Date   
Annual New Year Donor Appeal #germany

GerSig@...
 

Dear Friends:
As we prepare to celebrate the New Year please take a moment to consider
this:

JewishGen provides us with the vital source for our ongoing genealogical
research.

JewishGen is still one of the only free genealogical sites.

It is free to us, but not free to JewishGen who must bear the expense of
providing all the resources we use daily without a second thought. These
are costs that must be met to overcome the current financial shortfall at
JewishGen.

To continue as a public service institution, JewishGen has launched the
first Annual New Year Donor Appeal. The goal is to raise $300,000
to carry us through to the end of 2002 and to acquire the necessary
hardware and software applications for improved databases scheduled to
begin going online by October. There are two million records >from Yad
Vashem and other sources waiting to be made available to us!

The GerSig Forum, The GerSig Archives and the GerSig Website are all
available to us free of charge because JewishGen's "server" and "list server" computers provide these services. We are not required to pay
anything to JewishGen for this.

In the future, GerSig plans to expand our website and add new data bases
such as the Aufbau Name Index and others. These improvements will only
be possible if JewishGen receives more financial contributions.

The financial support of each and every one of us is needed if JewishGen
is to continue as the only free site for Jewish genealogical research.

Give what you can afford, be it $25, the suggested annual minimum, or $100
(or more) which will enroll you in the JGFFAlert. This is a system that
informs you via immediate e-mail if another researcher enters data into the
JGFF that has the potential of linking to your family names.

Please go now to:

<http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen-erosity/contribute.ihtml>

With your permission, your name will be listed on a special 2002 Annual
New Year Donor Appeal recognition site. We are asking that ALL our users
make a donation to the very best of their financial ability. Consider
scheduling a monthly deduction >from your credit card if this works best
for you.

On behalf of JewishGen and GerSig, our very best wishes
for a healthy, happy and peaceful New Year.

John Paul Lowens, New York GerSig Coordinator

German SIG #Germany Annual New Year Donor Appeal #germany

GerSig@...
 

Dear Friends:
As we prepare to celebrate the New Year please take a moment to consider
this:

JewishGen provides us with the vital source for our ongoing genealogical
research.

JewishGen is still one of the only free genealogical sites.

It is free to us, but not free to JewishGen who must bear the expense of
providing all the resources we use daily without a second thought. These
are costs that must be met to overcome the current financial shortfall at
JewishGen.

To continue as a public service institution, JewishGen has launched the
first Annual New Year Donor Appeal. The goal is to raise $300,000
to carry us through to the end of 2002 and to acquire the necessary
hardware and software applications for improved databases scheduled to
begin going online by October. There are two million records >from Yad
Vashem and other sources waiting to be made available to us!

The GerSig Forum, The GerSig Archives and the GerSig Website are all
available to us free of charge because JewishGen's "server" and "list server" computers provide these services. We are not required to pay
anything to JewishGen for this.

In the future, GerSig plans to expand our website and add new data bases
such as the Aufbau Name Index and others. These improvements will only
be possible if JewishGen receives more financial contributions.

The financial support of each and every one of us is needed if JewishGen
is to continue as the only free site for Jewish genealogical research.

Give what you can afford, be it $25, the suggested annual minimum, or $100
(or more) which will enroll you in the JGFFAlert. This is a system that
informs you via immediate e-mail if another researcher enters data into the
JGFF that has the potential of linking to your family names.

Please go now to:

<http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen-erosity/contribute.ihtml>

With your permission, your name will be listed on a special 2002 Annual
New Year Donor Appeal recognition site. We are asking that ALL our users
make a donation to the very best of their financial ability. Consider
scheduling a monthly deduction >from your credit card if this works best
for you.

On behalf of JewishGen and GerSig, our very best wishes
for a healthy, happy and peaceful New Year.

John Paul Lowens, New York GerSig Coordinator

Buchenwald Disk Identified #general

Tracy LeSage <tlesage@...>
 

Hello List Members,
As promised I am writing to update you on the Buchenwald Concentration
Camp Disk. Prof.Sigismund Kobe sent a copy of my message to the Buchenwald
Memorial Historical Department. He received a response, then translated it
for me. With his permission here is what they had to say.
I would like to thank everyone who assisted in helping to identify this
object. Now the next step is to see if Ican find any surviving members of
his family.
Thank you,
Tracy LeSage

The shown object is a cover of an urn of the local crematorium in Weimar.
There up to middle of 1940 the bodies of KZ Buchenwald were cremated.
The administration of the city sent the urns, after demand of relatives,
to the native cemetaries. In the case that there were no such demands or no
relatives could be found, the urns stayed in the administration of the
camp. In time they were poured out. At arrival of the US army, thousands
of urns or covers were found. It is not for the first time, that such a
cover was taken as a remembrance of the horrors that were seen.

Alexander Horvath ( the name on the cover is written wrong), born on 15 Jul
1911 in Oberwart (Burgenland/Austria) belonged to a group of Burgenland
gipsies, coming on 27 Sep 1939 >from the KZ (camp) Dachau to Buchenwald. He
had the prisoner number 33946. On 15 Jan 1940 he died in KZ Buchenwald
due to ' cardiac insufficiency '. On 16 Jan 1940 he was cremated (number
on the cover = registration number of the crematorium). An address of the
family dosn't exist. The families of the Burgenland gipsies were deported
during the years of Nazi power, many of them were killed.

Re: "modern cursive" Hebrew--German or Polish in origin? #general

MBernet@...
 

I received many, many responses to my inquiry about the origin of modern
"standard' Israeli cursive fonts. I should have given credit to everyone
who responded.

A number of people guided me to the Encyclopedia Judaica (which I had
already consulted, both CD-Rom *and* the print edition which contains all
the illustrations and plates, most of which are missing >from the CD).
Others directed me to the century-old Jewish Encyclopedia which has just
been put on-line.

from these two sources it appears that the Hebrew cursive script that is
taught in Israeli schools and has been adapted to linotype and electronic
fonts differs very little >from the fonts taught in Germany around 1900; I
have not found instances of Yiddish cursive fonts that deviated >from the
German model, and unless someone else can help us out, it looks like the
Yiddish script is no different >from that of Germany.

To all those who came up with ideas, many thanks. I especially want to
thank my old friend Tom Veterinarer of Brazil who was one of those who
provided leads to the two encyclopedias. And please, don't anyone get me
wrong; having checked out the information that was suggested by others has
in no way made me an expert or a mavin in the topic.

Michael Bernet,
New York

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Buchenwald Disk Identified #general

Tracy LeSage <tlesage@...>
 

Hello List Members,
As promised I am writing to update you on the Buchenwald Concentration
Camp Disk. Prof.Sigismund Kobe sent a copy of my message to the Buchenwald
Memorial Historical Department. He received a response, then translated it
for me. With his permission here is what they had to say.
I would like to thank everyone who assisted in helping to identify this
object. Now the next step is to see if Ican find any surviving members of
his family.
Thank you,
Tracy LeSage

The shown object is a cover of an urn of the local crematorium in Weimar.
There up to middle of 1940 the bodies of KZ Buchenwald were cremated.
The administration of the city sent the urns, after demand of relatives,
to the native cemetaries. In the case that there were no such demands or no
relatives could be found, the urns stayed in the administration of the
camp. In time they were poured out. At arrival of the US army, thousands
of urns or covers were found. It is not for the first time, that such a
cover was taken as a remembrance of the horrors that were seen.

Alexander Horvath ( the name on the cover is written wrong), born on 15 Jul
1911 in Oberwart (Burgenland/Austria) belonged to a group of Burgenland
gipsies, coming on 27 Sep 1939 >from the KZ (camp) Dachau to Buchenwald. He
had the prisoner number 33946. On 15 Jan 1940 he died in KZ Buchenwald
due to ' cardiac insufficiency '. On 16 Jan 1940 he was cremated (number
on the cover = registration number of the crematorium). An address of the
family dosn't exist. The families of the Burgenland gipsies were deported
during the years of Nazi power, many of them were killed.

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: "modern cursive" Hebrew--German or Polish in origin? #general

MBernet@...
 

I received many, many responses to my inquiry about the origin of modern
"standard' Israeli cursive fonts. I should have given credit to everyone
who responded.

A number of people guided me to the Encyclopedia Judaica (which I had
already consulted, both CD-Rom *and* the print edition which contains all
the illustrations and plates, most of which are missing >from the CD).
Others directed me to the century-old Jewish Encyclopedia which has just
been put on-line.

from these two sources it appears that the Hebrew cursive script that is
taught in Israeli schools and has been adapted to linotype and electronic
fonts differs very little >from the fonts taught in Germany around 1900; I
have not found instances of Yiddish cursive fonts that deviated >from the
German model, and unless someone else can help us out, it looks like the
Yiddish script is no different >from that of Germany.

To all those who came up with ideas, many thanks. I especially want to
thank my old friend Tom Veterinarer of Brazil who was one of those who
provided leads to the two encyclopedias. And please, don't anyone get me
wrong; having checked out the information that was suggested by others has
in no way made me an expert or a mavin in the topic.

Michael Bernet,
New York

Re: Landsmanshaft organization Query #general

Joan Parker <housemom@...>
 

In my home library is Nathan Ausubel's Pictorial History of the Jewish
People . I looked up landmanschaften, page 283, to be sure that what I
was going to write in reply to Linda was correct because I vaguely
remembered my gf saying it was a burial society. He was president of the
Plotzer Young Men's Independent Society in 1932. Maybe that is how the
various landmanschaftens were started, but according to the book it was
more than that.

Briefly, these were the extraordinary number of fraternal lodges of mutual
aid, benevolent, sick-and-benefit, burial and free loan societies formed
by the immigrants themselves. These societies also provided a sense of
belonging, a place to preserve their dignity when they fell on hard
times. It was also a way of preserving familiar ties to the Old World.
In 1900 there were over 1,000 societies in New York and by 1935 well over
3000.

There was more in the section, but this is just a basic explanation of why
families joined. Jerry is also correct when he wrote: >>I suspect that,
often, membership is a practical and social convenience. Nevertheless, the
intense emotional attachment to a former world must be present. >>

Joan Parker
Miami, FL
Searching: GOLDBERG and GOODSTEIN-Plock, Poland/Russia and Brooklyn, NY;
PINKUS and WINOGRAD-Odessa, Ukraine and Brooklyn, NY; GELFAND-Minsk and
Bronx, NY; YEHUDIS; KATZ, Bronx, NY

Jerome;
My great grandparents belonged to a landsmanshaft for those who were
fro Wysokie Mazowiekie. I do not know the name, my grandmother cannot
remember it. Only my g. grandfather was >from Wysokie Maz. My g.
grandmother was >from Zambrow. I find it odd that he joined, he left
Wysokie Maz., as a young child to live in London, England. I do not
know how much he would have remembered. Linda Altman
Genners:
I have often pondered the question of whether or not all members of a
landsmanshaft come >from the shtetl,or vicinity, upon which the
organization is based. How do we then account for so many of the
married couples being members? I suspect that, often, membership is
a practical and social convenience. Nevertheless, the intense
emotional attachment to a former world must be present. ...
Jerome Seligsohn

Re: EIDB success #general

Goulnik, Yves {PBC~Basel}
 

something always worth trying when you get the message
that the scanned manifest is not available is to press
the Reload/Refresh button. In my experience it often
works though I have no explanation for it, might be a
temporary glitch with the EIDB.

Yv

Y.Goulnik
http://goulniky.free.fr/

BOLTAX / BOLTAXA, Vinograd #general

zerakodesh@...
 

Hello
I am looking for a Usher BOLTAX or BOLTAXA. He lived in Vinograd.
Thanks for any help you can give. These people lived in Vinograd.
Sholom
Esther Feinstein Sackheim
Zerakodesh@...

Re: BALBERISHKI #general

Ann Rabinowitz <annrab@...>
 

I would like to know if anyone is familiar with the following family from
Wilkowiski (Vilkaviskis), Lithuania:

Sheine BALBERISHKI, born 1938, parents Zavil and Beile BALBERISHKI,
resident of the Kovner Yiddisher Kinderheim, Kestucio 34, Kaunas,
Lithuania. This was a children's orphanage.

I am not researching this family, per se, but only this child and her
parents and whether she survived. Therefore, I do not have any other
information on this family name.

Thank you,
Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@...

need Yiddish translation on Viewmate #general

Saul Goldstone <sgoldsto@...>
 

JewishGenners,

Please translate the yiddish on the back of a wedding picture.

The words can be found on the Viewmate website.

Simply click on the following address and it will take you directly to
VM1751 .... an image of the inscription.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/source/vm1751.html

I thank you in advance .... and please respond directly to me.

Saul Goldstone
Saratoga, California
sgoldsto@...

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Landsmanshaft organization Query #general

Joan Parker <housemom@...>
 

In my home library is Nathan Ausubel's Pictorial History of the Jewish
People . I looked up landmanschaften, page 283, to be sure that what I
was going to write in reply to Linda was correct because I vaguely
remembered my gf saying it was a burial society. He was president of the
Plotzer Young Men's Independent Society in 1932. Maybe that is how the
various landmanschaftens were started, but according to the book it was
more than that.

Briefly, these were the extraordinary number of fraternal lodges of mutual
aid, benevolent, sick-and-benefit, burial and free loan societies formed
by the immigrants themselves. These societies also provided a sense of
belonging, a place to preserve their dignity when they fell on hard
times. It was also a way of preserving familiar ties to the Old World.
In 1900 there were over 1,000 societies in New York and by 1935 well over
3000.

There was more in the section, but this is just a basic explanation of why
families joined. Jerry is also correct when he wrote: >>I suspect that,
often, membership is a practical and social convenience. Nevertheless, the
intense emotional attachment to a former world must be present. >>

Joan Parker
Miami, FL
Searching: GOLDBERG and GOODSTEIN-Plock, Poland/Russia and Brooklyn, NY;
PINKUS and WINOGRAD-Odessa, Ukraine and Brooklyn, NY; GELFAND-Minsk and
Bronx, NY; YEHUDIS; KATZ, Bronx, NY

Jerome;
My great grandparents belonged to a landsmanshaft for those who were
fro Wysokie Mazowiekie. I do not know the name, my grandmother cannot
remember it. Only my g. grandfather was >from Wysokie Maz. My g.
grandmother was >from Zambrow. I find it odd that he joined, he left
Wysokie Maz., as a young child to live in London, England. I do not
know how much he would have remembered. Linda Altman
Genners:
I have often pondered the question of whether or not all members of a
landsmanshaft come >from the shtetl,or vicinity, upon which the
organization is based. How do we then account for so many of the
married couples being members? I suspect that, often, membership is
a practical and social convenience. Nevertheless, the intense
emotional attachment to a former world must be present. ...
Jerome Seligsohn

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: EIDB success #general

Goulnik, Yves {PBC~Basel}
 

something always worth trying when you get the message
that the scanned manifest is not available is to press
the Reload/Refresh button. In my experience it often
works though I have no explanation for it, might be a
temporary glitch with the EIDB.

Yv

Y.Goulnik
http://goulniky.free.fr/

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen BOLTAX / BOLTAXA, Vinograd #general

zerakodesh@...
 

Hello
I am looking for a Usher BOLTAX or BOLTAXA. He lived in Vinograd.
Thanks for any help you can give. These people lived in Vinograd.
Sholom
Esther Feinstein Sackheim
Zerakodesh@...

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: BALBERISHKI #general

Ann Rabinowitz <annrab@...>
 

I would like to know if anyone is familiar with the following family from
Wilkowiski (Vilkaviskis), Lithuania:

Sheine BALBERISHKI, born 1938, parents Zavil and Beile BALBERISHKI,
resident of the Kovner Yiddisher Kinderheim, Kestucio 34, Kaunas,
Lithuania. This was a children's orphanage.

I am not researching this family, per se, but only this child and her
parents and whether she survived. Therefore, I do not have any other
information on this family name.

Thank you,
Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@...

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen need Yiddish translation on Viewmate #general

Saul Goldstone <sgoldsto@...>
 

JewishGenners,

Please translate the yiddish on the back of a wedding picture.

The words can be found on the Viewmate website.

Simply click on the following address and it will take you directly to
VM1751 .... an image of the inscription.

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/source/vm1751.html

I thank you in advance .... and please respond directly to me.

Saul Goldstone
Saratoga, California
sgoldsto@...

Re: Benno: the name #general

Mark Halpern <willie46@...>
 

In some Galician records, I have noticed Benno or Beno to be the
secular name for the Hebrew name Benzion.

Mark Halpern

----- Original Message -----
I'm wondering what the history of the forename "Benno" is. Is
it a diminutive of Benjamin? Is it specifically Jewish, or
specifically German, or what? Anything you know might help.

Thanks

Benjamin Griffin

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Benno: the name #general

Mark Halpern <willie46@...>
 

In some Galician records, I have noticed Benno or Beno to be the
secular name for the Hebrew name Benzion.

Mark Halpern

----- Original Message -----
I'm wondering what the history of the forename "Benno" is. Is
it a diminutive of Benjamin? Is it specifically Jewish, or
specifically German, or what? Anything you know might help.

Thanks

Benjamin Griffin

Re: Benno: the name #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 9/5/2002 5:54:59 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
bgriffin@... writes:

<< I'm wondering what the history of the forename "Benno" is. Is it a
diminutive of Benjamin? Is it specifically Jewish, >>

==Kaganoff says it's derived >from Benno, a Polish and Czech diminutive of
Ber (kinnuy for Dov and for Issachar). Beider doesn't mention the name at
all unless you count a very rare Medieval Benoye-->from the Biblical
Benayah.

Encyclopedia Judaica lists about a dozen people with the Benno name, one
of them as a contributor on many topics. His Hebrew name is given as Ben
Zion, and there's also a noted Israeli jurist, Benno/Benzion.

I'm pretty sure the name's been taken by quite a few Benjamins and
Benedicts (originally Baruch). I'm not sure that the Czech/Polish
derivation is the major one; it was quite a common name among "educated"
German Jews who generally did not want to associate with Slavic names.

Benno has a neat Italian sound and has probably been appropriated for that
reason by German Jews. It may have been a vogue name, especially for boys
named Yom-Tov, Shem-Tov, Tuviyah whose name includes the Hebrew Tov, for
"good."

It's not necessarily a Jewish name either: the Chief of Police in Nurnberg
during the German deportation of the Jews, was named Benno (apparently, he
had a "good" heart and was able to save quite a few Jews.)

Michael Bernet, New York <mBernet@...>

WOLFF (Pfungstadt, Frankfurt/M, Koenigsberg, Amsterdam, N.Carolina); BERNET,
BERNERT, JONDORF(Frensdorf, Bamberg, Nurnberg); FEUCHTWANGER
(Schwabach, Hagenbach & Fuerth); KONIGSHOFER (anywhere); BERG, WOLF(F),
(Demmelsdorf & Zeckendorf); Shim`on GUTENSTEIN (Bad Homburg ca 1760);
FRENSDORF/ER (anywhere); MAINZER (Lorsch); anyone in Ermreuth or Floss;
GOLDSCHMIDT (B. Homburg, Hessdorf). ALTMANN (Silesia); TIMMENDORFER

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Benno: the name #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 9/5/2002 5:54:59 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
bgriffin@... writes:

<< I'm wondering what the history of the forename "Benno" is. Is it a
diminutive of Benjamin? Is it specifically Jewish, >>

==Kaganoff says it's derived >from Benno, a Polish and Czech diminutive of
Ber (kinnuy for Dov and for Issachar). Beider doesn't mention the name at
all unless you count a very rare Medieval Benoye-->from the Biblical
Benayah.

Encyclopedia Judaica lists about a dozen people with the Benno name, one
of them as a contributor on many topics. His Hebrew name is given as Ben
Zion, and there's also a noted Israeli jurist, Benno/Benzion.

I'm pretty sure the name's been taken by quite a few Benjamins and
Benedicts (originally Baruch). I'm not sure that the Czech/Polish
derivation is the major one; it was quite a common name among "educated"
German Jews who generally did not want to associate with Slavic names.

Benno has a neat Italian sound and has probably been appropriated for that
reason by German Jews. It may have been a vogue name, especially for boys
named Yom-Tov, Shem-Tov, Tuviyah whose name includes the Hebrew Tov, for
"good."

It's not necessarily a Jewish name either: the Chief of Police in Nurnberg
during the German deportation of the Jews, was named Benno (apparently, he
had a "good" heart and was able to save quite a few Jews.)

Michael Bernet, New York <mBernet@...>

WOLFF (Pfungstadt, Frankfurt/M, Koenigsberg, Amsterdam, N.Carolina); BERNET,
BERNERT, JONDORF(Frensdorf, Bamberg, Nurnberg); FEUCHTWANGER
(Schwabach, Hagenbach & Fuerth); KONIGSHOFER (anywhere); BERG, WOLF(F),
(Demmelsdorf & Zeckendorf); Shim`on GUTENSTEIN (Bad Homburg ca 1760);
FRENSDORF/ER (anywhere); MAINZER (Lorsch); anyone in Ermreuth or Floss;
GOLDSCHMIDT (B. Homburg, Hessdorf). ALTMANN (Silesia); TIMMENDORFER