Date   

Re: From Rashi to King David #rabbinic

MBernet@...
 

I got to thinking, perhaps Rashi could trace his descent to the
Kalonymos rabbinical dynasty that exerted major influence in the
Ashkenazi world of the 9th to 13th centuries. The Kalonmos rabbis of
Lucca, in southern Italy, were invited around the year 800 by
Charles, king of the Francs, to move to Mainz and other cities in
the Rhine region, to head the Jewish communities, and were
ultimately the teachers of Rashi and his generation.

The German Jews up to the 9th century (descendants largely >from the
Romans' Jewish slaves, camp followers, merchants and soldiers, and
their local spouses) were objectively unlikely to have been able to
trace their history back to Eretz Yisrael and to the period of the
Tanna'im (rabbis of the Mishna). The Kalonymos family on the other
hand, a powerful and scholarly group in then prosperous and highly
literate southern Italy, who may well have migrated there >from Eretz
Yisrael during the time of the Mishna, would have been much more
likely to be able to trace back their roots.

The Encyclopedia Judaica states that a number of genealogies of the
Kalonymos family are extant, listing the parental links and the
links of teacher-and-student. It cites as "the best and most
complete [sic]" version one "written probably around 1220 by Eleazar
b. Judah (b. Kalonymus) of Worms." This tree was written in the
context of establishing the veracity of Jewish traditions and
prayers >from earlier centuries

It starts with "I, Eleazar ha-Katan, received the true version of
the prayers >from my father and teacher, Rabbi Judah, son of Rabbi
Kalonymus, son of Moses, son of Rabbi Judah, son of Rabbi Kalonymus,
son of Rabbi Moses, son of Rabbi Kalonymus, son of Judah. And I also
received it >from Judah he-Hasid, as he received it >from his father,
Rabbi Samuel he-Hasid, as he received it >from Rabbi Eleazar
he-Hazzan of Speyer; for when Rabbi Kalonymus died, his son Rabbi
Samuel he-Hasid was only a boy, so he gave (transmitted) it to Rabbi
Eleazar he-Hazzan of Speyer, and when he, Rabbi Samuel he-Hasid,
grew up, he received [the secrets] >from him, as was ordered by Rabbi
Kalonymus the Elder. "And Rabbi Kalonymus the Elder received [the
tradition] >from his father, Rabbi Isaac; and Rabbi Isaac received
[it] >from his father, Rabbi Eleazar the Great, son of Rabbi Isaac,
son of Rabbi Joshua, son of Rabbi Abun, the Rabbi Abun who was the
grandfather of Rabbi Simeon the Great, of Mainz."

And on and on, backward and forward, linking together many of the
greatest scholars and Peytanim of Germany in the 9th to 12th
centuries all the way back to "They all received the secret of the
true version of the prayers, teacher >from his teacher, up to Abu
Aaron, the son of Rabbi Samuel ha-Nasi, who came >from Babylonia
because of a misadventure, and had to wander >from place to
place ... son of Kalonymus, son of Rabbi Judah. He was the first who
left Lombardy, he and his sons, Rabbi Kalonymus and Rabbi Jekuthiel,
and his relation Rabbi Ithiel, and other important persons; for the
king Charles brought them with him >from the country of Lombardy, and
settled them in Mainz."

I think it is safe to assume that if "Eleazar ha-Katan, son of Rabbi
Judah, son of Rabbi Kalonymus, son of Moses, son of Rabbi Judah, son
of Rabbi Kalonymus, son of Rabbi Moses, son of Rabbi Kalonymus, son
of Judah" had known anything about his ancestry earlier than what
must have been the 7th or 8th century in Lucca, he woud have related
it. Since he did not, it must have been unknown. And, if even the
well-documented Kalonymos family, scholars >from way back in a very
civilized and cultured area of the world, could not trace back their
ancestry, it is unlikely that Rashi could have traced non-Kalonymos
ancestors through a thousand years of slavery or soldiery in the
lands of the Franks and the early Germanic and Goth primitives.

There were other rabbinic lines of descent -- the MaHaRaL of Prague
was reported to be a descendant of Hai ben Sherira Ga'on [939 -
1038], in Babylonia, who could credibly trace his ancestry back to
the time of the Mishna. I find Hai ben Sherira's line much easier to
accept because of the unbroken traditions and redords in Babylonia,
but I wonder whether the Hai Gaon-Maharal connection may not have
been the result of the Maharal's eager followers.

Michael Bernet
New York


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Re: From Rashi to King David #rabbinic

MBernet@...
 

I got to thinking, perhaps Rashi could trace his descent to the
Kalonymos rabbinical dynasty that exerted major influence in the
Ashkenazi world of the 9th to 13th centuries. The Kalonmos rabbis of
Lucca, in southern Italy, were invited around the year 800 by
Charles, king of the Francs, to move to Mainz and other cities in
the Rhine region, to head the Jewish communities, and were
ultimately the teachers of Rashi and his generation.

The German Jews up to the 9th century (descendants largely >from the
Romans' Jewish slaves, camp followers, merchants and soldiers, and
their local spouses) were objectively unlikely to have been able to
trace their history back to Eretz Yisrael and to the period of the
Tanna'im (rabbis of the Mishna). The Kalonymos family on the other
hand, a powerful and scholarly group in then prosperous and highly
literate southern Italy, who may well have migrated there >from Eretz
Yisrael during the time of the Mishna, would have been much more
likely to be able to trace back their roots.

The Encyclopedia Judaica states that a number of genealogies of the
Kalonymos family are extant, listing the parental links and the
links of teacher-and-student. It cites as "the best and most
complete [sic]" version one "written probably around 1220 by Eleazar
b. Judah (b. Kalonymus) of Worms." This tree was written in the
context of establishing the veracity of Jewish traditions and
prayers >from earlier centuries

It starts with "I, Eleazar ha-Katan, received the true version of
the prayers >from my father and teacher, Rabbi Judah, son of Rabbi
Kalonymus, son of Moses, son of Rabbi Judah, son of Rabbi Kalonymus,
son of Rabbi Moses, son of Rabbi Kalonymus, son of Judah. And I also
received it >from Judah he-Hasid, as he received it >from his father,
Rabbi Samuel he-Hasid, as he received it >from Rabbi Eleazar
he-Hazzan of Speyer; for when Rabbi Kalonymus died, his son Rabbi
Samuel he-Hasid was only a boy, so he gave (transmitted) it to Rabbi
Eleazar he-Hazzan of Speyer, and when he, Rabbi Samuel he-Hasid,
grew up, he received [the secrets] >from him, as was ordered by Rabbi
Kalonymus the Elder. "And Rabbi Kalonymus the Elder received [the
tradition] >from his father, Rabbi Isaac; and Rabbi Isaac received
[it] >from his father, Rabbi Eleazar the Great, son of Rabbi Isaac,
son of Rabbi Joshua, son of Rabbi Abun, the Rabbi Abun who was the
grandfather of Rabbi Simeon the Great, of Mainz."

And on and on, backward and forward, linking together many of the
greatest scholars and Peytanim of Germany in the 9th to 12th
centuries all the way back to "They all received the secret of the
true version of the prayers, teacher >from his teacher, up to Abu
Aaron, the son of Rabbi Samuel ha-Nasi, who came >from Babylonia
because of a misadventure, and had to wander >from place to
place ... son of Kalonymus, son of Rabbi Judah. He was the first who
left Lombardy, he and his sons, Rabbi Kalonymus and Rabbi Jekuthiel,
and his relation Rabbi Ithiel, and other important persons; for the
king Charles brought them with him >from the country of Lombardy, and
settled them in Mainz."

I think it is safe to assume that if "Eleazar ha-Katan, son of Rabbi
Judah, son of Rabbi Kalonymus, son of Moses, son of Rabbi Judah, son
of Rabbi Kalonymus, son of Rabbi Moses, son of Rabbi Kalonymus, son
of Judah" had known anything about his ancestry earlier than what
must have been the 7th or 8th century in Lucca, he woud have related
it. Since he did not, it must have been unknown. And, if even the
well-documented Kalonymos family, scholars >from way back in a very
civilized and cultured area of the world, could not trace back their
ancestry, it is unlikely that Rashi could have traced non-Kalonymos
ancestors through a thousand years of slavery or soldiery in the
lands of the Franks and the early Germanic and Goth primitives.

There were other rabbinic lines of descent -- the MaHaRaL of Prague
was reported to be a descendant of Hai ben Sherira Ga'on [939 -
1038], in Babylonia, who could credibly trace his ancestry back to
the time of the Mishna. I find Hai ben Sherira's line much easier to
accept because of the unbroken traditions and redords in Babylonia,
but I wonder whether the Hai Gaon-Maharal connection may not have
been the result of the Maharal's eager followers.

Michael Bernet
New York


Passports in Ukraine? (two words in Cyrillic, 1875) #general

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@...>
 

I am surprised by two words in Cyrillic, >from the 1875 census of Nikolayev,
Ukraine. The words are here:

http://www4.wittenberg.edu/academics/music/kazez/NikB.jpg

My amateur translation of the left column indicates that this census gives
the age of the residents of Nikolayev according to their passport. Could
that be? I would think it exceedingly rare that someone in 1875 in Ukraine
would have a passport! Or did the word "passport" have some a different
meaning at that time?

Dan

P.S. Nikolayev is located southwest of Kiev, very near Proskurov, here:

http://userpages.wittenberg.edu/dkazez/fam/city/Ob-cit.html

Here are all of the towns and surnames in this Nikolayev document:

http://www.kazez.com/~dan/Ukraine/1800s.html


Daniel Kazez <dkazez@wittenberg.edu>
Springfield, Ohio USA
Ukraine: OBERMAN-HOBERMAN-GUBERMAN, LIS-LYS, SOBEL, STEIN, AKSMAN-AXMAN
Ukraine: Zaslav-Mikolayev-Krasilov-Medvedovka-Proskurov-Mogilev
http://www.kazez.com/~dan/oberman/


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Passports in Ukraine? (two words in Cyrillic, 1875) #general

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@...>
 

I am surprised by two words in Cyrillic, >from the 1875 census of Nikolayev,
Ukraine. The words are here:

http://www4.wittenberg.edu/academics/music/kazez/NikB.jpg

My amateur translation of the left column indicates that this census gives
the age of the residents of Nikolayev according to their passport. Could
that be? I would think it exceedingly rare that someone in 1875 in Ukraine
would have a passport! Or did the word "passport" have some a different
meaning at that time?

Dan

P.S. Nikolayev is located southwest of Kiev, very near Proskurov, here:

http://userpages.wittenberg.edu/dkazez/fam/city/Ob-cit.html

Here are all of the towns and surnames in this Nikolayev document:

http://www.kazez.com/~dan/Ukraine/1800s.html


Daniel Kazez <dkazez@wittenberg.edu>
Springfield, Ohio USA
Ukraine: OBERMAN-HOBERMAN-GUBERMAN, LIS-LYS, SOBEL, STEIN, AKSMAN-AXMAN
Ukraine: Zaslav-Mikolayev-Krasilov-Medvedovka-Proskurov-Mogilev
http://www.kazez.com/~dan/oberman/


Anyone going to NYC Municipal Archives soon? #general

Elise Friedman <elise@...>
 

If anyone is going to the Municipal Archives in NYC within the next week
or two and wouldn't mind looking at a couple vital records for me, would
you please contact me? I have exact record numbers and don't need a copy
of the record, just need the information >from it. I'll be going there in
a month or so myself, but if I could obtain the info >from these records
now, it'll enable me to do some additional preliminary research before I
get there.

Please respond privately.

Thanks!
Elise Friedman
Columbia, Maryland

Researching:
PALEVSKY/PALEFSKY, POLLACK, DUBIN (Horodetz/Kobryn, Belarus);
LIPSCHITZ/LIFSHITZ (Brest-Litovsk, Belarus);
EISNER, TAUB, SASS (Myszkowice/Tarnopol, Ukraine);
MILLER [or variants], TAUB (Dobromil/Byblo, Ukraine);
CHERNOCK/CHERNIACK (Novozybkov, Russia); CHESIN (Mstislavl, Belarus);
KMIOTEK/FRIEDMAN/LEWIS (Makow, Lomza, Poland)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Anyone going to NYC Municipal Archives soon? #general

Elise Friedman <elise@...>
 

If anyone is going to the Municipal Archives in NYC within the next week
or two and wouldn't mind looking at a couple vital records for me, would
you please contact me? I have exact record numbers and don't need a copy
of the record, just need the information >from it. I'll be going there in
a month or so myself, but if I could obtain the info >from these records
now, it'll enable me to do some additional preliminary research before I
get there.

Please respond privately.

Thanks!
Elise Friedman
Columbia, Maryland

Researching:
PALEVSKY/PALEFSKY, POLLACK, DUBIN (Horodetz/Kobryn, Belarus);
LIPSCHITZ/LIFSHITZ (Brest-Litovsk, Belarus);
EISNER, TAUB, SASS (Myszkowice/Tarnopol, Ukraine);
MILLER [or variants], TAUB (Dobromil/Byblo, Ukraine);
CHERNOCK/CHERNIACK (Novozybkov, Russia); CHESIN (Mstislavl, Belarus);
KMIOTEK/FRIEDMAN/LEWIS (Makow, Lomza, Poland)


Re: Does Mikuli=Moishe? Marrying dead wife's sister #general

Ida & Joseph Schwarcz <idayosef@...>
 

The word for "aunty" in Yiddish is Mume (or Mime, depending on whether the
speakers lived in the north or the south)and the official word for
step-mother is "shtif-mame" but many autobiographies of people who were
orphaned and had step mothers refer to them as Mume. My late mother-in-law
was the daughter of her father's second wife, who was also the sister of
his first wife, so her half-siblings were also her first cousins.
Ida Selavan Schwarcz
Arad, israel


Henny had written:
. . . .the two wives were probably first cousins.

to which Stan Goodman replied
... or indeed, with the same probability, second cousins. >>

==That one father was Moish and the other Mikuli does not mean they were
necessarily two different persons; he just used his various names (Hebrew,
Yiddish, Polish, registered, nickname, kinnuy) on different occasions.

==I'd say the highest probability is that they were sisters, with
cousinship diminishing with each rank. So many widowers in my various
families married sisters in law. I think it was virtually "the thing to
do."

==Remember, it was a mitzva for the family of the bride to remain
connected, to the grandchildren and nephews/nieces. Even more so, finding
a husband for a bride was not easy given the mass departure of the younger
sons in Jewish families who lacked economic opportunities at home.

==Marrying a sister-in-law had many advantages, not the least that it
didn't require a long search for a shidduch and long negotiations,
important for a man left with four children including a newborn who
required a mother who was close enough to understand them.

==The bride's family probably also saved on the dowry. Not inconsequential.

Michael Bernet, New York <<


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Does Mikuli=Moishe? Marrying dead wife's sister #general

Ida & Joseph Schwarcz <idayosef@...>
 

The word for "aunty" in Yiddish is Mume (or Mime, depending on whether the
speakers lived in the north or the south)and the official word for
step-mother is "shtif-mame" but many autobiographies of people who were
orphaned and had step mothers refer to them as Mume. My late mother-in-law
was the daughter of her father's second wife, who was also the sister of
his first wife, so her half-siblings were also her first cousins.
Ida Selavan Schwarcz
Arad, israel


Henny had written:
. . . .the two wives were probably first cousins.

to which Stan Goodman replied
... or indeed, with the same probability, second cousins. >>

==That one father was Moish and the other Mikuli does not mean they were
necessarily two different persons; he just used his various names (Hebrew,
Yiddish, Polish, registered, nickname, kinnuy) on different occasions.

==I'd say the highest probability is that they were sisters, with
cousinship diminishing with each rank. So many widowers in my various
families married sisters in law. I think it was virtually "the thing to
do."

==Remember, it was a mitzva for the family of the bride to remain
connected, to the grandchildren and nephews/nieces. Even more so, finding
a husband for a bride was not easy given the mass departure of the younger
sons in Jewish families who lacked economic opportunities at home.

==Marrying a sister-in-law had many advantages, not the least that it
didn't require a long search for a shidduch and long negotiations,
important for a man left with four children including a newborn who
required a mother who was close enough to understand them.

==The bride's family probably also saved on the dowry. Not inconsequential.

Michael Bernet, New York <<


Rycer family in Israel #general

Norman Kagan
 

Daughter of Tatiana RYCER seeking Sewek Rycer [b. 1915, Warsaw],
retired Irrigation engineer in Tel Aviv,
and the daughters of Yadwiga (Rycer) Katz [b. 1923, Warsaw] .


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Rycer family in Israel #general

Norman Kagan
 

Daughter of Tatiana RYCER seeking Sewek Rycer [b. 1915, Warsaw],
retired Irrigation engineer in Tel Aviv,
and the daughters of Yadwiga (Rycer) Katz [b. 1923, Warsaw] .


The Central Zionist Archives #general

Familyresearch@...
 

Dear Genners,

As promised I will give you the new e-mail address
of the Search Bureau for Information about Immigrants
(The Central Zionist Archives). >from now you can send
your requests to Ruth an Tamara, they are now in charge
of the Search Bureau (please note that at this moment
it is very busy and we would like to ask you not to send
any requests right now, in about a month it will be less
hectic and we will be able to take care of your requests).

E-mail: familyresearch@jazo.org.il

All the best!
Regards,

Sharon Visser-CZA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen The Central Zionist Archives #general

Familyresearch@...
 

Dear Genners,

As promised I will give you the new e-mail address
of the Search Bureau for Information about Immigrants
(The Central Zionist Archives). >from now you can send
your requests to Ruth an Tamara, they are now in charge
of the Search Bureau (please note that at this moment
it is very busy and we would like to ask you not to send
any requests right now, in about a month it will be less
hectic and we will be able to take care of your requests).

E-mail: familyresearch@jazo.org.il

All the best!
Regards,

Sharon Visser-CZA


JGSGW Meeting - Suday, September 21, 2003 #general

Marlene Bishow <mlbishow@...>
 

The Jewish Genealogy Society of Greater Washington (JGSGW) will hold its
kickoff meeting for the new year on Sunday, September 21, 2003 at the
Northern Virginia Jewish Community Center, 8900 Little River Turnpike in
Fairfax, VA. The speaker at the meeting will be John Colletta,
Washington-based genealogist, author and teacher. Dr. Coletta's
presentation is entitled "Ellis Island's 17 Million Stories, What's Fact,
What's Myth." The meeting will begin with a social hour at 1:30 PM. The
presentation will begin at 2 PM.

In July, 2003, JGSGW hosted the 23rd IAJGS Conference on Jewish Genealogy.
The conference was a tremendous success and was attended by more than 1,200
genealogists >from 30 states and 17 countries. At the September meeting, a
videotape of the conference will be shown.

John Philip Colletta teaches at the National Archives, Smithsonian
Institution, and area universities. A faculty member of the Institute of
Genealogy and Historical Research, Samford University (Birmingham,
Alabama), and the Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy (Salt Lake City), his
publications include numerous scholarly and popular articles, two manuals -
They Came in Ships: A Guide to Finding Your Immigrant Ancestor's Arrival
Record and Finding Italian Roots: The Complete Guide for Americans - and
one non-fiction narrative - Only a Few Bones: A True Account of the
Rolling Fork Tragedy and Its Aftermath, a history of the German-speaking
merchant families, Jewish, Catholic and Protestant, in Vicksburg and the
Mississippi Delta during Reconstruction. Dr. Colletta has appeared
extensively on local and national radio and television, and is featured in
the PBS series "Ancestors." His Ph.D. in Medieval French is >from the
Catholic University of America.

The October 26 meeting of the society will be held at Congregation Har
Shalom in Potomac, MD. This session will be feature the annual "Ask The
Experts" sessions. Whether you are a serious genealogist or a more casual
researcher, if you are interested in more information regarding the Jewish
Genealogy Society of Greater Washington, please contact Marlene Bishow,
Vice President of Membership at mlbishow@mindspring.com

Marlene Bishow
Rockville, MD


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGSGW Meeting - Suday, September 21, 2003 #general

Marlene Bishow <mlbishow@...>
 

The Jewish Genealogy Society of Greater Washington (JGSGW) will hold its
kickoff meeting for the new year on Sunday, September 21, 2003 at the
Northern Virginia Jewish Community Center, 8900 Little River Turnpike in
Fairfax, VA. The speaker at the meeting will be John Colletta,
Washington-based genealogist, author and teacher. Dr. Coletta's
presentation is entitled "Ellis Island's 17 Million Stories, What's Fact,
What's Myth." The meeting will begin with a social hour at 1:30 PM. The
presentation will begin at 2 PM.

In July, 2003, JGSGW hosted the 23rd IAJGS Conference on Jewish Genealogy.
The conference was a tremendous success and was attended by more than 1,200
genealogists >from 30 states and 17 countries. At the September meeting, a
videotape of the conference will be shown.

John Philip Colletta teaches at the National Archives, Smithsonian
Institution, and area universities. A faculty member of the Institute of
Genealogy and Historical Research, Samford University (Birmingham,
Alabama), and the Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy (Salt Lake City), his
publications include numerous scholarly and popular articles, two manuals -
They Came in Ships: A Guide to Finding Your Immigrant Ancestor's Arrival
Record and Finding Italian Roots: The Complete Guide for Americans - and
one non-fiction narrative - Only a Few Bones: A True Account of the
Rolling Fork Tragedy and Its Aftermath, a history of the German-speaking
merchant families, Jewish, Catholic and Protestant, in Vicksburg and the
Mississippi Delta during Reconstruction. Dr. Colletta has appeared
extensively on local and national radio and television, and is featured in
the PBS series "Ancestors." His Ph.D. in Medieval French is >from the
Catholic University of America.

The October 26 meeting of the society will be held at Congregation Har
Shalom in Potomac, MD. This session will be feature the annual "Ask The
Experts" sessions. Whether you are a serious genealogist or a more casual
researcher, if you are interested in more information regarding the Jewish
Genealogy Society of Greater Washington, please contact Marlene Bishow,
Vice President of Membership at mlbishow@mindspring.com

Marlene Bishow
Rockville, MD


JGSLA Meeting September 21, 2003-Photographic Restoration Techniques for Genealogists #general

janmallen@...
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Los Angeles (JGSLA) meets on Sunday,
September 21, 2003 at 1:30 p.m. at University Synagogue -Small Chapel.
The topic of the meeting is:
Photograph Restoration Techniques for Genealogists. The speakers are Claire
Santos-Daigle and Michael Daigle, Owners of Photos Made Perfect (located in
San Diego).

The Daigles will present digital photo restoration including: what is
high-resolution digital photo restoration; what is needed to perform this
work; and what are the benefits of restoring photos digitally versus
conventional photographic methods. *Bring your photographs* that need to be
restored so that they can be scanned to show how to do the restoration! You
will learn how to do the restoration yourself, on your computer, or you may
also contract with the Daigles for professional restoration of your family
photos.

Michael Daigle began his genealogical research in 1992 and the Daigles
began restoring family photographs in 1999 when they began Photos Made
Perfect.

JGSLA's traveling library is available for review and research 30 minutes
before the meeting.

The meeting is on Sunday, September 21, 2003 1:30 p.m. at
University Synagogue – Small Chapel
11960 Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90049
Directions: >from the Valley and North: Take the e 405 south to Sunset
Blvd. Exit at Sunset, the first light is the off ramp, make a left then go
to Sunset and turn right on Sunset, heading west. Go 1 mile on Sunset to
Saltair. Go left at light and parking lot is on the left. Synagogue is on
the corner of Saltair and Sunset.
from the South: Take 405 going north and get off at Sunset. Turn left
(west) onto Sunset and follow the directions above.

There is no fee, parking is available. Non-members are welcome.

For more information on the JGSLA, including its future meetings, please
visit our website: www.JGSLA.org

Jan Meisels Allen
Vice President Programs, JGSLA
jan@jgsla.org


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGSLA Meeting September 21, 2003-Photographic Restoration Techniques for Genealogists #general

janmallen@...
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Los Angeles (JGSLA) meets on Sunday,
September 21, 2003 at 1:30 p.m. at University Synagogue -Small Chapel.
The topic of the meeting is:
Photograph Restoration Techniques for Genealogists. The speakers are Claire
Santos-Daigle and Michael Daigle, Owners of Photos Made Perfect (located in
San Diego).

The Daigles will present digital photo restoration including: what is
high-resolution digital photo restoration; what is needed to perform this
work; and what are the benefits of restoring photos digitally versus
conventional photographic methods. *Bring your photographs* that need to be
restored so that they can be scanned to show how to do the restoration! You
will learn how to do the restoration yourself, on your computer, or you may
also contract with the Daigles for professional restoration of your family
photos.

Michael Daigle began his genealogical research in 1992 and the Daigles
began restoring family photographs in 1999 when they began Photos Made
Perfect.

JGSLA's traveling library is available for review and research 30 minutes
before the meeting.

The meeting is on Sunday, September 21, 2003 1:30 p.m. at
University Synagogue – Small Chapel
11960 Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90049
Directions: >from the Valley and North: Take the e 405 south to Sunset
Blvd. Exit at Sunset, the first light is the off ramp, make a left then go
to Sunset and turn right on Sunset, heading west. Go 1 mile on Sunset to
Saltair. Go left at light and parking lot is on the left. Synagogue is on
the corner of Saltair and Sunset.
from the South: Take 405 going north and get off at Sunset. Turn left
(west) onto Sunset and follow the directions above.

There is no fee, parking is available. Non-members are welcome.

For more information on the JGSLA, including its future meetings, please
visit our website: www.JGSLA.org

Jan Meisels Allen
Vice President Programs, JGSLA
jan@jgsla.org


More Ukraine BOFS #ukraine

Marc M. Cohen <marccohen@...>
 

Chotin: BARAK, KANTORJI
Czernowitz (and region): RIBNER, WEININGER,
Shtorozynetz: KANTORJI, BARAK, SCHAEFFLER, DRUCKER
Dinovits: COHEN, GOLDENBERG, DINOVITZER, SCHLEICHER
Kiyev: KORNITZKY, CHOMITZ, FACTOR

Marc Cohen, Palo Alto, CA
marccohen@mindspring.com

MODERATOR'S NOTE: A friendly reminder to all that for these groups to "fly", those willing to organize them should step forward! :-)


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine More Ukraine BOFS #ukraine

Marc M. Cohen <marccohen@...>
 

Chotin: BARAK, KANTORJI
Czernowitz (and region): RIBNER, WEININGER,
Shtorozynetz: KANTORJI, BARAK, SCHAEFFLER, DRUCKER
Dinovits: COHEN, GOLDENBERG, DINOVITZER, SCHLEICHER
Kiyev: KORNITZKY, CHOMITZ, FACTOR

Marc Cohen, Palo Alto, CA
marccohen@mindspring.com

MODERATOR'S NOTE: A friendly reminder to all that for these groups to "fly", those willing to organize them should step forward! :-)


Re: GUNZENDORFER (California) #germany

DonnDevine@...
 

Johann:
The following may pertain. Cited page has links for fadditional
information and how to obtain photocopies of the newspaper notice:

San Francisco Call Newspaper - Vital Records for 1869-1895
http://feefhs.org/fdb2/6995/6995-232.html
(Final filed lists year, event type, and compller's record number.)

Gunzendorfer, Abe B.... married in 1894 to Schwartz, Bertha ...1894M-537
Gunzendorfer, dau of J.... born in 1894 ...1894B-796

Donn Devine Wilmington Delaware USA

Cc: johann.fleischmann@mesusa.de


German SIG #Germany Re: GUNZENDORFER (California) #germany

DonnDevine@...
 

Johann:
The following may pertain. Cited page has links for fadditional
information and how to obtain photocopies of the newspaper notice:

San Francisco Call Newspaper - Vital Records for 1869-1895
http://feefhs.org/fdb2/6995/6995-232.html
(Final filed lists year, event type, and compller's record number.)

Gunzendorfer, Abe B.... married in 1894 to Schwartz, Bertha ...1894M-537
Gunzendorfer, dau of J.... born in 1894 ...1894B-796

Donn Devine Wilmington Delaware USA

Cc: johann.fleischmann@mesusa.de