Date   

BOFs #belarus

Pavel Bernshtam <pavelb@...>
 

I'm interesting in BOFs:
ITKIN - Kolyshki, Vitebsk gubernia
BENIOMENSON - Khislavichi (Mstislav gubernia)
ALTSHULER - Chausy (Mogilev gubernia)
--

Pavel Bernshtam


BOFs - Grodno, Brest, Mogilev #belarus

Elise Friedman <efjg@...>
 

I'd like to participate in BOF groups for the following:

PALEVSKY Horodetz Grodno Grodno
POLLACK Horodetz Grodno Grodno
DUBIN Kobrin Grodno Grodno
DAITCH Kobrin Grodno Grodno
GOLDBERG Kobrin Grodno Grodno
LIFSHITZ Brest-Litovsk Brest Grodno
CHESIN Mstislavl Mstislavl Mogilev

Thanks,

Elise Friedman
Columbia, Maryland
efjg@comcast.net

Researching:
PALEVSKY/PALEFSKY, POLLACK, DUBIN (Horodetz/Kobryn, Belarus);
LIPSCHITZ/LIFSHITZ (Brest-Litovsk, Belarus);
EISNER, TAUB, SASS (Myszkowice/Tarnopol, Ukraine);
MILLER [or variants], TAUB (Dobromil/Byblo, Ukraine);
CHERNOCK/CHERNIACK (Novozybkov, Russia); CHESIN (Mstislavl, Mogilev);
KMIOTEK/FRIEDMAN/LEWIS (Makow, Lomza, Poland)


Belarus SIG #Belarus BOFs #belarus

Pavel Bernshtam <pavelb@...>
 

I'm interesting in BOFs:
ITKIN - Kolyshki, Vitebsk gubernia
BENIOMENSON - Khislavichi (Mstislav gubernia)
ALTSHULER - Chausy (Mogilev gubernia)
--

Pavel Bernshtam


Belarus SIG #Belarus BOFs - Grodno, Brest, Mogilev #belarus

Elise Friedman <efjg@...>
 

I'd like to participate in BOF groups for the following:

PALEVSKY Horodetz Grodno Grodno
POLLACK Horodetz Grodno Grodno
DUBIN Kobrin Grodno Grodno
DAITCH Kobrin Grodno Grodno
GOLDBERG Kobrin Grodno Grodno
LIFSHITZ Brest-Litovsk Brest Grodno
CHESIN Mstislavl Mstislavl Mogilev

Thanks,

Elise Friedman
Columbia, Maryland
efjg@comcast.net

Researching:
PALEVSKY/PALEFSKY, POLLACK, DUBIN (Horodetz/Kobryn, Belarus);
LIPSCHITZ/LIFSHITZ (Brest-Litovsk, Belarus);
EISNER, TAUB, SASS (Myszkowice/Tarnopol, Ukraine);
MILLER [or variants], TAUB (Dobromil/Byblo, Ukraine);
CHERNOCK/CHERNIACK (Novozybkov, Russia); CHESIN (Mstislavl, Mogilev);
KMIOTEK/FRIEDMAN/LEWIS (Makow, Lomza, Poland)


BOF #belarus

Safarismom@...
 

researching WARSHAFSKY Pinsk
Charlotte Rutta
Los Angeles Ca
safarismom@aol.com


Belarus SIG #Belarus BOF #belarus

Safarismom@...
 

researching WARSHAFSKY Pinsk
Charlotte Rutta
Los Angeles Ca
safarismom@aol.com


ARAK in Meorei Galicia #rabbinic

Yisrael Asper <yisraelasper@...>
 

Thanks to Dr. Yehuda Klausner I have been able to examine the ARAK
and STERNKLAR sections of Encyclopedia Meorei Galitzia. In the ARAK
section there is a picture of my granduncle, Rabbi Aharon Yehuda
ARAK. The book does not identify him but since I've seen him in my
parents' wedding pictures (he performed their marriage as he did for
other family members) I recognized his likeness as him when he was
younger. He is to be identified with the Rabbi Aharon Yehuda ARAK
mentioned in Dr. Neil Rosenstein's book "The Unbroken Chain" (See
Ref. 1).

For the record, I have deposited scans of the appropriate pages
referenced here with Dr. Yehuda Klausner, distinguished member of
the Israel Genealogical Society, and with Dr. Jacob Goldstein,
RavSIG's Discussion List Manager.

In Ref. 2, my grand uncle Aharon gives his ancestry in the male line
unbrokenly for several generations, and yet he does not list Rabbi
Aharon Yehuda ARAK, father of Rav Meir ARAK, as his paternal
grandfather.

On p.12 of Ref. 3, R' Israel Rabinowicz, the Kishiniver Rebbe,
writes in the introduction to his father's (the Skuler Rebbe and
my uncle Aharon's father-in-law) "Divrei Baruch":

"...the Rabbanit Hinda Arak may she rest in peace, sister of
the Rav the Gaon Rav Meir Arak his memory should be for a
blessing, mother of my brotherinlaw the honorable Rav the
Gaon Rav Avraham Aharon Yehuda Arak..."

In addition, on p.26 of Ref. 3, the Kishiniver Rebbe writes:

"...My sister the honorable Rabbanit Mita Sara with her
husband the honorable Rav the Gaon Rav Avraham Aharon
Yehuda Arak..."

Thus, this is not a matter for debate. The data is there. Another
potential piece of evidence that there has been some confusion in
dealing with Aharon Yehuda ARAKs on the part of informants in the
Encyclopedia Meorei Galitzia, in the STEIN section it mentions that
Fruma, the daughter of David STEIN of Kitov, married Rabbi Aharon
Yehuda ARAK, father of Rav Meir ARAK, and had as sons Rav Meir ARAK
and Rav Fishel ARAK without mentioning the ancestry of my granduncle
who descended >from neither brother.

Is not the Encyclopedia Meorei Galtzia saying in the STEIN section
that Pinchas STEIN, the father of David STEIN (father of Fruma ARAK
the mother of Rav Meir ARAK), was somehow descended >from the Rabbi
Gershon of Kitov (if so has it been shown in what way?) who was the
brother-in-law and Chassid of the Baal Shem Tov? [I can think of no
person other than Rabbi Gershon of Kitov, the brother-in-law and
Chassid of the Baal Shem Tov, who is being referred to when people say
giving no special context (if there is one) "Rabbi Gershon of Kitov."]

If anyone can help me out with the ARAK, STERNKLAR and STEIN
ancestries. I will be most grateful.

Thanks
Yisrael Asper

References
==========
1. Rosenstein, Neil, "The Unbroken Chain," Vol. II, CIS Publishers,
1990, p.924 (G16.7).

2. Arak, Aharon Yehuda, "Minchat Aharon," (in Heb.) Brooklyn, New
York, in the Hebrew year of 5738 (1977/1978), Dedication.

3. Rabinowicz, Baruch Pinchas, "Divrei Baruch," (in Heb.), Miami
Beach, Fla., 1959, Intro. by Rabbi Israel Rabinowicz, p.12, p.26.


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic ARAK in Meorei Galicia #rabbinic

Yisrael Asper <yisraelasper@...>
 

Thanks to Dr. Yehuda Klausner I have been able to examine the ARAK
and STERNKLAR sections of Encyclopedia Meorei Galitzia. In the ARAK
section there is a picture of my granduncle, Rabbi Aharon Yehuda
ARAK. The book does not identify him but since I've seen him in my
parents' wedding pictures (he performed their marriage as he did for
other family members) I recognized his likeness as him when he was
younger. He is to be identified with the Rabbi Aharon Yehuda ARAK
mentioned in Dr. Neil Rosenstein's book "The Unbroken Chain" (See
Ref. 1).

For the record, I have deposited scans of the appropriate pages
referenced here with Dr. Yehuda Klausner, distinguished member of
the Israel Genealogical Society, and with Dr. Jacob Goldstein,
RavSIG's Discussion List Manager.

In Ref. 2, my grand uncle Aharon gives his ancestry in the male line
unbrokenly for several generations, and yet he does not list Rabbi
Aharon Yehuda ARAK, father of Rav Meir ARAK, as his paternal
grandfather.

On p.12 of Ref. 3, R' Israel Rabinowicz, the Kishiniver Rebbe,
writes in the introduction to his father's (the Skuler Rebbe and
my uncle Aharon's father-in-law) "Divrei Baruch":

"...the Rabbanit Hinda Arak may she rest in peace, sister of
the Rav the Gaon Rav Meir Arak his memory should be for a
blessing, mother of my brotherinlaw the honorable Rav the
Gaon Rav Avraham Aharon Yehuda Arak..."

In addition, on p.26 of Ref. 3, the Kishiniver Rebbe writes:

"...My sister the honorable Rabbanit Mita Sara with her
husband the honorable Rav the Gaon Rav Avraham Aharon
Yehuda Arak..."

Thus, this is not a matter for debate. The data is there. Another
potential piece of evidence that there has been some confusion in
dealing with Aharon Yehuda ARAKs on the part of informants in the
Encyclopedia Meorei Galitzia, in the STEIN section it mentions that
Fruma, the daughter of David STEIN of Kitov, married Rabbi Aharon
Yehuda ARAK, father of Rav Meir ARAK, and had as sons Rav Meir ARAK
and Rav Fishel ARAK without mentioning the ancestry of my granduncle
who descended >from neither brother.

Is not the Encyclopedia Meorei Galtzia saying in the STEIN section
that Pinchas STEIN, the father of David STEIN (father of Fruma ARAK
the mother of Rav Meir ARAK), was somehow descended >from the Rabbi
Gershon of Kitov (if so has it been shown in what way?) who was the
brother-in-law and Chassid of the Baal Shem Tov? [I can think of no
person other than Rabbi Gershon of Kitov, the brother-in-law and
Chassid of the Baal Shem Tov, who is being referred to when people say
giving no special context (if there is one) "Rabbi Gershon of Kitov."]

If anyone can help me out with the ARAK, STERNKLAR and STEIN
ancestries. I will be most grateful.

Thanks
Yisrael Asper

References
==========
1. Rosenstein, Neil, "The Unbroken Chain," Vol. II, CIS Publishers,
1990, p.924 (G16.7).

2. Arak, Aharon Yehuda, "Minchat Aharon," (in Heb.) Brooklyn, New
York, in the Hebrew year of 5738 (1977/1978), Dedication.

3. Rabinowicz, Baruch Pinchas, "Divrei Baruch," (in Heb.), Miami
Beach, Fla., 1959, Intro. by Rabbi Israel Rabinowicz, p.12, p.26.


An Unknown Episode #general

Ada Holtzman <ada01@...>
 

Let me draw your attention to a new book published in Israel (in Hebrew)
"An Unknown Episode", the history of an encounter of thousands of Polish
Jewish soldiers with the Jews of Iraq and Iran in 1942-1943 written by
Dr. Shaul Sehayik (Tel Aviv 2003).

This is an amazing true story of Jewish brotherhood and how the Iranian
and Iraqi Jewish communities during the years of 1942-43, accepted,
assisted, smuggled to Palestine and opened the houses and the hearts to
their Jewish Polish brothers who suffered awuful persecutions during WWII,
refugees, soldiers in the Anders Army and 750 children known as "the
Teheran Children".

Table of Contents and a Forward in my web site:
http://www.zchor.org/brotherhood/book.htm

You are kindly invited to a special study evening which will take place
on Tuesday, Elul 12, 5763 ( September 9th, 2003) at 17:00 in the
Babylonian Jewish Heritage Center, 83 Mordechai Ben Porat Avenue, Or
Yehuda, Israel, buses 36,59 >from Tel Aviv, 76 >from Petach Tikva, 1 >from
Kiriat Ono.


Email: babylon "at" babylonjewry.org.il (replace "at" with @ to avoid
spam);Web Site: http://www.babylonjewry.org.il/

Among the speakers will be Dr. Zvi Yehuda, director of the Babylonian
Jewish Heritage Center;
Mr. Mordechai Ben Porat, chairman of the Babylonian Jewish Heritage Center;
Architect David Azrieli by the name of the Jewish soldiers withdrawers
from the Anders Army;
Engineer Benjamin Meirtchak, chairman of the The Association of Jewish
War Veterans of Polish Armies in Israel;
Rabbi Pinchas Rosengarten who was a rabbi in the Anders Army
Dr. Shaul Sehayik the researcher, author of the book.

Shalom

Ada Holtzman
www.zchor.org


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen An Unknown Episode #general

Ada Holtzman <ada01@...>
 

Let me draw your attention to a new book published in Israel (in Hebrew)
"An Unknown Episode", the history of an encounter of thousands of Polish
Jewish soldiers with the Jews of Iraq and Iran in 1942-1943 written by
Dr. Shaul Sehayik (Tel Aviv 2003).

This is an amazing true story of Jewish brotherhood and how the Iranian
and Iraqi Jewish communities during the years of 1942-43, accepted,
assisted, smuggled to Palestine and opened the houses and the hearts to
their Jewish Polish brothers who suffered awuful persecutions during WWII,
refugees, soldiers in the Anders Army and 750 children known as "the
Teheran Children".

Table of Contents and a Forward in my web site:
http://www.zchor.org/brotherhood/book.htm

You are kindly invited to a special study evening which will take place
on Tuesday, Elul 12, 5763 ( September 9th, 2003) at 17:00 in the
Babylonian Jewish Heritage Center, 83 Mordechai Ben Porat Avenue, Or
Yehuda, Israel, buses 36,59 >from Tel Aviv, 76 >from Petach Tikva, 1 >from
Kiriat Ono.


Email: babylon "at" babylonjewry.org.il (replace "at" with @ to avoid
spam);Web Site: http://www.babylonjewry.org.il/

Among the speakers will be Dr. Zvi Yehuda, director of the Babylonian
Jewish Heritage Center;
Mr. Mordechai Ben Porat, chairman of the Babylonian Jewish Heritage Center;
Architect David Azrieli by the name of the Jewish soldiers withdrawers
from the Anders Army;
Engineer Benjamin Meirtchak, chairman of the The Association of Jewish
War Veterans of Polish Armies in Israel;
Rabbi Pinchas Rosengarten who was a rabbi in the Anders Army
Dr. Shaul Sehayik the researcher, author of the book.

Shalom

Ada Holtzman
www.zchor.org


Re: From Rashi to King David #rabbinic

MBernet@...
 

I got to thinking, perhaps Rashi could trace his descent to the
Kalonymos rabbinical dynasty that exerted major influence in the
Ashkenazi world of the 9th to 13th centuries. The Kalonmos rabbis of
Lucca, in southern Italy, were invited around the year 800 by
Charles, king of the Francs, to move to Mainz and other cities in
the Rhine region, to head the Jewish communities, and were
ultimately the teachers of Rashi and his generation.

The German Jews up to the 9th century (descendants largely >from the
Romans' Jewish slaves, camp followers, merchants and soldiers, and
their local spouses) were objectively unlikely to have been able to
trace their history back to Eretz Yisrael and to the period of the
Tanna'im (rabbis of the Mishna). The Kalonymos family on the other
hand, a powerful and scholarly group in then prosperous and highly
literate southern Italy, who may well have migrated there >from Eretz
Yisrael during the time of the Mishna, would have been much more
likely to be able to trace back their roots.

The Encyclopedia Judaica states that a number of genealogies of the
Kalonymos family are extant, listing the parental links and the
links of teacher-and-student. It cites as "the best and most
complete [sic]" version one "written probably around 1220 by Eleazar
b. Judah (b. Kalonymus) of Worms." This tree was written in the
context of establishing the veracity of Jewish traditions and
prayers >from earlier centuries

It starts with "I, Eleazar ha-Katan, received the true version of
the prayers >from my father and teacher, Rabbi Judah, son of Rabbi
Kalonymus, son of Moses, son of Rabbi Judah, son of Rabbi Kalonymus,
son of Rabbi Moses, son of Rabbi Kalonymus, son of Judah. And I also
received it >from Judah he-Hasid, as he received it >from his father,
Rabbi Samuel he-Hasid, as he received it >from Rabbi Eleazar
he-Hazzan of Speyer; for when Rabbi Kalonymus died, his son Rabbi
Samuel he-Hasid was only a boy, so he gave (transmitted) it to Rabbi
Eleazar he-Hazzan of Speyer, and when he, Rabbi Samuel he-Hasid,
grew up, he received [the secrets] >from him, as was ordered by Rabbi
Kalonymus the Elder. "And Rabbi Kalonymus the Elder received [the
tradition] >from his father, Rabbi Isaac; and Rabbi Isaac received
[it] >from his father, Rabbi Eleazar the Great, son of Rabbi Isaac,
son of Rabbi Joshua, son of Rabbi Abun, the Rabbi Abun who was the
grandfather of Rabbi Simeon the Great, of Mainz."

And on and on, backward and forward, linking together many of the
greatest scholars and Peytanim of Germany in the 9th to 12th
centuries all the way back to "They all received the secret of the
true version of the prayers, teacher >from his teacher, up to Abu
Aaron, the son of Rabbi Samuel ha-Nasi, who came >from Babylonia
because of a misadventure, and had to wander >from place to
place ... son of Kalonymus, son of Rabbi Judah. He was the first who
left Lombardy, he and his sons, Rabbi Kalonymus and Rabbi Jekuthiel,
and his relation Rabbi Ithiel, and other important persons; for the
king Charles brought them with him >from the country of Lombardy, and
settled them in Mainz."

I think it is safe to assume that if "Eleazar ha-Katan, son of Rabbi
Judah, son of Rabbi Kalonymus, son of Moses, son of Rabbi Judah, son
of Rabbi Kalonymus, son of Rabbi Moses, son of Rabbi Kalonymus, son
of Judah" had known anything about his ancestry earlier than what
must have been the 7th or 8th century in Lucca, he woud have related
it. Since he did not, it must have been unknown. And, if even the
well-documented Kalonymos family, scholars >from way back in a very
civilized and cultured area of the world, could not trace back their
ancestry, it is unlikely that Rashi could have traced non-Kalonymos
ancestors through a thousand years of slavery or soldiery in the
lands of the Franks and the early Germanic and Goth primitives.

There were other rabbinic lines of descent -- the MaHaRaL of Prague
was reported to be a descendant of Hai ben Sherira Ga'on [939 -
1038], in Babylonia, who could credibly trace his ancestry back to
the time of the Mishna. I find Hai ben Sherira's line much easier to
accept because of the unbroken traditions and redords in Babylonia,
but I wonder whether the Hai Gaon-Maharal connection may not have
been the result of the Maharal's eager followers.

Michael Bernet
New York


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Re: From Rashi to King David #rabbinic

MBernet@...
 

I got to thinking, perhaps Rashi could trace his descent to the
Kalonymos rabbinical dynasty that exerted major influence in the
Ashkenazi world of the 9th to 13th centuries. The Kalonmos rabbis of
Lucca, in southern Italy, were invited around the year 800 by
Charles, king of the Francs, to move to Mainz and other cities in
the Rhine region, to head the Jewish communities, and were
ultimately the teachers of Rashi and his generation.

The German Jews up to the 9th century (descendants largely >from the
Romans' Jewish slaves, camp followers, merchants and soldiers, and
their local spouses) were objectively unlikely to have been able to
trace their history back to Eretz Yisrael and to the period of the
Tanna'im (rabbis of the Mishna). The Kalonymos family on the other
hand, a powerful and scholarly group in then prosperous and highly
literate southern Italy, who may well have migrated there >from Eretz
Yisrael during the time of the Mishna, would have been much more
likely to be able to trace back their roots.

The Encyclopedia Judaica states that a number of genealogies of the
Kalonymos family are extant, listing the parental links and the
links of teacher-and-student. It cites as "the best and most
complete [sic]" version one "written probably around 1220 by Eleazar
b. Judah (b. Kalonymus) of Worms." This tree was written in the
context of establishing the veracity of Jewish traditions and
prayers >from earlier centuries

It starts with "I, Eleazar ha-Katan, received the true version of
the prayers >from my father and teacher, Rabbi Judah, son of Rabbi
Kalonymus, son of Moses, son of Rabbi Judah, son of Rabbi Kalonymus,
son of Rabbi Moses, son of Rabbi Kalonymus, son of Judah. And I also
received it >from Judah he-Hasid, as he received it >from his father,
Rabbi Samuel he-Hasid, as he received it >from Rabbi Eleazar
he-Hazzan of Speyer; for when Rabbi Kalonymus died, his son Rabbi
Samuel he-Hasid was only a boy, so he gave (transmitted) it to Rabbi
Eleazar he-Hazzan of Speyer, and when he, Rabbi Samuel he-Hasid,
grew up, he received [the secrets] >from him, as was ordered by Rabbi
Kalonymus the Elder. "And Rabbi Kalonymus the Elder received [the
tradition] >from his father, Rabbi Isaac; and Rabbi Isaac received
[it] >from his father, Rabbi Eleazar the Great, son of Rabbi Isaac,
son of Rabbi Joshua, son of Rabbi Abun, the Rabbi Abun who was the
grandfather of Rabbi Simeon the Great, of Mainz."

And on and on, backward and forward, linking together many of the
greatest scholars and Peytanim of Germany in the 9th to 12th
centuries all the way back to "They all received the secret of the
true version of the prayers, teacher >from his teacher, up to Abu
Aaron, the son of Rabbi Samuel ha-Nasi, who came >from Babylonia
because of a misadventure, and had to wander >from place to
place ... son of Kalonymus, son of Rabbi Judah. He was the first who
left Lombardy, he and his sons, Rabbi Kalonymus and Rabbi Jekuthiel,
and his relation Rabbi Ithiel, and other important persons; for the
king Charles brought them with him >from the country of Lombardy, and
settled them in Mainz."

I think it is safe to assume that if "Eleazar ha-Katan, son of Rabbi
Judah, son of Rabbi Kalonymus, son of Moses, son of Rabbi Judah, son
of Rabbi Kalonymus, son of Rabbi Moses, son of Rabbi Kalonymus, son
of Judah" had known anything about his ancestry earlier than what
must have been the 7th or 8th century in Lucca, he woud have related
it. Since he did not, it must have been unknown. And, if even the
well-documented Kalonymos family, scholars >from way back in a very
civilized and cultured area of the world, could not trace back their
ancestry, it is unlikely that Rashi could have traced non-Kalonymos
ancestors through a thousand years of slavery or soldiery in the
lands of the Franks and the early Germanic and Goth primitives.

There were other rabbinic lines of descent -- the MaHaRaL of Prague
was reported to be a descendant of Hai ben Sherira Ga'on [939 -
1038], in Babylonia, who could credibly trace his ancestry back to
the time of the Mishna. I find Hai ben Sherira's line much easier to
accept because of the unbroken traditions and redords in Babylonia,
but I wonder whether the Hai Gaon-Maharal connection may not have
been the result of the Maharal's eager followers.

Michael Bernet
New York


Passports in Ukraine? (two words in Cyrillic, 1875) #general

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@...>
 

I am surprised by two words in Cyrillic, >from the 1875 census of Nikolayev,
Ukraine. The words are here:

http://www4.wittenberg.edu/academics/music/kazez/NikB.jpg

My amateur translation of the left column indicates that this census gives
the age of the residents of Nikolayev according to their passport. Could
that be? I would think it exceedingly rare that someone in 1875 in Ukraine
would have a passport! Or did the word "passport" have some a different
meaning at that time?

Dan

P.S. Nikolayev is located southwest of Kiev, very near Proskurov, here:

http://userpages.wittenberg.edu/dkazez/fam/city/Ob-cit.html

Here are all of the towns and surnames in this Nikolayev document:

http://www.kazez.com/~dan/Ukraine/1800s.html


Daniel Kazez <dkazez@wittenberg.edu>
Springfield, Ohio USA
Ukraine: OBERMAN-HOBERMAN-GUBERMAN, LIS-LYS, SOBEL, STEIN, AKSMAN-AXMAN
Ukraine: Zaslav-Mikolayev-Krasilov-Medvedovka-Proskurov-Mogilev
http://www.kazez.com/~dan/oberman/


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Passports in Ukraine? (two words in Cyrillic, 1875) #general

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@...>
 

I am surprised by two words in Cyrillic, >from the 1875 census of Nikolayev,
Ukraine. The words are here:

http://www4.wittenberg.edu/academics/music/kazez/NikB.jpg

My amateur translation of the left column indicates that this census gives
the age of the residents of Nikolayev according to their passport. Could
that be? I would think it exceedingly rare that someone in 1875 in Ukraine
would have a passport! Or did the word "passport" have some a different
meaning at that time?

Dan

P.S. Nikolayev is located southwest of Kiev, very near Proskurov, here:

http://userpages.wittenberg.edu/dkazez/fam/city/Ob-cit.html

Here are all of the towns and surnames in this Nikolayev document:

http://www.kazez.com/~dan/Ukraine/1800s.html


Daniel Kazez <dkazez@wittenberg.edu>
Springfield, Ohio USA
Ukraine: OBERMAN-HOBERMAN-GUBERMAN, LIS-LYS, SOBEL, STEIN, AKSMAN-AXMAN
Ukraine: Zaslav-Mikolayev-Krasilov-Medvedovka-Proskurov-Mogilev
http://www.kazez.com/~dan/oberman/


Anyone going to NYC Municipal Archives soon? #general

Elise Friedman <elise@...>
 

If anyone is going to the Municipal Archives in NYC within the next week
or two and wouldn't mind looking at a couple vital records for me, would
you please contact me? I have exact record numbers and don't need a copy
of the record, just need the information >from it. I'll be going there in
a month or so myself, but if I could obtain the info >from these records
now, it'll enable me to do some additional preliminary research before I
get there.

Please respond privately.

Thanks!
Elise Friedman
Columbia, Maryland

Researching:
PALEVSKY/PALEFSKY, POLLACK, DUBIN (Horodetz/Kobryn, Belarus);
LIPSCHITZ/LIFSHITZ (Brest-Litovsk, Belarus);
EISNER, TAUB, SASS (Myszkowice/Tarnopol, Ukraine);
MILLER [or variants], TAUB (Dobromil/Byblo, Ukraine);
CHERNOCK/CHERNIACK (Novozybkov, Russia); CHESIN (Mstislavl, Belarus);
KMIOTEK/FRIEDMAN/LEWIS (Makow, Lomza, Poland)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Anyone going to NYC Municipal Archives soon? #general

Elise Friedman <elise@...>
 

If anyone is going to the Municipal Archives in NYC within the next week
or two and wouldn't mind looking at a couple vital records for me, would
you please contact me? I have exact record numbers and don't need a copy
of the record, just need the information >from it. I'll be going there in
a month or so myself, but if I could obtain the info >from these records
now, it'll enable me to do some additional preliminary research before I
get there.

Please respond privately.

Thanks!
Elise Friedman
Columbia, Maryland

Researching:
PALEVSKY/PALEFSKY, POLLACK, DUBIN (Horodetz/Kobryn, Belarus);
LIPSCHITZ/LIFSHITZ (Brest-Litovsk, Belarus);
EISNER, TAUB, SASS (Myszkowice/Tarnopol, Ukraine);
MILLER [or variants], TAUB (Dobromil/Byblo, Ukraine);
CHERNOCK/CHERNIACK (Novozybkov, Russia); CHESIN (Mstislavl, Belarus);
KMIOTEK/FRIEDMAN/LEWIS (Makow, Lomza, Poland)


Re: Does Mikuli=Moishe? Marrying dead wife's sister #general

Ida & Joseph Schwarcz <idayosef@...>
 

The word for "aunty" in Yiddish is Mume (or Mime, depending on whether the
speakers lived in the north or the south)and the official word for
step-mother is "shtif-mame" but many autobiographies of people who were
orphaned and had step mothers refer to them as Mume. My late mother-in-law
was the daughter of her father's second wife, who was also the sister of
his first wife, so her half-siblings were also her first cousins.
Ida Selavan Schwarcz
Arad, israel


Henny had written:
. . . .the two wives were probably first cousins.

to which Stan Goodman replied
... or indeed, with the same probability, second cousins. >>

==That one father was Moish and the other Mikuli does not mean they were
necessarily two different persons; he just used his various names (Hebrew,
Yiddish, Polish, registered, nickname, kinnuy) on different occasions.

==I'd say the highest probability is that they were sisters, with
cousinship diminishing with each rank. So many widowers in my various
families married sisters in law. I think it was virtually "the thing to
do."

==Remember, it was a mitzva for the family of the bride to remain
connected, to the grandchildren and nephews/nieces. Even more so, finding
a husband for a bride was not easy given the mass departure of the younger
sons in Jewish families who lacked economic opportunities at home.

==Marrying a sister-in-law had many advantages, not the least that it
didn't require a long search for a shidduch and long negotiations,
important for a man left with four children including a newborn who
required a mother who was close enough to understand them.

==The bride's family probably also saved on the dowry. Not inconsequential.

Michael Bernet, New York <<


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Does Mikuli=Moishe? Marrying dead wife's sister #general

Ida & Joseph Schwarcz <idayosef@...>
 

The word for "aunty" in Yiddish is Mume (or Mime, depending on whether the
speakers lived in the north or the south)and the official word for
step-mother is "shtif-mame" but many autobiographies of people who were
orphaned and had step mothers refer to them as Mume. My late mother-in-law
was the daughter of her father's second wife, who was also the sister of
his first wife, so her half-siblings were also her first cousins.
Ida Selavan Schwarcz
Arad, israel


Henny had written:
. . . .the two wives were probably first cousins.

to which Stan Goodman replied
... or indeed, with the same probability, second cousins. >>

==That one father was Moish and the other Mikuli does not mean they were
necessarily two different persons; he just used his various names (Hebrew,
Yiddish, Polish, registered, nickname, kinnuy) on different occasions.

==I'd say the highest probability is that they were sisters, with
cousinship diminishing with each rank. So many widowers in my various
families married sisters in law. I think it was virtually "the thing to
do."

==Remember, it was a mitzva for the family of the bride to remain
connected, to the grandchildren and nephews/nieces. Even more so, finding
a husband for a bride was not easy given the mass departure of the younger
sons in Jewish families who lacked economic opportunities at home.

==Marrying a sister-in-law had many advantages, not the least that it
didn't require a long search for a shidduch and long negotiations,
important for a man left with four children including a newborn who
required a mother who was close enough to understand them.

==The bride's family probably also saved on the dowry. Not inconsequential.

Michael Bernet, New York <<


Rycer family in Israel #general

Norman Kagan
 

Daughter of Tatiana RYCER seeking Sewek Rycer [b. 1915, Warsaw],
retired Irrigation engineer in Tel Aviv,
and the daughters of Yadwiga (Rycer) Katz [b. 1923, Warsaw] .


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Rycer family in Israel #general

Norman Kagan
 

Daughter of Tatiana RYCER seeking Sewek Rycer [b. 1915, Warsaw],
retired Irrigation engineer in Tel Aviv,
and the daughters of Yadwiga (Rycer) Katz [b. 1923, Warsaw] .