Date   
First Annual New Year Donor Appeal #lodz #poland

Seflaum@...
 

Dear Friends:

As we prepare to celebrate the New Year please take a moment to consider
that JewishGen provides us with the vital source for our ongoing
genealogical research. JewishGen is still one of the only free
genealogical sites free to us, but not free to JewishGen who must bear the
monthly expense of providing all the resources we use daily without a
second thought. These are costs that must be met to overcome the current
shortfall.

To continue as a public service institution, JewishGen has launched the
first Annual New Year Donor Appeal. The goal is to raise $300,000 to carry
us through to the end of 2002 and to acquire the necessary hardware and
software applications for improved databases scheduled to begin going
online by October. There are two million records >from Yad Vashem and
other sources waiting to be made available to us!

The financial support of each and every one of us is needed if JewishGen is
to continue as the only free site for Jewish genealogical research. Give
what you can afford, be it $25, the suggested annual minimum, or $100 (or
more) which will enroll you in the JGFFAlert. This is a system that
informs you via immediate e-mail if another researcher enters data into the
JGFF that has the potential of linking to your family names.

Please go now to
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen-erosity/contribute.ihtml. With your
permission, your name will be listed on a special 2002 Annual New Year
Donor Appeal recognition site. We are asking that all our users make a
donation to the very best of their financial ability. Consider scheduling a
monthly deduction >from your credit card if this works best for you.

On behalf of JewishGen and the Lodz Area Research Group our very best wishes
for a healthy, happy, and peaceful New Year.

Regards,
Shirley Rotbein Flaum and Roni Seibel Liebowitz
Lodz Area Research Group (LARG) Co-coordinators
Internet: http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Lodz/LARG.htm

Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland First Annual New Year Donor Appeal #lodz #poland

Seflaum@...
 

Dear Friends:

As we prepare to celebrate the New Year please take a moment to consider
that JewishGen provides us with the vital source for our ongoing
genealogical research. JewishGen is still one of the only free
genealogical sites free to us, but not free to JewishGen who must bear the
monthly expense of providing all the resources we use daily without a
second thought. These are costs that must be met to overcome the current
shortfall.

To continue as a public service institution, JewishGen has launched the
first Annual New Year Donor Appeal. The goal is to raise $300,000 to carry
us through to the end of 2002 and to acquire the necessary hardware and
software applications for improved databases scheduled to begin going
online by October. There are two million records >from Yad Vashem and
other sources waiting to be made available to us!

The financial support of each and every one of us is needed if JewishGen is
to continue as the only free site for Jewish genealogical research. Give
what you can afford, be it $25, the suggested annual minimum, or $100 (or
more) which will enroll you in the JGFFAlert. This is a system that
informs you via immediate e-mail if another researcher enters data into the
JGFF that has the potential of linking to your family names.

Please go now to
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen-erosity/contribute.ihtml. With your
permission, your name will be listed on a special 2002 Annual New Year
Donor Appeal recognition site. We are asking that all our users make a
donation to the very best of their financial ability. Consider scheduling a
monthly deduction >from your credit card if this works best for you.

On behalf of JewishGen and the Lodz Area Research Group our very best wishes
for a healthy, happy, and peaceful New Year.

Regards,
Shirley Rotbein Flaum and Roni Seibel Liebowitz
Lodz Area Research Group (LARG) Co-coordinators
Internet: http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Lodz/LARG.htm

Re: DEUTSCH and the adoption of local names as family names #germany

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 9/4/2002 herman.da.fonseca-wollheim@... writes:

"While transcribing the 1813 Judenmatrikel for Ichenhausen, . . . . we
stumbled over Joseph b. Simon adopting the name of Joseph ICHENHAUSER. For
both of us it is the first occurrence of a Jew adopting as his family name
one deriving directly >from the place where he lives.
. . . Have similar facts occurred in other places and with the name of that place ? If so, please give us the facts.

==It was not uncommon for someone who had obtained prominence in a certain
town, to be known by that town's name. This was especially common in
Rabbinic families where the family name was not the town of birth or
ancestry but of the town where the rabbi had risen to prominence.

==As a parallel, Rabbi Seligman Baer (Yitzhak Dov Halevi) Bamberger, a
leader of German Orthodoxy, born in Wiesenbronn in 1807, is known as the
Wurzburger Rav because he (and later his son Nathan) served there for many
decades. (Curiously, the Bamberger family history cannot explain the
Bamberger name--Wiesenbronn is a long distance >from Bamberg and no
connections to Bamberg are known, (I have my own theories) and Rabbi
Seligman Baer's father's surname was apparently Wiesenbronn.)

" . . Moses Jacob >from Frankfurt would become, in Hamburg, Moses Jacob
Frankfurter. But when he moved on to Breslau, he would be called Moses
Jacob Hamburger."

==funny you should mention Frankfurt and Hamburg in one breath. The
Wurzburger's even more eminent contemporary, Rabbi Samson Rafael HIRSCH of
Franfkfurt was born in Hamburg, the son Rabbi Raphael HIRSCH--who was the
son of Rabbi Mendel FRANKFURTER but had later adopted as family name
HIRSCH. It would be curious if a member of this FRANKFURTER family of
Hamburg ever reached Breslau . . . and why Rabbi SSR didn't take the name
HAMBURGER (or FRANKFURTER) in Frankfurt.

". . . . I don't think that the name DEUTSCH was ever adopted outside the
German speaking countries. They would have used the translated name
("GERMAN", "L'ALLEMAND" etc)"

==They might have been called DEUTSCH anywhere else that German was
spoken--especially by any Yiddish-speaking Jew anywhere. And the Jewish
family name GERMAN is actually a Russified variant on Hermann which is
usually derived >from Hayim via Hyman. Kaganoff says that Ashkenazi Jews
(Ashkenaz is the traditional Biblical name attributed to Germany) who
settled the Turkish empire were commonly referred to there as Ashkenazi,
and when they returned to Europe they translated the name back to DEUTSCH.

".. . I suggest that a Jew taking the name DEUTSCH wanted to indicate
that he was assimilated and had to be considered as a German
citizen .. . . I am just back >from Wroclaw (Breslau) where in the Jewish
cemetery one can see tombstones of that period for volunteers, killed in
action. It would be quite normal in this patriotic and optimistic time to
adopt the family name DEUTSCH"

==Yes, but surnames werre adopted during the first quarter of the 19th
century--a century before WW 1. And when surnames werer adopted, Germany
was still far >from coalescing into a nation; people identified themselves
by the town or village, duchy or principlaity. Deutsch at that time meant
little more than a language--and that, too, differed wildly according to
location and social class.

==Traditionally, it is believed, the Jewish Name Deutsch is a actually a
variant on Da-i"tz (as Katz is for Ka'tz), the initials for Dayan Tzedek,
a member of the local rabbinical court. That's not exactly an
assimilationist tendency. Alternative spellings included Daitch, Teitz;
many New Yorkers will probably remember the Jewish-owned chain of
neighborhood groceries/delis by the name of Daitch-Shopwell

==Incidentally, not every geographic name indicates current or former
residence: the families known as London were originally named Lamdan
(teacher) and some London-Lamdans were elevated to "Englander" by the
locals. Berliner was Berl's son, Paris was named after a Polish village,
Moscowitch was the son of Moses . . . And I have reason to believe that
in some families, the name of two quite different towns were born
concurrently--like Oppenheim and Uffenheim--because they were spelled
identically in Hebrew.

==When so inclined, I take the name of three famed Jewish musicians: call
me Meyerbeer Halevy Castelnuovo-Tedesco. Meyer is my Hebrew name, Ber is
my patronymic, Halevi is tribal affiliation, I used to live in Newcastle
(Castelnuovo) on Tyne where I was known as "the Yekke" (Tedesco). Which
just goes to prove there's little accounting for a name.

And so, Shanah Tovah to all of us, whatever we're called

Michael Bernet, New York <mBernet@...>

German SIG #Germany Re: DEUTSCH and the adoption of local names as family names #germany

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 9/4/2002 herman.da.fonseca-wollheim@... writes:

"While transcribing the 1813 Judenmatrikel for Ichenhausen, . . . . we
stumbled over Joseph b. Simon adopting the name of Joseph ICHENHAUSER. For
both of us it is the first occurrence of a Jew adopting as his family name
one deriving directly >from the place where he lives.
. . . Have similar facts occurred in other places and with the name of that place ? If so, please give us the facts.

==It was not uncommon for someone who had obtained prominence in a certain
town, to be known by that town's name. This was especially common in
Rabbinic families where the family name was not the town of birth or
ancestry but of the town where the rabbi had risen to prominence.

==As a parallel, Rabbi Seligman Baer (Yitzhak Dov Halevi) Bamberger, a
leader of German Orthodoxy, born in Wiesenbronn in 1807, is known as the
Wurzburger Rav because he (and later his son Nathan) served there for many
decades. (Curiously, the Bamberger family history cannot explain the
Bamberger name--Wiesenbronn is a long distance >from Bamberg and no
connections to Bamberg are known, (I have my own theories) and Rabbi
Seligman Baer's father's surname was apparently Wiesenbronn.)

" . . Moses Jacob >from Frankfurt would become, in Hamburg, Moses Jacob
Frankfurter. But when he moved on to Breslau, he would be called Moses
Jacob Hamburger."

==funny you should mention Frankfurt and Hamburg in one breath. The
Wurzburger's even more eminent contemporary, Rabbi Samson Rafael HIRSCH of
Franfkfurt was born in Hamburg, the son Rabbi Raphael HIRSCH--who was the
son of Rabbi Mendel FRANKFURTER but had later adopted as family name
HIRSCH. It would be curious if a member of this FRANKFURTER family of
Hamburg ever reached Breslau . . . and why Rabbi SSR didn't take the name
HAMBURGER (or FRANKFURTER) in Frankfurt.

". . . . I don't think that the name DEUTSCH was ever adopted outside the
German speaking countries. They would have used the translated name
("GERMAN", "L'ALLEMAND" etc)"

==They might have been called DEUTSCH anywhere else that German was
spoken--especially by any Yiddish-speaking Jew anywhere. And the Jewish
family name GERMAN is actually a Russified variant on Hermann which is
usually derived >from Hayim via Hyman. Kaganoff says that Ashkenazi Jews
(Ashkenaz is the traditional Biblical name attributed to Germany) who
settled the Turkish empire were commonly referred to there as Ashkenazi,
and when they returned to Europe they translated the name back to DEUTSCH.

".. . I suggest that a Jew taking the name DEUTSCH wanted to indicate
that he was assimilated and had to be considered as a German
citizen .. . . I am just back >from Wroclaw (Breslau) where in the Jewish
cemetery one can see tombstones of that period for volunteers, killed in
action. It would be quite normal in this patriotic and optimistic time to
adopt the family name DEUTSCH"

==Yes, but surnames werre adopted during the first quarter of the 19th
century--a century before WW 1. And when surnames werer adopted, Germany
was still far >from coalescing into a nation; people identified themselves
by the town or village, duchy or principlaity. Deutsch at that time meant
little more than a language--and that, too, differed wildly according to
location and social class.

==Traditionally, it is believed, the Jewish Name Deutsch is a actually a
variant on Da-i"tz (as Katz is for Ka'tz), the initials for Dayan Tzedek,
a member of the local rabbinical court. That's not exactly an
assimilationist tendency. Alternative spellings included Daitch, Teitz;
many New Yorkers will probably remember the Jewish-owned chain of
neighborhood groceries/delis by the name of Daitch-Shopwell

==Incidentally, not every geographic name indicates current or former
residence: the families known as London were originally named Lamdan
(teacher) and some London-Lamdans were elevated to "Englander" by the
locals. Berliner was Berl's son, Paris was named after a Polish village,
Moscowitch was the son of Moses . . . And I have reason to believe that
in some families, the name of two quite different towns were born
concurrently--like Oppenheim and Uffenheim--because they were spelled
identically in Hebrew.

==When so inclined, I take the name of three famed Jewish musicians: call
me Meyerbeer Halevy Castelnuovo-Tedesco. Meyer is my Hebrew name, Ber is
my patronymic, Halevi is tribal affiliation, I used to live in Newcastle
(Castelnuovo) on Tyne where I was known as "the Yekke" (Tedesco). Which
just goes to prove there's little accounting for a name.

And so, Shanah Tovah to all of us, whatever we're called

Michael Bernet, New York <mBernet@...>

Family Names - DEUTSCH #germany

George Arnstein <vze2zx9t@...>
 

Hermann da Fonseca-Wollheim Tervuren, Belgium had some welcome examples on
Sep 4 Gersig discussion of persons who adopted as LAST Name the name of the
locality in which he/they lived. But then he seems to go astray in his
discussion of DEUTSCH as a last name, especially when he suggests patriotic
links.

I think this merely was someone who migrated to a non-German-speaking area
where the new community identified him as deutsch-speaking. "You know,
David who speaks deutsch," then contracted to simply David Deutsch,
possibly in an environment where Jews spoke Yiddish (eastern or western
version).

Note the many Alsatians named Schwab, suggesting ancestors in Schwaben
across the Rhine. And what about those named Tedesco?

George A., Washington, DC Alternate e-mail address is:
garnstein@...

German SIG #Germany Family Names - DEUTSCH #germany

George Arnstein <vze2zx9t@...>
 

Hermann da Fonseca-Wollheim Tervuren, Belgium had some welcome examples on
Sep 4 Gersig discussion of persons who adopted as LAST Name the name of the
locality in which he/they lived. But then he seems to go astray in his
discussion of DEUTSCH as a last name, especially when he suggests patriotic
links.

I think this merely was someone who migrated to a non-German-speaking area
where the new community identified him as deutsch-speaking. "You know,
David who speaks deutsch," then contracted to simply David Deutsch,
possibly in an environment where Jews spoke Yiddish (eastern or western
version).

Note the many Alsatians named Schwab, suggesting ancestors in Schwaben
across the Rhine. And what about those named Tedesco?

George A., Washington, DC Alternate e-mail address is:
garnstein@...

Success story - just in time for the New Year! #france

Marilyn Sheridan <marilyns@...>
 

Dear members of JewishGen Discussion Group, and BohMor SIG, France SIG,
Galicia SIG, and Hungary SIG,

Thanks to JewishGen (and to some other wonderful Jewish organizations) I
have recently found lost family in Budapest!

Not long before my father died, he mentioned that when he was a young child,
his mother would take him by train >from Vienna to visit his C******* cousins
in Budapest. He had three girl cousins, all older than himself. He
remembered only the first name of one cousin, and that another cousin had
married a man with the surname R*****.

My father could not tell me how he was related to these cousins, but I
suspected that his own mother and the mother of the cousins were sisters.
This proved to be correct, as I found when I looked recently in a book
called "Counted Remnant: Register of the Jewish Survivors in Budapest" that
was published in Budapest in 1946.

When I searched the list under "R" for the name R*****, I found a woman by
that name. As is done for each survivor in this record, she listed her own
mother's maiden name. That was my big clue: it was the same maiden surname
as that of my father's mother. Moreover, Mrs. R***** listed her mother's
first name. So, for the first time, I knew a name my father had not been
able to remember - the first name of his mother's sister.

My next step was to scan the same list for any children of Mrs. R*****. I
found two sons, who identified the maiden name of their mother as the former
Miss C*******, and their current home address as the same one where their
mother currently lived.

In an on-line telephone book of Hungary, I found only 5 people with the
surname R*****, and with one of the two first names. I wrote by snail-mail
to the only one in Budapest, including a photocopy of the relevant page of
"Counted Remnant" and a genealogy tree to show how we might be related.

You can imagine my thrill to receive a reply by snail mail! This was indeed
my second cousin. My father's mother and his mother's mother were sisters.
(Those sisters were daughters of Avraham Zvi Hersch BEUTEL the Hosid, who
was born in Skalat on April 16, 1852 and died in Vienna on May 7, 1936. I
can not find further information about him; so if anyone knows where I can
look, I would be happy to receive suggestions. The IKG Wien has no further
information; and I can not find out where Skalat records might be -
apparently they are not in Skalat - if any have indeed survived to this
day.)

The daughter of BEUTEL who lived in Budapest became the mother of three
daughters of her own. One was the mother of the the two R***** brothers
whom I discovered very recently. The second moved with her family to
France; my father lived with them >from the time he fled Vienna in 1938 until
the battle of Dunkirk in 1940; alas, I have confirmed (Klarsfeld) that all
perished at Auschwitz. The third sister (probably the oldest) and her
family may have moved to France, but they or some children may have stayed
in Hungary. No one seems to know or remember their surname.

It turns out that the wife of the younger R***** brother has cousins in Las
Vegas; they are very close, and telephone each other several times a month.
The younger R***** brother told his cousins about the letter that I had sent
to the older brother. A few weeks ago, the younger brother and his wife
traveled to Las Vegas to visit these cousins. Because I live in nearby
Tucson, I went to meet them. It was instant family!

The younger brother speaks only Hungarian; and because his wife is a
Hungarian government worker, their number is not in the telephone book for
reasons of privacy. The cousins in Las Vegas are multilingual (the wife
survived Bergen-Belsen, the husband was a partisan) and every word back and
forth had to be translated - but with such warmth and joy! My cousin hugs
just like my father did; we could not stop hugging each other. We had a
huge traditional Czechoslovakian / Hungarian dinner!

The younger brother knows little about his past, because his mother, who
died only a few years ago, could not bear to talk about her losses,
including the murders of her husband and father. His older brother, also,
finds it hard to talk about those times. The earliest memory of the brother
I met, is the occasion when Jews were herded brutally toward a ghetto in
Budapest; a soldier shoved his beloved grandfather, who could not move
"quickly enough", making him fall down, and then shot him on the spot.

When the Nazis demanded that Jews join the labor battalions, the older son
tried to convince his father that they should run away together and join the
partisans. The father said he was a WWI veteran, this was his fate, etc. -
and paid for this with his life, as did so many other decent Jews. The
older son fled, and survived as a partisan.

The younger son and his mother were saved by the extraordinary and
unforgettable heroism of Raoul Wallenberg; they lived in one of the
safe-houses till the end of WWII.

The younger son brought to Las Vegas a stack of ancient photographs; he had
found them in his mother's room after she died. She had never shown them to
him, or talked about them with him. He had planned to leave all of them
with me, so that I could photograph them and then mail them back to him.
But in the end, he could not bear to part with any that showed his father,
whom he does not remember at all. He also hung on to all the photos of his
mother. I find it very touching that he is such a devoted son.

However, he agreed to lend me photos that showed people he did not know. I
could not believe what I saw! There was a photo of my father at about 3
years old, with his mother and older sister, similar to the one SIGAL family
photo my father had been able to save. There were several photos of the two
sisters of the mother of the R***** brothers, each with spouses and / or
children. I knew who these people were, only because names on the backs of
some photos were those my father had mentioned. I was able to tell my
cousin, "This was your aunt! These were your little cousins!"

Some of the other photos showed a person or persons whose name on the back I
do not know; others provided no name or information, and I did not recognize
the person. But I found a wonderful turn-of-the-century photo of the
exquisite eldest aunt of the R***** brothers, with her three sparklingly
beautiful little children - and their first names are on the back of the
photo. Any such clue is a help in further research!

Now I must visit my cousins in Budapest, in order to meet all of them and
their families, and to see the rest of the photographs! I still have a
thousand questions, and I want to find more family. More important, we are
alive and we need to celebrate life. I must locate a person who speaks both
Hungarian and English, and with whom all of us can feel comfortable in
Budapest and / or Vienna.

I have found these relatives in large part due to the existence of JewishGen
and its various SIGs and sources of information. Thank you, also, to the
dozens of Genners and SIGgers who have helped me with all kinds of advice; I
have tried to thank each of you personally. My financial contribution will
be on its way to JewishGen.

Shana Tova to all. May we see peace in Israel and throughout the world,
this year.

Marilyn Sheridan (Miriam SIGAL)
Tucson, AZ, USA

MODERATOR NOTE: This message is much longer than that usually
permitted by Jewishgen. But, it is such a moving and beautiful
one that it is has been allowed by us. Truly a happy New Year
story!

French SIG #France Success story - just in time for the New Year! #france

Marilyn Sheridan <marilyns@...>
 

Dear members of JewishGen Discussion Group, and BohMor SIG, France SIG,
Galicia SIG, and Hungary SIG,

Thanks to JewishGen (and to some other wonderful Jewish organizations) I
have recently found lost family in Budapest!

Not long before my father died, he mentioned that when he was a young child,
his mother would take him by train >from Vienna to visit his C******* cousins
in Budapest. He had three girl cousins, all older than himself. He
remembered only the first name of one cousin, and that another cousin had
married a man with the surname R*****.

My father could not tell me how he was related to these cousins, but I
suspected that his own mother and the mother of the cousins were sisters.
This proved to be correct, as I found when I looked recently in a book
called "Counted Remnant: Register of the Jewish Survivors in Budapest" that
was published in Budapest in 1946.

When I searched the list under "R" for the name R*****, I found a woman by
that name. As is done for each survivor in this record, she listed her own
mother's maiden name. That was my big clue: it was the same maiden surname
as that of my father's mother. Moreover, Mrs. R***** listed her mother's
first name. So, for the first time, I knew a name my father had not been
able to remember - the first name of his mother's sister.

My next step was to scan the same list for any children of Mrs. R*****. I
found two sons, who identified the maiden name of their mother as the former
Miss C*******, and their current home address as the same one where their
mother currently lived.

In an on-line telephone book of Hungary, I found only 5 people with the
surname R*****, and with one of the two first names. I wrote by snail-mail
to the only one in Budapest, including a photocopy of the relevant page of
"Counted Remnant" and a genealogy tree to show how we might be related.

You can imagine my thrill to receive a reply by snail mail! This was indeed
my second cousin. My father's mother and his mother's mother were sisters.
(Those sisters were daughters of Avraham Zvi Hersch BEUTEL the Hosid, who
was born in Skalat on April 16, 1852 and died in Vienna on May 7, 1936. I
can not find further information about him; so if anyone knows where I can
look, I would be happy to receive suggestions. The IKG Wien has no further
information; and I can not find out where Skalat records might be -
apparently they are not in Skalat - if any have indeed survived to this
day.)

The daughter of BEUTEL who lived in Budapest became the mother of three
daughters of her own. One was the mother of the the two R***** brothers
whom I discovered very recently. The second moved with her family to
France; my father lived with them >from the time he fled Vienna in 1938 until
the battle of Dunkirk in 1940; alas, I have confirmed (Klarsfeld) that all
perished at Auschwitz. The third sister (probably the oldest) and her
family may have moved to France, but they or some children may have stayed
in Hungary. No one seems to know or remember their surname.

It turns out that the wife of the younger R***** brother has cousins in Las
Vegas; they are very close, and telephone each other several times a month.
The younger R***** brother told his cousins about the letter that I had sent
to the older brother. A few weeks ago, the younger brother and his wife
traveled to Las Vegas to visit these cousins. Because I live in nearby
Tucson, I went to meet them. It was instant family!

The younger brother speaks only Hungarian; and because his wife is a
Hungarian government worker, their number is not in the telephone book for
reasons of privacy. The cousins in Las Vegas are multilingual (the wife
survived Bergen-Belsen, the husband was a partisan) and every word back and
forth had to be translated - but with such warmth and joy! My cousin hugs
just like my father did; we could not stop hugging each other. We had a
huge traditional Czechoslovakian / Hungarian dinner!

The younger brother knows little about his past, because his mother, who
died only a few years ago, could not bear to talk about her losses,
including the murders of her husband and father. His older brother, also,
finds it hard to talk about those times. The earliest memory of the brother
I met, is the occasion when Jews were herded brutally toward a ghetto in
Budapest; a soldier shoved his beloved grandfather, who could not move
"quickly enough", making him fall down, and then shot him on the spot.

When the Nazis demanded that Jews join the labor battalions, the older son
tried to convince his father that they should run away together and join the
partisans. The father said he was a WWI veteran, this was his fate, etc. -
and paid for this with his life, as did so many other decent Jews. The
older son fled, and survived as a partisan.

The younger son and his mother were saved by the extraordinary and
unforgettable heroism of Raoul Wallenberg; they lived in one of the
safe-houses till the end of WWII.

The younger son brought to Las Vegas a stack of ancient photographs; he had
found them in his mother's room after she died. She had never shown them to
him, or talked about them with him. He had planned to leave all of them
with me, so that I could photograph them and then mail them back to him.
But in the end, he could not bear to part with any that showed his father,
whom he does not remember at all. He also hung on to all the photos of his
mother. I find it very touching that he is such a devoted son.

However, he agreed to lend me photos that showed people he did not know. I
could not believe what I saw! There was a photo of my father at about 3
years old, with his mother and older sister, similar to the one SIGAL family
photo my father had been able to save. There were several photos of the two
sisters of the mother of the R***** brothers, each with spouses and / or
children. I knew who these people were, only because names on the backs of
some photos were those my father had mentioned. I was able to tell my
cousin, "This was your aunt! These were your little cousins!"

Some of the other photos showed a person or persons whose name on the back I
do not know; others provided no name or information, and I did not recognize
the person. But I found a wonderful turn-of-the-century photo of the
exquisite eldest aunt of the R***** brothers, with her three sparklingly
beautiful little children - and their first names are on the back of the
photo. Any such clue is a help in further research!

Now I must visit my cousins in Budapest, in order to meet all of them and
their families, and to see the rest of the photographs! I still have a
thousand questions, and I want to find more family. More important, we are
alive and we need to celebrate life. I must locate a person who speaks both
Hungarian and English, and with whom all of us can feel comfortable in
Budapest and / or Vienna.

I have found these relatives in large part due to the existence of JewishGen
and its various SIGs and sources of information. Thank you, also, to the
dozens of Genners and SIGgers who have helped me with all kinds of advice; I
have tried to thank each of you personally. My financial contribution will
be on its way to JewishGen.

Shana Tova to all. May we see peace in Israel and throughout the world,
this year.

Marilyn Sheridan (Miriam SIGAL)
Tucson, AZ, USA

MODERATOR NOTE: This message is much longer than that usually
permitted by Jewishgen. But, it is such a moving and beautiful
one that it is has been allowed by us. Truly a happy New Year
story!

Landsmanschaften #general

HENKEN9@...
 

Genners,

I have recently sent several postings, in different contexts, concerning
my mgf, Barnett LEVINE. He died shortly after his 36th birthday in 1917
of an autoimmune disease. He was ill for four months before he passed
away. At the time he was the father of two small children and my gm was
pregnant with a third. Although he is buried in the Minsker Young Friends
section of United Hebrew on Staten Island, I'm not convinced he had been a
dues paying member prior to his death. (I have never seen documents to
prove or disprove).

Minsker Young Friends has 2 other sections; at Montefiore and Mt.
Hebron-both in Queens. These would have been far more convenient for a
young widow >from Williamsburg with 3 children. Before the buildout of the
subway system, I suspect the only way to get to United Hebrew within one
day was by car through New Jersey. I believe that it would have been
extremely difficult for her to visit the grave more than once a year, if
at that. Given the distance >from Brooklyn, it's likely that the plot
would have been much cheaper than the closer ones. I think if he was a
regular member he would have been buried in Queens. On the other hand, he
was >from Igumen, which is in the Minsk gubernia.

Behind my gf's stone are several small, pauper-like ones. The writing was
difficult to read, but they seemed to mark the graves of children, roughly
from the time of the 1918-9 flu pandemic. These tend to buttress my
belief that this particular section was, at least at that time, for non-
members who couldn't afford more. The society may have purchased the land
for future expansion.

I think it may be important, sans documentation, to be as observant as
possible.

L'Shana Tovah

Ty Henken
Centennial, Colo.
Henken9@...

HENKEN,SMOLINSKY>Vitebsk
POLCHINIKOFF/POLTINIKOW>Gomel, Mogilev
PECKEL>Ushachi, Vitebsk
LEVIN,LEVITT>Cherven, Minsk
WOLODARSKY>Riga,Svetlovodsk,Kherson,Astrahkan
INTRELEGATOR>Siauliai, Kaunas GUTMAN>Jaunjelgava, Latvia

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Landsmanschaften #general

HENKEN9@...
 

Genners,

I have recently sent several postings, in different contexts, concerning
my mgf, Barnett LEVINE. He died shortly after his 36th birthday in 1917
of an autoimmune disease. He was ill for four months before he passed
away. At the time he was the father of two small children and my gm was
pregnant with a third. Although he is buried in the Minsker Young Friends
section of United Hebrew on Staten Island, I'm not convinced he had been a
dues paying member prior to his death. (I have never seen documents to
prove or disprove).

Minsker Young Friends has 2 other sections; at Montefiore and Mt.
Hebron-both in Queens. These would have been far more convenient for a
young widow >from Williamsburg with 3 children. Before the buildout of the
subway system, I suspect the only way to get to United Hebrew within one
day was by car through New Jersey. I believe that it would have been
extremely difficult for her to visit the grave more than once a year, if
at that. Given the distance >from Brooklyn, it's likely that the plot
would have been much cheaper than the closer ones. I think if he was a
regular member he would have been buried in Queens. On the other hand, he
was >from Igumen, which is in the Minsk gubernia.

Behind my gf's stone are several small, pauper-like ones. The writing was
difficult to read, but they seemed to mark the graves of children, roughly
from the time of the 1918-9 flu pandemic. These tend to buttress my
belief that this particular section was, at least at that time, for non-
members who couldn't afford more. The society may have purchased the land
for future expansion.

I think it may be important, sans documentation, to be as observant as
possible.

L'Shana Tovah

Ty Henken
Centennial, Colo.
Henken9@...

HENKEN,SMOLINSKY>Vitebsk
POLCHINIKOFF/POLTINIKOW>Gomel, Mogilev
PECKEL>Ushachi, Vitebsk
LEVIN,LEVITT>Cherven, Minsk
WOLODARSKY>Riga,Svetlovodsk,Kherson,Astrahkan
INTRELEGATOR>Siauliai, Kaunas GUTMAN>Jaunjelgava, Latvia

Re: Researching a Name Change #general

jeanne4_98nospam@yahoo.com <jeanne4_98@...>
 

Assuming the name change was done through the legal system and not
simply by custom, you can check the court records. In most states, the
person would petition the local superior court for permission to change
the name. The court reviews the petition, holds a brief hearing and
then grants the change. The petition and court order would be on file.
I do not know whether they are filed under the previous name or the
new name, but since the petition would be in the earlier name, I would
look for that one first.

In some places, it is possible that this function would be handled by a
probate court, or in the case of a child or divorce, a family court.

I hope this is of some help to you.

Please note: I have modified my "reply to" address in an effort to avoid
automated spam. If you wish to reply to me, use the following address:
jeanne4_98 at yahoo.com.

Barbara Sloan
New Haven, CT

Searching SLATAS/ZLATIS/SLATIS, SANCTON/SANKTIN/SENKTIN,
SLONIMSKY/SLONIMSKI, PASSIN, WEINGER/WENGER--Belarus, Lithuania, Russia,
USA

Re: Tiraspol, Moldova #general

NFatouros@...
 

On Sept.4/02 Michoel Ronn wrote in part:

<< I am seeking any articles or information about the Jewish community of
Tiraspol in Moldova. (I am not referring to Terespol or Tirashpol, which
are different cities.) I am especially interest in knowing Jewish
population statistics at various times and the names of the rabbis there.
I have already searched in a number of sources, without success. >>

My copies of the 1962 Columbia-Lippincott Gazetteer as well as Chester
G. Cohen's "Shtetl Finder Gazetteer," and Miriam Weiner's "Jewish Roots in
Ukraine and Moldova" have listings for "Tiraspol" in Bessarabia. ( I've
found no listing for Tirashpol, but in Cohen's Gazetteer there is an entry
for a "Tereshpol," south of Lublin, and a "Terespoli," west of Brest-
Litvosk. The C-L, also has an entry for Terespol.)

Cohen's entry for Tiraspol mentions the name of only one rabbi of
Tiraspol, Chaim Shapiro, who was born in 1861. Mr. Ronn should post his
inquiry about Tiraspol rabbis to the RAV SIG because many subscribers to
special interest group are very knowledgeable about Rabbis and their
genealogies, or at leastm they can refer inquirers to the appropriate
references.

The only population statistic I have thus far found for Tiraspol is the
C-L's which says only that in 1939 it had a population of 43,000. But the
C-L doesn't indicate the proportion of Jews in that 1939 population.

A "google" search for Tiraspol turned up a website:

http://www.jewishmoldova.net/tiraspol.htm

which indicates that the Lubovitcher Chassids are attempting to revive
some community spirit among the few Jews that may have remained there or
returned. The site also offers the name of its present rabbi and an email
address to which one may write.

Another website for the Encarta Encyclopedia's brief account of Tiraspol's
history which mentions only the relatively small proportions of ethnic
Russians to the large Rumanian population.

Still another website http://www.ncsj.org/Moldova.shtml says that there
are now 2,500 Jews in Tiraspol, but another at

http://www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/irf/2001/5635.htm

says there are only 2,200

If he hasn't already done so, Mr. Ronn may want to read the account of
Moldavian Jews at:

http://www.heritagefilms.com/MOLDOVA.html

Fooling around for Tiraspol at the new

www.Jewishencyclopedia.com

turned up only mention of a family of converts, but a search for
"Bessarabia" produced eventually some 1897 census statistics but with no
breakdown for Jews in Tiraspol. A little more insight into Jewish
population in Bessarabia can be found by clicking on the Encyclopedia's
account of agricultural colonies in Russia.

Naomi Fatouros (nee FELDMAN)
Bloomington, Indiana
NFatouros@...
Researching: BELKOWSKY and BIELKOWSKY, Odessa and Berdichev;ROTHSTEIN,
Kremenchug; FELDMAN, Pinsk; SCHUTZ, RETTIG, WAHL, Shcherets; LEVY,
Mulhouse; SAS or SASS,Podwolochisk; RAPOPORT, Tarnopol, Korostyshev;
BEHAM, Salok and Kharkov; WOLPIANSKY, Ostryna.

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Researching a Name Change #general

jeanne4_98nospam@yahoo.com <jeanne4_98@...>
 

Assuming the name change was done through the legal system and not
simply by custom, you can check the court records. In most states, the
person would petition the local superior court for permission to change
the name. The court reviews the petition, holds a brief hearing and
then grants the change. The petition and court order would be on file.
I do not know whether they are filed under the previous name or the
new name, but since the petition would be in the earlier name, I would
look for that one first.

In some places, it is possible that this function would be handled by a
probate court, or in the case of a child or divorce, a family court.

I hope this is of some help to you.

Please note: I have modified my "reply to" address in an effort to avoid
automated spam. If you wish to reply to me, use the following address:
jeanne4_98 at yahoo.com.

Barbara Sloan
New Haven, CT

Searching SLATAS/ZLATIS/SLATIS, SANCTON/SANKTIN/SENKTIN,
SLONIMSKY/SLONIMSKI, PASSIN, WEINGER/WENGER--Belarus, Lithuania, Russia,
USA

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Tiraspol, Moldova #general

NFatouros@...
 

On Sept.4/02 Michoel Ronn wrote in part:

<< I am seeking any articles or information about the Jewish community of
Tiraspol in Moldova. (I am not referring to Terespol or Tirashpol, which
are different cities.) I am especially interest in knowing Jewish
population statistics at various times and the names of the rabbis there.
I have already searched in a number of sources, without success. >>

My copies of the 1962 Columbia-Lippincott Gazetteer as well as Chester
G. Cohen's "Shtetl Finder Gazetteer," and Miriam Weiner's "Jewish Roots in
Ukraine and Moldova" have listings for "Tiraspol" in Bessarabia. ( I've
found no listing for Tirashpol, but in Cohen's Gazetteer there is an entry
for a "Tereshpol," south of Lublin, and a "Terespoli," west of Brest-
Litvosk. The C-L, also has an entry for Terespol.)

Cohen's entry for Tiraspol mentions the name of only one rabbi of
Tiraspol, Chaim Shapiro, who was born in 1861. Mr. Ronn should post his
inquiry about Tiraspol rabbis to the RAV SIG because many subscribers to
special interest group are very knowledgeable about Rabbis and their
genealogies, or at leastm they can refer inquirers to the appropriate
references.

The only population statistic I have thus far found for Tiraspol is the
C-L's which says only that in 1939 it had a population of 43,000. But the
C-L doesn't indicate the proportion of Jews in that 1939 population.

A "google" search for Tiraspol turned up a website:

http://www.jewishmoldova.net/tiraspol.htm

which indicates that the Lubovitcher Chassids are attempting to revive
some community spirit among the few Jews that may have remained there or
returned. The site also offers the name of its present rabbi and an email
address to which one may write.

Another website for the Encarta Encyclopedia's brief account of Tiraspol's
history which mentions only the relatively small proportions of ethnic
Russians to the large Rumanian population.

Still another website http://www.ncsj.org/Moldova.shtml says that there
are now 2,500 Jews in Tiraspol, but another at

http://www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/irf/2001/5635.htm

says there are only 2,200

If he hasn't already done so, Mr. Ronn may want to read the account of
Moldavian Jews at:

http://www.heritagefilms.com/MOLDOVA.html

Fooling around for Tiraspol at the new

www.Jewishencyclopedia.com

turned up only mention of a family of converts, but a search for
"Bessarabia" produced eventually some 1897 census statistics but with no
breakdown for Jews in Tiraspol. A little more insight into Jewish
population in Bessarabia can be found by clicking on the Encyclopedia's
account of agricultural colonies in Russia.

Naomi Fatouros (nee FELDMAN)
Bloomington, Indiana
NFatouros@...
Researching: BELKOWSKY and BIELKOWSKY, Odessa and Berdichev;ROTHSTEIN,
Kremenchug; FELDMAN, Pinsk; SCHUTZ, RETTIG, WAHL, Shcherets; LEVY,
Mulhouse; SAS or SASS,Podwolochisk; RAPOPORT, Tarnopol, Korostyshev;
BEHAM, Salok and Kharkov; WOLPIANSKY, Ostryna.

Annual New Year Donor Appeal #yizkorbooks

Joyce Field
 

Dear Friends:

As we prepare to celebrate the New Year please take a moment to
consider that JewishGen provides us with the vital source for our
ongoing genealogical research. JewishGen is still one of the only
free genealogical sites-free to us, but not free to JewishGen, who
must bear the monthly expense of providing all the resources we use
daily without a second thought. These are costs that must be met to
overcome the current shortfall.

To continue as a public service institution, JewishGen has launched
the first Annual New Year Donor Appeal. The goal is to raise
$300,000 to carry us through to the end of 2002 and to acquire the
necessary hardware and software applications for improved databases
scheduled to begin going online by October. There are 2 million
records >from Yad Vashem and other sources waiting to be made
available to us!

Look at what the Yizkor Book Project accomplished in August. We
added four new books and updated 16 books.

New Books:

-Czestochowa, Poland
-Krakow, Poland
-Szekesfehervar, Hungary
-Wloclawek, Poland

Updated Books:

-Bedzin, Poland
-Brzeziny, Poland
-Buchach, Ukraine
-Dubossary, Moldova
-Khorostkov, Ukraine
-Koden, Poland
-Lida,Belarus
-Lite (Lithuania)
-Novogrudok, Belarus
-Olyka, Poland
-Piesk, Belarus
-Slutsk, Belarus
-Stawiski, Poland
-Thessalonika, Greece
-Zaglembia, Poland
-Zgierz, Poland

Every month we have new material on the Yizkor Book Page-more
translations >from the Pinkas HaKehillot, for example. We have a huge
update for the necrology index, too, that is in the queue. But and
the costs of preparing and keeping these materials available on line
must be met before they are added to the JewishGen servers. The
Yizkor Book Project received an award by IAJGS in Toronto as an
outstanding contribution to Jewish genealogy. We must keep the
project thriving and growing. We must keep JewishGen strong.

The financial support of each and every one of us is needed if
JewishGen is to continue as the only free site for Jewish
genealogical research. Give what you can afford, be it $25, the
suggested annual minimum, or $100 (or more) which will enroll you in
the JGFFAlert. This is a system that informs you via immediate
e-mail if another researcher enters data into the JGFF that has the
potential of linking to your family names.

Please go now to
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen-erosity/contribute.ihtml. With
your permission, your name will be listed on a special 2002 Annual
New Year Donor Appeal recognition site. We are asking that all our
users make a donation to the very best of their financial ability. Consider scheduling a monthly deduction >from your credit card if this works best for you.

On behalf of JewishGen and our Yizkor Book Project, our very best
wishes for a healthy, happy and peaceful New Year.

Joyce Field
Yizkor Book Project Manager
JewishGen Vice President, Research

Yizkor Books #YizkorBooks Annual New Year Donor Appeal #yizkorbooks

Joyce Field
 

Dear Friends:

As we prepare to celebrate the New Year please take a moment to
consider that JewishGen provides us with the vital source for our
ongoing genealogical research. JewishGen is still one of the only
free genealogical sites-free to us, but not free to JewishGen, who
must bear the monthly expense of providing all the resources we use
daily without a second thought. These are costs that must be met to
overcome the current shortfall.

To continue as a public service institution, JewishGen has launched
the first Annual New Year Donor Appeal. The goal is to raise
$300,000 to carry us through to the end of 2002 and to acquire the
necessary hardware and software applications for improved databases
scheduled to begin going online by October. There are 2 million
records >from Yad Vashem and other sources waiting to be made
available to us!

Look at what the Yizkor Book Project accomplished in August. We
added four new books and updated 16 books.

New Books:

-Czestochowa, Poland
-Krakow, Poland
-Szekesfehervar, Hungary
-Wloclawek, Poland

Updated Books:

-Bedzin, Poland
-Brzeziny, Poland
-Buchach, Ukraine
-Dubossary, Moldova
-Khorostkov, Ukraine
-Koden, Poland
-Lida,Belarus
-Lite (Lithuania)
-Novogrudok, Belarus
-Olyka, Poland
-Piesk, Belarus
-Slutsk, Belarus
-Stawiski, Poland
-Thessalonika, Greece
-Zaglembia, Poland
-Zgierz, Poland

Every month we have new material on the Yizkor Book Page-more
translations >from the Pinkas HaKehillot, for example. We have a huge
update for the necrology index, too, that is in the queue. But and
the costs of preparing and keeping these materials available on line
must be met before they are added to the JewishGen servers. The
Yizkor Book Project received an award by IAJGS in Toronto as an
outstanding contribution to Jewish genealogy. We must keep the
project thriving and growing. We must keep JewishGen strong.

The financial support of each and every one of us is needed if
JewishGen is to continue as the only free site for Jewish
genealogical research. Give what you can afford, be it $25, the
suggested annual minimum, or $100 (or more) which will enroll you in
the JGFFAlert. This is a system that informs you via immediate
e-mail if another researcher enters data into the JGFF that has the
potential of linking to your family names.

Please go now to
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen-erosity/contribute.ihtml. With
your permission, your name will be listed on a special 2002 Annual
New Year Donor Appeal recognition site. We are asking that all our
users make a donation to the very best of their financial ability. Consider scheduling a monthly deduction >from your credit card if this works best for you.

On behalf of JewishGen and our Yizkor Book Project, our very best
wishes for a healthy, happy and peaceful New Year.

Joyce Field
Yizkor Book Project Manager
JewishGen Vice President, Research

Success story - just in time for the New Year! #general

Marilyn Sheridan <marilyns@...>
 

Dear members of JewishGen Discussion Group, and BohMor SIG, France SIG,
Galicia SIG, and Hungary SIG,

Thanks to JewishGen (and to some other wonderful Jewish organizations) I
have recently found lost family in Budapest!

Not long before my father died, he mentioned that when he was a young
child, his mother would take him by train >from Vienna to visit his
C******* cousins in Budapest. He had three girl cousins, all older than
himself. He remembered only the first name of one cousin, and that
another cousin had married a man with the surname R*****.

My father could not tell me how he was related to these cousins, but I
suspected that his own mother and the mother of the cousins were sisters.
This proved to be correct, as I found when I looked recently in a book
called "Counted Remnant: Register of the Jewish Survivors in Budapest" that
was published in Budapest in 1946.

When I searched the list under "R" for the name R*****, I found a woman by
that name. As is done for each survivor in this record, she listed her own
mother's maiden name. That was my big clue: it was the same maiden surname
as that of my father's mother. Moreover, Mrs. R***** listed her mother's
first name. So, for the first time, I knew a name my father had not been
able to remember - the first name of his mother's sister.

My next step was to scan the same list for any children of Mrs. R*****.
I found two sons, who identified the maiden name of their mother as the
former Miss C*******, and their current home address as the same one where
their mother currently lived.

In an on-line telephone book of Hungary, I found only 5 people with the
surname R*****, and with one of the two first names. I wrote by snail-mail
to the only one in Budapest, including a photocopy of the relevant page of
"Counted Remnant" and a genealogy tree to show how we might be related.

You can imagine my thrill to receive a reply by snail mail! This was
indeed my second cousin. My father's mother and his mother's mother were
sisters. (Those sisters were daughters of Avraham Zvi Hersch BEUTEL the
Hosid, who was born in Skalat on April 16, 1852 and died in Vienna on May
7, 1936. I can not find further information about him; so if anyone knows
where I can look, I would be happy to receive suggestions. The IKG Wien
has no further information; and I can not find out where Skalat records
might be - apparently they are not in Skalat - if any have indeed survived
to this day.)

The daughter of BEUTEL who lived in Budapest became the mother of three
daughters of her own. One was the mother of the the two R***** brothers
whom I discovered very recently. The second moved with her family to
France; my father lived with them >from the time he fled Vienna in 1938
until the battle of Dunkirk in 1940; alas, I have confirmed (Klarsfeld)
that all perished at Auschwitz. The third sister (probably the oldest)
and her family may have moved to France, but they or some children may
have stayed in Hungary. No one seems to know or remember their surname.

It turns out that the wife of the younger R***** brother has cousins in
Las Vegas; they are very close, and telephone each other several times a
month. The younger R***** brother told his cousins about the letter that I
had sent to the older brother. A few weeks ago, the younger brother and
his wife traveled to Las Vegas to visit these cousins. Because I live in
nearby Tucson, I went to meet them. It was instant family!

The younger brother speaks only Hungarian; and because his wife is a
Hungarian government worker, their number is not in the telephone book for
reasons of privacy. The cousins in Las Vegas are multilingual (the wife
survived Bergen-Belsen, the husband was a partisan) and every word back and
forth had to be translated - but with such warmth and joy! My cousin hugs
just like my father did; we could not stop hugging each other. We had a
huge traditional Czechoslovakian / Hungarian dinner!

The younger brother knows little about his past, because his mother, who
died only a few years ago, could not bear to talk about her losses,
including the murders of her husband and father. His older brother, also,
finds it hard to talk about those times. The earliest memory of the
brother I met, is the occasion when Jews were herded brutally toward a
ghetto in Budapest; a soldier shoved his beloved grandfather, who could
not move "quickly enough", making him fall down, and then shot him on the
spot.

When the Nazis demanded that Jews join the labor battalions, the older son
tried to convince his father that they should run away together and join
the partisans. The father said he was a WWI veteran, this was his fate,
etc. - and paid for this with his life, as did so many other decent Jews.
The older son fled, and survived as a partisan.

The younger son and his mother were saved by the extraordinary and
unforgettable heroism of Raoul Wallenberg; they lived in one of the
safe-houses till the end of WWII.

The younger son brought to Las Vegas a stack of ancient photographs; he had
found them in his mother's room after she died. She had never shown them
to him, or talked about them with him. He had planned to leave all of them
with me, so that I could photograph them and then mail them back to him.
But in the end, he could not bear to part with any that showed his father,
whom he does not remember at all. He also hung on to all the photos of his
mother. I find it very touching that he is such a devoted son.

However, he agreed to lend me photos that showed people he did not know.
I could not believe what I saw! There was a photo of my father at about 3
years old, with his mother and older sister, similar to the one SIGAL
family photo my father had been able to save. There were several photos
of the two sisters of the mother of the R***** brothers, each with spouses
and / or children. I knew who these people were, only because names on
the backs of some photos were those my father had mentioned. I was able
to tell my cousin, "This was your aunt! These were your little cousins!"

Some of the other photos showed a person or persons whose name on the back
I do not know; others provided no name or information, and I did not
recognize the person. But I found a wonderful turn-of-the-century photo
of the exquisite eldest aunt of the R***** brothers, with her three
sparklingly beautiful little children - and their first names are on the
back of the photo. Any such clue is a help in further research!

Now I must visit my cousins in Budapest, in order to meet all of them and
their families, and to see the rest of the photographs! I still have a
thousand questions, and I want to find more family. More important, we are
alive and we need to celebrate life. I must locate a person who speaks
both Hungarian and English, and with whom all of us can feel comfortable in
Budapest and / or Vienna.

I have found these relatives in large part due to the existence of
JewishGen and its various SIGs and sources of information. Thank you,
also, to the dozens of Genners and SIGgers who have helped me with all
kinds of advice; I have tried to thank each of you personally. My
financial contribution will be on its way to JewishGen.

Shana Tova to all. May we see peace in Israel and throughout the world,
this year.

Marilyn Sheridan (Miriam SIGAL)
Tucson, AZ, USA

JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Success story - just in time for the New Year! #general

Marilyn Sheridan <marilyns@...>
 

Dear members of JewishGen Discussion Group, and BohMor SIG, France SIG,
Galicia SIG, and Hungary SIG,

Thanks to JewishGen (and to some other wonderful Jewish organizations) I
have recently found lost family in Budapest!

Not long before my father died, he mentioned that when he was a young
child, his mother would take him by train >from Vienna to visit his
C******* cousins in Budapest. He had three girl cousins, all older than
himself. He remembered only the first name of one cousin, and that
another cousin had married a man with the surname R*****.

My father could not tell me how he was related to these cousins, but I
suspected that his own mother and the mother of the cousins were sisters.
This proved to be correct, as I found when I looked recently in a book
called "Counted Remnant: Register of the Jewish Survivors in Budapest" that
was published in Budapest in 1946.

When I searched the list under "R" for the name R*****, I found a woman by
that name. As is done for each survivor in this record, she listed her own
mother's maiden name. That was my big clue: it was the same maiden surname
as that of my father's mother. Moreover, Mrs. R***** listed her mother's
first name. So, for the first time, I knew a name my father had not been
able to remember - the first name of his mother's sister.

My next step was to scan the same list for any children of Mrs. R*****.
I found two sons, who identified the maiden name of their mother as the
former Miss C*******, and their current home address as the same one where
their mother currently lived.

In an on-line telephone book of Hungary, I found only 5 people with the
surname R*****, and with one of the two first names. I wrote by snail-mail
to the only one in Budapest, including a photocopy of the relevant page of
"Counted Remnant" and a genealogy tree to show how we might be related.

You can imagine my thrill to receive a reply by snail mail! This was
indeed my second cousin. My father's mother and his mother's mother were
sisters. (Those sisters were daughters of Avraham Zvi Hersch BEUTEL the
Hosid, who was born in Skalat on April 16, 1852 and died in Vienna on May
7, 1936. I can not find further information about him; so if anyone knows
where I can look, I would be happy to receive suggestions. The IKG Wien
has no further information; and I can not find out where Skalat records
might be - apparently they are not in Skalat - if any have indeed survived
to this day.)

The daughter of BEUTEL who lived in Budapest became the mother of three
daughters of her own. One was the mother of the the two R***** brothers
whom I discovered very recently. The second moved with her family to
France; my father lived with them >from the time he fled Vienna in 1938
until the battle of Dunkirk in 1940; alas, I have confirmed (Klarsfeld)
that all perished at Auschwitz. The third sister (probably the oldest)
and her family may have moved to France, but they or some children may
have stayed in Hungary. No one seems to know or remember their surname.

It turns out that the wife of the younger R***** brother has cousins in
Las Vegas; they are very close, and telephone each other several times a
month. The younger R***** brother told his cousins about the letter that I
had sent to the older brother. A few weeks ago, the younger brother and
his wife traveled to Las Vegas to visit these cousins. Because I live in
nearby Tucson, I went to meet them. It was instant family!

The younger brother speaks only Hungarian; and because his wife is a
Hungarian government worker, their number is not in the telephone book for
reasons of privacy. The cousins in Las Vegas are multilingual (the wife
survived Bergen-Belsen, the husband was a partisan) and every word back and
forth had to be translated - but with such warmth and joy! My cousin hugs
just like my father did; we could not stop hugging each other. We had a
huge traditional Czechoslovakian / Hungarian dinner!

The younger brother knows little about his past, because his mother, who
died only a few years ago, could not bear to talk about her losses,
including the murders of her husband and father. His older brother, also,
finds it hard to talk about those times. The earliest memory of the
brother I met, is the occasion when Jews were herded brutally toward a
ghetto in Budapest; a soldier shoved his beloved grandfather, who could
not move "quickly enough", making him fall down, and then shot him on the
spot.

When the Nazis demanded that Jews join the labor battalions, the older son
tried to convince his father that they should run away together and join
the partisans. The father said he was a WWI veteran, this was his fate,
etc. - and paid for this with his life, as did so many other decent Jews.
The older son fled, and survived as a partisan.

The younger son and his mother were saved by the extraordinary and
unforgettable heroism of Raoul Wallenberg; they lived in one of the
safe-houses till the end of WWII.

The younger son brought to Las Vegas a stack of ancient photographs; he had
found them in his mother's room after she died. She had never shown them
to him, or talked about them with him. He had planned to leave all of them
with me, so that I could photograph them and then mail them back to him.
But in the end, he could not bear to part with any that showed his father,
whom he does not remember at all. He also hung on to all the photos of his
mother. I find it very touching that he is such a devoted son.

However, he agreed to lend me photos that showed people he did not know.
I could not believe what I saw! There was a photo of my father at about 3
years old, with his mother and older sister, similar to the one SIGAL
family photo my father had been able to save. There were several photos
of the two sisters of the mother of the R***** brothers, each with spouses
and / or children. I knew who these people were, only because names on
the backs of some photos were those my father had mentioned. I was able
to tell my cousin, "This was your aunt! These were your little cousins!"

Some of the other photos showed a person or persons whose name on the back
I do not know; others provided no name or information, and I did not
recognize the person. But I found a wonderful turn-of-the-century photo
of the exquisite eldest aunt of the R***** brothers, with her three
sparklingly beautiful little children - and their first names are on the
back of the photo. Any such clue is a help in further research!

Now I must visit my cousins in Budapest, in order to meet all of them and
their families, and to see the rest of the photographs! I still have a
thousand questions, and I want to find more family. More important, we are
alive and we need to celebrate life. I must locate a person who speaks
both Hungarian and English, and with whom all of us can feel comfortable in
Budapest and / or Vienna.

I have found these relatives in large part due to the existence of
JewishGen and its various SIGs and sources of information. Thank you,
also, to the dozens of Genners and SIGgers who have helped me with all
kinds of advice; I have tried to thank each of you personally. My
financial contribution will be on its way to JewishGen.

Shana Tova to all. May we see peace in Israel and throughout the world,
this year.

Marilyn Sheridan (Miriam SIGAL)
Tucson, AZ, USA

Surname REESE from Lithuania #general

Steve Orlen
 

On Shimon ORLIN's 1910 ship manifest, he lists as leaving behind a sister
Bane REESE, in Sosle (aka Zaslia, et al). On Shimon's daughter Riwa's
manifest (same boat, separate listing), she lists as leaving behind her
aunt, Bassa REESE. The same person, of course. This is the first time
I've heard of this great-great-aunt. The ORLIN family also lived in
Vieves, Bagaslaviskis, and Vilnius. Also, I don't recognize either Bane or
Bassa as Jewish given names. The closest I can come is Basya, Bina, and
Bune. Do any of the Lithuanian REESE's have such a woman in their trees?

Best, Steve Orlen
Tucson, Arizona

Benno: the name #general

Ben Griffin <bgriffin@...>
 

I'm wondering what the history of the forename "Benno" is. Is it a
diminutive of Benjamin? Is it specifically Jewish, or specifically
German, or what? Anything you know might help.

Thanks

Benjamin Griffin