Date   

Spelling of name in 1782 document - ViewMate #germany

henry wellisch
 

I have posted at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM63301

a 1782 document with two names where the spelling is unclear.

Help would be appreciated in finding the correct spelling. Thank you.

Henry Wellisch Toronto


German SIG #Germany Spelling of name in 1782 document - ViewMate #germany

henry wellisch
 

I have posted at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM63301

a 1782 document with two names where the spelling is unclear.

Help would be appreciated in finding the correct spelling. Thank you.

Henry Wellisch Toronto


ViewMate: Name in 1782 document #general

henry wellisch
 

I have posted in

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM63301

a 1782 document with two names where the spelling is unclear, and help would
be appreciated in finding the spelling.

Henry Wellisch
Toronto

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond via email to Henry or via the form in the ViewMate
application.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate: Name in 1782 document #general

henry wellisch
 

I have posted in

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM63301

a 1782 document with two names where the spelling is unclear, and help would
be appreciated in finding the spelling.

Henry Wellisch
Toronto

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond via email to Henry or via the form in the ViewMate
application.


ViewMate translation request - Russian #general

Iris Folkson <ifolkson@...>
 

I've posted a vital record in Russian for which I need a translation. Most
important is the names of the grandparents. It is on ViewMate at the
following address ...

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM63299

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much.

Iris Folkson


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate translation request - Russian #general

Iris Folkson <ifolkson@...>
 

I've posted a vital record in Russian for which I need a translation. Most
important is the names of the grandparents. It is on ViewMate at the
following address ...

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM63299

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much.

Iris Folkson


Fannie PUSTILNICK and Jacob STEIN - Philadelphia 1940 #general

Jules Feldman
 

The PUSTILNICK family appears in the 1940 census in Philadelphia.

The household consists of:
David PUSTILNICK aged 65
his wife Esther 60
son Samuel 23
daughter Fannie STEIN 27
son in law Jacob STEIN 30

I will be grateful for any further information about Jacob and Fannie and
descendants.

Samuel later became Samuel POSTON.

Thanks,
Jules Feldman
Kibbutz Yizreel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Fannie PUSTILNICK and Jacob STEIN - Philadelphia 1940 #general

Jules Feldman
 

The PUSTILNICK family appears in the 1940 census in Philadelphia.

The household consists of:
David PUSTILNICK aged 65
his wife Esther 60
son Samuel 23
daughter Fannie STEIN 27
son in law Jacob STEIN 30

I will be grateful for any further information about Jacob and Fannie and
descendants.

Samuel later became Samuel POSTON.

Thanks,
Jules Feldman
Kibbutz Yizreel


ViewMate translation requests - Polish #general

Roman Ravve
 

Please help to translate >from Polish - the reason of the leaving the
country >from 1922

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application:
https://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/responselist.asp?key=63341

Regards,
Roman Ravve


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate translation requests - Polish #general

Roman Ravve
 

Please help to translate >from Polish - the reason of the leaving the
country >from 1922

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application:
https://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/responselist.asp?key=63341

Regards,
Roman Ravve


Aglasterhausen Children's Home, Germany #germany

Alex Magocsi
 

Recently my "Uncle Joe" passed away.
He was a survivor of Auschwitz and was a resident of the above referenced Home.

This home was also known as:
The Aglasterhausen Home for Orphaned and Unaccompanied Children
and was in operation as a displaced persons' (DP) camp >from early
1946 to late 1948.

As a way to remember Uncle Joe, I decided to research Aglasterhausen
and stumbled upon two photographs at the US Holocaust Memorial Museum
of some of the "children" >from the home and, as a nice surprise,
Uncle Joe is shown in one. The two photographs were donated by a
private person.

I have searched the internet quite a bit in my search for information,
especially photos, regarding this Children's Home, searching both the
USHMM and the digital collections of the International Tracing Service
(ITS Arolsen).

I am writing today to see if any of the readers of this list have any
photographs >from the referenced Children's Home.

I suspect that there are photographs in private hands and I suspect
there are others who may be interested in seeing such photos.

Thank you, Alex Magocsi, Hamburg Germany awmjr@magocsi.org


German SIG #Germany Fwd: Aglasterhausen Children's Home, Germany #germany

Alex Magocsi
 

Recently my "Uncle Joe" passed away.
He was a survivor of Auschwitz and was a resident of the above referenced Home.

This home was also known as:
The Aglasterhausen Home for Orphaned and Unaccompanied Children
and was in operation as a displaced persons' (DP) camp >from early
1946 to late 1948.

As a way to remember Uncle Joe, I decided to research Aglasterhausen
and stumbled upon two photographs at the US Holocaust Memorial Museum
of some of the "children" >from the home and, as a nice surprise,
Uncle Joe is shown in one. The two photographs were donated by a
private person.

I have searched the internet quite a bit in my search for information,
especially photos, regarding this Children's Home, searching both the
USHMM and the digital collections of the International Tracing Service
(ITS Arolsen).

I am writing today to see if any of the readers of this list have any
photographs >from the referenced Children's Home.

I suspect that there are photographs in private hands and I suspect
there are others who may be interested in seeing such photos.

Thank you, Alex Magocsi, Hamburg Germany awmjr@magocsi.org


Re: given names #hungary

smartlines@...
 

Dear Tom,
until about the early 1900s, in the absence of official identification
documents, the registration of names (and other data, as well) was done =
by
verbal statements. How a Jewish or German name appeared in the registry
depended largely on the education level, language skills and hearing =
ability
of the rabbi. In the 1840s Jews tended to demonstrate their =
nationalistic
feelings by writing their German names in Hungarian orthography
(phonetically) and giving the Hungarian version of the given names =
(Erzs=E9bet
for Elisabeth for instance). For German or Hebrew names which had no
Hungarian equivalent something similar was chosen. It is therefore =
possible
that your Betti, at one point, was entered as Berta or vice versa. Given
names, unfortunately give no clues at all to researchers of Jewish =
families.
Andras Hirschler
Budapest, Hungary

Subject: Re: Given Names Pepi and Betti
From: tomchatt@earthlink.net
Date: Tue, 26 Dec 2017 08:39:56 -0800 (GMT-08:00)
X-Message-Number: 3

from my own family research, I can tell you that I found "diminutive" =
names
on official records in Hungary (or at least the northern reaches of the
empire in the 1860s). My great-grandmother, Betty Littman, was born in =
the
county of Szepes in the Kingdom of Hungary (today it is the Spi=C5=A5 =
region of
Slovakia). On her 1864 civil birth record, her name is recorded as =
"Betty".
(That birth registry is in German, which was the prevalent language of =
that
region, even though part of Kingdom of Hungary.) On the 1869 census of =
the
family (records in Hungarian), she is listed as "Bethy". Many of her
siblings on the same census have diminutive names, including "Josi"
(Joseph), "Leny" (Lena), "Esti", and "Resi" (Rose). Betty's Hebrew name =
was
Bluma, and on later records in America, she appears as Bertha, but to my
knowledge she always went by Betty in person throughout her life. I do =
not
know whether the name Bertha had any use in her early life in Hungary, =
or if
it was improvised after she came to America at age 23, not yet married.

Tom Chatt
Los Angeles, CA
Researching LITTMAN in Hungary; BRAUTMAN in Kishinev


Hungary SIG #Hungary RE:given names #hungary

smartlines@...
 

Dear Tom,
until about the early 1900s, in the absence of official identification
documents, the registration of names (and other data, as well) was done =
by
verbal statements. How a Jewish or German name appeared in the registry
depended largely on the education level, language skills and hearing =
ability
of the rabbi. In the 1840s Jews tended to demonstrate their =
nationalistic
feelings by writing their German names in Hungarian orthography
(phonetically) and giving the Hungarian version of the given names =
(Erzs=E9bet
for Elisabeth for instance). For German or Hebrew names which had no
Hungarian equivalent something similar was chosen. It is therefore =
possible
that your Betti, at one point, was entered as Berta or vice versa. Given
names, unfortunately give no clues at all to researchers of Jewish =
families.
Andras Hirschler
Budapest, Hungary

Subject: Re: Given Names Pepi and Betti
From: tomchatt@earthlink.net
Date: Tue, 26 Dec 2017 08:39:56 -0800 (GMT-08:00)
X-Message-Number: 3

from my own family research, I can tell you that I found "diminutive" =
names
on official records in Hungary (or at least the northern reaches of the
empire in the 1860s). My great-grandmother, Betty Littman, was born in =
the
county of Szepes in the Kingdom of Hungary (today it is the Spi=C5=A5 =
region of
Slovakia). On her 1864 civil birth record, her name is recorded as =
"Betty".
(That birth registry is in German, which was the prevalent language of =
that
region, even though part of Kingdom of Hungary.) On the 1869 census of =
the
family (records in Hungarian), she is listed as "Bethy". Many of her
siblings on the same census have diminutive names, including "Josi"
(Joseph), "Leny" (Lena), "Esti", and "Resi" (Rose). Betty's Hebrew name =
was
Bluma, and on later records in America, she appears as Bertha, but to my
knowledge she always went by Betty in person throughout her life. I do =
not
know whether the name Bertha had any use in her early life in Hungary, =
or if
it was improvised after she came to America at age 23, not yet married.

Tom Chatt
Los Angeles, CA
Researching LITTMAN in Hungary; BRAUTMAN in Kishinev


Issue #132 of Genealo-J , the Journal of the French Genealogical Society, has just been published #france

Georges Graner
 

*** Genealo-J, publication of the Jewish Genealogical Society of France,
Issue 132, winter 2017 has just been published.

Bernard Lyon-Caen writes a paper about the Leven family, a rather famous
family. The name of Leven first evokes several characters who played a
leading role in the creation of the Alliance Israelite Universelle. We
also know that several descendants identified themselves with this institution
during their whole life while others carry on the same task now. Other members
of the family yesterday and today invested in other fields. We first
transcribe a family history note written in 1929 by the lawyer Maurice
Leven, then we try to locate this family who lived in the 18th century and
early 19th in Uerdingen, on the edge of the Lower Rhine, then came to Paris
and Saint-Denis. In all these places, the name has for a long time been
attached to leather production and then to mineral waters. Starting >from the
first Levens arrived in Paris in 1838, the paper attempts to list their
descendants until today, gathering as much information on each of them as
possible, resulting in a great diversity.

The life of Antal Weiner (1878-1955) can be reconstructed thanks to a diary
found by his family. He is born in Senta, now in Serbia but which was then in
Hungary. Georges Graner relates how Weiner, after a youth in a modest family,
obtained a high school diploma, spent a happy year in the Austro-Hungarian
army and was recruited by the Hungarian railways. He was then and remained
during his whole life a patriot so that he felt a frustration when he was
ousted >from the railways in 1923 by the antisemitic laws. As every good
Hungarian, he had seen with sorrow the mutilation of Hungary after the World
War and was delighted when Hitler gave back some lost territories to his
country. The year 1944 was terrible for Jews in Hungary. Weiner’s daughter
was deported and almost all his family perished in the Holocaust but Antal
survived the hardships of the ghetto and of the siege of Budapest.

About the Coblentz family of Haguenau (Alsace) in the 18th century,
Pierre-Andre Meyer asks some genealogical questions. >from the legal problems
encountered in 1733 by Emanuel Coblentz, a young Jew of Haguenau accused of
having falsely shown his intention of converting to catholicism, and, before
him, by Lowel Coblentz, his father, in conflict for a long time with the
merchants and the magistrates of Haguenau, the article asks several questions
relating to the genealogy of this family. Disputing different statements by
Elie Scheid, the historian of the Jewish community of Haguenau, the author
shows a relationship between Lowel Coblentz and the great Zay (or Coblenz)
family of Metz. He also wonders about the family connections between Coblentz
and Feistel Moch, parnass of the Jewish community of Los Angeles, whose date
of death (largely erased on his grave in the Jewish cemetery in the city) has
been restored.

In 1928, a 'rags-to-riches' Greek Vlach emigrant to Sweden built and then
donated a school, adorned with a beautiful Swiss tower clock, to his native
mountain village of Nymfaion in Macedonia, Greece. Until recently no one knew
the real story behind it.The clock's four faces are marked (in Greek) with
the words "Omega" and "Bourla", so everyone assumed that the Swiss clock was
built by Omega, Switzerland. No one could recall what the word "Bourla" meant
or why it was there. Andonis Godis reveals the real identity of the complex
Swiss "Omega" clock and the fascinating family story of the Bourlas, one of
the Balkans most famous diamond and watch merchants, who escaped Salonica and
Greece during WWII and were thought to have perished in the Shoah without
leaving a trace. The author was fortunate to trace their improbable escape
to Palestine and locate the unsuspecting Sephardic family's descendants in
France.

Georges Graner, Paris


French SIG #France Issue #132 of Genealo-J , the Journal of the French Genealogical Society, has just been published #france

Georges Graner
 

*** Genealo-J, publication of the Jewish Genealogical Society of France,
Issue 132, winter 2017 has just been published.

Bernard Lyon-Caen writes a paper about the Leven family, a rather famous
family. The name of Leven first evokes several characters who played a
leading role in the creation of the Alliance Israelite Universelle. We
also know that several descendants identified themselves with this institution
during their whole life while others carry on the same task now. Other members
of the family yesterday and today invested in other fields. We first
transcribe a family history note written in 1929 by the lawyer Maurice
Leven, then we try to locate this family who lived in the 18th century and
early 19th in Uerdingen, on the edge of the Lower Rhine, then came to Paris
and Saint-Denis. In all these places, the name has for a long time been
attached to leather production and then to mineral waters. Starting >from the
first Levens arrived in Paris in 1838, the paper attempts to list their
descendants until today, gathering as much information on each of them as
possible, resulting in a great diversity.

The life of Antal Weiner (1878-1955) can be reconstructed thanks to a diary
found by his family. He is born in Senta, now in Serbia but which was then in
Hungary. Georges Graner relates how Weiner, after a youth in a modest family,
obtained a high school diploma, spent a happy year in the Austro-Hungarian
army and was recruited by the Hungarian railways. He was then and remained
during his whole life a patriot so that he felt a frustration when he was
ousted >from the railways in 1923 by the antisemitic laws. As every good
Hungarian, he had seen with sorrow the mutilation of Hungary after the World
War and was delighted when Hitler gave back some lost territories to his
country. The year 1944 was terrible for Jews in Hungary. Weiner’s daughter
was deported and almost all his family perished in the Holocaust but Antal
survived the hardships of the ghetto and of the siege of Budapest.

About the Coblentz family of Haguenau (Alsace) in the 18th century,
Pierre-Andre Meyer asks some genealogical questions. >from the legal problems
encountered in 1733 by Emanuel Coblentz, a young Jew of Haguenau accused of
having falsely shown his intention of converting to catholicism, and, before
him, by Lowel Coblentz, his father, in conflict for a long time with the
merchants and the magistrates of Haguenau, the article asks several questions
relating to the genealogy of this family. Disputing different statements by
Elie Scheid, the historian of the Jewish community of Haguenau, the author
shows a relationship between Lowel Coblentz and the great Zay (or Coblenz)
family of Metz. He also wonders about the family connections between Coblentz
and Feistel Moch, parnass of the Jewish community of Los Angeles, whose date
of death (largely erased on his grave in the Jewish cemetery in the city) has
been restored.

In 1928, a 'rags-to-riches' Greek Vlach emigrant to Sweden built and then
donated a school, adorned with a beautiful Swiss tower clock, to his native
mountain village of Nymfaion in Macedonia, Greece. Until recently no one knew
the real story behind it.The clock's four faces are marked (in Greek) with
the words "Omega" and "Bourla", so everyone assumed that the Swiss clock was
built by Omega, Switzerland. No one could recall what the word "Bourla" meant
or why it was there. Andonis Godis reveals the real identity of the complex
Swiss "Omega" clock and the fascinating family story of the Bourlas, one of
the Balkans most famous diamond and watch merchants, who escaped Salonica and
Greece during WWII and were thought to have perished in the Shoah without
leaving a trace. The author was fortunate to trace their improbable escape
to Palestine and locate the unsuspecting Sephardic family's descendants in
France.

Georges Graner, Paris


ViewMate translation request #poland

magijak@...
 

Dear Fellow Researchers,

I've posted 4 vital records in Russian, >from Mogielnica Poland, for which I
need extraction of all genealogical data (names, dates, places).

I'd appreciate as complete a translation as possible.

It is on ViewMate at the following addresses:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM62708
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM62651
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM62650
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM62649

Thank you very much,
magijak@gmail.com

Jacob Hammer

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately or on the ViewMate form.


JRI Poland #Poland ViewMate translation request #poland

magijak@...
 

Dear Fellow Researchers,

I've posted 4 vital records in Russian, >from Mogielnica Poland, for which I
need extraction of all genealogical data (names, dates, places).

I'd appreciate as complete a translation as possible.

It is on ViewMate at the following addresses:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM62708
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM62651
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM62650
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM62649

Thank you very much,
magijak@gmail.com

Jacob Hammer

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately or on the ViewMate form.


Family name query -- NICKI #lithuania

Andrea Nicki <nicandr4@...>
 

Dear list members, I have been for long trying to get more information
about my family name NICKI. My grandfather--John Nicki--came >from
Lithuania in 1913 to NY. He told his son--my father--that our original
last name was NAGOSOTZKI and that he had shortened it. However, there
is no information on this last name. And other documents refer to him by
the last name NICKI and say he had a brother with the last name NICKI.
I found a number of people listed with the last name NICKI in Poland
who had been in Jewish ghettos. I'm thinking now that maybe he was
trying to hide his Jewish identity and sound more Russian.

Does anyone know if this was something LIthuanian Jews did at that
time? I am not knowledgeable about the cultural pressures at that
time. My grandfather was always very silent about his lineage and
would not share any information, but called my father Litvak.

Thanks for any thoughts,
Andrea Nicki
Vancouver, Canada


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Family name query -- NICKI #lithuania

Andrea Nicki <nicandr4@...>
 

Dear list members, I have been for long trying to get more information
about my family name NICKI. My grandfather--John Nicki--came >from
Lithuania in 1913 to NY. He told his son--my father--that our original
last name was NAGOSOTZKI and that he had shortened it. However, there
is no information on this last name. And other documents refer to him by
the last name NICKI and say he had a brother with the last name NICKI.
I found a number of people listed with the last name NICKI in Poland
who had been in Jewish ghettos. I'm thinking now that maybe he was
trying to hide his Jewish identity and sound more Russian.

Does anyone know if this was something LIthuanian Jews did at that
time? I am not knowledgeable about the cultural pressures at that
time. My grandfather was always very silent about his lineage and
would not share any information, but called my father Litvak.

Thanks for any thoughts,
Andrea Nicki
Vancouver, Canada

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