indexing usually is not started until a
base amount of contributions have been received for that town's indexing
project. If you are interested in supporting your town's indexing
project, please see http://www.jri-poland.org/support.htm for
instructions on how to make your contribution. Please make sure to apply
your contribution to AGAD-your town(s).

If you have any questions, please contact me at mark@halpern.com.

Mark Halpern
AGAD Archive Coordinator


News for Galitzianers -- New AGAD Archive Records #galicia

Mark Halpern
 

Dear Fellow Galitzianers:

Over the last eight months, many hundreds of Jewish vital record
registers have been transferred >from the USC office (civil records office)
in Warsaw to the AGAD Archive in Warsaw. These registers are now
available to JRI-Poland for indexing. Many of these registers are for
marriages and deaths covering years 1917-1936. Actually a small
number of these registers have already been indexed and some of these
will be uploaded to our database in a month or two.

There a group of new towns - towns where no previous records have
been indexed by the AGAD indexing project - that might be of interest to
my fellow researchers.

Bohorodczany
Buczacz
Dunajow
Grzymalow
Halicz
Lysiec
Probuzna
Solotwina
Touste
Turka

In addition, the following towns have new records at AGAD ready for
indexing.

Bolechow, Bolszowce, Borszczow, Boryslaw, Bobrka, Brzezany,
Budzanow, Bursztyn, Chodorow, Czortkow, Drohobycz, Gliniany,
Gologory, Grodek Jagiellonski, Gwozdziec, Horodenka, Jagielnica,
Janow Trembowelski, Jaryczow Nowy, Jaworow, Kamionka Strumilowa,
Kolomyja, Komarno, Kopyczynce, Kosow, Kozlow, Kozowa, Lwow,
Mielnica, Mikulince, Monasterzyska, Mosty Wielkie, Nadworna, Narajow,
Nawaria, Obertyn, Podhajce, Podkamien, Podwoloczyska, Przemyslany,
Rawa Ruska, Rohatyn, Rozdol, Rudki, Sambor, Sasow, Skala, Skalat,
Sniatyn, Skole, Sokal, Sokolowka, Stanislawow, Stary Sambor, Strusow,
Stryj, Szczerzec, Tarnopol, Tartakow, Trembowla, Uhnow, Winniki, Zabie,
Zablotow, Zalozse, Zbaraz, Zborow, Zloczow, Zniesienie (Lwow), Zolkiew

As usual, we need the support of interested researchers to ensure that
these records will be indexed. If you have any questions, please contact
me at mark@halpern.com.

Mark Halpern
AGAD Archive Coordinator


More names from Gorlice (Gorlitz) school records #galicia

Russ Maurer
 

Last September I posted here about my initial work indexing records of
Jewish students at four primary schools in Gorlice (Yiddish: Gorlitz),
located about 25 miles south of Tarnow. The records are held at the
Polish State Archive in Przemysl. At that time, I focused on students in
first grade, as most students who went to school in Gorlitz would have
passed through first grade in Gorlitz at some point.

I have now indexed the remaining records >from all the grades. Not
surprisingly, I found about 500 students not in the earlier index,
bringing the total number of students to nearly 3000. The new,
complete, index includes links to all the annual report cards for each
student, a total of 13,000 records over the period 1893-1925 (years of
birth >from about 1880 to World War I). Typically, the information found
in the report card included the student's full name, the date and place
of birth, and the name of at least one parent or guardian. The
occupation of the adult was also mentioned, but I have not indexed the
occupation.

The Excel spreadsheet I have created may be downloaded at this URL:
https://goo.gl/kEaAga . I recommend reviewing the Read Me tab for
further information. Given the lack of other records for Gorlice, this is
a precious resource for Gorlice researchers. I have donated a copy to
JRI-Poland, who have kindly agreed to add the information to their free
on-line database. JRI-Poland will make an announcement when they
do the upload.

Russ Maurer
Pepper Pike, Ohio
Researching RIEGER >from Gorlice


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia News for Galitzianers -- New AGAD Archive Records #galicia

Mark Halpern
 

Dear Fellow Galitzianers:

Over the last eight months, many hundreds of Jewish vital record
registers have been transferred >from the USC office (civil records office)
in Warsaw to the AGAD Archive in Warsaw. These registers are now
available to JRI-Poland for indexing. Many of these registers are for
marriages and deaths covering years 1917-1936. Actually a small
number of these registers have already been indexed and some of these
will be uploaded to our database in a month or two.

There a group of new towns - towns where no previous records have
been indexed by the AGAD indexing project - that might be of interest to
my fellow researchers.

Bohorodczany
Buczacz
Dunajow
Grzymalow
Halicz
Lysiec
Probuzna
Solotwina
Touste
Turka

In addition, the following towns have new records at AGAD ready for
indexing.

Bolechow, Bolszowce, Borszczow, Boryslaw, Bobrka, Brzezany,
Budzanow, Bursztyn, Chodorow, Czortkow, Drohobycz, Gliniany,
Gologory, Grodek Jagiellonski, Gwozdziec, Horodenka, Jagielnica,
Janow Trembowelski, Jaryczow Nowy, Jaworow, Kamionka Strumilowa,
Kolomyja, Komarno, Kopyczynce, Kosow, Kozlow, Kozowa, Lwow,
Mielnica, Mikulince, Monasterzyska, Mosty Wielkie, Nadworna, Narajow,
Nawaria, Obertyn, Podhajce, Podkamien, Podwoloczyska, Przemyslany,
Rawa Ruska, Rohatyn, Rozdol, Rudki, Sambor, Sasow, Skala, Skalat,
Sniatyn, Skole, Sokal, Sokolowka, Stanislawow, Stary Sambor, Strusow,
Stryj, Szczerzec, Tarnopol, Tartakow, Trembowla, Uhnow, Winniki, Zabie,
Zablotow, Zalozse, Zbaraz, Zborow, Zloczow, Zniesienie (Lwow), Zolkiew

As usual, we need the support of interested researchers to ensure that
these records will be indexed. If you have any questions, please contact
me at mark@halpern.com.

Mark Halpern
AGAD Archive Coordinator


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia More names from Gorlice (Gorlitz) school records #galicia

Russ Maurer
 

Last September I posted here about my initial work indexing records of
Jewish students at four primary schools in Gorlice (Yiddish: Gorlitz),
located about 25 miles south of Tarnow. The records are held at the
Polish State Archive in Przemysl. At that time, I focused on students in
first grade, as most students who went to school in Gorlitz would have
passed through first grade in Gorlitz at some point.

I have now indexed the remaining records >from all the grades. Not
surprisingly, I found about 500 students not in the earlier index,
bringing the total number of students to nearly 3000. The new,
complete, index includes links to all the annual report cards for each
student, a total of 13,000 records over the period 1893-1925 (years of
birth >from about 1880 to World War I). Typically, the information found
in the report card included the student's full name, the date and place
of birth, and the name of at least one parent or guardian. The
occupation of the adult was also mentioned, but I have not indexed the
occupation.

The Excel spreadsheet I have created may be downloaded at this URL:
https://goo.gl/kEaAga . I recommend reviewing the Read Me tab for
further information. Given the lack of other records for Gorlice, this is
a precious resource for Gorlice researchers. I have donated a copy to
JRI-Poland, who have kindly agreed to add the information to their free
on-line database. JRI-Poland will make an announcement when they
do the upload.

Russ Maurer
Pepper Pike, Ohio
Researching RIEGER >from Gorlice

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