Date   

Re: occupation: scourer??? #general

tediboy <rmod@...>
 

In article <3DB81414.80100@sciti.com>,
Stephanie Weiner <laguna@sciti.com> wrote:

I have found information on a relative living in Amesbury, MA in
1903-1904. His occupation is listed as "scourer." Anyone have a clue
what a scourer did??
It seems likely to me that the occupation would be a wool scourer or scourer
of some other form of textile. >from my limited knowlege of the US. I think
that region had a lot of textile mills during that era.(it still may have
for all I know)
One textile industry that still exists in some small towns, in the sheep
grazing lands of inland eastern Australia where I live, is a wool scour
where the grease & burrs etc. are removed >from fleeces. Those who work in
this industry are often called scourers.
I hope this helps,
Myer O'Donnell


where is Dow Field? #general

Howard Zakai
 

Hello,

I have a picture of my grandfather dressed in uniform sometime during Waorld
War II. Someone wrote in "Dow Field." Any clue where this would be?

He was registered into the Service in the Bronx, New York and was in the Army
Air Force.

Howie Zakai
Staten Island, NY


Looking for Abby Grissinger #general

Cindy Gallard <dg2286@...>
 

Looking for researcher #3591, Abby Grissinger, researching
Lobatch family. Thank you
Cindy Gallard
Denver, CO

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately.


Re: Occupation #france

Elliott Terman <meterman@...>
 

Dear Ms Weiner
It is most likely that your relative in Amesbury, MA was working in the
Textile Industry. During the time frame that you noted, 1903 - 1904,
the Textile Industry was probably the main employer, aside >from Fishery,
in MA and the entire New England area.
A Scourer had a hard, WET and HOT job during any season of the
year...especially during the Summer.
Although fabric processed in the area included all types of fibers,
Scouring most often referred to the cleaning of raw wool fibers, prior
to spinning into yarn for weaving. The raw stock SMELLED AWFUL. It was
dirty work..."what kind of job was that for a Jewish boy...?
Elliott Terman


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: occupation: scourer??? #general

tediboy <rmod@...>
 

In article <3DB81414.80100@sciti.com>,
Stephanie Weiner <laguna@sciti.com> wrote:

I have found information on a relative living in Amesbury, MA in
1903-1904. His occupation is listed as "scourer." Anyone have a clue
what a scourer did??
It seems likely to me that the occupation would be a wool scourer or scourer
of some other form of textile. >from my limited knowlege of the US. I think
that region had a lot of textile mills during that era.(it still may have
for all I know)
One textile industry that still exists in some small towns, in the sheep
grazing lands of inland eastern Australia where I live, is a wool scour
where the grease & burrs etc. are removed >from fleeces. Those who work in
this industry are often called scourers.
I hope this helps,
Myer O'Donnell


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen where is Dow Field? #general

Howard Zakai
 

Hello,

I have a picture of my grandfather dressed in uniform sometime during Waorld
War II. Someone wrote in "Dow Field." Any clue where this would be?

He was registered into the Service in the Bronx, New York and was in the Army
Air Force.

Howie Zakai
Staten Island, NY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Looking for Abby Grissinger #general

Cindy Gallard <dg2286@...>
 

Looking for researcher #3591, Abby Grissinger, researching
Lobatch family. Thank you
Cindy Gallard
Denver, CO

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Occupation #general

Elliott Terman <meterman@...>
 

Dear Ms Weiner
It is most likely that your relative in Amesbury, MA was working in the
Textile Industry. During the time frame that you noted, 1903 - 1904,
the Textile Industry was probably the main employer, aside >from Fishery,
in MA and the entire New England area.
A Scourer had a hard, WET and HOT job during any season of the
year...especially during the Summer.
Although fabric processed in the area included all types of fibers,
Scouring most often referred to the cleaning of raw wool fibers, prior
to spinning into yarn for weaving. The raw stock SMELLED AWFUL. It was
dirty work..."what kind of job was that for a Jewish boy...?
Elliott Terman


Re: Jewish names based on location #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 10/26/2002 7:19:48 PM Eastern Daylight Time, Irvjs@aol.com
writes:

<< I do not dispute that many Jewish names in Germany were based on
place-names with which the person was associated but in my own family I have
found some hard-to explain family names. My ggf, Leib Speier (which is
already a place name, though the Speiers came >from HOF), wrote in the "Family
Book" in 1872 that he took the mane HOLSTEIN, though the family; lived near
Kassel and had no apparent connection with the province of Holstein.

Leib Speier-Holstein also traces his ancestry to the PLAUT Family of
Neuenbrunslar, which again is not near Schleswig-Holstein. Another mystery
regarding the "taking" of additional names are the various descendants of
Josef Plaut who added names such as Dannenberg, Stern and Koenig to the Plaut
name. Often the original name (Plaut, Speier) was dropped and only the newer
name retained by future generations. >>

Irwin Schiffres has raised an important point. The rational for people
"taking" a specific family name is often as inexpicable as the ashes of the
red heifer.

Who can guess today? Names weren't necessarily taken, they were also given,
long before the laws required it, by members of the community, by members of
the family, even, to distinguish one clan >from another or one person >from
others with the same name.

There may have been some connections, or it may have been a whimsy. In my own
ancestral family, some had taken/been given the village name, Frensdorf, as
family name by the very early 18th cent (especially one rabbinical family in
Hanover and Hamburg, who doubled the final F. There was another rabbi, Uri
Feist of nearby-Bamberg whom researchers assumed to be a member of my
family--but he wasn't. His father Samuel Feist had been known as Samuel
Frensdorf because he briefly lived in the village.

In 1813 when the law demanded it, my extended family took eight different
family names, including Elkan (after an Elchanan ancestor) and Feldheim (for
no known reason) and Bernet (because the Bavarian villagers pronounced the
name YomTov as YomDov and "everyone" knows a Dov [Heb] is a Baer [Ger.] and
"renamed" an earlier YomTov as Jondef Behr.)

The different names in my family were taken almost of necessity: in the
previous century my ancestral family accounted for something like 70% of the
Jewish population of the tiny village, and they spread by marriage, business
and inclination to the neighboring town (Bamberg). Even so, there were so
many BERNET's in the region that one branch changed the name to BERNERT, and
no less than three of the young men of the Bamberg community who gave their
lives in WW 1 were Bernets.

I'm still trying to link together all the FRENSDORF[F]s. All the BERNETs who
came to America in th 19th century became BARNET on their arrival (BERNATs
for those who felt too crowded by their relatives). Today, only two Jewish
BERNET families remain: I amd my descendants, and the grandson of my
grandfather's cousin, and his descendants in California.

Michael Bernet, New York <mBernet@aol.com>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Jewish names based on location #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 10/26/2002 7:19:48 PM Eastern Daylight Time, Irvjs@aol.com
writes:

<< I do not dispute that many Jewish names in Germany were based on
place-names with which the person was associated but in my own family I have
found some hard-to explain family names. My ggf, Leib Speier (which is
already a place name, though the Speiers came >from HOF), wrote in the "Family
Book" in 1872 that he took the mane HOLSTEIN, though the family; lived near
Kassel and had no apparent connection with the province of Holstein.

Leib Speier-Holstein also traces his ancestry to the PLAUT Family of
Neuenbrunslar, which again is not near Schleswig-Holstein. Another mystery
regarding the "taking" of additional names are the various descendants of
Josef Plaut who added names such as Dannenberg, Stern and Koenig to the Plaut
name. Often the original name (Plaut, Speier) was dropped and only the newer
name retained by future generations. >>

Irwin Schiffres has raised an important point. The rational for people
"taking" a specific family name is often as inexpicable as the ashes of the
red heifer.

Who can guess today? Names weren't necessarily taken, they were also given,
long before the laws required it, by members of the community, by members of
the family, even, to distinguish one clan >from another or one person >from
others with the same name.

There may have been some connections, or it may have been a whimsy. In my own
ancestral family, some had taken/been given the village name, Frensdorf, as
family name by the very early 18th cent (especially one rabbinical family in
Hanover and Hamburg, who doubled the final F. There was another rabbi, Uri
Feist of nearby-Bamberg whom researchers assumed to be a member of my
family--but he wasn't. His father Samuel Feist had been known as Samuel
Frensdorf because he briefly lived in the village.

In 1813 when the law demanded it, my extended family took eight different
family names, including Elkan (after an Elchanan ancestor) and Feldheim (for
no known reason) and Bernet (because the Bavarian villagers pronounced the
name YomTov as YomDov and "everyone" knows a Dov [Heb] is a Baer [Ger.] and
"renamed" an earlier YomTov as Jondef Behr.)

The different names in my family were taken almost of necessity: in the
previous century my ancestral family accounted for something like 70% of the
Jewish population of the tiny village, and they spread by marriage, business
and inclination to the neighboring town (Bamberg). Even so, there were so
many BERNET's in the region that one branch changed the name to BERNERT, and
no less than three of the young men of the Bamberg community who gave their
lives in WW 1 were Bernets.

I'm still trying to link together all the FRENSDORF[F]s. All the BERNETs who
came to America in th 19th century became BARNET on their arrival (BERNATs
for those who felt too crowded by their relatives). Today, only two Jewish
BERNET families remain: I amd my descendants, and the grandson of my
grandfather's cousin, and his descendants in California.

Michael Bernet, New York <mBernet@aol.com>


People's School? #general

Anna Olswanger <anna.olswanger@...>
 

In researching the town of Varniai in Lithuania, a translator
provided this description of the town >from Slownik Geograficzny
Krolestwa Polskiego i Innych Krajow Slowianskich [Geographical
Dictionary of the Kingdom of Poland and Other Slavonic
Countries], published in 1880:

Varniai had 19 houses, 205 inhabitants, a [Russian Orthodox]
church, 8 Catholic churches, 3 synagogues, a people's school, a
post and telegraph office, 49 stores, and a few small industries.
Market days were every Tuesday and Friday. Fairs (bazaars) were
held on March 19, June 27, and September 8.

Does anyone know what the term "people's school" means?

Thanks if you can help.

Anna Olswanger (researching Alschwanger/Olschwanger in Kretinga
and Varniai, Lithuania)

Anna Olswanger Books
http://www.olswanger.com


Immigration Records-SAMUEL SIEGEL #general

Marilyn Siegel <jadzgran@...>
 

Hi All,
I have been trying to find my father-in-law, and his family's arrival in
the U.S,I have searched and searched the Ellis Island and other sites, with
every variation on spelling I could think of, and still come up empty. Does
anyone have a source for Russians or anyone coming to the U.S.? I would be
most appreciative for any help.
Samuel (or Sam) SIEGEL (or perhaps SEGALOVITCH)
Born in Minsk, I think Uzda, Russia, about 1893.
Emigrated to the U.S. in about 1913 or 1914, at about age 20.
He was ordained as a Rabbi (or Reverend) in Russia.
His father's name was Shimon or Simon.

Wife Doris, nee Magilenski, and daughter Bess emigrated about 8 years
later, 1921 or 1922.
Doris was born in Uzda, also in 1893.
Bess (Bashe Miriam) was born in Russia in 1913.

Samuel's father, shimon Siegel was born about 1848, and was a Rabbi. He
may have arrived in 1921 or earlier.

I have been told that Samuel returned to Russia with his brother,
Schleime, to bring over their sister, Florence. so there should be 2
entries to the U.S. for Samuel. I have also been told that, with Florence,
they landed in N.Y. at the former site of Castle Garden.

It has been quite frustrating trying to find these elusive relatives,
and I would be thrilled and thankful for any help.
Marilyn S. in Fl.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen People's School? #general

Anna Olswanger <anna.olswanger@...>
 

In researching the town of Varniai in Lithuania, a translator
provided this description of the town >from Slownik Geograficzny
Krolestwa Polskiego i Innych Krajow Slowianskich [Geographical
Dictionary of the Kingdom of Poland and Other Slavonic
Countries], published in 1880:

Varniai had 19 houses, 205 inhabitants, a [Russian Orthodox]
church, 8 Catholic churches, 3 synagogues, a people's school, a
post and telegraph office, 49 stores, and a few small industries.
Market days were every Tuesday and Friday. Fairs (bazaars) were
held on March 19, June 27, and September 8.

Does anyone know what the term "people's school" means?

Thanks if you can help.

Anna Olswanger (researching Alschwanger/Olschwanger in Kretinga
and Varniai, Lithuania)

Anna Olswanger Books
http://www.olswanger.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Immigration Records-SAMUEL SIEGEL #general

Marilyn Siegel <jadzgran@...>
 

Hi All,
I have been trying to find my father-in-law, and his family's arrival in
the U.S,I have searched and searched the Ellis Island and other sites, with
every variation on spelling I could think of, and still come up empty. Does
anyone have a source for Russians or anyone coming to the U.S.? I would be
most appreciative for any help.
Samuel (or Sam) SIEGEL (or perhaps SEGALOVITCH)
Born in Minsk, I think Uzda, Russia, about 1893.
Emigrated to the U.S. in about 1913 or 1914, at about age 20.
He was ordained as a Rabbi (or Reverend) in Russia.
His father's name was Shimon or Simon.

Wife Doris, nee Magilenski, and daughter Bess emigrated about 8 years
later, 1921 or 1922.
Doris was born in Uzda, also in 1893.
Bess (Bashe Miriam) was born in Russia in 1913.

Samuel's father, shimon Siegel was born about 1848, and was a Rabbi. He
may have arrived in 1921 or earlier.

I have been told that Samuel returned to Russia with his brother,
Schleime, to bring over their sister, Florence. so there should be 2
entries to the U.S. for Samuel. I have also been told that, with Florence,
they landed in N.Y. at the former site of Castle Garden.

It has been quite frustrating trying to find these elusive relatives,
and I would be thrilled and thankful for any help.
Marilyn S. in Fl.


New to list-in need of advice #ukraine

Kelly Collins <Nibdipper@...>
 

Greetings list members,

I am desperately trying to find information on the family of my
husband's grandfather, Leo SINGER. What I know of Leo, is that he came to
the United States in 1913. His given name is listed on his "Declaration of
Intention" as Laub WILSHONSKY. He joined the US Cavalry in World War I and
his discharge papers also reflect this name. He came >from Kiev, Russia
and lived in Newark, New Jersey, where he became a fireman in 1928, at
which time he changed his name legally >from Laub WILSHONSKY to Leo SINGER.
None of his paper work, reflects his parents names. I know that he had 2
brothers, Max and Saul SINGER (given names >from the home country unknown).
I tried to further my research, looking for information on Max SINGER,
who very kindly shows up in census records. To that end, I have come across
information online suggesting that the parents names were Morris and
Anna (nee STULBERG) WILSHINSKY.
With both surnames, WILSHONSKY and WILSHINSKY, I have been currently
unable to find Ellis Island information on any family members. I do know
for certain that Leo came through Ellis Island and I have tried variations
of spelling, only to come up empty handed. In trying to locate the
surname online, WILSHINSKY is the only one that gets any hits, however,
nothing definitive or helpful in my search.
Is there anyone who might have information on this family or would be
able to guide me in where to look in other sources or possibly insight
on the variations of spelling for the surname in Russia? I know all this
is very generalized and being new to research overseas, I am very unsure
in my footing. Any assistance will be gratefully appreciated. Thank you
all, so much for your time.

Sincerely,
Kelly Collins


Moderator's Note:
Most of JewishGen's databases use the Daitch-Mokotoff Soundex system for
searching, which takes various spellings into account. The advanced search
ability allows you to enclose characters of the name being searched in
brackets signifying that the letter should not be soundexed but must
appear as is. So, for starters, please try - JewishGen InfoFile Index:
http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine New to list-in need of advice #ukraine

Kelly Collins <Nibdipper@...>
 

Greetings list members,

I am desperately trying to find information on the family of my
husband's grandfather, Leo SINGER. What I know of Leo, is that he came to
the United States in 1913. His given name is listed on his "Declaration of
Intention" as Laub WILSHONSKY. He joined the US Cavalry in World War I and
his discharge papers also reflect this name. He came >from Kiev, Russia
and lived in Newark, New Jersey, where he became a fireman in 1928, at
which time he changed his name legally >from Laub WILSHONSKY to Leo SINGER.
None of his paper work, reflects his parents names. I know that he had 2
brothers, Max and Saul SINGER (given names >from the home country unknown).
I tried to further my research, looking for information on Max SINGER,
who very kindly shows up in census records. To that end, I have come across
information online suggesting that the parents names were Morris and
Anna (nee STULBERG) WILSHINSKY.
With both surnames, WILSHONSKY and WILSHINSKY, I have been currently
unable to find Ellis Island information on any family members. I do know
for certain that Leo came through Ellis Island and I have tried variations
of spelling, only to come up empty handed. In trying to locate the
surname online, WILSHINSKY is the only one that gets any hits, however,
nothing definitive or helpful in my search.
Is there anyone who might have information on this family or would be
able to guide me in where to look in other sources or possibly insight
on the variations of spelling for the surname in Russia? I know all this
is very generalized and being new to research overseas, I am very unsure
in my footing. Any assistance will be gratefully appreciated. Thank you
all, so much for your time.

Sincerely,
Kelly Collins


Moderator's Note:
Most of JewishGen's databases use the Daitch-Mokotoff Soundex system for
searching, which takes various spellings into account. The advanced search
ability allows you to enclose characters of the name being searched in
brackets signifying that the letter should not be soundexed but must
appear as is. So, for starters, please try - JewishGen InfoFile Index:
http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/


Can someone help please #general

Lili Susser <susserl@...>
 

Hello Friends
I was excited to receive my fathers resume as he was applying for a job in
the "Magistrat city of Plock". In it he mentions He finished "szkole realna"
in Wloclawek and Mantinband's bookkeeping classes (kursy buchalteryjne) in
Lodz.
Then he goes on "I practiced as a bookkeeper apprentice in Lodz for the Firm
Leon Rapoport and son. ( dom Handlowo Expedycyjny ) (in the year 1916)"
Is anybody familiar with this school or business? Is any of it mentioned
anywhere that I may be able to look up?
Any help will be greatly appreciated
Lili Susser
susserl@attbi.com


GOLDEMBERG/GOLDBERG #general

JANICE GOLDMAN <jg2333@...>
 

Dear Jewishgenners:
I am seeking to locate the descendants of the following
GOLDBERG/GOLDENBERG/GOLDEMBERG families:
- Hannah
- David
- Jack
- Maurice (or Morris)
- Sarina (or similar)
- Esther
They were >from Romania/Turkey.
Thank you very much.
Janice Goldman
jg2333@msn.com
Chicago, IL USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Can someone help please #general

Lili Susser <susserl@...>
 

Hello Friends
I was excited to receive my fathers resume as he was applying for a job in
the "Magistrat city of Plock". In it he mentions He finished "szkole realna"
in Wloclawek and Mantinband's bookkeeping classes (kursy buchalteryjne) in
Lodz.
Then he goes on "I practiced as a bookkeeper apprentice in Lodz for the Firm
Leon Rapoport and son. ( dom Handlowo Expedycyjny ) (in the year 1916)"
Is anybody familiar with this school or business? Is any of it mentioned
anywhere that I may be able to look up?
Any help will be greatly appreciated
Lili Susser
susserl@attbi.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen GOLDEMBERG/GOLDBERG #general

JANICE GOLDMAN <jg2333@...>
 

Dear Jewishgenners:
I am seeking to locate the descendants of the following
GOLDBERG/GOLDENBERG/GOLDEMBERG families:
- Hannah
- David
- Jack
- Maurice (or Morris)
- Sarina (or similar)
- Esther
They were >from Romania/Turkey.
Thank you very much.
Janice Goldman
jg2333@msn.com
Chicago, IL USA