Date   

Translation please #germany

Dennis Baer <dennis.baer@...>
 

Hello

Can someone translate the short letter [in large modern type German]
found at:

http://www.hoflink.com/~dbaer/darmstadt_response.jpg

Thank you.

Dennis Baer City? State?

MOD NOTE: Residence information is required for your future postings
to this Forum.


German SIG #Germany Translation please #germany

Dennis Baer <dennis.baer@...>
 

Hello

Can someone translate the short letter [in large modern type German]
found at:

http://www.hoflink.com/~dbaer/darmstadt_response.jpg

Thank you.

Dennis Baer City? State?

MOD NOTE: Residence information is required for your future postings
to this Forum.


Too Many M's #general

Albert W. Gershman <gershie@...>
 

What's the likelihood that three Eastern European Ashkenazi Jewish
brothers were named: Moishe, Mottel and Moses.

This is the scenario: Moishe comes to America in mid 1907 to see his
brother Moses, who is already living here with this Anglicized name. In
1910 Mottel shows up to see his brother Moishe.

Sort of reminds me of that Bob Newhart show with the two brothers
Daryl. Did we, Jews of Eastern European practice, do this?

Searching:
BEGUN (Pinsk), SINOWITZ (Pinsk, Worldwide), DAVICO/DEVITKA (Pinsk,
Colorado)
DUFINE/DUFAIN, (Mezhirich, Israel)
GERSHMAN (Mezhirich, Antopol)
GOLUBCHICK, LIPOFSKY,(Antopol)
VAN DUNK descendants of Greenberg (Paterson, NJ)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Too Many M's #general

Albert W. Gershman <gershie@...>
 

What's the likelihood that three Eastern European Ashkenazi Jewish
brothers were named: Moishe, Mottel and Moses.

This is the scenario: Moishe comes to America in mid 1907 to see his
brother Moses, who is already living here with this Anglicized name. In
1910 Mottel shows up to see his brother Moishe.

Sort of reminds me of that Bob Newhart show with the two brothers
Daryl. Did we, Jews of Eastern European practice, do this?

Searching:
BEGUN (Pinsk), SINOWITZ (Pinsk, Worldwide), DAVICO/DEVITKA (Pinsk,
Colorado)
DUFINE/DUFAIN, (Mezhirich, Israel)
GERSHMAN (Mezhirich, Antopol)
GOLUBCHICK, LIPOFSKY,(Antopol)
VAN DUNK descendants of Greenberg (Paterson, NJ)


Re: LEWIN - Paul & Rosa #germany

Ernest and Doris Stiefel <erstiefel@...>
 

The Thersesienstadt Memorbook shows three Paul Lewins

born 1872, died in Theresienstadt 1944
born 1893, deported to Auschwitz
born 1864, deported to Treblinka

As far as Rosa Lewin is concerned there were also three

Rosa born 1862, died in Thesesienstadt 1942
Rosa born 1873, liberated >from Theresienstadt
Rosa born 1862, died in Theresienstadt 1943

As far as the Jews >from Stettin are concerned, they were the first ones who
were deported to Poland in February 1940. I understand that they lived in
Poland for some time.

ERNEST R. STIEFEL, Seattle, Washington


German SIG #Germany Re: LEWIN - Paul & Rosa #germany

Ernest and Doris Stiefel <erstiefel@...>
 

The Thersesienstadt Memorbook shows three Paul Lewins

born 1872, died in Theresienstadt 1944
born 1893, deported to Auschwitz
born 1864, deported to Treblinka

As far as Rosa Lewin is concerned there were also three

Rosa born 1862, died in Thesesienstadt 1942
Rosa born 1873, liberated >from Theresienstadt
Rosa born 1862, died in Theresienstadt 1943

As far as the Jews >from Stettin are concerned, they were the first ones who
were deported to Poland in February 1940. I understand that they lived in
Poland for some time.

ERNEST R. STIEFEL, Seattle, Washington


WIN(N)IKOFs from Dobrova, Poland #general

Mel Comisarow <melcom@...>
 

I have recently discovered that my VINIKVOVSKY relatives who migrated
from the Sokolka, Poland area to Southeastern Ukraine in 1852 and then,
before and after WWI to North America, where where they became
WINNIKOFFs, WINIKOFFs and WEINKLEs, were originally >from the town of
Dombrovy (Russian name)/Dobrova (Polish name, no "m") located at N 53š
38¹ E 23š 21¹, 20 km NNW of Sokolka in Poland. Are there any
WINIKOFFs/WINIKOVs/VINIKOVs, etc. out there whose ancestors hail >from
Dombrovy/Dobrova Poland?

Mel Comisarow
melcom@chem.ubc.ca

MODERATOR'S NOTE:
Your chances of success in your research will be greatly
enhanced if you register the name(s) you are searching for
in the JewishGen Family Finder.
Go to www.jewishgen.org/jgff


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen WIN(N)IKOFs from Dobrova, Poland #general

Mel Comisarow <melcom@...>
 

I have recently discovered that my VINIKVOVSKY relatives who migrated
from the Sokolka, Poland area to Southeastern Ukraine in 1852 and then,
before and after WWI to North America, where where they became
WINNIKOFFs, WINIKOFFs and WEINKLEs, were originally >from the town of
Dombrovy (Russian name)/Dobrova (Polish name, no "m") located at N 53š
38¹ E 23š 21¹, 20 km NNW of Sokolka in Poland. Are there any
WINIKOFFs/WINIKOVs/VINIKOVs, etc. out there whose ancestors hail >from
Dombrovy/Dobrova Poland?

Mel Comisarow
melcom@chem.ubc.ca

MODERATOR'S NOTE:
Your chances of success in your research will be greatly
enhanced if you register the name(s) you are searching for
in the JewishGen Family Finder.
Go to www.jewishgen.org/jgff


Re: Red Cross Holocaust Tracing Center #belarus

LindaCGreenman@...
 

In a message dated 12/21/2002 8:51:33 PM Eastern Standard Time,
ebf2001@comcast.net writes:



<< I'd be curious to learn what other people have experienced in terms of
length of time for the search and results.
>>

Although Evan Fishman requested a private response, as the volunteer in
charge of the Holocaust Tracing Program in the Greater New York Red Cross, it
might be helpful to other genners if I posted this to the whole group.

When anyone in the United States initiates a request \tfor a search for
relatives presumed lost in WWII -- there is a strict international protocol
that must be followed:

1) You submit your request (form #1609) to your local Red Cross Holocaust
tracing office.

2) They review it to ensure that all the mandated information has been filled
out and sign off on it.

3) It is sent to the National WWII Tracing Office in Baltimore where the
volunteers there will open a file and make a determination, based on what you
have written, which European Red Cross office(s) should receive it. A
typical example, the person you are searching for was born in Poland, may
have moved around in Russia and was then possibly sent to an unknown
concentration camp.

4) If Baltimore has a question about any of the information you filled in,
i.e., they can find no town in Poland that matches the one you named, they
will communicate with your local office who will call or write to you in
order to get more accurate information >from you.

5) In the above example, after having the forms translated into Polish,
Russian and German -- Baltimore will forward your request to the National
Office of the Polish Red Cross in Warsaw, the National Office of the Russian
Red Cross in Moscow, and the Arolson Archives of Concentration Camp Documents
in Germany.

6) According to the ICRC (International Committee of the Red Cross) mandate,
the Polish and Russian Red Cross National Offices will then open their own
files before forwarding your request to the local Red Cross office(s) in
every place you mentioned that your relative might have lived or even passed
through.

7) Local volunteers in all of these offices will then begin the incredible
time consuming task of going through 60+ year old HAND WRITTEN sometimes
crumbling paper records looking for your relative. (None of this has been
computerized). As soon as any bit of information is discovered, it is routed
back through the Baltimore office to your local office and then on to you.

9) The bad news is that in approximately 35% of the requests, NO records are
ever found.

9) The good news is that Baltimore NEVER closes your case, and if new
information is discovered 10 years after you asked for it, it will still be
sent to you. In fact, when you think that 65% of the requests for
information receive some sort of response, it is truly amazing.

As you can see, the process is cumbersome and overwhelming. In addition to
all of the genealogists who are looking for their family history, there are
literally thousands who are looking for a date to say kaddish for a parent --
and many more who are looking for their self documentation in order to apply
for slave labor and property reparations.

How long does it take? In the best of cases, a year or two, more often three
to five years. I just received records >from Bosnia for someone who had
requested a search in 1991, when the war interrupted the search When it was
over, the Bosnian Red Cross continued to look and found our inquirer's family
records.

You are right that It would be totally useless for anyone else to tell you
how long their search took -- since each set of facts are individual. It
also depends on whether the local European office has a two day/week
volunteer or a full time staff of 10!

One thing is VERY important. If you move or change your phone number and
don't update the information with your local office, you stand a good chance
of never receiving any of the information!

So, don't give up. Keep in touch. If the records are there, they'll find
them.

Linda Greenman

Researching GREENMAN/RESNICK/RUSHEVSKY/RUSH/SHERETSHEVSKY/
SHERRY >from Antopol, NY and Alabama.
RAFALOWSKI/RAFF/FISHBEIN >from Miedzyzrec/Bialystok and NY.
PLOCIENKO/CALECKI/HERMAN/KLUGER >from Sniadowo/Radzilow/Zambrow and NY, Paris,
Johannesburg.
GREENBERG/COHEN >from Rochester, NY. WEISS >from Mexico City.


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: Red Cross Holocaust Tracing Center #belarus

LindaCGreenman@...
 

In a message dated 12/21/2002 8:51:33 PM Eastern Standard Time,
ebf2001@comcast.net writes:



<< I'd be curious to learn what other people have experienced in terms of
length of time for the search and results.
>>

Although Evan Fishman requested a private response, as the volunteer in
charge of the Holocaust Tracing Program in the Greater New York Red Cross, it
might be helpful to other genners if I posted this to the whole group.

When anyone in the United States initiates a request \tfor a search for
relatives presumed lost in WWII -- there is a strict international protocol
that must be followed:

1) You submit your request (form #1609) to your local Red Cross Holocaust
tracing office.

2) They review it to ensure that all the mandated information has been filled
out and sign off on it.

3) It is sent to the National WWII Tracing Office in Baltimore where the
volunteers there will open a file and make a determination, based on what you
have written, which European Red Cross office(s) should receive it. A
typical example, the person you are searching for was born in Poland, may
have moved around in Russia and was then possibly sent to an unknown
concentration camp.

4) If Baltimore has a question about any of the information you filled in,
i.e., they can find no town in Poland that matches the one you named, they
will communicate with your local office who will call or write to you in
order to get more accurate information >from you.

5) In the above example, after having the forms translated into Polish,
Russian and German -- Baltimore will forward your request to the National
Office of the Polish Red Cross in Warsaw, the National Office of the Russian
Red Cross in Moscow, and the Arolson Archives of Concentration Camp Documents
in Germany.

6) According to the ICRC (International Committee of the Red Cross) mandate,
the Polish and Russian Red Cross National Offices will then open their own
files before forwarding your request to the local Red Cross office(s) in
every place you mentioned that your relative might have lived or even passed
through.

7) Local volunteers in all of these offices will then begin the incredible
time consuming task of going through 60+ year old HAND WRITTEN sometimes
crumbling paper records looking for your relative. (None of this has been
computerized). As soon as any bit of information is discovered, it is routed
back through the Baltimore office to your local office and then on to you.

9) The bad news is that in approximately 35% of the requests, NO records are
ever found.

9) The good news is that Baltimore NEVER closes your case, and if new
information is discovered 10 years after you asked for it, it will still be
sent to you. In fact, when you think that 65% of the requests for
information receive some sort of response, it is truly amazing.

As you can see, the process is cumbersome and overwhelming. In addition to
all of the genealogists who are looking for their family history, there are
literally thousands who are looking for a date to say kaddish for a parent --
and many more who are looking for their self documentation in order to apply
for slave labor and property reparations.

How long does it take? In the best of cases, a year or two, more often three
to five years. I just received records >from Bosnia for someone who had
requested a search in 1991, when the war interrupted the search When it was
over, the Bosnian Red Cross continued to look and found our inquirer's family
records.

You are right that It would be totally useless for anyone else to tell you
how long their search took -- since each set of facts are individual. It
also depends on whether the local European office has a two day/week
volunteer or a full time staff of 10!

One thing is VERY important. If you move or change your phone number and
don't update the information with your local office, you stand a good chance
of never receiving any of the information!

So, don't give up. Keep in touch. If the records are there, they'll find
them.

Linda Greenman

Researching GREENMAN/RESNICK/RUSHEVSKY/RUSH/SHERETSHEVSKY/
SHERRY >from Antopol, NY and Alabama.
RAFALOWSKI/RAFF/FISHBEIN >from Miedzyzrec/Bialystok and NY.
PLOCIENKO/CALECKI/HERMAN/KLUGER >from Sniadowo/Radzilow/Zambrow and NY, Paris,
Johannesburg.
GREENBERG/COHEN >from Rochester, NY. WEISS >from Mexico City.


BOOK CITE: History of Jews in Germany (The Pity of it All - Elon) #germany

MBernet@...
 

The Pity of it All: A History of Jews in Germany, 1743-1933 by Amos Elon.
Metropolitan Books. 464 pp. $30

has been widely praised by reviewers. I've put it on my must-buy list

Michael Bernet Suburban NYC mbernet@aol.com

MODERATOR NOTE: I've been reading it. The reviewers are right (in my
opinion).


Re: BRONSTEIN family. Cumingke? #romania

Bernie Levy <Bernie-Levy@...>
 

I wonder why the moderator didn't also mention the Shtetl-Seeker at
http://www.jewishgen.org/ShtetlSeeker .

In any case using JGFF, nothing turns up spelled Cumingke and nothing
resembling it in Romania. However there are lots of variations in the
Ukraine, mostly spelled Kamenka or Kamencha. In fact, there is one
researcher listed for Bronstein in Kamencha, Ukraine.

Shtetl-Seeker turns up many more variations of spellings in many
countries including Romania but many more in Ukraine.

Note that these two sources try to keep current names of towns and their
location within current borders. When in doubt or an initial search
turns up nothing, try using a Soundex search and/or try specifying "Any
Country"

Bernie Levy
Stamford, CT

Researching:
KAUDERER, BURG, ALTMAN - Bukowina area in Ukraine, e.g. Beregomet, Migovo
LEVY, POSMONTIER - Biezun (?), Poland
ACKERMAN - Kretinga, Lithuania
DREBIN/DREBEN - Lithuania; Poltava, Ukraine

On 12/19/2002 7:43 PM Winton Pitcoff wrote

[snip]

Before he passed away, my grandfather, William BRONSTEIN, told me that
his father, Harry BRONSTEIN, came >from a town called Cumingke in
Romania. I have not been able to find any reference to this town. Did it
exist?

Similarly, any information about the BRONSTEIN family >from Cumingke,
Romania (came to the U.S. in the early 1900's) would be much
appreciated.

Thanks.

-- Winton Pitcoff
Northampton, MA, USA

MODERATOR NOTE: Don't forget to check the JGFF (www.jewishgen.org/jgff)
for your names/towns and enter your names too.


German SIG #Germany BOOK CITE: History of Jews in Germany (The Pity of it All - Elon) #germany

MBernet@...
 

The Pity of it All: A History of Jews in Germany, 1743-1933 by Amos Elon.
Metropolitan Books. 464 pp. $30

has been widely praised by reviewers. I've put it on my must-buy list

Michael Bernet Suburban NYC mbernet@aol.com

MODERATOR NOTE: I've been reading it. The reviewers are right (in my
opinion).


Romania SIG #Romania Re: BRONSTEIN family. Cumingke? #romania

Bernie Levy <Bernie-Levy@...>
 

I wonder why the moderator didn't also mention the Shtetl-Seeker at
http://www.jewishgen.org/ShtetlSeeker .

In any case using JGFF, nothing turns up spelled Cumingke and nothing
resembling it in Romania. However there are lots of variations in the
Ukraine, mostly spelled Kamenka or Kamencha. In fact, there is one
researcher listed for Bronstein in Kamencha, Ukraine.

Shtetl-Seeker turns up many more variations of spellings in many
countries including Romania but many more in Ukraine.

Note that these two sources try to keep current names of towns and their
location within current borders. When in doubt or an initial search
turns up nothing, try using a Soundex search and/or try specifying "Any
Country"

Bernie Levy
Stamford, CT

Researching:
KAUDERER, BURG, ALTMAN - Bukowina area in Ukraine, e.g. Beregomet, Migovo
LEVY, POSMONTIER - Biezun (?), Poland
ACKERMAN - Kretinga, Lithuania
DREBIN/DREBEN - Lithuania; Poltava, Ukraine

On 12/19/2002 7:43 PM Winton Pitcoff wrote

[snip]

Before he passed away, my grandfather, William BRONSTEIN, told me that
his father, Harry BRONSTEIN, came >from a town called Cumingke in
Romania. I have not been able to find any reference to this town. Did it
exist?

Similarly, any information about the BRONSTEIN family >from Cumingke,
Romania (came to the U.S. in the early 1900's) would be much
appreciated.

Thanks.

-- Winton Pitcoff
Northampton, MA, USA

MODERATOR NOTE: Don't forget to check the JGFF (www.jewishgen.org/jgff)
for your names/towns and enter your names too.


Disraeli on his Jewish ancestry, in Parliament #general

MBernet@...
 

For an article I'm writing on Jewish genealogy, I seek the correct text
for a statement made by Benjamin Disraeli in the House of Commons.

Here is the rough paraphrase:

"While the ancestors of right honorable gentleman for Upper Ordure were
walking around dressed in pelts and woad, my ancestors were signing psalms
to the Lord in the temple of King Solomon."

Does anyone have the correct text?

Thanks

Michael Bernet New York mBernet@aol.com.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Disraeli on his Jewish ancestry, in Parliament #general

MBernet@...
 

For an article I'm writing on Jewish genealogy, I seek the correct text
for a statement made by Benjamin Disraeli in the House of Commons.

Here is the rough paraphrase:

"While the ancestors of right honorable gentleman for Upper Ordure were
walking around dressed in pelts and woad, my ancestors were signing psalms
to the Lord in the temple of King Solomon."

Does anyone have the correct text?

Thanks

Michael Bernet New York mBernet@aol.com.


Re: Red Cross Holocaust Tracing Center #belarus

LindaCGreenman@...
 

ebf2001@comcast.net writes:

<< I'd be curious to learn what other people have experienced in terms of
length of time for the search and results.
>>

Although Evan Fishman requested a private response, as the volunteer in
charge of the Holocaust Tracing Program in the Greater New York Red Cross,
it might be helpful to other genners if I posted this to the whole group.

When anyone in the United States initiates a request \tfor a search for
relatives presumed lost in WWII -- there is a strict international
protocol that must be followed:

1) You submit your request (form #1609) to your local Red Cross Holocaust
tracing office.

2) They review it to ensure that all the mandated information has been
filled out and sign off on it.

3) It is sent to the National WWII Tracing Office in Baltimore where the
volunteers there will open a file and make a determination, based on what
you have written, which European Red Cross office(s) should receive it. A
typical example, the person you are searching for was born in Poland, may
have moved around in Russia and was then possibly sent to an unknown
concentration camp.

4) If Baltimore has a question about any of the information you filled in,
i.e., they can find no town in Poland that matches the one you named, they
will communicate with your local office who will call or write to you in
order to get more accurate information >from you.

5) In the above example, after having the forms translated into Polish,
Russian and German -- Baltimore will forward your request to the National
Office of the Polish Red Cross in Warsaw, the National Office of the
Russian Red Cross in Moscow, and the Arolson Archives of Concentration
Camp Documents in Germany.

6) According to the ICRC (International Committee of the Red Cross)
mandate, the Polish and Russian Red Cross National Offices will then open
their own files before forwarding your request to the local Red Cross
office(s) in every place you mentioned that your relative might have lived
or even passed through.

7) Local volunteers in all of these offices will then begin the incredible
time consuming task of going through 60+ year old *hand written* sometimes
crumbling paper records looking for your relative. (None of this has been
computerized). As soon as any bit of information is discovered, it is
routed back through the Baltimore office to your local office and then on
to you.

9) The bad news is that in approximately 35% of the requests, No records
are ever found.

9) The good news is that Baltimore *never* closes your case, and if new
information is discovered 10 years after you asked for it, it will still
be sent to you. In fact, when you think that 65% of the requests for
information receive some sort of response, it is truly amazing.

As you can see, the process is cumbersome and overwhelming. In addition
to all of the genealogists who are looking for their family history, there
are literally thousands who are looking for a date to say kaddish for a
parent -- and many more who are looking for their self documentation in
order to apply for slave labor and property reparations.

How long does it take? In the best of cases, a year or two, more often
three to five years. I just received records >from Bosnia for someone who
had requested a search in 1991, when the war interrupted the search When
it was over, the Bosnian Red Cross continued to look and found our
inquirer's family records.

You are right that It would be totally useless for anyone else to tell you
how long their search took -- since each set of facts are individual. It
also depends on whether the local European office has a two day/week
volunteer or a full time staff of 10!

One thing is *very* important. If you move or change your phone number
and don't update the information with your local office, you stand a good
chance of never receiving any of the information!

So, don't give up. Keep in touch. If the records are there, they'll find
them.

Linda Greenman

Researching GREENMAN/RESNICK/RUSHEVSKY/RUSH/SHERETSHEVSKY/
SHERRY >from Antopol, NY and Alabama.
RAFALOWSKI/RAFF/FISHBEIN >from Miedzyzrec/Bialystok and NY.
PLOCIENKO/CALECKI/HERMAN/KLUGER >from Sniadowo/Radzilow/Zambrow and NY,
Paris, Johannesburg.
GREENBERG/COHEN >from Rochester, NY. WEISS >from Mexico City.


Chaim WEITZMANN #general

PAZ <PAZ@...>
 

I'm writing on behalf of a friend who is researching the family of his
mother, Mindla Weitzmann. She was born around 1878, but it is not known
where. She immigrated to America sometime before the First World War.
Family lore has it that she was related to Dr. Chaim Weitzmann, first
president of Israel. He would like to know if anyone out there knows of a
family tree for Chaim Weitzmann.

Peter Zack
Toronto, Canada

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately


Translation of Hebrew Tombstone Inscription #general

Jerry Schneider <jschneider@...>
 

I need help >from anyone in the 'genner community to translate the Hebrew
inscription on my great grandfather's gravesite in Beth El in NJ. His
name was Abraham Harrison.

A photo of the inscription is on ViewMate, VM2015, at the following url.

http://data.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/viewmateview.asp?key=2015

Thank you. Please respond privately.

- jerry


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Red Cross Holocaust Tracing Center #general

LindaCGreenman@...
 

ebf2001@comcast.net writes:

<< I'd be curious to learn what other people have experienced in terms of
length of time for the search and results.
>>

Although Evan Fishman requested a private response, as the volunteer in
charge of the Holocaust Tracing Program in the Greater New York Red Cross,
it might be helpful to other genners if I posted this to the whole group.

When anyone in the United States initiates a request \tfor a search for
relatives presumed lost in WWII -- there is a strict international
protocol that must be followed:

1) You submit your request (form #1609) to your local Red Cross Holocaust
tracing office.

2) They review it to ensure that all the mandated information has been
filled out and sign off on it.

3) It is sent to the National WWII Tracing Office in Baltimore where the
volunteers there will open a file and make a determination, based on what
you have written, which European Red Cross office(s) should receive it. A
typical example, the person you are searching for was born in Poland, may
have moved around in Russia and was then possibly sent to an unknown
concentration camp.

4) If Baltimore has a question about any of the information you filled in,
i.e., they can find no town in Poland that matches the one you named, they
will communicate with your local office who will call or write to you in
order to get more accurate information >from you.

5) In the above example, after having the forms translated into Polish,
Russian and German -- Baltimore will forward your request to the National
Office of the Polish Red Cross in Warsaw, the National Office of the
Russian Red Cross in Moscow, and the Arolson Archives of Concentration
Camp Documents in Germany.

6) According to the ICRC (International Committee of the Red Cross)
mandate, the Polish and Russian Red Cross National Offices will then open
their own files before forwarding your request to the local Red Cross
office(s) in every place you mentioned that your relative might have lived
or even passed through.

7) Local volunteers in all of these offices will then begin the incredible
time consuming task of going through 60+ year old *hand written* sometimes
crumbling paper records looking for your relative. (None of this has been
computerized). As soon as any bit of information is discovered, it is
routed back through the Baltimore office to your local office and then on
to you.

9) The bad news is that in approximately 35% of the requests, No records
are ever found.

9) The good news is that Baltimore *never* closes your case, and if new
information is discovered 10 years after you asked for it, it will still
be sent to you. In fact, when you think that 65% of the requests for
information receive some sort of response, it is truly amazing.

As you can see, the process is cumbersome and overwhelming. In addition
to all of the genealogists who are looking for their family history, there
are literally thousands who are looking for a date to say kaddish for a
parent -- and many more who are looking for their self documentation in
order to apply for slave labor and property reparations.

How long does it take? In the best of cases, a year or two, more often
three to five years. I just received records >from Bosnia for someone who
had requested a search in 1991, when the war interrupted the search When
it was over, the Bosnian Red Cross continued to look and found our
inquirer's family records.

You are right that It would be totally useless for anyone else to tell you
how long their search took -- since each set of facts are individual. It
also depends on whether the local European office has a two day/week
volunteer or a full time staff of 10!

One thing is *very* important. If you move or change your phone number
and don't update the information with your local office, you stand a good
chance of never receiving any of the information!

So, don't give up. Keep in touch. If the records are there, they'll find
them.

Linda Greenman

Researching GREENMAN/RESNICK/RUSHEVSKY/RUSH/SHERETSHEVSKY/
SHERRY >from Antopol, NY and Alabama.
RAFALOWSKI/RAFF/FISHBEIN >from Miedzyzrec/Bialystok and NY.
PLOCIENKO/CALECKI/HERMAN/KLUGER >from Sniadowo/Radzilow/Zambrow and NY,
Paris, Johannesburg.
GREENBERG/COHEN >from Rochester, NY. WEISS >from Mexico City.