Date   

trying to contact #Teichman and #Bergman family of Toronto, #canada

Neil Rosenstein
 

Trying to contact the #Teichman and #Bergman families who descend from
Esther, died in Cracow in 1939, married Issachar Shual Teichman of
Turka. Her grandson, Selig Bergman died and buried in #Toronto in
1988, his brother Allen married Beverley and his sister Helen married
David Spiegelman.
Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately with family information


JGS of Greater Boston- Virtual Program on January 31, 2021 1:30PM EST #events #education

Jessie Klein
 

The JGS of Greater Boston presents Amy Wachs-History and Geography-Tools for Eastern European Research Jan. 31, 2021 1:30PM EST-Zoom Meeting.
Free for JGSGB Members, $5.00 for Non-members. For information go to www.jgsgb.org


Jessie Klein
Co-President 
JGSGB
president@...


Re: Origin of Latvian Jews #latvia

Kevin Brook
 

Louis,

Alexander Beider hasn't listed Dondes as a surname of Sephardic origin.

A Scottish origin for any Ashkenazic surname would be impossible but that's an interesting coincidence you've found.

A Spanish or Portuguese surname similar to Dondes doesn't come to my mind.  There's an Italian surname Dondero but no connection of the Ashkenazic surname to that one would be expected.

Kevin Alan Brook


Re: Question On Becoming A Citizen in 1920s Canada #canada

Paul Silverstone
 

Some of my relatives obtained their Canadian citizenship years after
arriving. Many of their records were destroyed, especially those that
became citizens before 1900.
On the reverse side, a Canadian woman marrying a citizen of another
country lost her Canadian citizenship. My mother married in 1930 to a
US citizen for instance. Since they were not living in the US, but in
Britain, she eventually received a British passport (Canada being
British), until she was naturalized in the US in 1942, three years after
arriving in NY. When they wanted to travel together in 1930 she
received a paper from the US consulate in London identifying her as
married to an American citizen.
--
Paul Silverstone
West Vancouver, BC

see: www.paulsilverstone.com


Re: Question On Becoming A Citizen in 1920s Canada #canada

Molly Staub
 

Feldafing was a Displaced Person’s’ Camp after World War II liberation. My adopted sister, a Holocaust survivor, was there after Dachau and before coming to the U.S.

Molly Arost Staub
📱


IGRA Show & Tell January 11 #holocaust

Garri Regev
 

The next IGRA Show & Tell session will be on Monday, January 11, 2021 at 9 pm Israel time (2 pm EST) in English. (The same session will be held in Hebrew on January 25.)

The Central Database of Shoah Victims’ Names and other genealogical sources at Yad Vashem

Over 4.8 million of the six million Jews murdered by the Nazis and their accomplices are commemorated in Yad Vashem's online Central Database of Shoah Victims' Names. The lecture will highlight new features and materials, as well as "tips" on utilizing the database to the fullest.  It will also include guidance on the use of other Yad Vashem sources online that are relevant for genealogists.

Serafima Velkovich has been working at Yad Vashem for 16 years. She is a PhD Candidate at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.   A researcher in the Reference and Information Department of the Yad Vashem Archives division, Velkovich was closely involved in the work on names material in Yad Vashem`s databases. She lectures on the use of Yad Vashem resources for genealogical and other research to various groups, as well as to visiting genealogists and organizations who make use of genealogical tools for their research.  She participates in the international conferences and films on the Holocaust topics. 


Garri Regev
President, IGRA


Re: Shmuel Leib CITRON, Minsk and Vilnius #lithuania

ireneplotzker@...
 

My great-great-grandmother was Rosa Citron, born around 1809, daughter of Levi, but she was born in Kowal.

Irene Plotzker
Wilmington, DE


Re: Question On Becoming A Citizen in 1920s Canada #canada

Alan Greenberg
 

You are sort of correct, but not quite.

First, there was no concept of Citizenship in Canada. If you naturalized, you because a British Subject (citizenship in Canada did not come about until 1947). But that does not alter your basic question. The Naturalization Act of 1914 required an applicant to have been resident in Canada for at least 1 year, and resident in some British territory for at least 5 years. So residence in England for 4 years followed by just 1 year in Canada would suffice.

That probably does not address your case. Census data is notoriously unreliable. The naturalization file would likely give the data of arrival as well as the ship.

Sadly with the pandemic, as Jeri knows, it is taking many months to get naturalization records.

Alan Greenberg
JGS-Montreal





At 2021-01-03 03:47 PM, Teewinot via groups.jewishgen.org wrote:
Happy New Year Cousins!

I'm trying to figure out a possible puzzle. I say possible, because I'm
not even sure I have the right people (same common name).

According to one index I found, it has my cousin (definitely him) taking
the Oath of Allegiance in Montreal in June 1923.

I found a person of the same name in the 1921 Canada census for
Montreal. Some of the information fits and makes sense (occupation and
marital status), some of it doesn't. It says this person's nationality
was "United States" and that he arrived in Canada in 1920. It was my
understanding that my cousin went right from Grodno Gubernia to Montreal
(date unknown), but I suppose that could be wrong.

How long did a person have to live in Canada before they could apply for
and obtain citizenship? I thought it was five years. This seems like
too short a time if these two people are one and the same.

Thank you,
Jeri Friedman
Port Saint Lucie, Florida

--
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus


Red Cross listing showing time in Auschwitz and in Buchenwald #lodz #poland #holocaust

Sharon E Siegel
 

Today I found a Red Cross document that lists our parents as having spent 1 1/2 years each in Auschwitz and in Buchenwald.

It says one was in Auschwitz and one was in Buchenwald, but neither ever mentioned it.  Is it possible that this document could be wrong?  If it is right, did people actually spend that amount of time and still survive to be released?

We are just so shocked to have found that.
--
Sharon E. Siegel 
Port Jervis, NY USA


Re: Question On Becoming A Citizen in 1920s Canada #canada

Teewinot
 

Hi Tema,

They could be "naturalized" as Canadians after 3 years.
Thank you! I thought it was five years. Three years fits perfectly
(along with the other info), so this must be the correct person.

BTW, my great great grandmother's name was Tema.

Stay safe,
Jeri Friedman
Port Saint Lucie, Florida

--
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus


Re: Question On Becoming A Citizen in 1920s Canada #canada

Sharon E Siegel
 

We have relatives named Friedman, who derived from Rzezak. They came from Poland hometown via Feldafing,Germany, I believe.  What that be your family?
--
Sharon E. Siegel 
Port Jervis, NY USA


Re: Question On Becoming A Citizen in 1920s Canada #canada

Teewinot
 

Hi Avrum,

My grandfather became a Canadian citizen in Nov 1906 after residing 3
1/2 years in Canada (per his naturalization Certificate)

At some time in 1905 (per the St Albans list) he travelled by train to
New York where he was introduced to my Grandmother. He returned to
Montreal and after an approximately one year correspond returned to
Brooklyn, married my Grandmother. and then they both took up residence
in Canada.

My grandmother did not become a Canadian citizen until 1941. (possibly a
wartime need for a passport to visit cousins in New York

The Canadian Naturalization Act that was inforce in 1906 governed the
length of residence needed for citizen ship
Interesting. I had no idea that my cousin had come to live in the USA
first and naturalized there. I was under the impression he went right
to Montreal. It all fits now. Maybe I'll be able to find him at Ellis
Island, unless he did arrive in Montreal first like his uncle. I have
no idea.

Thanks for this information.

Take care,
Jeri Friedman
Port Saint Lucie, Florida

--
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus


Re: Question On Becoming A Citizen in 1920s Canada #canada

temafrank1@...
 

They could be "naturalized" as Canadians after 3 years.
--
Tema Frank
Edmonton, Canada
Project: https://temafrank.com/tema-frank-history-detective/


Searching for Book: The Speaking Stones of Siret #photographs #romania

krausj2@...
 

Does anyone have up-to-date information on how to purchase a copy of Dr. Thomas Weggemann's The Speaking Stones of Siret?

I find it described at a kehilalinks site, https://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/bukovina/speaking_stones.htm , and also at Dr. Weggemann's website, http://www.dr.weggemann.at/siret.htm ,  but the email addresses at both locations -- and for his American agents -- come back return to sender.

Thanks in advance for anyone who can help.
--
Joe Kraus
krausj2@...


Judy Bowman
 

New discovery: In researching my great-grandfather's brother/half-brother Harris Bowman, I looked at HIS records to find some clues...he listed his birth town as Russcheitz, Poland or Russia.  When I looked up a sound-alike town in the town finder on JewishGen, I got Russocice, Poland, which was also called Wladyslawow-Russocice at times.  And so, we are not from Wladyslawow, Lithuania aka Kurdikos-Naumestis.  It is back to Wladyslawow, Poland.  Surely the two brothers, though many years apart, are both from this town.  One lists Russcheitz, Poland, and the other lists Wladyslawow, Poland years later.  I'm still looking for Jacob Baumgarten, who left that place and came to the UK with Harris and Israel.  Harris is probably Hersz or a derivation:  I found his tombstone, and he is listed as Zvi Ben Yakov, so Hirsch.   I'm still looking for birth or death certificates on Israel or Harris, that might say what their mothers' names were.  I have done DNA testing, but so far no connections with Baumgarten relatives.  I wish these Baumgarten's would come up accurately in JRI-Poland.  

 

Judy Bowman

judybowmancasting@...
USA
Researching: Baumgarten/Bowman(Wladyslawow, Poland, Wales UK, South Africa), Halpern(Grodno, Indura), Kopelman(Odessa/Starokonstantinov) Rosenbaum(Sieradz, Zychlin, Lodz), Muskat(Halubitz), Fellman/Felman/Berkman(Sakiai), Aschkenas(Chroskoff, Austria)

 

 


Ashkenazim with Oriental eyes #general

Mel Comisarow
 

In Ukraine, during the 1918–1920 Russian Civil War between the Whites and the Reds, some of the White soldiers were from Central Asian territories like Kyrgystan. They rode camels. They also had "Oriental" genes that would have been left on any children that they sired in Ukraine. I presume that Central 
Asian DNA can be distinguised from Chinese DNA. 

Mel Comisarow
Vancouver BC


Re: Question On Becoming A Citizen in 1920s Canada #canada

Avrum Lapin
 

My grandfather became a Canadian citizen in Nov 1906 after residing 3 1/2 years in Canada (per his naturalization Certificate)

At some time in 1905 (per the St Albans list) he travelled by train to New York where he was introduced to my Grandmother. He returned to Montreal and after an approximately one year correspond returned to Brooklyn, married my Grandmother. and then they both took up residence in Canada.

My grandmother did not become a Canadian citizen until 1941. (possibly a wartime need for a passport to visit cousins in New York

The Canadian Naturalization Act that was inforce in 1906 governed the length of residence needed for citizen ship


Avrum Lapin
avrum223@...
Searching LUBELSKI of Bialystok and LAPUNSKI of Grodno


Inside the U.S. Army's Warehouse full of Nazi Art #holocaust

Phil Goldfarb
 

An interesting story in today's New Yorker: Inside the U.S. Army’s Warehouse Full of Nazi Art | The New Yorker 

Phil Goldfarb
Tulsa, OK

Researching Leet, Brom, Gitow, Goldfarb, Merin


Re: How many "first names" did people have? #names

Sally Bruckheimer
 

My ggrandmother was one of 20 children born to a couple in a tiny town. In the birth records, her mother's name was listed differently on each one. My ggrandmother was usually Rachel (also one of her mother's names), but on her marriage record in NYC, she was Regina (a sister's birth name and also her mother's name on a different record).

It isn't just women. Her husband was born Baruch in Amsterdam, grew up as Barnett in London, and lived in New York as Bernard. Obviously his Hebrew name was Baruch, but whatever else was common - usage was fine.

Sally Bruckheimer
Princeton, NJ


Post 1895 Civil Records from Hungary #hungary #records

dtolman@...
 

I recently learned that familysearch has digitally posted not only the jewish religious vital records from before 1895, but also had the post 1895 civil records (for all citizens) for many towns in the post 1895 period. Looking through them however, I noted that they are not indexed on family search or jewishgen - and they are inconsistent. For example - the scanned entries for my grandmothers small village of Tiszalúc have records that stretch into the late 20th century - while the nearby city of Miskolc only seems to stretch from 1895-1908. 

Are there any plans or projects underway under jewishgen or any other site to index any of these post 1895 civil records?
Does anyone know if there is a good resource that summarizes what records were preserved for each town (not just the scanned records by familysearch - but record books that they did not scan)?
I'm particularly interested in the Miskolc/Borsod/Zemblen region. 

Many thanks
Daniel Eig

4481 - 4500 of 658719