Date   

A special request from JRI-Poland #lodz #poland

Stanley Diamond
 

Dear friends of JRI-Poland:

As we near the end of 2017, once again we encourage you to consider
JRI-Poland in your year-end giving plans, to help us to continue to
expand our database with additional entries and information for your
town(s).

This year, more than ever, we have an opportunity to make a huge
difference for researchers. There are now scans available for hundreds
of thousands of records for which funds are needed to undertake the
Phase 3 full extractions.If you have missed the description of the
Phase 3 initiative, read more in this Avotaynu article
_www.jri-poland.org/downloads/Avotaynu_Fall-2016_JRI-Poland-update.pdf_

As JRI-Poland researchers and supporters know, JRI-Poland fundraising
has traditionally been "shtetl-specific" -- that is, you, the users of
our website and database, support the records indexing and records
extraction work for the town(s) in which your families lived.

Many researchers also mark their contributions "use the funds wherever
they are needed most," and we sincerely appreciate their recognition
of how their support gives us flexibility - sometimes to fund work
on towns for which there are very few known researchers.

There are exciting plans underway to make JRI-Poland searches even more
productive, and "General Fund" donations can also help make this
initiative a reality.

JRI-Poland is proud to point out that in our past 22-years of activity,
approximately 93% of all funds we have raised have been spent
specifically for the creation of data. This proportion of fund
utilization for our mission is remarkable -- and extremely rare --
in non-profit organizations.

To all of you who have generously supported our activity in the past,
we thank you again. To researchers who have not yet made a donation to
JRI-Poland, we ask you to consider 2017 as the year you support
the organization that has meant so much to you and your family.
The JRI-Poland donations page _www.jri-poland.org/support.htm_
provides a facility to make recurring donations. Small donations,
each month, can make a difference

Note: Jewish Records Indexing - Poland is an independent non-profit
organization with its own administration, volunteers and fundraising.
Because JRI-Poland's database, discussion group and website are
hosted by JewishGen, as a courtesy to researchers, JRI-Poland enables
its data search results to be displayed on JewishGen's All Poland Database.

Wishing each and every one a healthy and joyous Hanukkah

Stanley Diamond
Executive Director
On behalf of the Board of JRI-Poland


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland A special request from JRI-Poland #lodz #poland

Stanley Diamond
 

Dear friends of JRI-Poland:

As we near the end of 2017, once again we encourage you to consider
JRI-Poland in your year-end giving plans, to help us to continue to
expand our database with additional entries and information for your
town(s).

This year, more than ever, we have an opportunity to make a huge
difference for researchers. There are now scans available for hundreds
of thousands of records for which funds are needed to undertake the
Phase 3 full extractions.If you have missed the description of the
Phase 3 initiative, read more in this Avotaynu article
_www.jri-poland.org/downloads/Avotaynu_Fall-2016_JRI-Poland-update.pdf_

As JRI-Poland researchers and supporters know, JRI-Poland fundraising
has traditionally been "shtetl-specific" -- that is, you, the users of
our website and database, support the records indexing and records
extraction work for the town(s) in which your families lived.

Many researchers also mark their contributions "use the funds wherever
they are needed most," and we sincerely appreciate their recognition
of how their support gives us flexibility - sometimes to fund work
on towns for which there are very few known researchers.

There are exciting plans underway to make JRI-Poland searches even more
productive, and "General Fund" donations can also help make this
initiative a reality.

JRI-Poland is proud to point out that in our past 22-years of activity,
approximately 93% of all funds we have raised have been spent
specifically for the creation of data. This proportion of fund
utilization for our mission is remarkable -- and extremely rare --
in non-profit organizations.

To all of you who have generously supported our activity in the past,
we thank you again. To researchers who have not yet made a donation to
JRI-Poland, we ask you to consider 2017 as the year you support
the organization that has meant so much to you and your family.
The JRI-Poland donations page _www.jri-poland.org/support.htm_
provides a facility to make recurring donations. Small donations,
each month, can make a difference

Note: Jewish Records Indexing - Poland is an independent non-profit
organization with its own administration, volunteers and fundraising.
Because JRI-Poland's database, discussion group and website are
hosted by JewishGen, as a courtesy to researchers, JRI-Poland enables
its data search results to be displayed on JewishGen's All Poland Database.

Wishing each and every one a healthy and joyous Hanukkah

Stanley Diamond
Executive Director
On behalf of the Board of JRI-Poland


A special request from JRI-Poland #poland

Stanley Diamond
 

Dear friends of JRI-Poland:

As we near the end of 2017, once again we encourage you to consider
JRI-Poland in your year-end giving plans, to help us to continue to
expand our database with additional entries and information for your
town(s).

This year, more than ever, we have an opportunity to make a huge
difference for researchers. There are now scans available for hundreds
of thousands of records for which funds are needed to undertake the
Phase 3 full extractions.If you have missed the description of the
Phase 3 initiative, read more in this Avotaynu article
_www.jri-poland.org/downloads/Avotaynu_Fall-2016_JRI-Poland-update.pdf_

As JRI-Poland researchers and supporters know, JRI-Poland fundraising
has traditionally been "shtetl-specific" -- that is, you, the users of
our website and database, support the records indexing and records
extraction work for the town(s) in which your families lived.

Many researchers also mark their contributions "use the funds wherever
they are needed most," and we sincerely appreciate their recognition
of how their support gives us flexibility - sometimes to fund work
on towns for which there are very few known researchers.

There are exciting plans underway to make JRI-Poland searches even more
productive, and "General Fund" donations can also help make this
initiative a reality.

JRI-Poland is proud to point out that in our past 22-years of activity,
approximately 93% of all funds we have raised have been spent
specifically for the creation of data. This proportion of fund
utilization for our mission is remarkable -- and extremely rare --
in non-profit organizations.

To all of you who have generously supported our activity in the past,
we thank you again. To researchers who have not yet made a donation to
JRI-Poland, we ask you to consider 2017 as the year you support
the organization that has meant so much to you and your family.
The JRI-Poland donations page _www.jri-poland.org/support.htm_
provides a facility to make recurring donations. Small donations,
each month, can make a difference

Note: Jewish Records Indexing - Poland is an independent non-profit
organization with its own administration, volunteers and fundraising.
Because JRI-Poland's database, discussion group and website are
hosted by JewishGen, as a courtesy to researchers, JRI-Poland enables
its data search results to be displayed on JewishGen's All Poland Database.

Wishing each and every one a healthy and joyous Hanukkah

Stanley Diamond
Executive Director
On behalf of the Board of JRI-Poland


JRI Poland #Poland A special request from JRI-Poland #poland

Stanley Diamond
 

Dear friends of JRI-Poland:

As we near the end of 2017, once again we encourage you to consider
JRI-Poland in your year-end giving plans, to help us to continue to
expand our database with additional entries and information for your
town(s).

This year, more than ever, we have an opportunity to make a huge
difference for researchers. There are now scans available for hundreds
of thousands of records for which funds are needed to undertake the
Phase 3 full extractions.If you have missed the description of the
Phase 3 initiative, read more in this Avotaynu article
_www.jri-poland.org/downloads/Avotaynu_Fall-2016_JRI-Poland-update.pdf_

As JRI-Poland researchers and supporters know, JRI-Poland fundraising
has traditionally been "shtetl-specific" -- that is, you, the users of
our website and database, support the records indexing and records
extraction work for the town(s) in which your families lived.

Many researchers also mark their contributions "use the funds wherever
they are needed most," and we sincerely appreciate their recognition
of how their support gives us flexibility - sometimes to fund work
on towns for which there are very few known researchers.

There are exciting plans underway to make JRI-Poland searches even more
productive, and "General Fund" donations can also help make this
initiative a reality.

JRI-Poland is proud to point out that in our past 22-years of activity,
approximately 93% of all funds we have raised have been spent
specifically for the creation of data. This proportion of fund
utilization for our mission is remarkable -- and extremely rare --
in non-profit organizations.

To all of you who have generously supported our activity in the past,
we thank you again. To researchers who have not yet made a donation to
JRI-Poland, we ask you to consider 2017 as the year you support
the organization that has meant so much to you and your family.
The JRI-Poland donations page _www.jri-poland.org/support.htm_
provides a facility to make recurring donations. Small donations,
each month, can make a difference

Note: Jewish Records Indexing - Poland is an independent non-profit
organization with its own administration, volunteers and fundraising.
Because JRI-Poland's database, discussion group and website are
hosted by JewishGen, as a courtesy to researchers, JRI-Poland enables
its data search results to be displayed on JewishGen's All Poland Database.

Wishing each and every one a healthy and joyous Hanukkah

Stanley Diamond
Executive Director
On behalf of the Board of JRI-Poland


The E-L117 Y-DNA Haplogroup #dna

Amos Israel Zezmer
 

Dear fellow researchers,

My 2nd cousin's Y-DNA Haplogroup is E-L117. I have not had much success
in discovering any information on this haplogroup. Perhaps I am not
looking in the right place.

Family Tree DNA's Migration Map shows this group pretty much all over
Africa.

This is weird because our parents come >from Vel'ke Kapusany, Slovakia
(formerly Nagykapos, Hungary) and I have been able to trace our
ancestors as far back as 1820, always living in the same town and region.

Looking forward to your feedback.

Best regards,

Amos ZEZMER
Yerres, France


DNA Research #DNA The E-L117 Y-DNA Haplogroup #dna

Amos Israel Zezmer
 

Dear fellow researchers,

My 2nd cousin's Y-DNA Haplogroup is E-L117. I have not had much success
in discovering any information on this haplogroup. Perhaps I am not
looking in the right place.

Family Tree DNA's Migration Map shows this group pretty much all over
Africa.

This is weird because our parents come >from Vel'ke Kapusany, Slovakia
(formerly Nagykapos, Hungary) and I have been able to trace our
ancestors as far back as 1820, always living in the same town and region.

Looking forward to your feedback.

Best regards,

Amos ZEZMER
Yerres, France


"What Genealogists Should Know About DNA - Without the Science Lesson!" #general

Nolan Altman
 

The Jewish Genealogy Society of Long Island (JGSLI), winner of the IAJGS
2015 Outstanding Publication Award for its You Tube Channel, is pleased to
announce its latest video, "What Genealogists Should Know About DNA.Without
the Science Lesson!"

DNA and genealogy. It's all over...TV commercials, Facebook groups, print
media, and DNA special interest groups. Using DNA for family research might
be the biggest innovation in genealogy since someone discovered a descendant
chart etched on a cave wall in southern Europe. So, what is it about DNA
that has genealogists salivating? And I mean that literally. There are
plenty of websites and tutorials on the basics of DNA. What we're attempted
in this video, is to present the points we think a genealogist should know,
about using DNA to help with their research.without the science lesson.

You can access all 34 of our short instructional videos directly >from our
You Tube Channel at
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCUV8xttIn93AwJX2_I0AIAg/feed or >from our
website http://jgsli.org/ If you have any comments or recommendations for
other topics, please let me know at past_pres@jgsli.org

Nolan Altman


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen "What Genealogists Should Know About DNA - Without the Science Lesson!" #general

Nolan Altman
 

The Jewish Genealogy Society of Long Island (JGSLI), winner of the IAJGS
2015 Outstanding Publication Award for its You Tube Channel, is pleased to
announce its latest video, "What Genealogists Should Know About DNA.Without
the Science Lesson!"

DNA and genealogy. It's all over...TV commercials, Facebook groups, print
media, and DNA special interest groups. Using DNA for family research might
be the biggest innovation in genealogy since someone discovered a descendant
chart etched on a cave wall in southern Europe. So, what is it about DNA
that has genealogists salivating? And I mean that literally. There are
plenty of websites and tutorials on the basics of DNA. What we're attempted
in this video, is to present the points we think a genealogist should know,
about using DNA to help with their research.without the science lesson.

You can access all 34 of our short instructional videos directly >from our
You Tube Channel at
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCUV8xttIn93AwJX2_I0AIAg/feed or >from our
website http://jgsli.org/ If you have any comments or recommendations for
other topics, please let me know at past_pres@jgsli.org

Nolan Altman


Viewmate-Translation from Polish #poland

Sheryl Levin <slevin0715@...>
 

Good morning, I would like complete translations of these 2 birth
records >from the town of Szczuczyn. Please respond via the Viewmate form.

https://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/viewmateview.asp?key=62745

https://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/viewmateview.asp?key=62749

Thank you,
Sheryl Levin
Voorhees, NJ


JRI Poland #Poland Viewmate-Translation from Polish #poland

Sheryl Levin <slevin0715@...>
 

Good morning, I would like complete translations of these 2 birth
records >from the town of Szczuczyn. Please respond via the Viewmate form.

https://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/viewmateview.asp?key=62745

https://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/viewmateview.asp?key=62749

Thank you,
Sheryl Levin
Voorhees, NJ


This week's Yizkor book excerpt on the JewishGen Facebook page #general

Bruce Drake <BDrake@...>
 

Many shtetls in the Pale were arenas for political, ideological and social
competition among three groups: the Hasidim, the Zionists and the "Bund" (Der
Algemeyner Yidisher Arbeter Bund, or General Union of Jewish Workers), a group
driven by the young Jewish intelligentsia who sought to make cause with a new
Jewish working class that was woefully underpaid, overworked and discriminated
against. It was Zionism that prevailed in Rokitno (Rokytne) in northwestern
Ukraine, which had formerly been part of the Russian Empire and later Poland.

The "The Origins of the Zionist Movement" >from Rokitno's Yizkor book traces the
history of this struggle.

URL: https://www.facebook.com/JewishGen.org/posts/1596222360399913

Bruce Drake
Silver Spring, MD

Researching: DRACH, EBERT, KIMMEL, ZLOTNICK
Towns: Wojnilow, Kovel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen This week's Yizkor book excerpt on the JewishGen Facebook page #general

Bruce Drake <BDrake@...>
 

Many shtetls in the Pale were arenas for political, ideological and social
competition among three groups: the Hasidim, the Zionists and the "Bund" (Der
Algemeyner Yidisher Arbeter Bund, or General Union of Jewish Workers), a group
driven by the young Jewish intelligentsia who sought to make cause with a new
Jewish working class that was woefully underpaid, overworked and discriminated
against. It was Zionism that prevailed in Rokitno (Rokytne) in northwestern
Ukraine, which had formerly been part of the Russian Empire and later Poland.

The "The Origins of the Zionist Movement" >from Rokitno's Yizkor book traces the
history of this struggle.

URL: https://www.facebook.com/JewishGen.org/posts/1596222360399913

Bruce Drake
Silver Spring, MD

Researching: DRACH, EBERT, KIMMEL, ZLOTNICK
Towns: Wojnilow, Kovel


A special request from JRI-Poland #general

Stanley Diamond
 

Dear friends:

As we near the end of 2017, once again we encourage you to consider
JRI-Poland in your year-end giving plans, to help us to continue to expand our
database with additional entries and information for your town(s).

This year, more than ever, we have an opportunity to make a huge difference
for researchers. There are now scans available for hundreds of thousands
of records for which funds are needed to undertake the Phase 3 full
extractions. If you have missed the description of the Phase 3 initiative, read
more in this Avotaynu article
http://www.jri-poland.org/downloads/Avotaynu_Fall-2016_JRI-Poland-update.pdf

As JRI-Poland researchers and supporters know, JRI-Poland fundraising has
traditionally been "shtetl-specific" -- that is, you, the users of our
website and database, support the records indexing and records extraction work
for the town(s) in which your families lived.

Many researchers also mark their contributions "use the funds wherever they
are needed most," and we sincerely appreciate their recognition of how
their support gives us flexibility - sometimes to fund work on towns for which
there are very few known researchers.

There are exciting plans underway to make JRI-Poland searches even more
productive, and "General Fund" donations can also help make this initiative a
reality.

JRI-Poland is proud to point out that in our past 22-years of activity,
approximately 93% of all funds we have raised have been spent specifically for
the creation of data. This proportion of fund utilization for our mission
is remarkable -- and extremely rare -- in non-profit organizations.

To all of you who have generously supported our activity in the past, we
thank you again. To researchers who have not yet made a donation to
JRI-Poland, we ask you to consider 2017 as the year you support the organization
that has meant so much to you and your family. The JRI-Poland donations page
http://www.jri-poland.org/support.htm
provides a facility to make recurring donations. Small donations, each month,
can make a difference.

Note: Because Jewish Records-Indexing Poland is an independent organization
whose database, discussion group and website are hosted by JewishGen, as a
courtesy to researchers, JRI-Poland enables its data search results to be
displayed on JewishGen's All Poland Database.

Wishing each and every one a healthy and joyous Hanukkah

Stanley Diamond
Executive Director
On behalf of the Board of JRI-Poland


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen A special request from JRI-Poland #general

Stanley Diamond
 

Dear friends:

As we near the end of 2017, once again we encourage you to consider
JRI-Poland in your year-end giving plans, to help us to continue to expand our
database with additional entries and information for your town(s).

This year, more than ever, we have an opportunity to make a huge difference
for researchers. There are now scans available for hundreds of thousands
of records for which funds are needed to undertake the Phase 3 full
extractions. If you have missed the description of the Phase 3 initiative, read
more in this Avotaynu article
http://www.jri-poland.org/downloads/Avotaynu_Fall-2016_JRI-Poland-update.pdf

As JRI-Poland researchers and supporters know, JRI-Poland fundraising has
traditionally been "shtetl-specific" -- that is, you, the users of our
website and database, support the records indexing and records extraction work
for the town(s) in which your families lived.

Many researchers also mark their contributions "use the funds wherever they
are needed most," and we sincerely appreciate their recognition of how
their support gives us flexibility - sometimes to fund work on towns for which
there are very few known researchers.

There are exciting plans underway to make JRI-Poland searches even more
productive, and "General Fund" donations can also help make this initiative a
reality.

JRI-Poland is proud to point out that in our past 22-years of activity,
approximately 93% of all funds we have raised have been spent specifically for
the creation of data. This proportion of fund utilization for our mission
is remarkable -- and extremely rare -- in non-profit organizations.

To all of you who have generously supported our activity in the past, we
thank you again. To researchers who have not yet made a donation to
JRI-Poland, we ask you to consider 2017 as the year you support the organization
that has meant so much to you and your family. The JRI-Poland donations page
http://www.jri-poland.org/support.htm
provides a facility to make recurring donations. Small donations, each month,
can make a difference.

Note: Because Jewish Records-Indexing Poland is an independent organization
whose database, discussion group and website are hosted by JewishGen, as a
courtesy to researchers, JRI-Poland enables its data search results to be
displayed on JewishGen's All Poland Database.

Wishing each and every one a healthy and joyous Hanukkah

Stanley Diamond
Executive Director
On behalf of the Board of JRI-Poland


Jewish Hospital in Uman #ukraine

Joshua Skarf <jskarf@...>
 

No one seems to have any information about the Jewish hospital in Uman, so I looked a little deeper using the Historical Jewish Press website and found a fair amount of information. I thought I'd share what I've managed to find:Â


In the mid-19th century, the city of Uman was home to a Jewish hospital for the poor.(1) The 50-bed hospital was originally built by Kalman Tolchinsky, a wealthy donor in Uman who also paid for the city bathhouses to be renovated.(2) The hospital was built with gardens and a vineyard around it.(3) When Tolchinsky died in 1865, six men were chosen to serve as trustees of the hospital, each funding it for two months a year. They were Yakov Ettinger, Azriel Meir Yakilitz, Yona and Chaim Ettinger, Zalman Bernstein, and Kalman Aurbach. They brought an influx of funds that allowed the hospital to improve its food and services to the poor of Uman.(4) Shortly after, the hospital was destroyed and then rebuilt by a Mr. Rappaport, who ran the hospital for ten years.(5) At the end of 19th century funds were collected to renovate the hospital.(6) The hospital was still functioning in 1919, when victims of the Ukrainian pogroms were brought there for treatment >from surrounding villages.(7)

In the 1860s, the hospital was small and lacked resources. It had four rooms, each holding between 5-10 patients. Patients were given simple rations of bread and water as well as donated clothes. The hospital had 3 orderlies and one doctor who would make house-calls twice a week. The rooms were poorly insulated and heated.(8) In 1880, the medical staff was increased to four doctors.(9)

from the 1840s through the 1860s, the hospital was funded by a city-stipulated monopoly on sourdough, which at the time was used for baked goods in place of yeast.(10) Butchers also paid a tax on their sales to the hospital, and individual patients often made donations to the hospital. In 1863, the financial stability of the hospital was compromised when a citizen began importing sourdough and selling it on his own, for individual profit. Rabbis issued decrees against this practice, but it apparently continued as the townspeople preferred the low prices and high-quality sourdough. At least one angry citizen suspected that the directors of the hospital were pocketing part of these funds.(11) Over the years the operating costs were supplemented by rich donors, especially building costs.Â

NOTES
(1) The earliest reference I found to the hospital was in 1861, but the author was unaware of who had set up the hospital or when it had occurred. The author writes that it has existed â??for many years.â?? (â??Masa Umanâ?? in Hamelitz 22 Aug 1861, I.866-868)Â
(2) Evel Kavedâ in Hamelitz 16 Nov 1865, IV.634
(3) Hamelitz, 6 Dec 1865, IV.372
(4) Hamelitz 8 Jul 1879, XXVII.551
(5) Hamelitz 18 7, 1884 859-863
(6) The Ukraine SIG is currently collecting funds to translate a collection about this fundraising campaign.
(7) The Slaughter of the Ukrainian Jews in 1919, 348. The Ukraine Terror and the Jewish Peril, p.13
(8) ibid
(9) Hamelitz 8 Jun 1880, 175.
(10) Beit Cholim Mechirat Shâmarim ba-Ir Umanâ in Hamelitz 20 Aug 1863, III.475-478.
(11) Masa Umanâ in Hamelitz, 22 Aug 1861.


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Jewish Hospital in Uman #ukraine

Joshua Skarf <jskarf@...>
 

No one seems to have any information about the Jewish hospital in Uman, so I looked a little deeper using the Historical Jewish Press website and found a fair amount of information. I thought I'd share what I've managed to find:Â


In the mid-19th century, the city of Uman was home to a Jewish hospital for the poor.(1) The 50-bed hospital was originally built by Kalman Tolchinsky, a wealthy donor in Uman who also paid for the city bathhouses to be renovated.(2) The hospital was built with gardens and a vineyard around it.(3) When Tolchinsky died in 1865, six men were chosen to serve as trustees of the hospital, each funding it for two months a year. They were Yakov Ettinger, Azriel Meir Yakilitz, Yona and Chaim Ettinger, Zalman Bernstein, and Kalman Aurbach. They brought an influx of funds that allowed the hospital to improve its food and services to the poor of Uman.(4) Shortly after, the hospital was destroyed and then rebuilt by a Mr. Rappaport, who ran the hospital for ten years.(5) At the end of 19th century funds were collected to renovate the hospital.(6) The hospital was still functioning in 1919, when victims of the Ukrainian pogroms were brought there for treatment >from surrounding villages.(7)

In the 1860s, the hospital was small and lacked resources. It had four rooms, each holding between 5-10 patients. Patients were given simple rations of bread and water as well as donated clothes. The hospital had 3 orderlies and one doctor who would make house-calls twice a week. The rooms were poorly insulated and heated.(8) In 1880, the medical staff was increased to four doctors.(9)

from the 1840s through the 1860s, the hospital was funded by a city-stipulated monopoly on sourdough, which at the time was used for baked goods in place of yeast.(10) Butchers also paid a tax on their sales to the hospital, and individual patients often made donations to the hospital. In 1863, the financial stability of the hospital was compromised when a citizen began importing sourdough and selling it on his own, for individual profit. Rabbis issued decrees against this practice, but it apparently continued as the townspeople preferred the low prices and high-quality sourdough. At least one angry citizen suspected that the directors of the hospital were pocketing part of these funds.(11) Over the years the operating costs were supplemented by rich donors, especially building costs.Â

NOTES
(1) The earliest reference I found to the hospital was in 1861, but the author was unaware of who had set up the hospital or when it had occurred. The author writes that it has existed â??for many years.â?? (â??Masa Umanâ?? in Hamelitz 22 Aug 1861, I.866-868)Â
(2) Evel Kavedâ in Hamelitz 16 Nov 1865, IV.634
(3) Hamelitz, 6 Dec 1865, IV.372
(4) Hamelitz 8 Jul 1879, XXVII.551
(5) Hamelitz 18 7, 1884 859-863
(6) The Ukraine SIG is currently collecting funds to translate a collection about this fundraising campaign.
(7) The Slaughter of the Ukrainian Jews in 1919, 348. The Ukraine Terror and the Jewish Peril, p.13
(8) ibid
(9) Hamelitz 8 Jun 1880, 175.
(10) Beit Cholim Mechirat Shâmarim ba-Ir Umanâ in Hamelitz 20 Aug 1863, III.475-478.
(11) Masa Umanâ in Hamelitz, 22 Aug 1861.


Lerner rabbis #ukraine

Molly Staub
 

Another researcher has informed me that my great-grandfather, Yechiel
Berenson of Ukraine, married a daughter of Rabbi Shevach Lerner of
Kitygorod, Podolia Gubernia. Shevach's wife Devorah was a descendant of
Rashi. My informant did not know the bride's given name, but the couple had
four sons : Rabbi Samuel Lerner of Dinovtsy; Rabbi Israel Abraham of
Tereshpol and Balin; Rabbi Mordechai of Munkacs; and Rabbi Mendel of
Kitaygorod. Rabbi Shevach and Devorah also had two daughters, but this
researcher did not know their names.

She received this information orally >from a relative many years ago. I know
Lerner is a common name, but I have tried to verify the information with no
success. I found a few Rabbi Lerners in Brooklyn, but no evidence that
they're the correct ones

If anyone has any of these people on their trees, I would appreciate any
information to help me fill in the blanks.

Thank you, Molly Arost Staub Katzman
Boca Raton, FL

AROST, HARAST Dombraveni, Moldova; Philadelphia, JARAST Argentina, BERENSON
Ukraine, Philadelphia, GRAFFMAN Philadelphia, GROFFMAN, London, SHTOFMAN
Dumbraveni, Philadelphia, GOLDEMBERGArgentina, WASSERMAN Russia,
Philadelphia, ZUKERMAN Russia, Pittsburgh, LERNER Podolia Gubernia, Russia

Molly Arost Staub


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Lerner rabbis #ukraine

Molly Staub
 

Another researcher has informed me that my great-grandfather, Yechiel
Berenson of Ukraine, married a daughter of Rabbi Shevach Lerner of
Kitygorod, Podolia Gubernia. Shevach's wife Devorah was a descendant of
Rashi. My informant did not know the bride's given name, but the couple had
four sons : Rabbi Samuel Lerner of Dinovtsy; Rabbi Israel Abraham of
Tereshpol and Balin; Rabbi Mordechai of Munkacs; and Rabbi Mendel of
Kitaygorod. Rabbi Shevach and Devorah also had two daughters, but this
researcher did not know their names.

She received this information orally >from a relative many years ago. I know
Lerner is a common name, but I have tried to verify the information with no
success. I found a few Rabbi Lerners in Brooklyn, but no evidence that
they're the correct ones

If anyone has any of these people on their trees, I would appreciate any
information to help me fill in the blanks.

Thank you, Molly Arost Staub Katzman
Boca Raton, FL

AROST, HARAST Dombraveni, Moldova; Philadelphia, JARAST Argentina, BERENSON
Ukraine, Philadelphia, GRAFFMAN Philadelphia, GROFFMAN, London, SHTOFMAN
Dumbraveni, Philadelphia, GOLDEMBERGArgentina, WASSERMAN Russia,
Philadelphia, ZUKERMAN Russia, Pittsburgh, LERNER Podolia Gubernia, Russia

Molly Arost Staub


Brodsky, Brotski, Brotzka #ukraine

mike brodsky <bsculptor@...>
 

My great grandfather Israel and his brother Asher with anyone of the above last names immigrated through Castle Garden, NY to the US in 1891 >from Zlatopol, Ukraine. Israel was born there about 1858-1862. My branch of the family moved to New Haven, Connecticut about 1895 and has been in Connecticut since then except for me (I am in Oakland, Ca.).
I am interested if anyone has any information about the Brodsky's in Zlatopol, Ukraine. I am aware that the Sugar Brodskys are >from there but I haven't been able to find a relationship.

Thanks
Mike Brodsky
Bsculptor@sbcglobal.net


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Brodsky, Brotski, Brotzka #ukraine

mike brodsky <bsculptor@...>
 

My great grandfather Israel and his brother Asher with anyone of the above last names immigrated through Castle Garden, NY to the US in 1891 >from Zlatopol, Ukraine. Israel was born there about 1858-1862. My branch of the family moved to New Haven, Connecticut about 1895 and has been in Connecticut since then except for me (I am in Oakland, Ca.).
I am interested if anyone has any information about the Brodsky's in Zlatopol, Ukraine. I am aware that the Sugar Brodskys are >from there but I haven't been able to find a relationship.

Thanks
Mike Brodsky
Bsculptor@sbcglobal.net

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