Date   

Re: EU's Data Privacy Regulation (GDPR) Affects Access to Netherlands Family Cards Being Online #germany

Rod Miller <rpm@...>
 

The EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) has significant rule
exceptions for historical projects, as well as being limited to living
persons only and data of current EU citizens only, and any archive that
restricts data >from 1920 and 1940 that is about victims of the Holocaust
is not only overreacting, but sending out the wrong message that the
intent of GDPR is to suppress the dissemation of the actual history of
the Holocaust. I do not believe that is the purpose and/or intention of
the GDPR.

Our non-profit organization Tracing the Past e.V. is about to release
biographies of around 406,000 people in our "Mapping the
Lives" project, most of them German Jews, >from the German
minority census of 1939.

We would not even consider redacting the information we are
publishing about the Jewish/non-Jewish heritage of each individuals'
grandparents, nor any of the other data -this information was recorded
in the Census and is part of the historical record - unless an EU
court ordered us to do so.
And even then, we would probably just move the project to outside
the EU and continue making it available online worldwide.

Should any living person request that we delete a record or redact parts
of it, we would of course honor such a request, and should any family
member make such a request, we would seriously consider it based on the
motivation for such a reguest.

I hope the suppression of historical data is not a trend that continues,
because if more institutions misinterpret the GDPR and react >from fear
and paranoia to suppress historical information related to the
Holocaust, then it is going to have a significant negative impact on
Holocaust research and education. That would be a truly terrible
development.

Roderick Miller, Tracing the Past e.V. Berlin, Germany


German SIG #Germany Re: EU's Data Privacy Regulation (GDPR) Affects Access to Netherlands Family Cards Being Online #germany

Rod Miller <rpm@...>
 

The EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) has significant rule
exceptions for historical projects, as well as being limited to living
persons only and data of current EU citizens only, and any archive that
restricts data >from 1920 and 1940 that is about victims of the Holocaust
is not only overreacting, but sending out the wrong message that the
intent of GDPR is to suppress the dissemation of the actual history of
the Holocaust. I do not believe that is the purpose and/or intention of
the GDPR.

Our non-profit organization Tracing the Past e.V. is about to release
biographies of around 406,000 people in our "Mapping the
Lives" project, most of them German Jews, >from the German
minority census of 1939.

We would not even consider redacting the information we are
publishing about the Jewish/non-Jewish heritage of each individuals'
grandparents, nor any of the other data -this information was recorded
in the Census and is part of the historical record - unless an EU
court ordered us to do so.
And even then, we would probably just move the project to outside
the EU and continue making it available online worldwide.

Should any living person request that we delete a record or redact parts
of it, we would of course honor such a request, and should any family
member make such a request, we would seriously consider it based on the
motivation for such a reguest.

I hope the suppression of historical data is not a trend that continues,
because if more institutions misinterpret the GDPR and react >from fear
and paranoia to suppress historical information related to the
Holocaust, then it is going to have a significant negative impact on
Holocaust research and education. That would be a truly terrible
development.

Roderick Miller, Tracing the Past e.V. Berlin, Germany


Chernigov Gubernia Document Translation Project #general

Beth Galleto
 

Dear fellow researchers,

If your relatives lived in the former Chernigov gubernia, you may know that
family lists-- also called tax poll censuses-- for Jewish families living in
this area were compiled in the 19th and early 20th centuries. We now have an
opportunity to translate and index these records through the Ukraine SIG, and
your help is needed to move the project forward. I am excitedly anticipating
the treasure trove of family information this project will reveal to us!

The records, hand-written in Cyrillic, show names and ages of family members
and may also show where the family is registered, the social status of the
head of household, his or her occupation, and other information. The lists
cover towns currently in Ukraine and the Russian Republic, including Borzna,
Chernigov, Glukhov, Gorodnya, Konotop, Kozolets, Krolevets, Mglin, Nezhin,
Novgorod-Seversk, Nobozybkov, Oster, Sosnitsa and Starodub. They were made in
1882, 1888, 1906, and 1910, plus a few >from 1900 to 1904.

The lists were microfilmed by the Latter Day Saints (LDS) church and have now
been scanned, but they can be viewed only at LDS FamilySearch libraries. The
Chernigov Gubernia Document Translation Project will translate and index
these records, to enable researchers to find and understand the scanned
original documents. Donations are needed to hire people with the skills to
read and translate the handwritten entries, enter the information into a
JewishGen spreadsheet, and prepare the data for posting to the JewishGen
Ukraine Database.

To donate to the Chernigov Gubernia Document Translation Project or for more
details, please go to
https://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=22

Once the project is under way, contributors of $100 or more will be able to
access the spreadsheets before the data becomes available on the JewishGen
Ukraine Database. Thank you for your interest and your help.

Beth Galleto
Project Leader


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Chernigov Gubernia Document Translation Project #general

Beth Galleto
 

Dear fellow researchers,

If your relatives lived in the former Chernigov gubernia, you may know that
family lists-- also called tax poll censuses-- for Jewish families living in
this area were compiled in the 19th and early 20th centuries. We now have an
opportunity to translate and index these records through the Ukraine SIG, and
your help is needed to move the project forward. I am excitedly anticipating
the treasure trove of family information this project will reveal to us!

The records, hand-written in Cyrillic, show names and ages of family members
and may also show where the family is registered, the social status of the
head of household, his or her occupation, and other information. The lists
cover towns currently in Ukraine and the Russian Republic, including Borzna,
Chernigov, Glukhov, Gorodnya, Konotop, Kozolets, Krolevets, Mglin, Nezhin,
Novgorod-Seversk, Nobozybkov, Oster, Sosnitsa and Starodub. They were made in
1882, 1888, 1906, and 1910, plus a few >from 1900 to 1904.

The lists were microfilmed by the Latter Day Saints (LDS) church and have now
been scanned, but they can be viewed only at LDS FamilySearch libraries. The
Chernigov Gubernia Document Translation Project will translate and index
these records, to enable researchers to find and understand the scanned
original documents. Donations are needed to hire people with the skills to
read and translate the handwritten entries, enter the information into a
JewishGen spreadsheet, and prepare the data for posting to the JewishGen
Ukraine Database.

To donate to the Chernigov Gubernia Document Translation Project or for more
details, please go to
https://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=22

Once the project is under way, contributors of $100 or more will be able to
access the spreadsheets before the data becomes available on the JewishGen
Ukraine Database. Thank you for your interest and your help.

Beth Galleto
Project Leader


Occupation on a 1907 marriage license #general

Gary Pokrassa
 

I have a marriage license >from 1907 >from Manhattan in NYC which lists the
groom's occupation as "Biegler." I am stumped by this.

The 1910 census lists his occupation as "Ironer - Cloak shop" and the 1920
census has "Presser - ladies clothes"

I asked the FHL librarian who referred to a book of occupations and she
found no clue. I have looked everywhere I can think of - tried Google
Translate >from Yiddish and nada.

Gary Pokrassa
JGID # 70858


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Occupation on a 1907 marriage license #general

Gary Pokrassa
 

I have a marriage license >from 1907 >from Manhattan in NYC which lists the
groom's occupation as "Biegler." I am stumped by this.

The 1910 census lists his occupation as "Ironer - Cloak shop" and the 1920
census has "Presser - ladies clothes"

I asked the FHL librarian who referred to a book of occupations and she
found no clue. I have looked everywhere I can think of - tried Google
Translate >from Yiddish and nada.

Gary Pokrassa
JGID # 70858


ViewMate translation request - Yiddish; RING #general

Cathy Klion
 

I've posted a short obituary in Yiddish for which I need a translation.

It is on ViewMate at the following address ...
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM64535

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much.

Cathy Klion


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate translation request - Yiddish; RING #general

Cathy Klion
 

I've posted a short obituary in Yiddish for which I need a translation.

It is on ViewMate at the following address ...
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM64535

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much.

Cathy Klion


Translation of the Memorial Book of Nowy-Dwor just published by the Yizkor-Books-in-Translation Project #general

Joel Alpert
 

The Yizkor-Books-In-Print Project of JewishGen is proud to announce the
publication of its 66th title, The Memorial Book of Nowy-Dwor in hard cover.

It is the translation of the mainly Yiddish book: Pinkas Nowy Dwor.

The original Yizkor Book, edited by Aryeh Shamri and Dov Berish First,
was published in Tel Aviv in 1965 by the Former Residents of Nowy-Dwor
in Israel, USA, Argentina, Uruguay, and France. The source is 575
double-columned pages, primarily written in Yiddish, with a few
articles in Hebrew and English.

The translation is hard cover, 11 inches by 8.5 inches, 928 pages with all
the illustrations and photographs of the original Yizkor book. The
Translation Project Coordinator is Debra Michlewitz; the translators are
Miriam Leberstein, Pamela Russ, and Amy Samin. Their work preserves the
power of the original text. Nili Goldman designed the cover.

List Price: $75.95 Available on Amazon for around $55

This book retells the history of Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, including historical
illustrations and photographs. It preserves the story of the town of your
ancestors beginning with its founding and ending with the destruction of
the Jewish community in 1942. The translation makes it accessible for
children and grandchildren; it answers those important questions which
these English speaking generations ask. It is a valuable historical source
with both scholarly and deeply personal accounts.

Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland is located 17 miles NW of Warsaw, at the
confluence of the Narew and Vistula Rivers. Alternate names and
spellings are Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki [Polish], Novi Dvor [Yiddish], Sde
Chadash [Hebrew], Novy Dvor, Nowy Dwor, and Nowydwor, Mazoviecki

Researchers and descendants of this and nearby towns will want to have
this book.

For more information go to:
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Nowy_Dwor.html

The Yizkor-Books-In-Print Project now has 66 titles available. To see
all the books, go to:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/ybip.html

Nearby Jewish Communities:
Zakroczym 4 miles W
Jablonna 10 miles ESE
Nasielsk 11 miles NNE
Leszno 13 miles SSW
Nowe Miasto 15 miles NNW
Serock 16 miles ENE
Blonie 17 miles SSW
Warszawa 17 miles SE
Czerwinsk and Wisla 18 miles W.

We hope you find this of interest for you and your family in discovering
the history of your ancestors. This would make a lovely Passover or
birthday gift for a loved one.

For orders 4 or more books to one address in the US, UK, Canada or
Australia, we can offer you a significantly reduced price of $35 per
book including shipping (Amazon discount price is about $55 plus
shipping). Email to ybip@jewishgen.org

Email to ybip@jewishgen.org to get prices for other locations outside of the US.

Joel Alpert, Coordinator of the Yizkor-Books-In-Print Project


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Translation of the Memorial Book of Nowy-Dwor just published by the Yizkor-Books-in-Translation Project #general

Joel Alpert
 

The Yizkor-Books-In-Print Project of JewishGen is proud to announce the
publication of its 66th title, The Memorial Book of Nowy-Dwor in hard cover.

It is the translation of the mainly Yiddish book: Pinkas Nowy Dwor.

The original Yizkor Book, edited by Aryeh Shamri and Dov Berish First,
was published in Tel Aviv in 1965 by the Former Residents of Nowy-Dwor
in Israel, USA, Argentina, Uruguay, and France. The source is 575
double-columned pages, primarily written in Yiddish, with a few
articles in Hebrew and English.

The translation is hard cover, 11 inches by 8.5 inches, 928 pages with all
the illustrations and photographs of the original Yizkor book. The
Translation Project Coordinator is Debra Michlewitz; the translators are
Miriam Leberstein, Pamela Russ, and Amy Samin. Their work preserves the
power of the original text. Nili Goldman designed the cover.

List Price: $75.95 Available on Amazon for around $55

This book retells the history of Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, including historical
illustrations and photographs. It preserves the story of the town of your
ancestors beginning with its founding and ending with the destruction of
the Jewish community in 1942. The translation makes it accessible for
children and grandchildren; it answers those important questions which
these English speaking generations ask. It is a valuable historical source
with both scholarly and deeply personal accounts.

Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland is located 17 miles NW of Warsaw, at the
confluence of the Narew and Vistula Rivers. Alternate names and
spellings are Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki [Polish], Novi Dvor [Yiddish], Sde
Chadash [Hebrew], Novy Dvor, Nowy Dwor, and Nowydwor, Mazoviecki

Researchers and descendants of this and nearby towns will want to have
this book.

For more information go to:
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Nowy_Dwor.html

The Yizkor-Books-In-Print Project now has 66 titles available. To see
all the books, go to:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/ybip.html

Nearby Jewish Communities:
Zakroczym 4 miles W
Jablonna 10 miles ESE
Nasielsk 11 miles NNE
Leszno 13 miles SSW
Nowe Miasto 15 miles NNW
Serock 16 miles ENE
Blonie 17 miles SSW
Warszawa 17 miles SE
Czerwinsk and Wisla 18 miles W.

We hope you find this of interest for you and your family in discovering
the history of your ancestors. This would make a lovely Passover or
birthday gift for a loved one.

For orders 4 or more books to one address in the US, UK, Canada or
Australia, we can offer you a significantly reduced price of $35 per
book including shipping (Amazon discount price is about $55 plus
shipping). Email to ybip@jewishgen.org

Email to ybip@jewishgen.org to get prices for other locations outside of the US.

Joel Alpert, Coordinator of the Yizkor-Books-In-Print Project


Searching: ZATALOFSKY #general

Felissa Lashley
 

One of my ancestors Dvora ZATALOFSKY >from the Ukraine is said to have
made aliyah to Israel in 1910 where she married Schmuel DAYAN. I would
appreciate any information about the family in Israel or elsewhere.
Her family name in the U.S. became Satloff or Satlow.

Thank you for any information.

Felissa Lashley
frlashley@gmail.com
Austin, Texas


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching: ZATALOFSKY #general

Felissa Lashley
 

One of my ancestors Dvora ZATALOFSKY >from the Ukraine is said to have
made aliyah to Israel in 1910 where she married Schmuel DAYAN. I would
appreciate any information about the family in Israel or elsewhere.
Her family name in the U.S. became Satloff or Satlow.

Thank you for any information.

Felissa Lashley
frlashley@gmail.com
Austin, Texas


Polish High School Records #general

Isabel Cymerman <isabelcym3@...>
 

Dear Genners,
Where can I find student records >from pre-WWII Gimnazjum im.
Niklewski which was in Warsaw? I am looking for years 1926-1928. Is
there a Ministry of Education Archive that I can contact?

Thank you.

Isabel Cymerman
Southbury, CT


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Polish High School Records #general

Isabel Cymerman <isabelcym3@...>
 

Dear Genners,
Where can I find student records >from pre-WWII Gimnazjum im.
Niklewski which was in Warsaw? I am looking for years 1926-1928. Is
there a Ministry of Education Archive that I can contact?

Thank you.

Isabel Cymerman
Southbury, CT


Research in the Vilnius district #general

Jill Anderson
 

Did your family come >from the Vilnius region, or might they have lived in
Vilnius for a time? LitvakSig's Vilnius District Research Group translates
records >from this area and contributors to the Group have access to them as
soon as the translations are made. These Excel spread sheets can be
downloaded to your computer and you can sort the information any way you
like - by surname, by date, by first name, by town etc. Shtetls in the
Vilnius District are: Antakalnis, Bagaslaviskis, Bezdonys, Ciobiskis,
Gelvonai, Giedraiciai, Inturke, Jasiunai, Joniskes, Laibiskis, Maisiagala,
Mikhalishki, Moletai, Musninkai, Naujoji Vilna, Nemencine, Novygorod,
Paberze, Rudamina, Salcininkai, Sesuoliai, Sirvintos, Snipiskes, Stundishki,
Turgeliai, Vilnius City and Yakubantse.

Over the last year we made 66,000 lines of information available. These
include the 1784 Poll Tax for Vilnius City; 1834 Revision Lists; Draft
Lists >from 1880 to 1916; the 1878 Merchants' Draft List and the Snipiskes
Cemetery List. Please be aware that the information in these records is
not just about the individual but can contain details about his or her
family members, their names, ages, where they were born and occupations.
Street address are sometimes available too.

I am just about to add records for the HKP Jewish Labour Camp 1943-1944
which contains information for about 1200 individuals. We have more
records to translate but in order to do that, we need contributions. If
you donate $100 you will have access for five years to all the records
we have translated so far and all the new translations as they are
available. The translated records are added to our free All Lithuania
Database after about 18 months.

Please help us with this work. See the LitvakSig website for more details
about the Vilnius District Research Group, or you're welcome to contact
me directly.
https://www.litvaksig.org/research/district-research/vilnius-district-research-group
[MOD. NOTE: shortened URL - https://goo.gl/2Fz39g ]

Jill Anderson
Coordinator of the Vilnius District Research Group of LitvakSig
jill.anderson@mac.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Research in the Vilnius district #general

Jill Anderson
 

Did your family come >from the Vilnius region, or might they have lived in
Vilnius for a time? LitvakSig's Vilnius District Research Group translates
records >from this area and contributors to the Group have access to them as
soon as the translations are made. These Excel spread sheets can be
downloaded to your computer and you can sort the information any way you
like - by surname, by date, by first name, by town etc. Shtetls in the
Vilnius District are: Antakalnis, Bagaslaviskis, Bezdonys, Ciobiskis,
Gelvonai, Giedraiciai, Inturke, Jasiunai, Joniskes, Laibiskis, Maisiagala,
Mikhalishki, Moletai, Musninkai, Naujoji Vilna, Nemencine, Novygorod,
Paberze, Rudamina, Salcininkai, Sesuoliai, Sirvintos, Snipiskes, Stundishki,
Turgeliai, Vilnius City and Yakubantse.

Over the last year we made 66,000 lines of information available. These
include the 1784 Poll Tax for Vilnius City; 1834 Revision Lists; Draft
Lists >from 1880 to 1916; the 1878 Merchants' Draft List and the Snipiskes
Cemetery List. Please be aware that the information in these records is
not just about the individual but can contain details about his or her
family members, their names, ages, where they were born and occupations.
Street address are sometimes available too.

I am just about to add records for the HKP Jewish Labour Camp 1943-1944
which contains information for about 1200 individuals. We have more
records to translate but in order to do that, we need contributions. If
you donate $100 you will have access for five years to all the records
we have translated so far and all the new translations as they are
available. The translated records are added to our free All Lithuania
Database after about 18 months.

Please help us with this work. See the LitvakSig website for more details
about the Vilnius District Research Group, or you're welcome to contact
me directly.
https://www.litvaksig.org/research/district-research/vilnius-district-research-group
[MOD. NOTE: shortened URL - https://goo.gl/2Fz39g ]

Jill Anderson
Coordinator of the Vilnius District Research Group of LitvakSig
jill.anderson@mac.com


Horowitz of Rechov Yoel in Jerusalem #general

Neil@...
 

Trying to make contact with Avraham Horowitz or family members who
used o live at ** Rechov Yoel in Jerusalem and posted Pages of
Testimony at Yad Vashem.

Neil Rosenstein


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Horowitz of Rechov Yoel in Jerusalem #general

Neil@...
 

Trying to make contact with Avraham Horowitz or family members who
used o live at ** Rechov Yoel in Jerusalem and posted Pages of
Testimony at Yad Vashem.

Neil Rosenstein


Josefa #general

Franck naidoo <francknaidoo@...>
 

Good day

Can anyone please point me in the right direction.

In 1990 -1991, In Fulham, London, lived an old woman Josefa. At that time,
she must have been 86. She lived alone in a house on Munster Road, I lived
down the road. She was suffering >from Alzheimer's and I used to check on
her daily for a year, as in the winter she constantly turned of the heating.
It was only between the social worker (2 x week) and myself (sometimes 3 x
day) that anyone would check on her.

Obviously at the time, I was not interested in her origins as she wouldn't
be able to answer me coherently. I would say to her, Josefa, I am too busy
to come all the time, so please do not turn off the electricity, as I had
paid for it and that it was colder inside the house than the freezing
temperatures outside.

She would respond that she is used to it because in her country, Latvia it
was colder. And I would be frustrated - but this is not Latvia.

She would just smile.

I would have to cycle back >from Fulham Broadway during lunchtimes to check
that the heating was on, as it was so cold. I could'nt go away for weekends
as I would be delivering sandwiches and food to her.

Long story short. I returned >from holiday with my girl friend and when I
went to her house, she was gone. She had been taken to a nursing home in
Surrey and after much investigation I found out where she was. Alison drove
me there to visit her.

They had cut her hair short and she just had a bath and was sitting on her
bed. She recognized me immediately. Josefa's hair was mattered and she
hadn't had a bath in all the time that I knew her, as the social workers
don't do that. Of course, Josefa sometimes didn't use the toilet, maybe
she didnt remember.

I called the nursing home a month later, to check on Josefa. They told me
that she had died and that they had no record of the next of kin.

Days later her house was sold and was being renovated. If you walked down
Munster Road with Fulham Road to your back, her house would be on the
right hand side. Maybe someone would know. 157 seems to be a familiar number.

This is all the information that I have.

Three weeks ago an old friend >from Malibu, California, said that he would
come to see me in Helsinki and said that he wanted to come to Latvia, as
his grandmother had come >from there. We immediately booked the flights to
Riga and arrived there last Monday.

Riga was amazing, we were only there for two days. I said to Barrie, that
we should not go to the holocaust museum.

I am in-between a Law degree in Finland and UN job in Geneva, so I have
bought flights to Riga where I shall spend a month. I would like to trace
Josefa. I don't even know her family name.

She would tell me that she has an Irish tenant and that he overflowed the
water >from is bath and that there was water stain on the wallpaper. The
stains were there, but that tenant lived there fifteen years ago. >from
that I gathered that she had no living relatives.

I did recall some municipality bills and I am sure that I will be able to
recognize if I would see some records.

I am sure that Josefa has records. They must exist in London somewhere. I
hazard a guess that Josefa was Jewish. I am sure that she came >from Latvia
as she always spoke of her.

Anyone with leads, please contact me.

With very best regards

Franck Naidoo


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Josefa #general

Franck naidoo <francknaidoo@...>
 

Good day

Can anyone please point me in the right direction.

In 1990 -1991, In Fulham, London, lived an old woman Josefa. At that time,
she must have been 86. She lived alone in a house on Munster Road, I lived
down the road. She was suffering >from Alzheimer's and I used to check on
her daily for a year, as in the winter she constantly turned of the heating.
It was only between the social worker (2 x week) and myself (sometimes 3 x
day) that anyone would check on her.

Obviously at the time, I was not interested in her origins as she wouldn't
be able to answer me coherently. I would say to her, Josefa, I am too busy
to come all the time, so please do not turn off the electricity, as I had
paid for it and that it was colder inside the house than the freezing
temperatures outside.

She would respond that she is used to it because in her country, Latvia it
was colder. And I would be frustrated - but this is not Latvia.

She would just smile.

I would have to cycle back >from Fulham Broadway during lunchtimes to check
that the heating was on, as it was so cold. I could'nt go away for weekends
as I would be delivering sandwiches and food to her.

Long story short. I returned >from holiday with my girl friend and when I
went to her house, she was gone. She had been taken to a nursing home in
Surrey and after much investigation I found out where she was. Alison drove
me there to visit her.

They had cut her hair short and she just had a bath and was sitting on her
bed. She recognized me immediately. Josefa's hair was mattered and she
hadn't had a bath in all the time that I knew her, as the social workers
don't do that. Of course, Josefa sometimes didn't use the toilet, maybe
she didnt remember.

I called the nursing home a month later, to check on Josefa. They told me
that she had died and that they had no record of the next of kin.

Days later her house was sold and was being renovated. If you walked down
Munster Road with Fulham Road to your back, her house would be on the
right hand side. Maybe someone would know. 157 seems to be a familiar number.

This is all the information that I have.

Three weeks ago an old friend >from Malibu, California, said that he would
come to see me in Helsinki and said that he wanted to come to Latvia, as
his grandmother had come >from there. We immediately booked the flights to
Riga and arrived there last Monday.

Riga was amazing, we were only there for two days. I said to Barrie, that
we should not go to the holocaust museum.

I am in-between a Law degree in Finland and UN job in Geneva, so I have
bought flights to Riga where I shall spend a month. I would like to trace
Josefa. I don't even know her family name.

She would tell me that she has an Irish tenant and that he overflowed the
water >from is bath and that there was water stain on the wallpaper. The
stains were there, but that tenant lived there fifteen years ago. >from
that I gathered that she had no living relatives.

I did recall some municipality bills and I am sure that I will be able to
recognize if I would see some records.

I am sure that Josefa has records. They must exist in London somewhere. I
hazard a guess that Josefa was Jewish. I am sure that she came >from Latvia
as she always spoke of her.

Anyone with leads, please contact me.

With very best regards

Franck Naidoo

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