Date   

Re: Searching Anna RUBINSTEIN/ BOGUS N.Y. Connection #general

fbogus@...
 

I know it's been many years, but I just joined this board. Alexander BOGUS was my 1st cousin 2x removed. I don't know about anyone name RUBENSTEIN, but I am still in touch with one of Alexander's sons. He is on Ancestry also. If you're still active here and have not received an answer, I can see if the son knows anything about her.

FWIW, the baby boy was Herman. He died in 1952 but I have no more information about him.

Felice Bogus
Raleigh, NC


KARITSKY in Vilnius #lithuania

fbogus@...
 

I only recently discovered that my maternal gf's family came from Vilnius, not Russia as I had previously been told. My gf was the youngest of 3 siblings, all of whom came to the US somewhere between 1895 and 1900. I am unable to determine if their parents ever emigrated or if the siblings emigrated together. I only have Hebrew/Yiddish names for my great-grandparents. I got Shmuel KARITSKY from translating tombstones and intuited Perel KARITSKY based on the fact that each sibling had a daughter named Pauline or Pearl. Those children, along with Sam and Stanley who most likely were named for Shmuel, were all born in 1907 or later.

Is there any way I can use that information to find out more about these people? I've hit a wall.

Thank you,
Felice Bogus
Raleigh, NC


Re: Hidden children in Belgium - Polyclinique Chant d'Oiseau Woluwé #general

ewkent@...
 

Dear Debbie Bloch:

Google pointed me toward this "centre médical" (= "medical center", at least approximately) in today's Woluwe-Saint Pierre in Belgium: http://www.cmco.info ("Centre Médical du Chant d'Oiseau").

(The website is in French, and no email address is given under "Contact" -- but there is a street address given ("Avenue des Frères [with an accent-mark pointing toward the upper-left] Legrain 85, 1150 Bruxelles [= "Brussels"], and gives a telephone number.)

Perhaps someone who reads JewishGen discussions who lives in and/or has connections in the Brussels area could help you?

(And maybe added hashtags for "Belgium" -- and possibly for "Brussels" -- would help in calling attention to the location of the place you're interested in finding.)

Good Luck to you.

Sincerely,

Ethan Kent (in New York City; no knowledge of relatives in/from Belgium, but I do read French)
ewkent@... .


Lithuania and Poland records #lithuania #poland #records

Barbara & David Israel
 

I am looking to research records for Vilna, Lithuania and Nasielsk, Poland for my family. Where would be the best place to
connect with to see what vital records might be available for the 1800’s and earlier? Thank you for any help.

Barbara Fisher Israel
Tempe, AZ

Lithuania: Fischer/Fisher, Secondary names:Zwick, Becker, Levin

Poland: Cohen, Orlowski, Walegore, Perlmuter


Re: Hidden children in Belgium - Polyclinique Chant d'Oiseau Woluwé #general

Marcel Apsel
 

For somebody born in Brussels you have to know which borough he was born and there eventually you might find a birth certificate, if the birth was officially registered.  This is always the case when a child is born in a hospital, but might not be in some cases when a birth occurred at home without any official registration, especially during the war; but the latter was very exceptional and at the end the child will have to be registered anyway somewhere.  You have to know in which borough your father has been born; the city of Brussels is only one of the 19th boroughs of greater Brussels and if your father is born in another borough, but mentions that he is born in Brussels it won’t help.  It is the same as somebody will tell that he is born in New York; but is it Manhattan, Brooklyn, the Bronx, Staten Island or Queens?

 

Marcel Apsel

Antwerpen, Belgium


Re: Name change records NYC #austria-czech #galicia #names #records

ewkent@...
 

Tanya,

As I have said in another thread some time ago, I found evidence of my father's father's name change when looking at his birth certificate at the New York City Municipal Archives (he was born an American citizen in the Brownsville neighborhood in Brooklyn, New York -- so his birth certificate was a New York City certificate) -- information added after the name change  (I believe added using 1 or more hand stamps) was visible in the image of the Certificate.

As I said in that other post, I also found (via Newspapers.com) a legal notice from the Brooklyn Eagle newspaper (my grandfather was still living in Brooklyn at that time) announcing the official name change (although my grandfather seems to have used his original name for at least about 8 years after he got the name change legally approved [Shrug]).

------------

I agree that if the person in question became a naturalized US citizen, the original name upon arrival should be findable in the naturalization documentation (and in the passenger manifest upon arrival in the US -- if you can find that).

---------

Good Luck.

Ethan Kent (in New York City)
ewkent@... .


Re: 1930 census - invented people #general #records #usa

ewkent@...
 

Hi to all who will read this post.

I am not sure that my own US Census/genealogy story counts exactly as "invented relatives" (although it seems to involve persons who were not relatives of mine who were counted in the US Census as (in fact) relatives of a relative of mine)  -- and may not involve persons who never existed, but (echoing Deanna Levinsky's noticing boarders being possibly "passed off as family") I have what seems to be a story of landlords (or possibly boarders -- in any case (if they actually existed) older persons) being "passed off as family".

In the 1910 US Census listing (from Brooklyn) for the household (on Johnson Avenue) in Brooklyn for my maternal grandmother's brother (who was then listed with his wife -- and no children; their ages are given as "23" (my great-uncle) and "20" (his wife) ) , a man (age given as "45") whose name is given as "Isidor" (possibly "Isidore") and a woman (age given as "43") whose name is given as "Annie" are listed as "Father" and "Mother" -- and all 4 listed persons are given with the family name of "Pate".

However, the 2 middle-aged persons (if they existed -- and whoever they were) could not have possibly been the parents of my great-uncle Hyman... -- as his sister who was my grandmother (the baby among her siblings -- actually younger than one of her nieces (!) ) was born on Madison Street on the Lower East Side of Manhattan (definitely not Madison Avenue)  in May of 1910 (after the Census found her parents' household), and the household into which she was born (which naturally included both her and Hyman's parents) was duly listed in the same 1910 census on Madison Street in Manhattan -- with the parents' names given as "Isaac" and "Annie" Pat (with ages given as (respectively) "50" and "48" (Yes, it seems odd for my great-grandmother to have given birth in her late 40s, but that's "another story" (and her first children were born in the 1880s) ).

My great-grandparents (and their other children) subsequently took the name "Pate" that Hyman had come up with (and my grandmother actually didn't seem to remember having had  any other family name when I talked to her about the "original" family name (around 1980, I think: "Pate" seemed unusual, and possibly changed (as it was...)  ) -- but it seems clear to me that (whatever the situation was on Johnson Avenue in Brooklyn where Hyman and his young wife lived in 1910) the enumerator was somehow deceived (for some reason) into believing that Hyman's parents were living with him and his wife in Brooklyn, although they were alive and well (with 4 children -- 1 full-grown (age given as "22") and working living with them -- and another (my Grandma) "on the way") on a different island within New York City -- in Manhattan (on Madison Street, in what was then the Lower East Side).

I hope that this story is of interest and/or help in this thread.

Sincerely,

Ethan Kent (who grew up on Long Island, and is now in New York City where he was born)
ewkent@...

(Researching 4 main family lines: the Paat/Patt/Pat/Pates who emigrated from Bialystok (in today's Poland), the Kornhausers (who emigrated from Galicia -- from places in today's Ukraine (Turka) -- and probably today's Poland (Stefkowa)) , the Kantors (who emigrated from the Podolia region in today's Ukraine; possibly from Bratslav/Bratzlav), and the Gelperins/Halperins (who emigrated from the city known to Jews of their generation as "Vilna" -- but which is today known on maps as "Vilnius", the capital of independent Lithuania).)


500,000 records added to www.GenTeam.at - details #austria-czech #hungary

LarryBassist@...
 

Hi All,
  There was a post recently about 500,000 records added to GenTeam but details were not provided. I received this information:
Larry Bassist
Springville, Utah

www.GenTeam.at  500,000 new records online

 

Please feel free to forward this information to Internet forums and lists. Thank you!

 

 

Vienna, November 1, 2020

 

What’s new on GenTeam

 

-       About this update: Approximately 21.2 million records online

 

1          Military: Austro-Hungarian casualty lists 1914-1919

Already 2.2 million records

2          Vienna: Roman Catholic baptisms

3          Vienna: Roman Catholic marriages

4          Vienna: Roman Catholic burials

5          Vienna: Civil marriages

6          Seigniorial indices

7          Indices of Roman Catholic church registers for Burgenland, Lower Austria, Upper

Austria, Salzburg, Styria, Tyrol, Moravia and Germany

 

-           Summary of the information available on GenTeam:

            Complete gazetteer of Austria, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Slovenia and South

            Tyrol with parish affiliations, archival districts and links to the archives

            Data from Vienna, Lower Austria, Upper Austria, Burgenland, Salzburg, Tyrol, Styria,

Carinthia, Vorarlberg, Bohemia, Moravia, Silesia, Slovakia, Slovenia and Germany

 

 

Dear researchers,

 

About this update

 

On January 10, 2010, GenTeam went online with approximately 1.3 million entries (index of Roman Catholic marriages of Vienna, several indices for Lower Austria, owners of building plots in Lower Austria, gazetteer for Austria, Bohemia, Moravia and Slovenia). Today, more than 21.2 million records are online. I would like to take this opportunity to sincerely thank all those who have contributed to this success.

 

The number of registered and active users has also been growing continually. They all benefit from free access to all data without having to pay any membership fees.

 

If you are unsure about the exact spelling of the name of a person or a location, you can also enter partial names in all of GenTeam’s databases. Enter only the part you are sure about. The autocomplete function is an easy solution to solving the problem of variations in orthography!

 

Details on this update

 

1       Military – Austro-Hungarian casualty lists of World War I 1914- 1919

Already 2.2 million records!

 

The casualty lists enumerate the wounded and killed soldiers as well as the prisoners of war of all Crown Lands of the Habsburg monarchy. In their entirety, these lists will hold approximately 3 to 3.5 million names. They include officers and one-year volunteers, but also subordinated military personnel of all denominations, including Jewish, Muslim and Protestant soldiers.

Besides many lists that have already been entered fully, among them the casualties of Przemysl 1915 as well as supplemental lists, a great number of partial lists are also online. In addition, work is in progress for many more.

Several collaborators of this project prefer to remain unnamed. I would therefore like to sincerely thank all those who have contributed to this important database, all those who are already working on further lists, as well as Frank Raschka for managing this project.

 

I would like to invite you to participate in this fascinating project. If you are interested please contact the project manager Frank Raschka at verlustliste@... or kontakt@.... We will then send you a sample entry table and assign you a list number.

 

 

2       Vienna – Roman Catholic baptisms 1595- 1920

Already more than 2,1 million records online!

 

Records have been added for the parishes of 06 Gumpendorf, 08 Alservorstadt Pfarre, 08 Gebäranstalt (Alservorstadt Krankenhaus), 09 Votivkirche, 12 Meidling, 13 Maria Hietzing, 15 Reindorf, 18 Währing and 20 Sankt Brigitta. The numbers indicate the respective district of Vienna.

 

For a list of the available parishes and their respective periods as well as further important information on this database, click the green Help/Info button in the top right corner of the GenTeam website.

 

I would like to sincerely thank Mag. Wolfgang Altfahrt, Karin Farthofer, Daniela Horvath, Debbie Kaska, Cindy Lindau, Marco Puhr, Franz Spevacek, Jesko Stampa and Judith Starke as well as all those who are already working on further indices!

 

 

3       Vienna – Roman Catholic marriages 1542- 1938

Already more than 1 million records online!

 

Records have been added for the parishes of 01 Sankt Stephan and 16 Altottakring.

 

For a list of the available parishes and their respective periods as well as further important information on this database, click the green Help/Info button in the top right corner of the GenTeam website.

 

I would like to sincerely thank Dr. Andreas Dutz and Henrik Schwam!

 

 

4       Vienna – Roman Catholic burials 1600- 1938

 

Records have been added for the parishes of 02 St. Johann Nepomuk and 09 Votivkirche.

 

I would like to sincerely thank Monika Fischer and Jesko Stampa!

 

For a list of the available parishes and their respective periods as well as further important information on this database, click the green Help/Info button in the top right corner of the GenTeam website.

 

 

5       Vienna – Civil marriages and civil registry offices 1870-1939

 

The following records have been added: Civil marriages of the years 1934-1938 (volumes 55-59), civil marriages from the special civil registry office for August to December 1938, an index to the files of the non-Arian civil registry office from August to December 1938, as well as records from the civil registry office Leopoldstadt for the year 1939.

I would like to sincerely thank Dipl.-Ing. Georg Gaugusch!

 

 

6       Seigniorial indices

 

Records have been added for the estates of Asparn, Walterskirchen, Staatz and Pernegg, all of them in Lower Austria.

 

For a list of the available parishes and their respective periods as well as further important information on this database, click the green Help/Info button in the top right corner of the GenTeam website.

 

I would like to sincerely thank MR Johann Frank!

 

 

7       Indices of Roman Catholic church registers for Burgenland, Lower Austria, Upper Austria, Salzburg, Styria, Tyrol, Moravia and Germany 1585- 1938

 

Records have been added for the following Roman Catholic parishes:

 

Burgenland

Dörfl, Rattersdorf, Steinberg, Unterrabnitz

 

Lower Austria

Ardagger Markt, Ardagger Stift, Eibesthal, Furth an der Triesting, Kollmitzberg, Neudorf bei Staatz, Ringelsdorf, Sallingberg, Sankt Valentin-Landschach, Sindelburg, Stockerau, Trattenbach, Würmla, Zistersdorf, Zwettl Stift

 

Upper Austria

Gallneukirchen

 

Salzburg

Werfenweng

 

Styria

Graz-Don Bosco, Graz-Graben, Graz-Münzgraben, Graz-St. Vinzenz, Übelbach

 

Tyrol

Navis, Sankt Jodok am Brenner, Tux

 

Moravia

Kutscherau/Kucerov, Stallek/Stalky

 

Germany

Gemen

 

For a list of the available parishes and their respective periods as well as further important information on this database, click the green Help/Info button in the top right corner of the GenTeam website.

 

I would like to sincerely thank Dieter Alexander, Ursula Baldemaier, Eduard Beer, Helmut Eisenkölbl, Johann Georg Fankhauser, MR Johann Frank, Susanna Gromowski, Franziska Heidrich, Andreas Korzinek, Dipl.-Ing. Franz Kreuzinger, Maria Lang, Martha Melchart, Ulrike Messerschmidt, Günther Pethers, Mag. Gabi Rudinger Ferger, Isabella Spari, Johann Strasser, Ing. Manuela Taibl, Mag. Christian Tobolka, Theodora Winkler as well as all those who are already working on further indices.

 

We would be particularly pleased if you would also like to contribute to GenTeam by creating a database or providing one you have already finished. Whether you are fluent in reading Kurrent or prefer to create an index based on a source written with a typewriter or in Latin letters: There is something for everyone! We look forward to your participation.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact me.

 

I wish you all the best for your research with GenTeam and the new records, and that you may stay healthy!

 

With best regards,

Felix Gundacker

 

Prof. Ing. Felix Gundacker

Pantzergasse 30/8

A-1190 Vienna

Phone: +43 676 40 11 059

www.GenTeam.eu

 

“Connecting genealogists“

 

If you do not wish to receive any further communications from GenTeam, please send a short email message with the subject “Unsubscribe” to kontakt@.... Thank you! 54


JGSLI Virtual meeting on Sunday November 22 at 2:00 PM Eastern #announcements #events #education #unitedkingdom

Bonnie Birns
 

Hello all! The Jewish Genealogy Society of Long Island is delighted to invite you to our November monthly meeting featuring our guest speaker, Jeanette Rosenberg.

 

JGSLI is extending the invitation to the broader genealogy community. We ask that you register in advance (see below). Please share with your friends!

Sunday, November 22nd, 2:00 PM, via Zoom

Speaker: Jeanette R. Rosenberg, OBE
Topic: UK Research for Non-Natives

A professional genealogist, Jeanette Rosenberg holds a postgraduate diploma in genealogical studies. She is the Education and Mentoring lead for the JGS of Great Britain and chairs its German Special Interest Group. As a director of JewishGen’s GerSIG from 2009 to 2019, she coordinated its presentations at many IAJGS conferences. In February 2016, Jeanette received an Order of the British Empire award, one of the UK’s highest honors, for her services to the disabled.

Jeanette will describe resources available for research on families who lived in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Island – including civil and Jewish records, newspaper archives, maps, and directories – and how to access them from outside the UK. Her talk will also cover the geography and history that you need to know to undertake successful research in UK records.

There are two ways to join our meeting:
Register for our Zoom meeting: this will allow you to join in so you can chat with others before and after the meeting (this will be limited to the first 100 people to join)

 

When: Nov 22, 2020 02:00 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)

Register in advance for this meeting:
https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZUsduyqqT4jEtemD38ZzpHg8Xt6mwMtqm9f

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.


OR

Tune into our meeting via Facebook Live at https://facebook.com/groups/JGSLI/ . No Facebook account is required to view the meeting, but if you are signed into Facebook you can ask questions in writing via the comment section under the video.

 

This webinar is free and open to the public.

 

I look forward to "seeing" you all then!

 

Bonnie Birns

president@...

President, Jewish Genealogy Society of Long Island
Jericho, Long Island, NY researcher #59766


JGSLI Virtual meeting on Wednesday November 11 at 7:00 PM Eastern #announcements #events

Bonnie Birns
 

Hello all! The Jewish Genealogy Society of Long Island is delighted to invite you to our bonus monthly meeting featuring a book and author talk with our guest speaker, Meryl Ain, about her book The Takeaway Men.

 

JGSLI is extending the invitation to the broader genealogy community. We ask that you register in advance (see below). Please share with your friends!

Wednesday, November 11th, 7:00 PM, via Zoom

Speaker: Meryl Ain
Topic: The Takeaway Men

Meryl Ain is a career educator and published writer, whose articles have appeared in the Huffington PostJewish Week, the New York TimesNewsday and other publications. In 2014, she co-authored the award-winning book, The Living Memories Project: Legacies That Last. Her new book, The Takeaway Men, is the result of her life-long quest to learn more about the Holocaust and its aftermath. A novel based on historical research, The Takeaway Men raises many issues familiar to genealogists – the challenges of immigration, the burden of family secrets, the impact of the Holocaust on survivors’ children, and more. Meryl will discuss these aspects of her book as well as the research she did to better understand the experiences of survivors and their families.

There are two ways to join our meeting:
Register for our Zoom meeting: this will allow you to join in so you can chat with others before and after the meeting (this will be limited to the first 100 people to join)

 

When: Nov 11, 2020 07:00 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)

Register in advance for this meeting:
https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZctdeiorj0iHNc01Lw9UqfD_-Fq_0o7DDkm

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.


OR

Tune into our meeting via Facebook Live at https://facebook.com/groups/JGSLI/ . No Facebook account is required to view the meeting, but if you are signed into Facebook you can ask questions in writing via the comment section under the video.

 

This webinar is free and open to the public.

 

I look forward to "seeing" you all then!

 

Bonnie Birns

president@...

President, Jewish Genealogy Society of Long Island
Jericho, Long Island, NY researcher #59766


Re: Name change records NYC #austria-czech #galicia #names #records

Sherri Bobish
 


Tanya,

Did he naturalize?  If so, he may have done the name change during the naturalization process.  Both FamilySearch and Ancestry have good databases of naturalization indices and documents. 

FamilySearch is a free site:  www.familysearch.org  Ancestry is a subscription site, but many public libraries offer free access on their computers, and since Covid, many libraries offer free access to their library card holders on their home computers.

Try searching www.fultonhistory.com which is a free site of old digitized newspapers.  It started with NY papers, but has expanded to other states.  I have found notices of name changes by searching newspapers at that site.

Regards,

Sherri Bobish


Re: 1930 census - invented people #general #records #usa

alwitz@...
 

Thanks to everyone for he ideas/alternative explanations.
a few more details - this was isolated to the 1930 census.
It was the inventory of the house my Grandparents lived in for many years and the list included my Grandmother and Grandfather, my mother one aunt and one uncle all the lived long lives.
There is no question about them being my family, confusion of the name, etc.

The mystery entries are three younger children, listed in the census as children.
None of my family have ever heard of temporary cousins, hidden neighbors, child mortality at this time.
There were lots of stories about earlier infant mortality in Russia so children dying was not a tabu subject in the family.

Only three possibilities I can imagine:  1) The Census taker made up the extra children for some reason, 2) My grandparents invented the extra children for some reason, 3) Some neighbor answered the census for my family incorrectly.
This was the depression - would there have been a reason for making your family appear larger?

Allen Herskowitz
Suart Fl
HERSKOWITZ, HERSHKOWITZ, BOROFSKY


Re: View Mate Marriage Translations Request – Russian - RZEPNIK #translation

ryabinkym@...
 

VM31822

In Russian:

 

37.

Состоялось в Варшаве, в 1888-м году, 7-го (19) декабря, в 6 часов вечера, в концелярии чиновника гражданского состояния нехристианских исповеданий 2-го округа города Варшавы. Извещаем, что в присутствии свидетелей: Михола Телихмана, 25 лет, рабочего, проживающем в доме под номером 29 по Мурановской улице и Герша Азенштадта, 27 лет, каменщика, проживающим в доме номер 30 по Чивной улице, оба жители города Варшавы, был заключен религиозный брак. Жених-холостой Зелик Ржейник, каменщик, 24-и лет, родился в городе Варшаве, в доме под номером 299 проживающий, сын Мошки, рабочего, 58-и лет и Ханы, урожденной Ляйфер, 50-и лет, супругов Ржейник, проживающих по улице Зомбновской, дом номер 32 с девицей Миной Футерман, 25-и лет, проживающей с матерью в доме номер 299, родившуюся и живущей в Варшаве, дочь Умершего Герша и живущей Фейги, урожденной Ройтлер.  Браку предшествовали 3 предбрачные оглашения в окружной синагоге, 5, 12, 19 ноября (17, 24 ноября и 1 декабря) этого года.  Против этого не было никаких препядствий.  Брак этот совершил равин (не ясно).  Новобрачные объявили нам, что они не заключали брачный договор.  Акт сей прочитан и нами подписан, кроме неграмотной невесты. 

 

Подпись  Подпись  Подпись  Подпись   

 

Translated into English:

 

37.

 

It took place in Warsaw, in 1888, on December 7 (19), at 6 pm, in the office of an official of the civil status of non-Christian confessions of the 2nd district of the city of Warsaw. We inform you that in the presence of witnesses: Mikhol Telikhman, 25 years old, a worker living in house number 29 on Muranovskaya street and Gersh Azenstadt, 27 years old, a bricklayer living in house number 30 on Chyvna street, both residents of the city of Warsaw, a religious marriage. The single groom Zelik Rzheynik, a bricklayer, 24 years old, was born in the city of Warsaw, living in the house at number 299, the son of Moshka, a worker, 58 years old and Khana, nee Leifer, 50 years old, the spouses Rzheynik, living in Zombnowska Street, house number 32 with the girl Mina Futerman, 25 years old, living with her mother in house number 299, born and living in Warsaw, daughter of the Deceased Gersh and living Feiga, nee Reutler. The marriage was preceded by 3 premarital announcements in the district synagogue on November 5, 12, 19 (November 17, 24 and December 1) of this year. There were no obstacles against this. This marriage was made by a rabbi (not clear). The newlyweds announced to us that they had not entered into a prenuptial agreement. This act has been read and signed by us, except for the illiterate bride.

 

Signature Signature Signature Signature
Translated by Michael Ryabinky
Boynton Beach, FL


Re: Salzburg DP camps #austria-czech #holocaust #records

George Muenz
 

My parents were in Kammer-Schaerffing for about 4 years. 
--
George (Naftali) Muenz
Vancouver, Canada


WORMS family from Aschaffenburg/ Frankfurt #dna #germany

Steven Warner
 

Wondering if any direct line descendants from the WORMS family of Frankfurt, Germany have taken a Y-DNA test? I would be interested in comparing results to see if there is any connection to my Worms family from Aschaffenburg, Germany. The distances between both cities is not that great.

Steven Warner (swarner317@...)
Researching: WORMS families from Aschaffenburg & Sulzbach, Germany


Ivano-Frankivsk records #records

Lande
 

The USHMM has added 54,695 names taken from collection RG31.013M, Ivano-Frankivsk State Oblast Archives records.  The names come from reels 24-38 in Lista osob zamieszkalych (list of residents) in Stalislav (now Ivano-Frankivsk) in 1939.
As with all World Memory Project collections, the names are searchable online and copies of documents may be requested through IDD.
 
Peter Lande
Washington, D.C.


Re: Rothenberg family tree #general

Sherri Venezia
 

I have Rothenberg/ Rottenberg on my immediate tree; from Galicia, towns, villages both west and slightly north of Lemberg, now Lviv, Ukraine. Your Lina is intriguing; my gr gr grandmother was Liebe, so naming patterns in place. They came to NYC in first decade 20th C.

Sherri Venezia


Re: Sponsorship records #general #records

Sherri Bobish
 


Janis,

I would start with HIAS. https://www.hias.org/records-search-requests

AJHS has a HIAS client database, but it is a later time frame than you require.
https://ajhs.org/blog/records-hias-i-363-are-officially-live

Regards,

Sherri Bobish


Re: Salzburg DP camps #austria-czech #holocaust #records

Lewis, Megan
 

Hi Israel,

The Arolsen Archives records have many DP records.  Check their website arolsen-archives.org to see what they have put online already.  Ancestry.com has indexing some of their postwar lists as well.  If what you need is not online, you can submit a search request with them, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum or Yad Vashem.

The Joint Distribution Committee archives has digitized their DP camp records, https://archives.jdc.org/

USHMM has the Unite Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration (UNRRA) Austria mission records but the finding aid is not clear if there a lists of names for Salzburg.

Megan Lewis


Re: Translation please? #translation #poland

Leya Aronson
 

Hello,
Invitation to the wedding of GITTEL, sister of the person inviting to MENACHEM, son of the late Shmuel Bialik. Date of wedding is Tuesday, the 7th of Kislev, 5665 which corresponds to November 15, 1904. Signed MOSHE ZRYLEVITCH from PABINETZ  [Pabinetca]

Hope this helps.

Leya Aronson,
Toronto, Canada

4281 - 4300 of 656444