Date   

Re: Hertzberg-Cohen Wedding #latvia

Barry Graham <barry@...>
 

Dane HERZBERG (male) born in Bauske had a son Leib HERZBERG born in 1883 in
the same place, who married Chaie FALKSON who was born in 1880. They were
married on March 5th 1915 in Libau, Latvia. I do not have any record of
their descendants, unfortunately I have made no connection with any of their
descendants, I don't even know where they moved to.

Also Ahron FALKSON, born 1825 in Sassmacken, Latvia, married Liebe HERZBERG
and I am in touch with this part of the family, living in the USA and South
Africa. I do not know if Liebe was related to Leib and Dane.

Elias HERZBERG (again I do not know if he was connected to the other
HERZBERGs) married Liebe FALKSON who was born in 1856. They were married in
Tuckum, Latvia on April 19th 1877, and again, unfortunately, I have no
knowledge of what happened to them.

Barry Graham
Monsey, NY, USA
Researching (among others) HERZBERG, BLUMENTHAL, FALKSON


Latvia SIG #Latvia RE: Hertzberg-Cohen Wedding #latvia

Barry Graham <barry@...>
 

Dane HERZBERG (male) born in Bauske had a son Leib HERZBERG born in 1883 in
the same place, who married Chaie FALKSON who was born in 1880. They were
married on March 5th 1915 in Libau, Latvia. I do not have any record of
their descendants, unfortunately I have made no connection with any of their
descendants, I don't even know where they moved to.

Also Ahron FALKSON, born 1825 in Sassmacken, Latvia, married Liebe HERZBERG
and I am in touch with this part of the family, living in the USA and South
Africa. I do not know if Liebe was related to Leib and Dane.

Elias HERZBERG (again I do not know if he was connected to the other
HERZBERGs) married Liebe FALKSON who was born in 1856. They were married in
Tuckum, Latvia on April 19th 1877, and again, unfortunately, I have no
knowledge of what happened to them.

Barry Graham
Monsey, NY, USA
Researching (among others) HERZBERG, BLUMENTHAL, FALKSON


Re: Unreliability of death-related documents #general

David Edelman <pappapeach43@...>
 

Dear Roberta, and all others;

Even if the information was supplied by the named individual themselves,
does not mean the information is nescerary correct either.
For one of my grandfathers, on his marrage certificate (when he was
obviouslly still very much alive), it shows he was >from Greece. On his
death certificate, which he had nothing to do with, it shows him as being
Russian. Both the same person, and both with the same incorrect name!

So, how do I prove, once I get his birth record >from Poland, that this is
in fact the same person?! All that I have is one letter that his son (my
uncle) wrote me, telling me about the name switch. Remember, many of us
have ancesters, especially the males, who were fleeing the old country,
and would say anything once here just to get in. No one here would know,
so why not?

I may never learn why his marrage certificate (issued in New York) says he
is >from Greece, unless he went there first before coming here. Some
history, I guess, just get burried with the history maker, which is what
is great about this, trying to solve those kinds of puzzles.

David Edelman
San Francisco.
Researching:
EDELMAN; DUNN; STEIN; FEINSTEIN; ROSENBERG: Latvia.
FREIDENBER: Poland
ALLEN; London.

----Original Message Follows----
From: Roberta Sheps <roberta.sheps@ntlworld.com>
Reply-To: Roberta Sheps <roberta.sheps@ntlworld.com>
To: "JewishGen Discussion Group" <jewishgen@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Subject: Unreliability of death-related documents
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 2003 16:37:29 +0000

Dear Friends,

Having just lost an aunt in Canada (I being in England) I have encountered
a perfect example of how and why death-related documents should always be
treated with caution.

I phoned my aunt's son in Vancouver and offered my sympathy. After we
talked for a while I asked if, when he was going through her papers, he
found anything relating to our grandparents' emigration, he would send
me a copy. At this point he realised that I might know more about our
grandparents than he did and asked if I knew where they were born, as he
had to provide this information for his mother's death certificate. (As
an aside, can anybody in BC tell me whether or not this is correct?
I've never heard of the birthplace of the deceased's parents being
required for a death certificate.)

I gave him the information, after which he told me that he had already
given information to the relevant official, but that he had said that
both of them had been born in the Ukraine. This was incorrect, as my
grandmother was born near Vilnius. He said he'd call them to correct
the error, if it wasn't too late.

So, if he doesn't correct it, sometime in the future, some eager
genealogist in the family, who will not realise that I am the source and
font of all knowledge, may order my aunt's death certificate, read the
incorrect entry, and perpetuate the error.

Beware: two generations on, official in a hurry, informant ignorant of
the facts and in a distressed state, result incorrect official document.

Roberta Sheps
Colchester, England (born in Winnipeg, Canada)
Searching:
COHEN, KLAIMON, GROSSMAN, SPIVAK, PORTIGAL: Talna/Kiev (Ukraine);
BELOVITSKY(I), BELOV/BELOFF/BELL: (Popishok/Popiskes), Lithuania/
Montreal; YAFFE: Wiliez, nr Disna, Vilna Gubernia/ Winnipeg/ Montreal/
North Dakota; SHEPS, KRASNOW AND POTASHNIKOW: Odessa area


Re: Unreliability of death-related documents #general

hennynow
 

Roberta Sheps was surprised that the birthplace of a decedent's parents
was shown on a death certificate. I can tell her and all interested
Genners that the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in the United States shows
the following queries on its standard certificate of death (at least in my
father-in-law's document in 1948):

#13. Name of Father
#14. Birthplace of Father (City).......(State or country)........
#15. Maiden name of Mother
#16. Birthplace of Mother (City)......(State or country)........

However, my father's New York City, New York, USA, 1962 death certificate
only asks for the name of the father of the decedent and the maiden name
of the mother of the decedent.

For those JewishGenners not resident in the United States of America, let
me point out that vital records are kept by the governments of the fifty
states, not by the federal government. This is why one finds different
requirements.

And, yes, Roberta, I also have found many inaccuracies or omissions
regarding family members in official death certificates.

Henny
Henriette Moed Roth
Los Angeles, California
hennynow@pacbell.net


Re: Dortmund death certificates #general

Stephen G. Esrati <stevsta@...>
 

Anita Springer wrote:

Direct-line descendants can get a copy of a death certificate >from Germany
by writing to the town Standesamt for years after 1874. Copies cost 7 EU
each and they take cash. I have gotten Euros >from my local bank. You can
find the address for a town hall (standesamt) in Germany by looking in the
on-line German phone book, www.teleauskunft.de. Many towns also have
websites. It would be something like www.dortmund.de

Anita Springer, Boston

MODERATOR NOTE: That is indeed the official website of the city of
Dortmund.

I have found the Dortmund registry office (Standesamt) extremely helpful
in matters genealogical. My father was born in Dortmund and I sought
information about his parents, Alwin HIRSCH and Clara GOTTSCHALK HIRSCH.

Frau Kappmeyer wrote me and gave my grandparents' marriage date, their
birth dates, and the names of their parents (Julie GOTTSCHALK, nee
LEWIN and the merchant Jakob GOTTSCHALK).

She then added the date and place of birth of Julie GOTTSCHALK. She said
that up to 1905 her parents (Simon and Buenchen LEWIN) still lived in
Dortmund and no date of death could be ascertained for either of them.

She expanded on this by saying that Julie was Jakob's second wife,
referring to the marriage to Golda OSTER but said the date of marriage
could not be ascertained.

And on and on. It was a wonderful addition to my family tree.

Stephen G. Esrati
Searching for Alwin HIRSCH (Berlin and Dortmund) and Max Hirsch (Berlin)


Photos from the past - a new site #general

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

This is an interesting site:
Photographs >from the Past
http://photographsfromthepast.com/

It functions a bit like ViewMate but is fully dedicated to feature photos
to be identified. The people shown in these photographs are mysteries to
those who have contributed them to the site. Maybe a relative you were not
aware about

Enjoy
Tom Venetianer


Best way to get Naturalization & Military Discharge Papers? #general

Polina <polina-olsen@...>
 

Hi,

I found a few treasures today and wondered if someone could give me ideas
on where to get further information.

1. Where is the best place to get naturalization information for the
Southern District Court of New York?
The U.S. Certificate of Naturalization is dated Jan 17, 1911. I have a NYC
address, a name, and a few numbers but I'm not sure what the numbers mean.
The main number says 182102 and I can also see petition volume 27 page 91.
There is also volume <can't read> 77763 page 2?

2. I also found military discharge papers >from WWI and wondered if I could
work back to military records and the original draft registration form.
Does anyone know where I'd write? The discharge papers say:

Headquarters Central Dept. Chicago, Ill
1st Lieutenant Maurice Jacob Silver
Medical Corp
April 20, 1919
Fort Levenworth, Kansas

Thank you very much for any help with this.

Best Regards,

Polina Olsen
Portland, Oregon
Polina-Olsen@attbi.com


WEXLER, Pearl #general

Alan Steinfeld <poohtoes@...>
 

Searching for relatives of Pearl WEXLER, born in New York City in 1925.

Alan Steinfeld
poohtoes@erols.com

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Unreliability of death-related documents #general

David Edelman <pappapeach43@...>
 

Dear Roberta, and all others;

Even if the information was supplied by the named individual themselves,
does not mean the information is nescerary correct either.
For one of my grandfathers, on his marrage certificate (when he was
obviouslly still very much alive), it shows he was >from Greece. On his
death certificate, which he had nothing to do with, it shows him as being
Russian. Both the same person, and both with the same incorrect name!

So, how do I prove, once I get his birth record >from Poland, that this is
in fact the same person?! All that I have is one letter that his son (my
uncle) wrote me, telling me about the name switch. Remember, many of us
have ancesters, especially the males, who were fleeing the old country,
and would say anything once here just to get in. No one here would know,
so why not?

I may never learn why his marrage certificate (issued in New York) says he
is >from Greece, unless he went there first before coming here. Some
history, I guess, just get burried with the history maker, which is what
is great about this, trying to solve those kinds of puzzles.

David Edelman
San Francisco.
Researching:
EDELMAN; DUNN; STEIN; FEINSTEIN; ROSENBERG: Latvia.
FREIDENBER: Poland
ALLEN; London.

----Original Message Follows----
From: Roberta Sheps <roberta.sheps@ntlworld.com>
Reply-To: Roberta Sheps <roberta.sheps@ntlworld.com>
To: "JewishGen Discussion Group" <jewishgen@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Subject: Unreliability of death-related documents
Date: Tue, 21 Jan 2003 16:37:29 +0000

Dear Friends,

Having just lost an aunt in Canada (I being in England) I have encountered
a perfect example of how and why death-related documents should always be
treated with caution.

I phoned my aunt's son in Vancouver and offered my sympathy. After we
talked for a while I asked if, when he was going through her papers, he
found anything relating to our grandparents' emigration, he would send
me a copy. At this point he realised that I might know more about our
grandparents than he did and asked if I knew where they were born, as he
had to provide this information for his mother's death certificate. (As
an aside, can anybody in BC tell me whether or not this is correct?
I've never heard of the birthplace of the deceased's parents being
required for a death certificate.)

I gave him the information, after which he told me that he had already
given information to the relevant official, but that he had said that
both of them had been born in the Ukraine. This was incorrect, as my
grandmother was born near Vilnius. He said he'd call them to correct
the error, if it wasn't too late.

So, if he doesn't correct it, sometime in the future, some eager
genealogist in the family, who will not realise that I am the source and
font of all knowledge, may order my aunt's death certificate, read the
incorrect entry, and perpetuate the error.

Beware: two generations on, official in a hurry, informant ignorant of
the facts and in a distressed state, result incorrect official document.

Roberta Sheps
Colchester, England (born in Winnipeg, Canada)
Searching:
COHEN, KLAIMON, GROSSMAN, SPIVAK, PORTIGAL: Talna/Kiev (Ukraine);
BELOVITSKY(I), BELOV/BELOFF/BELL: (Popishok/Popiskes), Lithuania/
Montreal; YAFFE: Wiliez, nr Disna, Vilna Gubernia/ Winnipeg/ Montreal/
North Dakota; SHEPS, KRASNOW AND POTASHNIKOW: Odessa area


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Unreliability of death-related documents #general

hennynow
 

Roberta Sheps was surprised that the birthplace of a decedent's parents
was shown on a death certificate. I can tell her and all interested
Genners that the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in the United States shows
the following queries on its standard certificate of death (at least in my
father-in-law's document in 1948):

#13. Name of Father
#14. Birthplace of Father (City).......(State or country)........
#15. Maiden name of Mother
#16. Birthplace of Mother (City)......(State or country)........

However, my father's New York City, New York, USA, 1962 death certificate
only asks for the name of the father of the decedent and the maiden name
of the mother of the decedent.

For those JewishGenners not resident in the United States of America, let
me point out that vital records are kept by the governments of the fifty
states, not by the federal government. This is why one finds different
requirements.

And, yes, Roberta, I also have found many inaccuracies or omissions
regarding family members in official death certificates.

Henny
Henriette Moed Roth
Los Angeles, California
hennynow@pacbell.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Dortmund death certificates #general

Stephen G. Esrati <stevsta@...>
 

Anita Springer wrote:

Direct-line descendants can get a copy of a death certificate >from Germany
by writing to the town Standesamt for years after 1874. Copies cost 7 EU
each and they take cash. I have gotten Euros >from my local bank. You can
find the address for a town hall (standesamt) in Germany by looking in the
on-line German phone book, www.teleauskunft.de. Many towns also have
websites. It would be something like www.dortmund.de

Anita Springer, Boston

MODERATOR NOTE: That is indeed the official website of the city of
Dortmund.

I have found the Dortmund registry office (Standesamt) extremely helpful
in matters genealogical. My father was born in Dortmund and I sought
information about his parents, Alwin HIRSCH and Clara GOTTSCHALK HIRSCH.

Frau Kappmeyer wrote me and gave my grandparents' marriage date, their
birth dates, and the names of their parents (Julie GOTTSCHALK, nee
LEWIN and the merchant Jakob GOTTSCHALK).

She then added the date and place of birth of Julie GOTTSCHALK. She said
that up to 1905 her parents (Simon and Buenchen LEWIN) still lived in
Dortmund and no date of death could be ascertained for either of them.

She expanded on this by saying that Julie was Jakob's second wife,
referring to the marriage to Golda OSTER but said the date of marriage
could not be ascertained.

And on and on. It was a wonderful addition to my family tree.

Stephen G. Esrati
Searching for Alwin HIRSCH (Berlin and Dortmund) and Max Hirsch (Berlin)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Photos from the past - a new site #general

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

This is an interesting site:
Photographs >from the Past
http://photographsfromthepast.com/

It functions a bit like ViewMate but is fully dedicated to feature photos
to be identified. The people shown in these photographs are mysteries to
those who have contributed them to the site. Maybe a relative you were not
aware about

Enjoy
Tom Venetianer


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Best way to get Naturalization & Military Discharge Papers? #general

Polina <polina-olsen@...>
 

Hi,

I found a few treasures today and wondered if someone could give me ideas
on where to get further information.

1. Where is the best place to get naturalization information for the
Southern District Court of New York?
The U.S. Certificate of Naturalization is dated Jan 17, 1911. I have a NYC
address, a name, and a few numbers but I'm not sure what the numbers mean.
The main number says 182102 and I can also see petition volume 27 page 91.
There is also volume <can't read> 77763 page 2?

2. I also found military discharge papers >from WWI and wondered if I could
work back to military records and the original draft registration form.
Does anyone know where I'd write? The discharge papers say:

Headquarters Central Dept. Chicago, Ill
1st Lieutenant Maurice Jacob Silver
Medical Corp
April 20, 1919
Fort Levenworth, Kansas

Thank you very much for any help with this.

Best Regards,

Polina Olsen
Portland, Oregon
Polina-Olsen@attbi.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen WEXLER, Pearl #general

Alan Steinfeld <poohtoes@...>
 

Searching for relatives of Pearl WEXLER, born in New York City in 1925.

Alan Steinfeld
poohtoes@erols.com

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately.


Gubernskie Vedemosti for Lomza and Plock Gub. #ciechanow #poland

Marty Meyers <meyers01@...>
 

Hi folks,

The Gubernskie Vedomosti were pre-revolutionary local governmental
newspapers of the Russian empire.

It has been very interesting to see the Duma voting lists for Warsaw Gub posted
and available. I found two relatives living in Pultusk at the time of the
Duma voting.
I also see that other SIGs have been doing the same by acquiring the lists
for their
particular Gub of interest.

An introduction can be found at http://www.jewishgen.org/belarus/duma.htm
which is a
Duma Voters List FAQ and a sample page can be seen at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Latvia/DumaJakobstadt.gif

The Vedemosti (regional newspapers) are particularly useful since the Duma
lists include patrynomics. Two of my open research questions are easily
resolved if I find the patrynomic for two men in my family tree, both of
whom were
businessmen in the Makow area and would presumably be eligible to
vote. The Vedemosti offer an
opportunity to resolve these questions sooner than waiting for their death
records to
be available via PSA in 5 or 10 years.
(Yes, I could write the local offices but this seems promising and more fun).

My town research in the area is split across two other Gubernia as well as
Warsaw,
mainly Lomza Gub and Plock Gub, which cover 'my' towns of Przasnysz,
Chorzele, Makow, Ciechanow
and Karniewo. So naturally, I'm interested in finding out how we can get
the Duma voting
lists for Lomza and Plock Gub done with comparable results to those
beautifully obtained by
Ada Holtzman.
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/WarszawaDuma.htm

According to the publisher of these microfilms, both Lomza and Plock Gub
Vedemosti are
now available along with many other Gub. which were not available previously.

A list of the Vedemosti available on microfilm as of Dec 2002 can be found at
http://www.nross.com/slavic/ss.htm
and there are 31 reels of film for Lomza Gub. (1867-1915)
and 29 for Plock Gub. (1872-1915)

A couple of key questions:

1. how do we determine what libraries may have these films? (they are not
at NYPL or Lib of Congress)
2. if they are not available, it seems not too expensive to buy the
individual films at $120/roll
assuming we can identify the few rolls that contain the duma lists.
3. how can we determine which roll(s) contains the duma lists? should we
assume the same
publication date as the Warsaw Duma list (approx. 10 July 1907 for the 1907
Duma)? I guess
that if we are lucky, each of the voting years will be contained on a
single reel of film.
4. how about Duma votes other than the year of 1907? are 1906 and 1912
equally valuable?

Hopefully we'll find these in an accessible library somewhere, but if not,
I'll agree to throw in the first $120 once we figure out which films we
need to order.

Who else wants to join this effort?

Or maybe someone can tell me it is already underway by a
team of JRI-Poland experts somewhere and they just weren't telling us yet
until it is completed?

Marty Meyers
Montclair, NJ

researching:
BORDOWITZ >from Przasnysz/Mlawa/Ciechanow/Makow/Pultusk
ZYLBERMAN/SILVERMAN >from Przasnysz/Chorzele
MEYEROWITZ/POROSHKIN >from Bolshaya Berestovitsa (Belarus)
KIRSHNER/SIDMAN/BAILIN >from Slavuta/Volhynia/Ukraine
LANDSMAN/FINBERG/PEANEN >from Vilna
ZELMANOVICH/ROZENSZTEIN >from Poland (Przasnysz area?)


#Ciechanow #Poland Gubernskie Vedemosti for Lomza and Plock Gub. #poland #ciechanow

Marty Meyers <meyers01@...>
 

Hi folks,

The Gubernskie Vedomosti were pre-revolutionary local governmental
newspapers of the Russian empire.

It has been very interesting to see the Duma voting lists for Warsaw Gub posted
and available. I found two relatives living in Pultusk at the time of the
Duma voting.
I also see that other SIGs have been doing the same by acquiring the lists
for their
particular Gub of interest.

An introduction can be found at http://www.jewishgen.org/belarus/duma.htm
which is a
Duma Voters List FAQ and a sample page can be seen at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Latvia/DumaJakobstadt.gif

The Vedemosti (regional newspapers) are particularly useful since the Duma
lists include patrynomics. Two of my open research questions are easily
resolved if I find the patrynomic for two men in my family tree, both of
whom were
businessmen in the Makow area and would presumably be eligible to
vote. The Vedemosti offer an
opportunity to resolve these questions sooner than waiting for their death
records to
be available via PSA in 5 or 10 years.
(Yes, I could write the local offices but this seems promising and more fun).

My town research in the area is split across two other Gubernia as well as
Warsaw,
mainly Lomza Gub and Plock Gub, which cover 'my' towns of Przasnysz,
Chorzele, Makow, Ciechanow
and Karniewo. So naturally, I'm interested in finding out how we can get
the Duma voting
lists for Lomza and Plock Gub done with comparable results to those
beautifully obtained by
Ada Holtzman.
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/WarszawaDuma.htm

According to the publisher of these microfilms, both Lomza and Plock Gub
Vedemosti are
now available along with many other Gub. which were not available previously.

A list of the Vedemosti available on microfilm as of Dec 2002 can be found at
http://www.nross.com/slavic/ss.htm
and there are 31 reels of film for Lomza Gub. (1867-1915)
and 29 for Plock Gub. (1872-1915)

A couple of key questions:

1. how do we determine what libraries may have these films? (they are not
at NYPL or Lib of Congress)
2. if they are not available, it seems not too expensive to buy the
individual films at $120/roll
assuming we can identify the few rolls that contain the duma lists.
3. how can we determine which roll(s) contains the duma lists? should we
assume the same
publication date as the Warsaw Duma list (approx. 10 July 1907 for the 1907
Duma)? I guess
that if we are lucky, each of the voting years will be contained on a
single reel of film.
4. how about Duma votes other than the year of 1907? are 1906 and 1912
equally valuable?

Hopefully we'll find these in an accessible library somewhere, but if not,
I'll agree to throw in the first $120 once we figure out which films we
need to order.

Who else wants to join this effort?

Or maybe someone can tell me it is already underway by a
team of JRI-Poland experts somewhere and they just weren't telling us yet
until it is completed?

Marty Meyers
Montclair, NJ

researching:
BORDOWITZ >from Przasnysz/Mlawa/Ciechanow/Makow/Pultusk
ZYLBERMAN/SILVERMAN >from Przasnysz/Chorzele
MEYEROWITZ/POROSHKIN >from Bolshaya Berestovitsa (Belarus)
KIRSHNER/SIDMAN/BAILIN >from Slavuta/Volhynia/Ukraine
LANDSMAN/FINBERG/PEANEN >from Vilna
ZELMANOVICH/ROZENSZTEIN >from Poland (Przasnysz area?)


GUREVITCH #belarus

Dennis Flavell <dennis@...>
 

Am researching surname GUREVITCH in Latvia c 1900 ; Belarus pre 1900 ;
England, Canada, USA, c 1900 to 1920 .

Also MARCUZE in Latvia pre 1904 and England post 1902 .

Best wishes .

Dennis FLAVELL ; Cambridgeshire - England .

MODERATOR NOTE: Be sure to search the JewishGen Family Finder
(www.jewishgen.org/jgff)for others searching the same towns/names
and also to enter your own names/towns.


Belarus SIG #Belarus GUREVITCH #belarus

Dennis Flavell <dennis@...>
 

Am researching surname GUREVITCH in Latvia c 1900 ; Belarus pre 1900 ;
England, Canada, USA, c 1900 to 1920 .

Also MARCUZE in Latvia pre 1904 and England post 1902 .

Best wishes .

Dennis FLAVELL ; Cambridgeshire - England .

MODERATOR NOTE: Be sure to search the JewishGen Family Finder
(www.jewishgen.org/jgff)for others searching the same towns/names
and also to enter your own names/towns.


Plans for a book on northern Bukovina #romania

Bruce Reisch <bir1@...>
 

In the January 2003 issue of the monthly published by the Bukowina
Jews World Union <http://www.bukovinajewsworldunion.org> is an
article about the formation of a northern Bukovina committee. I'd
like to pass along this information in case anyone can help.

Here is my summary of what was published:

At the general meeting of the Bukovina Jews World Union on 26
November 2002, a committee of northern Bukoviners was formed to
record the past history and save it for future generations. The
Committee will be concerned with the publication of a book of local
history and geography, derived >from contributions >from members and
historians.

The committee consists for the time being of three persons (Sidi
Gross, Reuben Faerber and Zvi Schai). It is interested in northern
Bukovina locations: Bayantz, Budinetz, Banila pe Siret, Banila pe
Ceremus, Berhomet, Brodina, Broscautz, Cernautzi, Cotzmani, Costesti,
Crasna-Ilisesti, Crasna-Putna, Cincau, Cires, Ciudin, Davidesti,
Doroshautz, Dintinetz, Gura-Putilei, Ispas, I'esti, Jadova,
Jordanesti, Lijeni, Mihova, Milia, Mariceni, Noua-Jadova, Ocna,
Putila, Petrautz, Putna, Plosca, Panca, Pardutzi-Noui, Restuatzia,
Sadagura, Strojinetz, Stanesti, Sergini, Seletin, Straja, Turcini,
Vicovul de Sus, Viznitz, and Zastavna. (These appear to be pre-WWII
Romanian (?) names for these towns, not the current Ukrainian names.)

Anyone with valuable documents and materials is asked to contact Mr.
Jula Weiner Vice-President of the Bukovina Jews World Union, who can
be reached at the Tel Aviv office (contact info on the web site
above) or via email <elibuko@netvision.net.il>.



Bruce Reisch
Geneva, New York
bir1@nysaes.cornell.edu


Romania SIG #Romania Plans for a book on northern Bukovina #romania

Bruce Reisch <bir1@...>
 

In the January 2003 issue of the monthly published by the Bukowina
Jews World Union <http://www.bukovinajewsworldunion.org> is an
article about the formation of a northern Bukovina committee. I'd
like to pass along this information in case anyone can help.

Here is my summary of what was published:

At the general meeting of the Bukovina Jews World Union on 26
November 2002, a committee of northern Bukoviners was formed to
record the past history and save it for future generations. The
Committee will be concerned with the publication of a book of local
history and geography, derived >from contributions >from members and
historians.

The committee consists for the time being of three persons (Sidi
Gross, Reuben Faerber and Zvi Schai). It is interested in northern
Bukovina locations: Bayantz, Budinetz, Banila pe Siret, Banila pe
Ceremus, Berhomet, Brodina, Broscautz, Cernautzi, Cotzmani, Costesti,
Crasna-Ilisesti, Crasna-Putna, Cincau, Cires, Ciudin, Davidesti,
Doroshautz, Dintinetz, Gura-Putilei, Ispas, I'esti, Jadova,
Jordanesti, Lijeni, Mihova, Milia, Mariceni, Noua-Jadova, Ocna,
Putila, Petrautz, Putna, Plosca, Panca, Pardutzi-Noui, Restuatzia,
Sadagura, Strojinetz, Stanesti, Sergini, Seletin, Straja, Turcini,
Vicovul de Sus, Viznitz, and Zastavna. (These appear to be pre-WWII
Romanian (?) names for these towns, not the current Ukrainian names.)

Anyone with valuable documents and materials is asked to contact Mr.
Jula Weiner Vice-President of the Bukovina Jews World Union, who can
be reached at the Tel Aviv office (contact info on the web site
above) or via email <elibuko@netvision.net.il>.



Bruce Reisch
Geneva, New York
bir1@nysaes.cornell.edu