Date   

A New Twist on Name Changing #general

FREYAB@...
 

Hi Genners,

This is a new twist on name changing! Last month I decided to use the SSDI
(Social Security Death Index) to look up my in-laws information. Now, I have
the death certificates so this was never an urgent need. My father-in law
was
listed, but not my mother-in law. Strange? I signed off without a thought.

However, the next evening, I decided to take my own advice and try spelling
the name with a "w" instead of the "v" (Maslov). She's there - with a "new"
name!

I followed the instructions for reporting the error and at dinnertime tonight
got a phonecall >from Ms Rozinsky >from the local Social Security office. She
explained that they couldn't make changes in the index (she checked with her
supervisor on that), and I quote her on this - "because the party in question
would have to sign a paper requesting the change" . . . . .? I reminded her
that
this was the Death Index - -
Then I asked her how it got changed in the first place - she stated that at
one
point it was correct - but somewhere down the line it got changed and that
even
her widow's benefits received after 1992 were also spelled incorrectly. So
if
she didn't change it herself, we cannot do it now.
My sister-in-law DID try to get the SSA to correct the spelling at one point,
but wasn't successful - and as we all know - you "can't fight city hall"
especially when they use the type of logic as stated above!

Freya Blitstein Maslov
Morton Grove, IL


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen A New Twist on Name Changing #general

FREYAB@...
 

Hi Genners,

This is a new twist on name changing! Last month I decided to use the SSDI
(Social Security Death Index) to look up my in-laws information. Now, I have
the death certificates so this was never an urgent need. My father-in law
was
listed, but not my mother-in law. Strange? I signed off without a thought.

However, the next evening, I decided to take my own advice and try spelling
the name with a "w" instead of the "v" (Maslov). She's there - with a "new"
name!

I followed the instructions for reporting the error and at dinnertime tonight
got a phonecall >from Ms Rozinsky >from the local Social Security office. She
explained that they couldn't make changes in the index (she checked with her
supervisor on that), and I quote her on this - "because the party in question
would have to sign a paper requesting the change" . . . . .? I reminded her
that
this was the Death Index - -
Then I asked her how it got changed in the first place - she stated that at
one
point it was correct - but somewhere down the line it got changed and that
even
her widow's benefits received after 1992 were also spelled incorrectly. So
if
she didn't change it herself, we cannot do it now.
My sister-in-law DID try to get the SSA to correct the spelling at one point,
but wasn't successful - and as we all know - you "can't fight city hall"
especially when they use the type of logic as stated above!

Freya Blitstein Maslov
Morton Grove, IL


Searching for descendants of Rose ZIMMERMAN, nee Roza KANTAROWSKI, of Lapy,Poland #general

Lisa Ness <lisaness@...>
 

I will be very grateful for any assistance in contacting the children,
grandchildren or other close relatives of Mrs. Rose Zimmerman, born Roza
Kantarowski in Lapy, Poland. Roza, her older brother, Szmerel and
younger sisters Sonia and Tola arrived in the US on the Antwerp on
September 2, 1923 and went to Chicago to reside with Szmerel's
brother-in-law, Nathan Derner, according to the ship's manifest. I
believe Mrs. Zimmerman remained in Chicago throughout her life, but I am
not certain.

My maternal grandmother, Ruth Horowitz (nee Ruchla, only child of Josef
and Tsivye Szturman in Lapy, Poland) was a classmate and close childhood
friend of Roza Kantarowski. Several years after the death of her mother
and the departure of her father for America, Ruchla traveled to NY on the
Antwerp with the Kantarowski children. She was met by her father, and
lived with him, his second wife, Bela, and their children in Brooklyn,
NY, until she married Harry Horowitz in 1924 or 1925.

My grandmother was reluctant to describe her early life in Poland. I
have a photo of her with a friend (who might be Roza) but not much else
to document her experiences as a Jewish child in Eastern Europe. She
died in NY in December, 1986. By making contact with Mrs. Zimmerman's
family, I hope to gain a better understanding of Ruchla's childhood and
to pass that on to my daughter, who is her namesake.

A shaynim dank,
Lisa Dryman Ness
Newport Beach, CA

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching for descendants of Rose ZIMMERMAN, nee Roza KANTAROWSKI, of Lapy,Poland #general

Lisa Ness <lisaness@...>
 

I will be very grateful for any assistance in contacting the children,
grandchildren or other close relatives of Mrs. Rose Zimmerman, born Roza
Kantarowski in Lapy, Poland. Roza, her older brother, Szmerel and
younger sisters Sonia and Tola arrived in the US on the Antwerp on
September 2, 1923 and went to Chicago to reside with Szmerel's
brother-in-law, Nathan Derner, according to the ship's manifest. I
believe Mrs. Zimmerman remained in Chicago throughout her life, but I am
not certain.

My maternal grandmother, Ruth Horowitz (nee Ruchla, only child of Josef
and Tsivye Szturman in Lapy, Poland) was a classmate and close childhood
friend of Roza Kantarowski. Several years after the death of her mother
and the departure of her father for America, Ruchla traveled to NY on the
Antwerp with the Kantarowski children. She was met by her father, and
lived with him, his second wife, Bela, and their children in Brooklyn,
NY, until she married Harry Horowitz in 1924 or 1925.

My grandmother was reluctant to describe her early life in Poland. I
have a photo of her with a friend (who might be Roza) but not much else
to document her experiences as a Jewish child in Eastern Europe. She
died in NY in December, 1986. By making contact with Mrs. Zimmerman's
family, I hope to gain a better understanding of Ruchla's childhood and
to pass that on to my daughter, who is her namesake.

A shaynim dank,
Lisa Dryman Ness
Newport Beach, CA

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately


Meeting of the IGS-Negev #general

martha <martha@...>
 

Meeting Announcement - January 2003

Israel Genealogical Society - Negev Branch
" HaHevra HaGenealogit HaIsraelit "
* * * * * *
The next meeting of the IGS-Negev branch will take place:
Date: Wednesday, Jan. 8, 2003

Time: 20:00 (Library open >from 7:30)

Place: Kehilat Magen Avraham
Corner of Rehov Ad-Ad and Rehov Margalit
Omer

Our speaker will be: Shirley Rosen >from our Negev group. Shirley
will tell of her recent trip to her ancestral towns in Germany and
the new information that she discovered about her SACHS family.


Dues for the new year 2003 are being collected as of this meeting.
The national association has decided that dues for the year will be
220 NIS. If you pay before January 31 the dues will be only 200 NIS.
Please bring a checkbook and make the payment so you won't have to
worry about it for another year.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Meeting of the IGS-Negev #general

martha <martha@...>
 

Meeting Announcement - January 2003

Israel Genealogical Society - Negev Branch
" HaHevra HaGenealogit HaIsraelit "
* * * * * *
The next meeting of the IGS-Negev branch will take place:
Date: Wednesday, Jan. 8, 2003

Time: 20:00 (Library open >from 7:30)

Place: Kehilat Magen Avraham
Corner of Rehov Ad-Ad and Rehov Margalit
Omer

Our speaker will be: Shirley Rosen >from our Negev group. Shirley
will tell of her recent trip to her ancestral towns in Germany and
the new information that she discovered about her SACHS family.


Dues for the new year 2003 are being collected as of this meeting.
The national association has decided that dues for the year will be
220 NIS. If you pay before January 31 the dues will be only 200 NIS.
Please bring a checkbook and make the payment so you won't have to
worry about it for another year.


JGS Oregon: January 15th Monthly Meeting #general

Ronald D. Doctor <rondoctor@...>
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Oregon (JGSO) invites you to join us for JGSO's
January meeting.

How I Prepared For My Trip to Ukraine and What I Learned
presented by Ron Doctor

Date: Wednesday, January 15, 2003
Time: 7:30 pm to 9:30 pm
Place: Mittleman Jewish Community Center (MJCC) Computer Room
6651 SW Capitol Highway
Portland, Oregon

Ron will describe his September 2002 visit to Ukraine. He will illustrate the talk
with some of the 1,400 photos that he took while on the trip. He will discuss his
experiences with:

* Polish and Ukrainian Archives and Archivists
* Ukrainian cemeteries
* Unexpected discoveries
* Hotels and restaurants
* Pre-trip planning: what worked and what didn't

This event is FREE to JGSO members. Contribution of $2 at the door is requested from
non-members. Contribution is credited to membership if you join JGSO at the meeting.
We will have available at the meeting JGSO's new 170 page, 3rd edition of "Getting
Started in Jewish Genealogy: A Handbook for Beginners with Supplementary Information
for Advanced Research". The Handbook is free to new members with paid membership, $18
to non-members, and $12 to members.

For more information or questions, call Sandra Shapiro at (503) 694-5646, or e-mail
rondoctor@earthlink.net.

For more information about JGSO and its activities, visit the JGSO web site at:
http://www.rootsweb.com/~orjgs

To be placed on JGS of Oregon's e-mail distribution list, send an e-mail message to
rondoctor@earthlink.net. Once you are on the list, you will receive periodic messages
concerning Jewish Genealogy. Your name and e-mail address will not be distributed
outside of JGS of Oregon.

The JGSO is affiliated with the International Association of Jewish Genealogical
Societies (IAJGS).


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGS Oregon: January 15th Monthly Meeting #general

Ronald D. Doctor <rondoctor@...>
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Oregon (JGSO) invites you to join us for JGSO's
January meeting.

How I Prepared For My Trip to Ukraine and What I Learned
presented by Ron Doctor

Date: Wednesday, January 15, 2003
Time: 7:30 pm to 9:30 pm
Place: Mittleman Jewish Community Center (MJCC) Computer Room
6651 SW Capitol Highway
Portland, Oregon

Ron will describe his September 2002 visit to Ukraine. He will illustrate the talk
with some of the 1,400 photos that he took while on the trip. He will discuss his
experiences with:

* Polish and Ukrainian Archives and Archivists
* Ukrainian cemeteries
* Unexpected discoveries
* Hotels and restaurants
* Pre-trip planning: what worked and what didn't

This event is FREE to JGSO members. Contribution of $2 at the door is requested from
non-members. Contribution is credited to membership if you join JGSO at the meeting.
We will have available at the meeting JGSO's new 170 page, 3rd edition of "Getting
Started in Jewish Genealogy: A Handbook for Beginners with Supplementary Information
for Advanced Research". The Handbook is free to new members with paid membership, $18
to non-members, and $12 to members.

For more information or questions, call Sandra Shapiro at (503) 694-5646, or e-mail
rondoctor@earthlink.net.

For more information about JGSO and its activities, visit the JGSO web site at:
http://www.rootsweb.com/~orjgs

To be placed on JGS of Oregon's e-mail distribution list, send an e-mail message to
rondoctor@earthlink.net. Once you are on the list, you will receive periodic messages
concerning Jewish Genealogy. Your name and e-mail address will not be distributed
outside of JGS of Oregon.

The JGSO is affiliated with the International Association of Jewish Genealogical
Societies (IAJGS).


Yizkor Book update-December 2002 and annual #scandinavia

Joyce Field <jfield@...>
 

I took a two-week vacation >from Dec. 20- Jan. 4 and I have just
about crawled my way out >from under a mountain of emails that poured
in during my absence. Hence, the delay in writing the monthly update
for the Yizkor Book Project. It's great to get away but hard to
return to an avalanche of mail. To those of you who wrote me during
my absence, please give me a few more days to reply!!!

A reminder to new JewishGen researchers: all translations can be
found at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html and a
description of the Yizkor Book Project as well as the FAQ, database,
libraries, and other matters can be accessed >from
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/.

During December 2002 we added 3 books, 2 new entries , and 11 updates.

New books:

-Dusetos, Lithuania
-Suprasl, Poland
-Tomaszow, Poland

New entries:

-Dorosauti, Romania (Pinkas HaKehillot Romania)
-Poddebice, Poland (Pinkas HaKehillot Poland, volume 1)

Updates:

-Buchach, Ukraine
-Gorodenka (Horodenka), Ukraine
-Lida, Belarus
-Miklulintsy, Ukraine
-Pinsk, Belarus
-Radekhov, Ukraine
-Rokitnoye, Ukraine
-Rozniatow, Ukraine
-Slutsk, Belarus
-Sokoly, Poland
-Staszow, Poland

2002 was a productive year for the Yizkor Book Project. We added 29
new books and 97 entries, and updated 188 books. We had
approximately 270,000 hits in December and over 2.8 million hits to
the web site for the year, a record.

All this would not have been possible without the dedicated volunteer
Yizkor Book Staff, especially Lance Ackerfeld, the generous donors
who contributed translations, the incredibly hard-working and
talented project coordinators, and finally the financial donors whose
contributions allowed us to hire translators.

A Happy and Peaceful New Year to you all. We look forward to another
successful year.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Research


Scandinavia SIG #Scandinavia Yizkor Book update-December 2002 and annual #scandinavia

Joyce Field <jfield@...>
 

I took a two-week vacation >from Dec. 20- Jan. 4 and I have just
about crawled my way out >from under a mountain of emails that poured
in during my absence. Hence, the delay in writing the monthly update
for the Yizkor Book Project. It's great to get away but hard to
return to an avalanche of mail. To those of you who wrote me during
my absence, please give me a few more days to reply!!!

A reminder to new JewishGen researchers: all translations can be
found at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html and a
description of the Yizkor Book Project as well as the FAQ, database,
libraries, and other matters can be accessed >from
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/.

During December 2002 we added 3 books, 2 new entries , and 11 updates.

New books:

-Dusetos, Lithuania
-Suprasl, Poland
-Tomaszow, Poland

New entries:

-Dorosauti, Romania (Pinkas HaKehillot Romania)
-Poddebice, Poland (Pinkas HaKehillot Poland, volume 1)

Updates:

-Buchach, Ukraine
-Gorodenka (Horodenka), Ukraine
-Lida, Belarus
-Miklulintsy, Ukraine
-Pinsk, Belarus
-Radekhov, Ukraine
-Rokitnoye, Ukraine
-Rozniatow, Ukraine
-Slutsk, Belarus
-Sokoly, Poland
-Staszow, Poland

2002 was a productive year for the Yizkor Book Project. We added 29
new books and 97 entries, and updated 188 books. We had
approximately 270,000 hits in December and over 2.8 million hits to
the web site for the year, a record.

All this would not have been possible without the dedicated volunteer
Yizkor Book Staff, especially Lance Ackerfeld, the generous donors
who contributed translations, the incredibly hard-working and
talented project coordinators, and finally the financial donors whose
contributions allowed us to hire translators.

A Happy and Peaceful New Year to you all. We look forward to another
successful year.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Research


Yizkor Book update-December 2002 and annual #latvia

Joyce Field <jfield@...>
 

I took a two-week vacation >from Dec. 20- Jan. 4 and I have just
about crawled my way out >from under a mountain of emails that poured
in during my absence. Hence, the delay in writing the monthly update
for the Yizkor Book Project. It's great to get away but hard to
return to an avalanche of mail. To those of you who wrote me during
my absence, please give me a few more days to reply!!!

A reminder to new JewishGen researchers: all translations can be
found at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html and a
description of the Yizkor Book Project as well as the FAQ, database,
libraries, and other matters can be accessed >from
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/.

During December 2002 we added 3 books, 2 new entries , and 11 updates.

New books:

-Dusetos, Lithuania
-Suprasl, Poland
-Tomaszow, Poland

New entries:

-Dorosauti, Romania (Pinkas HaKehillot Romania)
-Poddebice, Poland (Pinkas HaKehillot Poland, volume 1)

Updates:

-Buchach, Ukraine
-Gorodenka (Horodenka), Ukraine
-Lida, Belarus
-Miklulintsy, Ukraine
-Pinsk, Belarus
-Radekhov, Ukraine
-Rokitnoye, Ukraine
-Rozniatow, Ukraine
-Slutsk, Belarus
-Sokoly, Poland
-Staszow, Poland

2002 was a productive year for the Yizkor Book Project. We added 29
new books and 97 entries, and updated 188 books. We had
approximately 270,000 hits in December and over 2.8 million hits to
the web site for the year, a record.

All this would not have been possible without the dedicated volunteer
Yizkor Book Staff, especially Lance Ackerfeld, the generous donors
who contributed translations, the incredibly hard-working and
talented project coordinators, and finally the financial donors whose
contributions allowed us to hire translators.

A Happy and Peaceful New Year to you all. We look forward to another
successful year.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Research


Latvia SIG #Latvia Yizkor Book update-December 2002 and annual #latvia

Joyce Field <jfield@...>
 

I took a two-week vacation >from Dec. 20- Jan. 4 and I have just
about crawled my way out >from under a mountain of emails that poured
in during my absence. Hence, the delay in writing the monthly update
for the Yizkor Book Project. It's great to get away but hard to
return to an avalanche of mail. To those of you who wrote me during
my absence, please give me a few more days to reply!!!

A reminder to new JewishGen researchers: all translations can be
found at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html and a
description of the Yizkor Book Project as well as the FAQ, database,
libraries, and other matters can be accessed >from
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/.

During December 2002 we added 3 books, 2 new entries , and 11 updates.

New books:

-Dusetos, Lithuania
-Suprasl, Poland
-Tomaszow, Poland

New entries:

-Dorosauti, Romania (Pinkas HaKehillot Romania)
-Poddebice, Poland (Pinkas HaKehillot Poland, volume 1)

Updates:

-Buchach, Ukraine
-Gorodenka (Horodenka), Ukraine
-Lida, Belarus
-Miklulintsy, Ukraine
-Pinsk, Belarus
-Radekhov, Ukraine
-Rokitnoye, Ukraine
-Rozniatow, Ukraine
-Slutsk, Belarus
-Sokoly, Poland
-Staszow, Poland

2002 was a productive year for the Yizkor Book Project. We added 29
new books and 97 entries, and updated 188 books. We had
approximately 270,000 hits in December and over 2.8 million hits to
the web site for the year, a record.

All this would not have been possible without the dedicated volunteer
Yizkor Book Staff, especially Lance Ackerfeld, the generous donors
who contributed translations, the incredibly hard-working and
talented project coordinators, and finally the financial donors whose
contributions allowed us to hire translators.

A Happy and Peaceful New Year to you all. We look forward to another
successful year.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Research


Budapest Jews 1837 SA-SE #hungary

Peter I. Hidas <thidas@...>
 

SURNAME Given Name Occupation Income (for 1845 only), forints per
year Place of Origin Year(s) of Registration Year of arrival (to
Pest) Comments OTHER SURNAMES


SACHSEL Catha scrapdealer Obuda 1837
SACHSEL Simon M. wholesaler Obuda 1837
SACHS Marc Simon wholesaler Obuda 1837
SACHSL Fanni flour merchant Obuda 1837
SADLER Mandel barber[?] Gyor 1837 1835
Hautscherer
SALAMON Jacob tailor Szutyan 1837
SAMEK Max buyer 30 1845
SAPHIR Sigmund physician Lovasbereny 1837
1813
SATTLER Aaron barber[?] Gyor 1837
SATTLER Gerson merchant 65 Lovasitz 1837,
1845 1825 peddler in 1845
SATTLER Nathan employee of Franz Prager Orsolen 1837 1823
SAX Marcus retailer 75 1845
SAXEL Samuel store clerk at Isac Breuer Bohemia 1837 1825
SAXL Salamon musician Pest 1837
SAXL Simon retailer 50 1845
SCHACH Herman peddler Pest 1837, 1845
beggar in 1845
SCHACHELE David unemployed Obuda 1837
1830
SCHAF Pinkas buyer Leibnick 1837 1825
SCHALTHIEL Ruben pipe merchant Pest 1837, 1845
beggar in 1845
SCHEFFER Salamon merchant 40 Jankovitz 1837, 1845
1817 buyer in 1845 SCHAEFER Salamon in 1845
SCHVITZER Salamon porter Vagujhely 1837 1825
SEEMANN Leopold buyer Balassagyarmat 1837 1825
SEIDNER Samuel B. wholesaler 40 Bun 1837 retailer
in 1845
SEIFENSIEDER Abraham art dealer 50 Schafe 1837, 1845 1825
peddler in 1845
SEILE Abraham diamond engraver Reschov 1837 1832
SEITNER Mauritius retailer 60 1845
SELIG Abraham porter Stanislo (Poland) 1837 1809
======================
Dr. P.I.Hidas

thidas@sympatico.ca
peterhidas@yahoo.com

http://community.webshots.com/user/peterhidas/
http://www3.sympatico.ca/thidas/Hungarian-history/


Hungary SIG #Hungary Budapest Jews 1837 SA-SE #hungary

Peter I. Hidas <thidas@...>
 

SURNAME Given Name Occupation Income (for 1845 only), forints per
year Place of Origin Year(s) of Registration Year of arrival (to
Pest) Comments OTHER SURNAMES


SACHSEL Catha scrapdealer Obuda 1837
SACHSEL Simon M. wholesaler Obuda 1837
SACHS Marc Simon wholesaler Obuda 1837
SACHSL Fanni flour merchant Obuda 1837
SADLER Mandel barber[?] Gyor 1837 1835
Hautscherer
SALAMON Jacob tailor Szutyan 1837
SAMEK Max buyer 30 1845
SAPHIR Sigmund physician Lovasbereny 1837
1813
SATTLER Aaron barber[?] Gyor 1837
SATTLER Gerson merchant 65 Lovasitz 1837,
1845 1825 peddler in 1845
SATTLER Nathan employee of Franz Prager Orsolen 1837 1823
SAX Marcus retailer 75 1845
SAXEL Samuel store clerk at Isac Breuer Bohemia 1837 1825
SAXL Salamon musician Pest 1837
SAXL Simon retailer 50 1845
SCHACH Herman peddler Pest 1837, 1845
beggar in 1845
SCHACHELE David unemployed Obuda 1837
1830
SCHAF Pinkas buyer Leibnick 1837 1825
SCHALTHIEL Ruben pipe merchant Pest 1837, 1845
beggar in 1845
SCHEFFER Salamon merchant 40 Jankovitz 1837, 1845
1817 buyer in 1845 SCHAEFER Salamon in 1845
SCHVITZER Salamon porter Vagujhely 1837 1825
SEEMANN Leopold buyer Balassagyarmat 1837 1825
SEIDNER Samuel B. wholesaler 40 Bun 1837 retailer
in 1845
SEIFENSIEDER Abraham art dealer 50 Schafe 1837, 1845 1825
peddler in 1845
SEILE Abraham diamond engraver Reschov 1837 1832
SEITNER Mauritius retailer 60 1845
SELIG Abraham porter Stanislo (Poland) 1837 1809
======================
Dr. P.I.Hidas

thidas@sympatico.ca
peterhidas@yahoo.com

http://community.webshots.com/user/peterhidas/
http://www3.sympatico.ca/thidas/Hungarian-history/


Re: Prany (Prienai) and Rossien (Raseiniai) #belarus

NFatouros@...
 

On Jan.5/02 Danielle Freedman (daniellefreedman640 @hotmail.com) wrote in
part:



However It was suggested to me that they were >from PRANY/PRENESE.
After locating off the Belarus web site The jewish Agreicultural Colonies
in Western Russia 1904, i found PRENAY (PRENAI)in Rossien/Shidlov/Kovno.
But cannot find anything further has Rossien become Rosenai? Please advise
me. And will PRENAY be there shtetl? OR THE SURROUNDING FORESTRY. can also
someone please advise me about the turpentine business in GRODNO?>>

I can't comment on much of Ms. Freedman's inquiry. But I think that "Prenay"
may be the Prienai I found listed as Pren, Prenai, and Prienai, in "Where We
Once Walked" (WWOW). This source says that PRienai had a pre World War II
population of 954, and is 38 kilometers south of Kaunas (Kovno).

As for "Rossien" or "Rosenai" this may be the place entered in WWOW as
"Rossein," and "Rassyn." which entries refer to the description under
"Raseiniai."

Raseiniai has still more spellings: Rasein, Raseinai, Rassyn, Resein,
Rosinei, Rossiein, Rossieny. It had a prewar population of 158, and is 69
kilometers west north west of Kaunas(Kovno).

I looked up Raseiniai in my Columbia-Lippincott (C-L) Gazetteer, and there it
said that the city had a population of 6,217, was 45 miles northwes tof
Kounas. It was known for tanning, shoe manufacturing, sawmilling and
flourmilling. It dates >from the 13th century and during the 17th and 18th
centuries was the cultural center of Samogitia. It was under the Russian
KKovno government until 1920. The C-L offers yet two more spellings:
"Rasinayai" and "Rasynyay."

I also checked in my C-L Gazetteer for Prienai, and learned that it is
located o the left bank of the Newman River, 17 miles south of Kaunas. It was
a lumbermilling center and there was also manufacturing of furniture,
turpentine, rosin, shoese, vegetable oil and beer. In 1795 it passed to
PRussi, and in 1815, went to Russian Poland. It was part of the Suvalki
government until 1920.

And more:

On pp.245-248 of Nancy Schoenburg and Stuart Schoenburg,"Lithuanian Jewish
Communities, Jason Aronson Inc.1996, there is a lot about "Rasin" or
Raseiniai. And on pp.236-237, of the same book, there is a lot about Pren
(Prienai) as well.

Ms. Freedman may find out more about Grodno and her two towns, using a
"search this website" box at Jewishgen's main page
(http://www.jewishgen.org) For all I know she may find others who are
interested in her ZAPOROWSKY and SABOLINSKY or SABOLINSKIE surnames in
Jewishgen's Family Finder. If not, she should list them herself in the Family
Finder. She should also check Jewishgen's Discussion Group Archives. (The
ZAPOROWSKY surname reminds me of the Zaporog cossacks!)


Naomi Fatouros (nee FELDMAN)
Bloomington, Indiana
NFatouros@aol.com
Researching: BELKOWSKY and BIELKOWSKY, Odessa and Berdichev;ROTHSTEIN,
Kremenchug; FELDMAN, Pinsk; SCHUTZ, RETTIG, WAHL, Shcherets; LEVY, Mulhouse;
SAS or SASS,Podwolochisk; RAPOPORT, Tarnopol, Korostyshev; BEHAM, Salok and
Kharkov; WOLPIANSKY, Ostryna.


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: Prany (Prienai) and Rossien (Raseiniai) #belarus

NFatouros@...
 

On Jan.5/02 Danielle Freedman (daniellefreedman640 @hotmail.com) wrote in
part:



However It was suggested to me that they were >from PRANY/PRENESE.
After locating off the Belarus web site The jewish Agreicultural Colonies
in Western Russia 1904, i found PRENAY (PRENAI)in Rossien/Shidlov/Kovno.
But cannot find anything further has Rossien become Rosenai? Please advise
me. And will PRENAY be there shtetl? OR THE SURROUNDING FORESTRY. can also
someone please advise me about the turpentine business in GRODNO?>>

I can't comment on much of Ms. Freedman's inquiry. But I think that "Prenay"
may be the Prienai I found listed as Pren, Prenai, and Prienai, in "Where We
Once Walked" (WWOW). This source says that PRienai had a pre World War II
population of 954, and is 38 kilometers south of Kaunas (Kovno).

As for "Rossien" or "Rosenai" this may be the place entered in WWOW as
"Rossein," and "Rassyn." which entries refer to the description under
"Raseiniai."

Raseiniai has still more spellings: Rasein, Raseinai, Rassyn, Resein,
Rosinei, Rossiein, Rossieny. It had a prewar population of 158, and is 69
kilometers west north west of Kaunas(Kovno).

I looked up Raseiniai in my Columbia-Lippincott (C-L) Gazetteer, and there it
said that the city had a population of 6,217, was 45 miles northwes tof
Kounas. It was known for tanning, shoe manufacturing, sawmilling and
flourmilling. It dates >from the 13th century and during the 17th and 18th
centuries was the cultural center of Samogitia. It was under the Russian
KKovno government until 1920. The C-L offers yet two more spellings:
"Rasinayai" and "Rasynyay."

I also checked in my C-L Gazetteer for Prienai, and learned that it is
located o the left bank of the Newman River, 17 miles south of Kaunas. It was
a lumbermilling center and there was also manufacturing of furniture,
turpentine, rosin, shoese, vegetable oil and beer. In 1795 it passed to
PRussi, and in 1815, went to Russian Poland. It was part of the Suvalki
government until 1920.

And more:

On pp.245-248 of Nancy Schoenburg and Stuart Schoenburg,"Lithuanian Jewish
Communities, Jason Aronson Inc.1996, there is a lot about "Rasin" or
Raseiniai. And on pp.236-237, of the same book, there is a lot about Pren
(Prienai) as well.

Ms. Freedman may find out more about Grodno and her two towns, using a
"search this website" box at Jewishgen's main page
(http://www.jewishgen.org) For all I know she may find others who are
interested in her ZAPOROWSKY and SABOLINSKY or SABOLINSKIE surnames in
Jewishgen's Family Finder. If not, she should list them herself in the Family
Finder. She should also check Jewishgen's Discussion Group Archives. (The
ZAPOROWSKY surname reminds me of the Zaporog cossacks!)


Naomi Fatouros (nee FELDMAN)
Bloomington, Indiana
NFatouros@aol.com
Researching: BELKOWSKY and BIELKOWSKY, Odessa and Berdichev;ROTHSTEIN,
Kremenchug; FELDMAN, Pinsk; SCHUTZ, RETTIG, WAHL, Shcherets; LEVY, Mulhouse;
SAS or SASS,Podwolochisk; RAPOPORT, Tarnopol, Korostyshev; BEHAM, Salok and
Kharkov; WOLPIANSKY, Ostryna.


Re: Brewers in Galicia (expanding inquiry to winemaking and lumber industries). #galicia

hankman <hankman@...>
 

Hi,

I would be interested to see a discussion of the winemaking (and
sales) and lumber industries. How these industries functioned. What
the typical relation was to the non-Jewish landowner? What was the
typical scale of operations, was it more often very local or did they
sometimes operate in a regional or national venue? How large were the
typical tracts of land leased for vineyards or timbering? What size
were the lumber mills? How many people did the typical lumber mill
employ? What sort of equipment was used? Can any of these operations
be traced by records of the machinery purchases for the lumber mills
(this assumes that the equipment was manufactured by large
corporations). If it was simple equipment manufactured locally by
small smithies this may not be a rewarding path of inquiry. I imagine
that there would be some sort of records of land ownership, would
their also be public records of land leases >from the Polish
aristocracy to the Jewish lessees? etc., etc.

Many similar questions present themselves about the (Jewish)
winemaking industry.

I have no doubt that if such information is made available, that it
will produce many helpful leads in our various genealogical searches.

Thanks for the info.

Kol Tuv

Chaim Manaster


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: Brewers in Galicia (expanding inquiry to winemaking and lumber industries). #galicia

hankman <hankman@...>
 

Hi,

I would be interested to see a discussion of the winemaking (and
sales) and lumber industries. How these industries functioned. What
the typical relation was to the non-Jewish landowner? What was the
typical scale of operations, was it more often very local or did they
sometimes operate in a regional or national venue? How large were the
typical tracts of land leased for vineyards or timbering? What size
were the lumber mills? How many people did the typical lumber mill
employ? What sort of equipment was used? Can any of these operations
be traced by records of the machinery purchases for the lumber mills
(this assumes that the equipment was manufactured by large
corporations). If it was simple equipment manufactured locally by
small smithies this may not be a rewarding path of inquiry. I imagine
that there would be some sort of records of land ownership, would
their also be public records of land leases >from the Polish
aristocracy to the Jewish lessees? etc., etc.

Many similar questions present themselves about the (Jewish)
winemaking industry.

I have no doubt that if such information is made available, that it
will produce many helpful leads in our various genealogical searches.

Thanks for the info.

Kol Tuv

Chaim Manaster


Brewery #galicia

Gayle Schlissel Riley <key2pst@...>
 

Tarnobrzeg had a brewery..I have a postcard of it..There is a very small
book, in Polish at the FHL in Salt Lake about the Breweries in Poland,
only part two..I do not remember the name of the book..Gayle

Gayle Schlissel Riley
<key2pst@pacbell.net>


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Brewery #galicia

Gayle Schlissel Riley <key2pst@...>
 

Tarnobrzeg had a brewery..I have a postcard of it..There is a very small
book, in Polish at the FHL in Salt Lake about the Breweries in Poland,
only part two..I do not remember the name of the book..Gayle

Gayle Schlissel Riley
<key2pst@pacbell.net>