Date   

Help on Yiddish names into English diminutives #general

Alex Bender <alemik@...>
 

Hello,

I am researching my great-grandmother Sarah and her sisters (surname will
be omitted for now since this inquiry concerns only her given name). They
were >from either >from Jaslo, Poland, or Minsk, Belarus and were born in
the late 1870s / early 1880s.

I know that Sarah's sisters' names in this country were Mary and Ida. I am
pretty sure that she only had two sisters, although I'm not certain.

My question concerns Yiddish *equivalents* of these names. I recently
found a picture (which belonged to Sarah) on which there is Yiddish on the
back. Translated, it is addressed to *Mera* and is >from *Dina.* Do these
Yiddish names in any way match up to the English names of Sarah, Ida, or
Mary? If so, which ones?

I thought that *Mera* might be Sarah since they sound similar, and also
since my great-grandmother Sarah was the one who possessed the photo. But
then again, *Mera* also sounds similar to Mary. *Dina* appears to have
some of the same letters as Ida, although I don't know if that has any
significance or is simply a coincidence.

I suspect that the Yiddish names belong to two of the three sisters, but
I'm not sure which ones. Is there any way to be sure, or at least form a
likely guess? I'm not currently aware of any documents online that detail
name changes >from Yiddish to English.

Thanks for any help in solving this mystery.
Alex

MODERATOR NOTE: Useful information on this topic can be found at the
Jewishgen Given Names Database at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames/


Don't laminate copies of photos!! #general

David Kravitz
 

I never laminate or treat old photographs in any way other than storing
them in a cool, dark place. This, after scanning them in color (even black
and white ones). I can now *improve* my photograph, enhancing colors and
contrast, remove scratches and blemishes and, usually, my copy is better
than the original. I can display my pictures anyway I please, confident in
the knowledge that if one fades, I can print off another one. I can also
distribute copies to interested family members who are usually willing to
let me borrow their precious photographs for copying.

David Kravitz
Bournemouth
England


Re: Jewish calendar (converter) #general

Eve Line Blum <eve.line.blum@...>
 

Jewishgenners should be aware that most of the sites or computer programs
suggested for a Hebrew-Civil calendar converter are only available to
users of a PC,not for Mac users

When you search on the Web for Hebrew calendar, you are amazed of the lot
of very interesting information you get. Among them is a very useful and
friendly calendar converter where you can choose any year you want. It
presents the whole month and even the whole year in one single table. It's
at http://www.hebcal.com/

In addition., there is just such a converter right on JewishGen at
Jewishgen Tools: http://www.jewishgen.org/jos/josdates.htm
where you can convert immediately and quickly one date at a time.

Eve Line Blum-Cherchevsky
Besancon (France)
and also
Cercle de Genealogie Juive (International JGS in Paris)
http://www.genealoj.org


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Help on Yiddish names into English diminutives #general

Alex Bender <alemik@...>
 

Hello,

I am researching my great-grandmother Sarah and her sisters (surname will
be omitted for now since this inquiry concerns only her given name). They
were >from either >from Jaslo, Poland, or Minsk, Belarus and were born in
the late 1870s / early 1880s.

I know that Sarah's sisters' names in this country were Mary and Ida. I am
pretty sure that she only had two sisters, although I'm not certain.

My question concerns Yiddish *equivalents* of these names. I recently
found a picture (which belonged to Sarah) on which there is Yiddish on the
back. Translated, it is addressed to *Mera* and is >from *Dina.* Do these
Yiddish names in any way match up to the English names of Sarah, Ida, or
Mary? If so, which ones?

I thought that *Mera* might be Sarah since they sound similar, and also
since my great-grandmother Sarah was the one who possessed the photo. But
then again, *Mera* also sounds similar to Mary. *Dina* appears to have
some of the same letters as Ida, although I don't know if that has any
significance or is simply a coincidence.

I suspect that the Yiddish names belong to two of the three sisters, but
I'm not sure which ones. Is there any way to be sure, or at least form a
likely guess? I'm not currently aware of any documents online that detail
name changes >from Yiddish to English.

Thanks for any help in solving this mystery.
Alex

MODERATOR NOTE: Useful information on this topic can be found at the
Jewishgen Given Names Database at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames/


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Don't laminate copies of photos!! #general

David Kravitz
 

I never laminate or treat old photographs in any way other than storing
them in a cool, dark place. This, after scanning them in color (even black
and white ones). I can now *improve* my photograph, enhancing colors and
contrast, remove scratches and blemishes and, usually, my copy is better
than the original. I can display my pictures anyway I please, confident in
the knowledge that if one fades, I can print off another one. I can also
distribute copies to interested family members who are usually willing to
let me borrow their precious photographs for copying.

David Kravitz
Bournemouth
England


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Jewish calendar (converter) #general

Eve Line Blum <eve.line.blum@...>
 

Jewishgenners should be aware that most of the sites or computer programs
suggested for a Hebrew-Civil calendar converter are only available to
users of a PC,not for Mac users

When you search on the Web for Hebrew calendar, you are amazed of the lot
of very interesting information you get. Among them is a very useful and
friendly calendar converter where you can choose any year you want. It
presents the whole month and even the whole year in one single table. It's
at http://www.hebcal.com/

In addition., there is just such a converter right on JewishGen at
Jewishgen Tools: http://www.jewishgen.org/jos/josdates.htm
where you can convert immediately and quickly one date at a time.

Eve Line Blum-Cherchevsky
Besancon (France)
and also
Cercle de Genealogie Juive (International JGS in Paris)
http://www.genealoj.org


Re: Draganowka #general

Mark Halpern <willie46@...>
 

Dear Ruth:

There is a Dragonowka in eastern Galicia very near Tarnopol. This area was
part of the Austrian Empire before WWI, part of Poland between the Wars,
and part of the Soviet Union after WWII. It is now in Ukraine at
coordinates 4931 2530 about 4.5 miles WSW of Tarnopol.

Dragonowka's vital events were registered in nearby Tarnopol. The Jewish
Records Indexing - Poland AGAD Archives Project is in the process of
indexing all the vital records for 86 administrative towns in the eastern
part of the former province of Galicia. Tarnopol was the first town
indexed and all its records >from about 1870 to 1899 have been indexed.
These indices are searchable at the JRI-Poland website
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/index.htm. Just click on *Search Database*
and fill in the form. Once you find an index entry of interest, you can
order that record >from the AGAD Archives through the JRI-Poland order
process. Costs for AGAD records are $11 each.

Mark Halpern
AGAD Archive Coordinator
JRI-Poland

----- Original Message -----
My grandmother was born in Draganowka in the 1880s. Does
anyone know of this place and how I can get a copy of my grandmother's
birth certificate?
Ruth Levit


Re: Chassidic dress #general

R <ruthien@...>
 

Bernard Rosinsky wrote:

I have pictures of family members at the turn of the 20th century (some
end of 19th century). I know that it is possible to categorize a
tradiional jew by his clothing: Is he a Chassid or a Mitnaged and if a
Chassid, what group he belonged to. Is there a reference book that can
help me determine where I should categorize my ancestor?
Can I deduce more facts >from just a picture?
In general, you can deduce little >from such a picture. Traditional dress
in Russia, for instance, was virtually identical among both chasidim and
misnagdim. And in Lithuania, the dress was somewhat different >from in
Russia, but there again, chassidim and traditional misnagdim dressed
nearly alike. Ditto for Poland, and for Galicia, Hungary, etc. So while
the manner of dress in the picture might indicate the country of origin,
and that the person wore what was in those days traditional Jewish
garb in that country, it will indicate little else about the person.
Certainly not what "kind" of chassid the person might be.

One exception might be Vizhnitz Chassidim. As far as I know, they were and
are the only ones to wear their hat backwards, with the bow on the band
tied on the right side instead of the left.

Moshe Siechmach


Boston index besides NARA #general

C&V <proprius@...>
 

Fran Segall's question about alternatives to the NARA microfilms for
Boston arrivals reminds me of my experience at the Washington NARA. After
trying to read an illegible microfilm, I asked an attendant if there were
any other copies. His reply was negative, and he as much as said to
forget about being able to read the film.
After I got back home, I ordered the same microfilm through the local
Mormon library, and was able to read the microfilm that they provided.
So, don't give up; see if the film can be ordered >from another source to
receive a more legible copy.

Cynthia Spikell


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Draganowka #general

Mark Halpern <willie46@...>
 

Dear Ruth:

There is a Dragonowka in eastern Galicia very near Tarnopol. This area was
part of the Austrian Empire before WWI, part of Poland between the Wars,
and part of the Soviet Union after WWII. It is now in Ukraine at
coordinates 4931 2530 about 4.5 miles WSW of Tarnopol.

Dragonowka's vital events were registered in nearby Tarnopol. The Jewish
Records Indexing - Poland AGAD Archives Project is in the process of
indexing all the vital records for 86 administrative towns in the eastern
part of the former province of Galicia. Tarnopol was the first town
indexed and all its records >from about 1870 to 1899 have been indexed.
These indices are searchable at the JRI-Poland website
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/index.htm. Just click on *Search Database*
and fill in the form. Once you find an index entry of interest, you can
order that record >from the AGAD Archives through the JRI-Poland order
process. Costs for AGAD records are $11 each.

Mark Halpern
AGAD Archive Coordinator
JRI-Poland

----- Original Message -----
My grandmother was born in Draganowka in the 1880s. Does
anyone know of this place and how I can get a copy of my grandmother's
birth certificate?
Ruth Levit


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Chassidic dress #general

R <ruthien@...>
 

Bernard Rosinsky wrote:

I have pictures of family members at the turn of the 20th century (some
end of 19th century). I know that it is possible to categorize a
tradiional jew by his clothing: Is he a Chassid or a Mitnaged and if a
Chassid, what group he belonged to. Is there a reference book that can
help me determine where I should categorize my ancestor?
Can I deduce more facts >from just a picture?
In general, you can deduce little >from such a picture. Traditional dress
in Russia, for instance, was virtually identical among both chasidim and
misnagdim. And in Lithuania, the dress was somewhat different >from in
Russia, but there again, chassidim and traditional misnagdim dressed
nearly alike. Ditto for Poland, and for Galicia, Hungary, etc. So while
the manner of dress in the picture might indicate the country of origin,
and that the person wore what was in those days traditional Jewish
garb in that country, it will indicate little else about the person.
Certainly not what "kind" of chassid the person might be.

One exception might be Vizhnitz Chassidim. As far as I know, they were and
are the only ones to wear their hat backwards, with the bow on the band
tied on the right side instead of the left.

Moshe Siechmach


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Boston index besides NARA #general

C&V <proprius@...>
 

Fran Segall's question about alternatives to the NARA microfilms for
Boston arrivals reminds me of my experience at the Washington NARA. After
trying to read an illegible microfilm, I asked an attendant if there were
any other copies. His reply was negative, and he as much as said to
forget about being able to read the film.
After I got back home, I ordered the same microfilm through the local
Mormon library, and was able to read the microfilm that they provided.
So, don't give up; see if the film can be ordered >from another source to
receive a more legible copy.

Cynthia Spikell


Re: Palestine- British mandate records #unitedkingdom

shaul <shaul@...>
 

On 26/08/02 Merv & Naomi Barnett <@naomi_in_oz> asked about
Palestien mandate records ni the UK.

there is a large section in the British Library, oriental and India Office
Collections. this was the subject of a talk given by Jill Geber at the 21st
International Conference on Jewish Genealogy, July 2001 in London, and the
catalogue can be accessed online.

The Public Records Office, Kew has material. but if you are looking for
vital records, these are mainly in Israel.


Saul Issroff


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Re: Palestine- British mandate records #unitedkingdom

shaul <shaul@...>
 

On 26/08/02 Merv & Naomi Barnett <@naomi_in_oz> asked about
Palestien mandate records ni the UK.

there is a large section in the British Library, oriental and India Office
Collections. this was the subject of a talk given by Jill Geber at the 21st
International Conference on Jewish Genealogy, July 2001 in London, and the
catalogue can be accessed online.

The Public Records Office, Kew has material. but if you are looking for
vital records, these are mainly in Israel.


Saul Issroff


Entire text of 'The Jewish Encyclopedia' now online #poland #lodz

Seflaum@...
 

Dear Fellow Researchers,

A fellow genealogist and I discovered this new web site today:

http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com

This is >from the introduction to site:

"This website contains the complete contents of the 12-volume Jewish
Encyclopedia, which was originally published between 1901-1906. The Jewish
Encyclopedia, which recently became part of the public domain, contains over
15,000 articles and illustrations. This online version contains the unedited
contents of the original encyclopedia. Since the original work was completed
almost 100 years ago, it does not cover a significant portion of modern
Jewish History (e.g., the creation of Israel, the Holocaust, etc.)..."

The entire text is searchable. Images may be located by searching for text in
the captions. Enjoy!

Regards,
Shirley Rotbein Flaum
Houston, Texas


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland Entire text of 'The Jewish Encyclopedia' now online #lodz #poland

Seflaum@...
 

Dear Fellow Researchers,

A fellow genealogist and I discovered this new web site today:

http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com

This is >from the introduction to site:

"This website contains the complete contents of the 12-volume Jewish
Encyclopedia, which was originally published between 1901-1906. The Jewish
Encyclopedia, which recently became part of the public domain, contains over
15,000 articles and illustrations. This online version contains the unedited
contents of the original encyclopedia. Since the original work was completed
almost 100 years ago, it does not cover a significant portion of modern
Jewish History (e.g., the creation of Israel, the Holocaust, etc.)..."

The entire text is searchable. Images may be located by searching for text in
the captions. Enjoy!

Regards,
Shirley Rotbein Flaum
Houston, Texas


Polish doctors #lodz #poland

Chaim freedman
 

Subject: Seeking records about Polish doctors before >& during the war
From: "Alan Glixman"
There is a book "The Mrtyrdom of Jewish Physicians in Poland" by Dr. Leon
Wulman, edited by Louis Falstein, Exposition Press, New York. It has capsule
biogaphies. It should be of interest to researchers of Polish Jewry.

Chaim Freedman
Petah Tikvah, Israel
chaimjan@...
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Colonies_of_Ukraine/index.htm


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland Polish doctors #lodz #poland

Chaim freedman
 

Subject: Seeking records about Polish doctors before >& during the war
From: "Alan Glixman"
There is a book "The Mrtyrdom of Jewish Physicians in Poland" by Dr. Leon
Wulman, edited by Louis Falstein, Exposition Press, New York. It has capsule
biogaphies. It should be of interest to researchers of Polish Jewry.

Chaim Freedman
Petah Tikvah, Israel
chaimjan@...
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Colonies_of_Ukraine/index.htm


Re: Going to Latvia in October #latvia

Martha Lev-Zion <martha@...>
 

Would very much appreciate any tips >from SIG members re:
-- research in the Historical Archives
Always write ahead to the Archives and tell the archivists what families
you are researching and when you wish to come. That way, given enough time,
they will be able to prepare some valuable sources for you. The Archives
are not exactly set up for personal researching, so you might be
disappointed with the way things work. But if you let them know in plenty
of time, they might be able to gather some material together for you. You
will love walking in the footstep of your ancestors! Enjoy the visit!

Martha Lev-Zion, Israel
President, SIG Latvia


Latvia SIG #Latvia Re: Going to Latvia in October #latvia

Martha Lev-Zion <martha@...>
 

Would very much appreciate any tips >from SIG members re:
-- research in the Historical Archives
Always write ahead to the Archives and tell the archivists what families
you are researching and when you wish to come. That way, given enough time,
they will be able to prepare some valuable sources for you. The Archives
are not exactly set up for personal researching, so you might be
disappointed with the way things work. But if you let them know in plenty
of time, they might be able to gather some material together for you. You
will love walking in the footstep of your ancestors! Enjoy the visit!

Martha Lev-Zion, Israel
President, SIG Latvia