Date   

* ref: Lucskifalun #hungary

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

Sorry Moderator some corrections are in order ;-)

Lucskifalun (should be written 'Lucski falun') means "at the Lucski
village". Falu is "village" and in Hungarian the 'n' suffix denotes
"at" (like Budapesten means "at Budapest").

Present name of Lucski is Lucky with a hasek on the 'c'.

Rozsahegy is now Ruzomberok in Slovakia and belonged also to the
Lipto county, Rozsahegy district.

At 00:00 -0500 21.08.02, Hungarian SIG digest wrote:
Subject: =3D?iso-8859-1?Q?falun_and_f=3DFCrd=3DF6?=3D
From: Jaki <jaki@...>
Date: Sun, 18 Aug 2002 21:32:37 -0400

Moderator: Lucski was a place in Lipt=DB megye, N=C8metlipcsei
jaras (district), now Slovakia. Falun is probably "falu",
which means village. Present name may be Luky, Slovakia. I suggest
that Lucskifalu is either the same place as Lucski or a small
settlement very near by. Comments? A quick review of resources
didn't identify Rozsahegy but it could be former name of Roznov,
which is not far >from Luky.
--
-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-. -.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-. -.-.-
Tom Venetianer <mailto:tom.vene@...>
Sao Paulo - Brazil

Moderator: Thank to Tom for the corrections. I'm always willing to try to solve a geographical puzzle but am not reluctant to concede that the best I can offer is often only supposition!


Hungary SIG #Hungary * ref: Lucskifalun #hungary

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

Sorry Moderator some corrections are in order ;-)

Lucskifalun (should be written 'Lucski falun') means "at the Lucski
village". Falu is "village" and in Hungarian the 'n' suffix denotes
"at" (like Budapesten means "at Budapest").

Present name of Lucski is Lucky with a hasek on the 'c'.

Rozsahegy is now Ruzomberok in Slovakia and belonged also to the
Lipto county, Rozsahegy district.

At 00:00 -0500 21.08.02, Hungarian SIG digest wrote:
Subject: =3D?iso-8859-1?Q?falun_and_f=3DFCrd=3DF6?=3D
From: Jaki <jaki@...>
Date: Sun, 18 Aug 2002 21:32:37 -0400

Moderator: Lucski was a place in Lipt=DB megye, N=C8metlipcsei
jaras (district), now Slovakia. Falun is probably "falu",
which means village. Present name may be Luky, Slovakia. I suggest
that Lucskifalu is either the same place as Lucski or a small
settlement very near by. Comments? A quick review of resources
didn't identify Rozsahegy but it could be former name of Roznov,
which is not far >from Luky.
--
-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-. -.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-. -.-.-
Tom Venetianer <mailto:tom.vene@...>
Sao Paulo - Brazil

Moderator: Thank to Tom for the corrections. I'm always willing to try to solve a geographical puzzle but am not reluctant to concede that the best I can offer is often only supposition!


Re: h-sig digest: July 24, 2002 (looking for Polachek) #hungary

Harry Goldstein <apdsvys@...>
 


Subject: Please Post
From: JoAnna Wogulis <mojo@...>
Date: Tue, 23 Jul 2002 12:43:16 -0700
X-Message-Number: 1

My first posting. I am looking for relatives with
the surname,
Polachek, Polacsek, Anais and Ouslander. They lived
in Csap, Hungary,
which is now Chop in the Ukraine. I'm also
interested to know if Csap
was ever part of Czechoslovakia. When my mother
came to the U.S. her
ethnicity was listed as Hebrew, Tchacosl. although
they were all from
Csap. That was in 1922.
Thanks for any help you can give.
JoAnna Wogulis

Moderator: I believe that Csap, formerly in the
Nagykapos district of Ung megye, Hungary, was ceded
to the new republic of Czechoslovakia following
World War I. See
<http://www.hungary.com/corvinus/lib/hmcb/hmcb04.htm>
for info about shifting populations in this area.
Hi,
According to my mother, who comes >from Nagy Kalo,
there was a Polachek or Polacsek family living there.
Some of the descendants, having survived WWII, are to
this day living in the Williamsburg section of
Brooklyn, NY.
I have a photograph of the gravestone of an 'Avrohom
Polachek' buried next to my mothers grandfather in the
Nagy Kalo cemetary. This Avrohom Polachek was born
about 150 years ago. There is a grandson of this
Avrohom living in Monsey, NY by the name of Shimon
Polachek.

If you want more info, please eMail me offline at
simchag@....


Regards
Simcha Goldstein


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: h-sig digest: July 24, 2002 (looking for Polachek) #hungary

Harry Goldstein <apdsvys@...>
 


Subject: Please Post
From: JoAnna Wogulis <mojo@...>
Date: Tue, 23 Jul 2002 12:43:16 -0700
X-Message-Number: 1

My first posting. I am looking for relatives with
the surname,
Polachek, Polacsek, Anais and Ouslander. They lived
in Csap, Hungary,
which is now Chop in the Ukraine. I'm also
interested to know if Csap
was ever part of Czechoslovakia. When my mother
came to the U.S. her
ethnicity was listed as Hebrew, Tchacosl. although
they were all from
Csap. That was in 1922.
Thanks for any help you can give.
JoAnna Wogulis

Moderator: I believe that Csap, formerly in the
Nagykapos district of Ung megye, Hungary, was ceded
to the new republic of Czechoslovakia following
World War I. See
<http://www.hungary.com/corvinus/lib/hmcb/hmcb04.htm>
for info about shifting populations in this area.
Hi,
According to my mother, who comes >from Nagy Kalo,
there was a Polachek or Polacsek family living there.
Some of the descendants, having survived WWII, are to
this day living in the Williamsburg section of
Brooklyn, NY.
I have a photograph of the gravestone of an 'Avrohom
Polachek' buried next to my mothers grandfather in the
Nagy Kalo cemetary. This Avrohom Polachek was born
about 150 years ago. There is a grandson of this
Avrohom living in Monsey, NY by the name of Shimon
Polachek.

If you want more info, please eMail me offline at
simchag@....


Regards
Simcha Goldstein


magyar zsido #hungary

ilona lerman <phililona2001@...>
 

How can I get back copies of Magyar Zsido? How much
does a back issue cost?
Ilona Lerman, phililona2001@...
Searching;
KELLER- PRESOV, SLOVAKIA
FELLNER- SOPRON
GOTTLIEB-VASVAR

Moderator: Contact Louis Schonfeld, the "father" of H-SIG at <ischon@...> regarding copies of back issues. Magyar Zsido ceased publication several years ago. Anyone interested in working on an on-line edition?


Hungary SIG #Hungary magyar zsido #hungary

ilona lerman <phililona2001@...>
 

How can I get back copies of Magyar Zsido? How much
does a back issue cost?
Ilona Lerman, phililona2001@...
Searching;
KELLER- PRESOV, SLOVAKIA
FELLNER- SOPRON
GOTTLIEB-VASVAR

Moderator: Contact Louis Schonfeld, the "father" of H-SIG at <ischon@...> regarding copies of back issues. Magyar Zsido ceased publication several years ago. Anyone interested in working on an on-line edition?


Re: litvaksig digest: August 19, 2002 #lithuania

Judith27
 

Dear LitvakSIGdom,

The wonderful documentary, UNCLE CHATZKEL, which was shown at the Toronto Conference, is one of many videos, books, and other publications listed and described on the LitvakSIG Publications web page at http://www.jewishgen.org/Litvak/publications.htm

The entry for this very moving video reads:
<< Uncle Chatzkel {Australia: Film Australia National Interest
Program, in association with ROBE Productions and SBS Independent, with the assistance of the New South Wales Film and Television Office,
Producer/Director/Writer: Rod Freedman; Co-Producer: Emile Sherman;
Cinematographer: Nicholas Sherman; Principal Photography in Lithuania (June 1997) and Australia (July 1999); 52:20 minutes long, in colour with some black and white footage}

"Uncle Chatzkel portrays the patient triumph of one man's dignity and
intellect over genocide, oppression and personal adversity. Chatzkel Lemchen has lived through the Russian revolution, two world wars, a communist regime and the transition of Lithuania >from Soviet republic to an independent state.

"During the Holocaust his parents and children, along with many of their
fellow Jewish citizens, were killed by the Nazis and their Lithuanian
supporters. He and his wife were sent to separate concentration camps in
Germany. Chatzkel survived through his skills as a linguist and
lexicographer, and his dictionaries helped preserve the Lithuanian language during the Soviet era.

"Born in 1904 in the small town of Papile to Rocha and Avraham Yaakov
Lemchen, Chatzkel Lemchen was the youngest of seven children. During World
War I, the frontline came dangerously close to Papile, forcing his family to flee across several countries, eventually settling in Penza, Russia, where they lived for seven years under the new Communist regime. At the age of 17, Chatzkel and his family returned home to find it in ruins and settled in nearby Zagare. It was at University Jonas that Chatzkel became an assistant to Professor Janos Jablonskis, widely recognised as the "Father of the Modern Lithuanian Language." His talent as a linguist and scholar was evident early in his 'apprenticeship' to Jablonskis and he went on to become a highly respected teacher and translator.

In the late 1920s, Chatzkel met and married Ela 'Lena' Wohlson, a fellow teacher. Together they raised two sons, Azarye and Victor, and moved to the city of Kaunas (Kovno in Yiddish). In 1939, Lithuania became another Soviet republic under the non-aggression treaty between Russia and Germany. However, when the latter invaded and occupied Lithuania in 1941, Chatzkel and his family were imprisoned in the Kaunas (Kovno) Ghetto and later transported to separate concentration camps in Germany. The Holocaust claimed the lives of his parents and his sons, and on release >from Dachau at the end of World War II, Chatzkel returned home to hear that his wife was seriously ill in a German hospital. After they reunited, he nursed her back to health and, even after his wife's death in 1979, he lived in Vilnius working as a linguist and lexicographer until his death at age 97 on Nov. 11, 2001. "

This video can be ordered >from Film Australia Sales, PO Box 46, Lindfield NSW 2070, Australia, or mmullen@...

< I am sorry to tell you the sad news that Uncle Chatzkel died on
Sunday, November 11. Born on April 21, 1904, he had reached the age of 97,
extraordinary for a man who had endured so much.> wrote his great-nephew Rod Freedman, who produced, directed, and wrote the video about Uncle Chatzkelis Lemchenas.

To read the full text of Rod Freedman's message and eulogy which was
posted by Saul Isroff in November 2001, go to the LitvakSIG Discussion
Archives on the JewishGen SIG Lists Archive web page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.isa?jg~jgsys~sigspop

Shalom,
Judi Langer-Surnamer Caplan
Editor, LitvakSIG Online Journal


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: litvaksig digest: August 19, 2002 #lithuania

Judith27
 

Dear LitvakSIGdom,

The wonderful documentary, UNCLE CHATZKEL, which was shown at the Toronto Conference, is one of many videos, books, and other publications listed and described on the LitvakSIG Publications web page at http://www.jewishgen.org/Litvak/publications.htm

The entry for this very moving video reads:
<< Uncle Chatzkel {Australia: Film Australia National Interest
Program, in association with ROBE Productions and SBS Independent, with the assistance of the New South Wales Film and Television Office,
Producer/Director/Writer: Rod Freedman; Co-Producer: Emile Sherman;
Cinematographer: Nicholas Sherman; Principal Photography in Lithuania (June 1997) and Australia (July 1999); 52:20 minutes long, in colour with some black and white footage}

"Uncle Chatzkel portrays the patient triumph of one man's dignity and
intellect over genocide, oppression and personal adversity. Chatzkel Lemchen has lived through the Russian revolution, two world wars, a communist regime and the transition of Lithuania >from Soviet republic to an independent state.

"During the Holocaust his parents and children, along with many of their
fellow Jewish citizens, were killed by the Nazis and their Lithuanian
supporters. He and his wife were sent to separate concentration camps in
Germany. Chatzkel survived through his skills as a linguist and
lexicographer, and his dictionaries helped preserve the Lithuanian language during the Soviet era.

"Born in 1904 in the small town of Papile to Rocha and Avraham Yaakov
Lemchen, Chatzkel Lemchen was the youngest of seven children. During World
War I, the frontline came dangerously close to Papile, forcing his family to flee across several countries, eventually settling in Penza, Russia, where they lived for seven years under the new Communist regime. At the age of 17, Chatzkel and his family returned home to find it in ruins and settled in nearby Zagare. It was at University Jonas that Chatzkel became an assistant to Professor Janos Jablonskis, widely recognised as the "Father of the Modern Lithuanian Language." His talent as a linguist and scholar was evident early in his 'apprenticeship' to Jablonskis and he went on to become a highly respected teacher and translator.

In the late 1920s, Chatzkel met and married Ela 'Lena' Wohlson, a fellow teacher. Together they raised two sons, Azarye and Victor, and moved to the city of Kaunas (Kovno in Yiddish). In 1939, Lithuania became another Soviet republic under the non-aggression treaty between Russia and Germany. However, when the latter invaded and occupied Lithuania in 1941, Chatzkel and his family were imprisoned in the Kaunas (Kovno) Ghetto and later transported to separate concentration camps in Germany. The Holocaust claimed the lives of his parents and his sons, and on release >from Dachau at the end of World War II, Chatzkel returned home to hear that his wife was seriously ill in a German hospital. After they reunited, he nursed her back to health and, even after his wife's death in 1979, he lived in Vilnius working as a linguist and lexicographer until his death at age 97 on Nov. 11, 2001. "

This video can be ordered >from Film Australia Sales, PO Box 46, Lindfield NSW 2070, Australia, or mmullen@...

< I am sorry to tell you the sad news that Uncle Chatzkel died on
Sunday, November 11. Born on April 21, 1904, he had reached the age of 97,
extraordinary for a man who had endured so much.> wrote his great-nephew Rod Freedman, who produced, directed, and wrote the video about Uncle Chatzkelis Lemchenas.

To read the full text of Rod Freedman's message and eulogy which was
posted by Saul Isroff in November 2001, go to the LitvakSIG Discussion
Archives on the JewishGen SIG Lists Archive web page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.isa?jg~jgsys~sigspop

Shalom,
Judi Langer-Surnamer Caplan
Editor, LitvakSIG Online Journal


Donations to SIGs and Jewishgen #lithuania

Howard Margol
 

Barbara Sloan, New Haven, CT writes (on the Litvak SIG Digest);

<< I have read with interest the comments about the need to donate money.
Obviously all the SIGs and Jewishgen itself need money to operate. The
SIGs and JewishGen run on both money and volunteerism. BOTH are needed
to continue accumulating and disseminating this wonderful body of
knowledge.

I have been offended more than once by well-meaning but boorish people
who have written me personally to suggest that I donate money when I've
recounted some small success due at least in part to what I've learned
here. I am also offended that some SIGs don't want donations of less
than $100. Some of us can't afford to give that much at once. Why
aren't smaller donations welcome?

It seems to me that if we all donate what we can--both monetarily and
otherwise--that this project will continue to flourish. And may I
suggest that it is most improper for anyone to write another personally
to tell that that person to donate money at a particular time. >>
____________________________

Barbara makes a good point but, unfortunately, it does not solve the problem. Whether we like it or not, the days of a "free lunch" are coming closer and closer in ceasing to exist. I am afraid that all of us have become spoiled by the free databases that have been made available to us.

A number of major genealogy databases were, until recently, free. Now, you
have to pay a fee to access them. I am afraid that it is only a matter of
time before sites like Jewishgen, Litvak SIG, as well as other databases,
will either be "frozen in time", or have to close down altogether due to a
lack of funds. Volunteerism is great but, if there is no money with which to purchase needed hardware, software, search engines, records, etc., the
volunteers will have nothing to do or work with.

At the recent conference in Toronto I was shocked when I learned that of the many, many thousands who use Jewishgen almost on a daily basis only a
comparative few donate any money to Jewishgen. I find it difficult to believe that most of these non-donators are living on such a limited budget that they cannot afford 50 cents per week. A minimum of 10,000 users (and that is a very conservative number), donating 50 cents weekly to Jewishgen, would solve a lot of problems. I wonder what the reaction would be if Jewishgen had to shut down for an entire month. Perhaps we need to find out what it would be like to be without Jewishgen.

I have always made it a personal policy to not tell others how to spend their money. However, I have also been a firm believer in marketing a good product. No one is forced to donate money even if what they are being offered is well worth the price. Example: Litvak SIG has a policy that if you donate $100 USD to a particular Uezyd, or District, you will receive all of the translated records received for that District many months prior to it appearing in the ALD. Is that a bargain? You bet it is.

Contrast that with sending a research request to the Historical Archive in
Vilnius. You have to send a research fee of $100 USD plus $13 for a
translation of each record they find for your ancestors. If you request a
search for several surnames and several different towns, more money will
required to be sent. Sending a research request to the Kaunas Archive will
require similar amounts to be sent there as well. For a single $100 donation to the Litvak SIG, you will receive many, many records >from both archives. Rather than look at it as a $100 expenditure you cannot afford, consider it as a real bargain you cannot afford to pass up.

I am in no way criticizing the Lithuanian archives for what they charge. They are forced to do that in order to support the service they provide. Also, I have no official position with Jewishgen or with the Litvak SIG so my comments involving those organizations are strictly my own. Neither are my comments intended as criticizm of Barbara Sloan. Some individuals would like to do more but, for various reasons are not in a position to do so. I would hope that those in that situation would number in the hundreds and not in the thousands as the facts suggest.

I am sure there are those who would disagree with my position. I have no
problem with that. I do think, however, that something needs to be done
before it is too late and the wonderful databases that we have become
accustomed to no longer exist.

Howard Margol
Atlanta, Georgia


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Donations to SIGs and Jewishgen #lithuania

Howard Margol
 

Barbara Sloan, New Haven, CT writes (on the Litvak SIG Digest);

<< I have read with interest the comments about the need to donate money.
Obviously all the SIGs and Jewishgen itself need money to operate. The
SIGs and JewishGen run on both money and volunteerism. BOTH are needed
to continue accumulating and disseminating this wonderful body of
knowledge.

I have been offended more than once by well-meaning but boorish people
who have written me personally to suggest that I donate money when I've
recounted some small success due at least in part to what I've learned
here. I am also offended that some SIGs don't want donations of less
than $100. Some of us can't afford to give that much at once. Why
aren't smaller donations welcome?

It seems to me that if we all donate what we can--both monetarily and
otherwise--that this project will continue to flourish. And may I
suggest that it is most improper for anyone to write another personally
to tell that that person to donate money at a particular time. >>
____________________________

Barbara makes a good point but, unfortunately, it does not solve the problem. Whether we like it or not, the days of a "free lunch" are coming closer and closer in ceasing to exist. I am afraid that all of us have become spoiled by the free databases that have been made available to us.

A number of major genealogy databases were, until recently, free. Now, you
have to pay a fee to access them. I am afraid that it is only a matter of
time before sites like Jewishgen, Litvak SIG, as well as other databases,
will either be "frozen in time", or have to close down altogether due to a
lack of funds. Volunteerism is great but, if there is no money with which to purchase needed hardware, software, search engines, records, etc., the
volunteers will have nothing to do or work with.

At the recent conference in Toronto I was shocked when I learned that of the many, many thousands who use Jewishgen almost on a daily basis only a
comparative few donate any money to Jewishgen. I find it difficult to believe that most of these non-donators are living on such a limited budget that they cannot afford 50 cents per week. A minimum of 10,000 users (and that is a very conservative number), donating 50 cents weekly to Jewishgen, would solve a lot of problems. I wonder what the reaction would be if Jewishgen had to shut down for an entire month. Perhaps we need to find out what it would be like to be without Jewishgen.

I have always made it a personal policy to not tell others how to spend their money. However, I have also been a firm believer in marketing a good product. No one is forced to donate money even if what they are being offered is well worth the price. Example: Litvak SIG has a policy that if you donate $100 USD to a particular Uezyd, or District, you will receive all of the translated records received for that District many months prior to it appearing in the ALD. Is that a bargain? You bet it is.

Contrast that with sending a research request to the Historical Archive in
Vilnius. You have to send a research fee of $100 USD plus $13 for a
translation of each record they find for your ancestors. If you request a
search for several surnames and several different towns, more money will
required to be sent. Sending a research request to the Kaunas Archive will
require similar amounts to be sent there as well. For a single $100 donation to the Litvak SIG, you will receive many, many records >from both archives. Rather than look at it as a $100 expenditure you cannot afford, consider it as a real bargain you cannot afford to pass up.

I am in no way criticizing the Lithuanian archives for what they charge. They are forced to do that in order to support the service they provide. Also, I have no official position with Jewishgen or with the Litvak SIG so my comments involving those organizations are strictly my own. Neither are my comments intended as criticizm of Barbara Sloan. Some individuals would like to do more but, for various reasons are not in a position to do so. I would hope that those in that situation would number in the hundreds and not in the thousands as the facts suggest.

I am sure there are those who would disagree with my position. I have no
problem with that. I do think, however, that something needs to be done
before it is too late and the wonderful databases that we have become
accustomed to no longer exist.

Howard Margol
Atlanta, Georgia


ARNOLDI/DRUCKER and ROTHSCHILD #germany

Sharan E. Newman
 

I am looking for information on the ARNOLDI and DRUCKER families
of Stettin or a nearby town >from the mid 1800s. Judah ARNOLDI married
Johanna DRUCKER.

They had at least two daughters, Eva, who married David LISSMANN and
Henrietta, who married Samuel FISCHER. Both moved to Philadelphia about
1870-80.

Also, I have some information on the ROTHSCHILD family of Heldenbergen,
Hesse >from 1720 to about 1860. If anyone is connected with this family,
I'd be happy to send what I have.

Sharan Newman, Portland, Oregon USA <sharan@...>


German SIG #Germany ARNOLDI/DRUCKER and ROTHSCHILD #germany

Sharan E. Newman
 

I am looking for information on the ARNOLDI and DRUCKER families
of Stettin or a nearby town >from the mid 1800s. Judah ARNOLDI married
Johanna DRUCKER.

They had at least two daughters, Eva, who married David LISSMANN and
Henrietta, who married Samuel FISCHER. Both moved to Philadelphia about
1870-80.

Also, I have some information on the ROTHSCHILD family of Heldenbergen,
Hesse >from 1720 to about 1860. If anyone is connected with this family,
I'd be happy to send what I have.

Sharan Newman, Portland, Oregon USA <sharan@...>


Falticeni synagogue vandalized #romania

victoria barkoff <vbar@...>
 

I was not aware that the Falticeni synagogue was vandalized in April or May.
There is an Associated Press item on the Ha'aretz website:

http://www.haaretzdaily.com/hasen/pages/ShArt.jhtml?itemNo=166590&contrassID=3&subContrassID=0&sbSubContrassID=0

Victoria Barkoff
Montreal, Canada


Romania SIG #Romania Falticeni synagogue vandalized #romania

victoria barkoff <vbar@...>
 

I was not aware that the Falticeni synagogue was vandalized in April or May.
There is an Associated Press item on the Ha'aretz website:

http://www.haaretzdaily.com/hasen/pages/ShArt.jhtml?itemNo=166590&contrassID=3&subContrassID=0&sbSubContrassID=0

Victoria Barkoff
Montreal, Canada


Romanian Shul - St. Louis - Missouri. #romania

Nigel Wilson <wilsonettes@...>
 

Dear Genners,

from previous requests and your responses I now know more about my family in
St. Louis.

However, I still need help…

JOSEPH and NECHAME NADLER >from Botosani, Romania, together with their
children Rifka (Beckie), Moritz (Morris), Yirl, Sima and Naftule arrived in
St. Louis in 1902. Address 8015 7th St. St. Louis (how long they stayed
there for I don’t know).

Although it has taken time I have found out that Beckie married a Max
Hershkowitz and moved to New York, buried in Elmont Long Island. Morris
married a Fannie Seigal, had 6 children and continued to live in St. Louis,
and is buried there. (I am now in contact with members of his family)

Through the most wonderful volunteers working for the St. Louis Genealogical
Soc I have found the burial place of Joseph, but not of his wife Nechame.
Nor can I find any information on their other children Yirl, Sima and
Naftule.

Morris was married in 1906 by Rabbi Z Rosenfeld of the Sheerith Sfard
Congregation (Romanian shul) also know as Chevrah Sheiray Sfard. Records of
this congregation were I was told kept in the St. Louis Jewish Library in
the Brodsky Centre. Again a most wonderful volunteer went to check this out
but found ‘the box’ contained nothing more than a few inconsequential
papers.

How can records of a large congregation just disappear when the shul becomes
defunct? Surely there must be ledgers of births/marriages/deaths somewhere?

A Dr. Walter Ehrlich has written a book entitled Zion in the Valley (about
the Jews of St. Louis) – does anyone know how I can contact this gentleman
directly to see if he has any information?

Does anyone have family who used to belong to the Sheerith Sfard
Congregation and might be able to throw light on the matter?

The other Romanian shul in St. Louis was the Ahavas Achim Anshei Romania –
however as Morris was married under the auspices of the Sheerith Sfard I
shall concentrate my search towards that community whose members were mostly
buried in the Chesed Shel Emeth Cemetery.

I look forward to any suggestions anyone may have.

Thank you all once again for your previous assistance.

Patricia Wilson (Israel)


Re: Baron FLONDER #romania

Bruce Reisch <bir1@...>
 

Subject: Baron FLONDER
From: "earlstamp" <earlstamp@...>
Date: Tue, 20 Aug 2002 16:54:10 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

I am looking for information on a Baron FLONDER of Bukovina.

snip

Earl:

You will probably find someone to help you on the Bukovina-Gen
mailing list, where they have great depth in researching non Jewish
ancestors. See <http://www.bukovinasociety.org/buko-gen.html> for
subscription information.

--
Bruce Reisch
Geneva, New York

RADAUTZ: http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/radauti/radautz.html
SADGURA: http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/sadgura/sadgura.html
Researching: REISCH, SCHECHTER, FEUERSTEIN - Sadgura, Bukowina, Ukraine
SCHACHTER, BRUCKER/BRUKER, HALPERN, HELLMANN, KURTZ - Radauti and
Solca, Bukowina, Romania
WEISSMAN - Brody, Galicia, Ukraine SCHACHTER, HELLMANN - Okup, Ukraine


Romania SIG #Romania Romanian Shul - St. Louis - Missouri. #romania

Nigel Wilson <wilsonettes@...>
 

Dear Genners,

from previous requests and your responses I now know more about my family in
St. Louis.

However, I still need help…

JOSEPH and NECHAME NADLER >from Botosani, Romania, together with their
children Rifka (Beckie), Moritz (Morris), Yirl, Sima and Naftule arrived in
St. Louis in 1902. Address 8015 7th St. St. Louis (how long they stayed
there for I don’t know).

Although it has taken time I have found out that Beckie married a Max
Hershkowitz and moved to New York, buried in Elmont Long Island. Morris
married a Fannie Seigal, had 6 children and continued to live in St. Louis,
and is buried there. (I am now in contact with members of his family)

Through the most wonderful volunteers working for the St. Louis Genealogical
Soc I have found the burial place of Joseph, but not of his wife Nechame.
Nor can I find any information on their other children Yirl, Sima and
Naftule.

Morris was married in 1906 by Rabbi Z Rosenfeld of the Sheerith Sfard
Congregation (Romanian shul) also know as Chevrah Sheiray Sfard. Records of
this congregation were I was told kept in the St. Louis Jewish Library in
the Brodsky Centre. Again a most wonderful volunteer went to check this out
but found ‘the box’ contained nothing more than a few inconsequential
papers.

How can records of a large congregation just disappear when the shul becomes
defunct? Surely there must be ledgers of births/marriages/deaths somewhere?

A Dr. Walter Ehrlich has written a book entitled Zion in the Valley (about
the Jews of St. Louis) – does anyone know how I can contact this gentleman
directly to see if he has any information?

Does anyone have family who used to belong to the Sheerith Sfard
Congregation and might be able to throw light on the matter?

The other Romanian shul in St. Louis was the Ahavas Achim Anshei Romania –
however as Morris was married under the auspices of the Sheerith Sfard I
shall concentrate my search towards that community whose members were mostly
buried in the Chesed Shel Emeth Cemetery.

I look forward to any suggestions anyone may have.

Thank you all once again for your previous assistance.

Patricia Wilson (Israel)


Romania SIG #Romania Re: Baron FLONDER #romania

Bruce Reisch <bir1@...>
 

Subject: Baron FLONDER
From: "earlstamp" <earlstamp@...>
Date: Tue, 20 Aug 2002 16:54:10 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

I am looking for information on a Baron FLONDER of Bukovina.

snip

Earl:

You will probably find someone to help you on the Bukovina-Gen
mailing list, where they have great depth in researching non Jewish
ancestors. See <http://www.bukovinasociety.org/buko-gen.html> for
subscription information.

--
Bruce Reisch
Geneva, New York

RADAUTZ: http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/radauti/radautz.html
SADGURA: http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/sadgura/sadgura.html
Researching: REISCH, SCHECHTER, FEUERSTEIN - Sadgura, Bukowina, Ukraine
SCHACHTER, BRUCKER/BRUKER, HALPERN, HELLMANN, KURTZ - Radauti and
Solca, Bukowina, Romania
WEISSMAN - Brody, Galicia, Ukraine SCHACHTER, HELLMANN - Okup, Ukraine


Early 20th Century Census Data #romania

Arik Solomon <Arik@...>
 

Fellow SIGers,

Does anyone know if there is a Hungary/Romania online census data >from
the early 20th century (1900-1930).
If not online, where else is it possible to get such data ?
I know that areas such as Transylvania (which I'm interested in)
switched hands more than once during this period of time, this is why I
want both censuses if available.


Thanks,

Arik Solomon
Petah Tikva
Israel


Romania SIG #Romania Early 20th Century Census Data #romania

Arik Solomon <Arik@...>
 

Fellow SIGers,

Does anyone know if there is a Hungary/Romania online census data >from
the early 20th century (1900-1930).
If not online, where else is it possible to get such data ?
I know that areas such as Transylvania (which I'm interested in)
switched hands more than once during this period of time, this is why I
want both censuses if available.


Thanks,

Arik Solomon
Petah Tikva
Israel