Date   

Re: First Name; Kazimiera #general

sallybru <sallybru@...>
 

Casimir (the more English spelling) is a Slavic name. Jews often had
secular names common to whatever region they lived in, so it is not
impossible that he was Jewish, but that is not his Hebrew name, if he is.

Sally Bruckheimer
Albany, NY


Lynda Baker from Saanichton, B.C. #general

carols
 

Lynda......I am trying to reach you via e-mail but your address is
incorrect in Family Finder. If you should see this message, please
e-mail me regarding your search for SALANT. Thank you. Carol Streem
Cleveland, Ohio

MODERATOR NOTE; Non working email addresses in JGFF should be reported
to: LostNFound@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: First Name; Kazimiera #general

sallybru <sallybru@...>
 

Casimir (the more English spelling) is a Slavic name. Jews often had
secular names common to whatever region they lived in, so it is not
impossible that he was Jewish, but that is not his Hebrew name, if he is.

Sally Bruckheimer
Albany, NY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Lynda Baker from Saanichton, B.C. #general

carols
 

Lynda......I am trying to reach you via e-mail but your address is
incorrect in Family Finder. If you should see this message, please
e-mail me regarding your search for SALANT. Thank you. Carol Streem
Cleveland, Ohio

MODERATOR NOTE; Non working email addresses in JGFF should be reported
to: LostNFound@...


K(H)ASMINSI(Y) family name origin and meaning #general

Igor Pavlov <imp1959@...>
 

Hi,

Any idea about meaning and origin of the family name

K(H)asminski(y)? My grandma was born in Nevel, Pskov or Vitebsk

region, Russia.



Thank you,

Igor Pavlov


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen K(H)ASMINSI(Y) family name origin and meaning #general

Igor Pavlov <imp1959@...>
 

Hi,

Any idea about meaning and origin of the family name

K(H)asminski(y)? My grandma was born in Nevel, Pskov or Vitebsk

region, Russia.



Thank you,

Igor Pavlov


Need help with translation #general

katie <ak2727@...>
 

Dear Genners:

Does anyone know what the word "recte" means? It is written between two
different surnames on a Military Passport of my grandfather's >from 1901 in
Lemberg, (Lviv). I'm not sure what language it is; possibly German or
Polish?

Thank you,
Katie
ak2727@...


Hints & Kinks: Given Names "Equivalents"? #general

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

Dear researchers,

A recurring topic here is given names "equivalents". I would like to shed
some light on this puzzling topic by embedding it in a common research
scenario and explaining how available tools and techniques can be used to
find relatives. For our scenario, consider a new researcher in the US and
his research projects:

1. Gather surname, given name (English, Hebrew, and Yiddish), relational
links, and personal data >from close family members back to grandparents,
and seeking all US ancestors and collateral lines.
2. Search available US data bases (e.g., Social Security) for additional
ancestral and collateral relatives in the US, including immigration data.
3. Using the immigration data about the European country of emigration,
search available US data bases (e.g., NARA, Ellis Island) for the
immigrants. Expand tree.
4. Using data bases listing European Jews (e.g., JRI-Poland), search for
known European relatives, and their ancestors and collateral relatives.
5. >from information gleaned about collateral relatives >from Europe, go
back to the US and search for those who immigrated to the US, as in 2
above.

In this typical approach, one is concerned with two types of
names: European and US surnames, and European and US given names (English,
Hebrew, Yiddish, and European secular). The procedure with computerized
data is first to search for the surname and then to seek your given names
in the surname list.

The best procedure is to use both the Soundex and the "beginning-letters"
methods of search. The Soundex method provides some assurance that you
will find your name even though you may not know its exact spelling,
because Soundex uses the sound of the name rather than its spelling. The
"beginning letters" method (e.g., searching for "yeh*" when looking for
Yehuda) is efficient because many names are well represented by their first
few letters. Both approaches tend to yield more finds than you will be
interested in, but they are nevertheless effective, especially when both
are used. Since many given names are well-defined by their first three
letters, the beginning letters method minimizes the number of false
positives (search results which are wrong for you). While this is less
true for surnames, it still works surprisingly well. Soundex works well
for surnames, less well for given names, while the beginning-letters method
works well for given names, less well for surnames.

A major problem is that for a variety of reasons, Jews have always tended
to use large numbers of given names. In European countries, one sometimes
finds as many as twenty to forty names being used by a single person in
different venues. For surnames, a major problem is that European Jews were
at best indifferent to their assigned surnames, and at worst hostile to
their use. The main reason was that a surname made them more visible to
the civil government for purposes of taxation (usually twice that of
non-Jews) and the drafting of male children into the army (>from which they
returned no longer Jews or, worse, were lost completely to their
families). So Jews' use of both surnames and given names was intended to
confuse the government by Jews becoming "lost".

In addition, Yiddish was *the* vernacular language for most Jews,
especially in central and eastern Europe. Yiddish was a warm,
family-oriented language and its use automatically generated many terms of
endearment (Chanele, Sheyndele), lovingly used by all family members for
one another, and even by friends in the Jewish community. Those Jews who
had contact with non-Jews adopted local secular (e.g., Aniela (Polish)) or
European secular (Abraham (German)) given names to make their names easier
for non-Jews to pronounce. About 500 secular German names were popularly
used (and recognized by the Rabbinate) in eastern Europe during the
nineteenth century.

Jewish names in Europe formed linked groups. One such example in Poland is
for the legal names Beyla/Belta/Beylka/Beylta. Yiddish
names: Bayle/Beyle/Veyle. Yiddish
nicknames: Baltshe/Bayli/Belke/Belte/Beltshe/Beshe/Beshke/Beylke/Beylte,
Pele/Pelke/Pelte, Vele/Velke/Veylke. A woman with several names >from this
group could have distributed her name set among a number of different
Polish archival documents. And if she emigrated >from Poland to the US, she
may have chosen one or more of several English names that seemed to "go"
with her original
name: Anna/Bella/Bertha/Bessie/Blanche/Beatrice/Beckie/Bertha. If she
immigrated to Argentina, she may have chosen Basilia or Berta.

There is a statistical link between the European name group and each of the
US names. This means that x percent of women with the name Beyle had
adopted the name Bessie, while y percent of them had adopted the name
Bertha. Does this mean that your Aunt Beyle >from Poland would have adopted
the name Bessie or the name Bertha? Of course not! Statistics cannot ever
be applied to an individual this way, they only summarize the results of
the study of a number of names. There is no "equivalence" between the name
Beyle and the name Bessie for an individual -- the name Bessie may have
come >from another Yiddish name, say, Bluma or >from Hebrew name
BasSheva. But there is a certain statistical *likelihood* that a woman
from Poland named Beyle would end up being Bessie in the US.
This statistical likelihood can be used to advantage with the Given Names
Data Bases on JewishGen,
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames/. For example, if project 4
above finds for you a new collateral Polish great-great aunt named Beyle,
and if you believe that she may have immigrated to the US, then you could
search the Poland GNDB for the Yiddish name Beyle, and in project 5 use the
linked list of English names for the US to search for her there. While
this could be tedious and require time, you do have an approach which is
reasonable. Similarly, if you know great Uncle Morris in the US came from
Poland, but don't know what Hebrew, Yiddish, or European secular names he
might have had there, you could use the Poland GNDB to search for all
Poland Jewish names linked to the name Morris in the US, and get a list of
those European Jewish names. The list might be long if you have no
Jewish-name information for Morris but you do have a workable procedure.

So, there are no given name "equivalencies" but there is a road map for
finding relatives.

Prof. G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Need help with translation #general

katie <ak2727@...>
 

Dear Genners:

Does anyone know what the word "recte" means? It is written between two
different surnames on a Military Passport of my grandfather's >from 1901 in
Lemberg, (Lviv). I'm not sure what language it is; possibly German or
Polish?

Thank you,
Katie
ak2727@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Hints & Kinks: Given Names "Equivalents"? #general

Prof. G. L. Esterson <jerry@...>
 

Dear researchers,

A recurring topic here is given names "equivalents". I would like to shed
some light on this puzzling topic by embedding it in a common research
scenario and explaining how available tools and techniques can be used to
find relatives. For our scenario, consider a new researcher in the US and
his research projects:

1. Gather surname, given name (English, Hebrew, and Yiddish), relational
links, and personal data >from close family members back to grandparents,
and seeking all US ancestors and collateral lines.
2. Search available US data bases (e.g., Social Security) for additional
ancestral and collateral relatives in the US, including immigration data.
3. Using the immigration data about the European country of emigration,
search available US data bases (e.g., NARA, Ellis Island) for the
immigrants. Expand tree.
4. Using data bases listing European Jews (e.g., JRI-Poland), search for
known European relatives, and their ancestors and collateral relatives.
5. >from information gleaned about collateral relatives >from Europe, go
back to the US and search for those who immigrated to the US, as in 2
above.

In this typical approach, one is concerned with two types of
names: European and US surnames, and European and US given names (English,
Hebrew, Yiddish, and European secular). The procedure with computerized
data is first to search for the surname and then to seek your given names
in the surname list.

The best procedure is to use both the Soundex and the "beginning-letters"
methods of search. The Soundex method provides some assurance that you
will find your name even though you may not know its exact spelling,
because Soundex uses the sound of the name rather than its spelling. The
"beginning letters" method (e.g., searching for "yeh*" when looking for
Yehuda) is efficient because many names are well represented by their first
few letters. Both approaches tend to yield more finds than you will be
interested in, but they are nevertheless effective, especially when both
are used. Since many given names are well-defined by their first three
letters, the beginning letters method minimizes the number of false
positives (search results which are wrong for you). While this is less
true for surnames, it still works surprisingly well. Soundex works well
for surnames, less well for given names, while the beginning-letters method
works well for given names, less well for surnames.

A major problem is that for a variety of reasons, Jews have always tended
to use large numbers of given names. In European countries, one sometimes
finds as many as twenty to forty names being used by a single person in
different venues. For surnames, a major problem is that European Jews were
at best indifferent to their assigned surnames, and at worst hostile to
their use. The main reason was that a surname made them more visible to
the civil government for purposes of taxation (usually twice that of
non-Jews) and the drafting of male children into the army (>from which they
returned no longer Jews or, worse, were lost completely to their
families). So Jews' use of both surnames and given names was intended to
confuse the government by Jews becoming "lost".

In addition, Yiddish was *the* vernacular language for most Jews,
especially in central and eastern Europe. Yiddish was a warm,
family-oriented language and its use automatically generated many terms of
endearment (Chanele, Sheyndele), lovingly used by all family members for
one another, and even by friends in the Jewish community. Those Jews who
had contact with non-Jews adopted local secular (e.g., Aniela (Polish)) or
European secular (Abraham (German)) given names to make their names easier
for non-Jews to pronounce. About 500 secular German names were popularly
used (and recognized by the Rabbinate) in eastern Europe during the
nineteenth century.

Jewish names in Europe formed linked groups. One such example in Poland is
for the legal names Beyla/Belta/Beylka/Beylta. Yiddish
names: Bayle/Beyle/Veyle. Yiddish
nicknames: Baltshe/Bayli/Belke/Belte/Beltshe/Beshe/Beshke/Beylke/Beylte,
Pele/Pelke/Pelte, Vele/Velke/Veylke. A woman with several names >from this
group could have distributed her name set among a number of different
Polish archival documents. And if she emigrated >from Poland to the US, she
may have chosen one or more of several English names that seemed to "go"
with her original
name: Anna/Bella/Bertha/Bessie/Blanche/Beatrice/Beckie/Bertha. If she
immigrated to Argentina, she may have chosen Basilia or Berta.

There is a statistical link between the European name group and each of the
US names. This means that x percent of women with the name Beyle had
adopted the name Bessie, while y percent of them had adopted the name
Bertha. Does this mean that your Aunt Beyle >from Poland would have adopted
the name Bessie or the name Bertha? Of course not! Statistics cannot ever
be applied to an individual this way, they only summarize the results of
the study of a number of names. There is no "equivalence" between the name
Beyle and the name Bessie for an individual -- the name Bessie may have
come >from another Yiddish name, say, Bluma or >from Hebrew name
BasSheva. But there is a certain statistical *likelihood* that a woman
from Poland named Beyle would end up being Bessie in the US.
This statistical likelihood can be used to advantage with the Given Names
Data Bases on JewishGen,
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/GivenNames/. For example, if project 4
above finds for you a new collateral Polish great-great aunt named Beyle,
and if you believe that she may have immigrated to the US, then you could
search the Poland GNDB for the Yiddish name Beyle, and in project 5 use the
linked list of English names for the US to search for her there. While
this could be tedious and require time, you do have an approach which is
reasonable. Similarly, if you know great Uncle Morris in the US came from
Poland, but don't know what Hebrew, Yiddish, or European secular names he
might have had there, you could use the Poland GNDB to search for all
Poland Jewish names linked to the name Morris in the US, and get a list of
those European Jewish names. The list might be long if you have no
Jewish-name information for Morris but you do have a workable procedure.

So, there are no given name "equivalencies" but there is a road map for
finding relatives.

Prof. G. L. Esterson, Ra'anana, Israel


A Yiddish World Remembered #general

Andrew Blumberg <ajb61@...>
 

A Yiddish World Remembered, premiering Sat., August 10 at 9:10 p.m., on
New York Public Television station WLIW, tells the story of Jewish life
in the shtetls and urban cities of Eastern Europe at the start of the
20th century using never-before-seen archival film, photographs and
interviews with scholars and some of the last remaining villagers, many
of whom currently reside in the New York metro area. Actor Elliot Gould
narrates.

Click here for full schedule on WLIW
http://www.pbs.org/cgi-registry/whatson/template.cgir?s=WLIW&t=3&p=20031
&c=d&d=2002-08-10

The program also airs Sunday, August 11, on WNET.

Andrew Blumberg

Searching
BLUMBERG: Bielsk Podlaski, Grodno Gubernia, Poland
EDELSTEIN / ADELSTEIN: in or near Bessarabia
EIDUS / EIDUSS / AIDUS / AIDUSS / ADUS / EDUS: Dvinsk & Riga, Latvia
GOLDMAN: Kolki, Ukraine GERMAN / GURMAN: Bessarabia
GILMAN: Ukraine (Kolki) KAPLAN: Bielsk Podlaski, Grodno Gubernia, Poland
KAPLAN: Kolki, Ukraine LASKOWITZ: near Vilnius, Lithuania

MODERATOR NOTE: Surname list truncated at six lines


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen A Yiddish World Remembered #general

Andrew Blumberg <ajb61@...>
 

A Yiddish World Remembered, premiering Sat., August 10 at 9:10 p.m., on
New York Public Television station WLIW, tells the story of Jewish life
in the shtetls and urban cities of Eastern Europe at the start of the
20th century using never-before-seen archival film, photographs and
interviews with scholars and some of the last remaining villagers, many
of whom currently reside in the New York metro area. Actor Elliot Gould
narrates.

Click here for full schedule on WLIW
http://www.pbs.org/cgi-registry/whatson/template.cgir?s=WLIW&t=3&p=20031
&c=d&d=2002-08-10

The program also airs Sunday, August 11, on WNET.

Andrew Blumberg

Searching
BLUMBERG: Bielsk Podlaski, Grodno Gubernia, Poland
EDELSTEIN / ADELSTEIN: in or near Bessarabia
EIDUS / EIDUSS / AIDUS / AIDUSS / ADUS / EDUS: Dvinsk & Riga, Latvia
GOLDMAN: Kolki, Ukraine GERMAN / GURMAN: Bessarabia
GILMAN: Ukraine (Kolki) KAPLAN: Bielsk Podlaski, Grodno Gubernia, Poland
KAPLAN: Kolki, Ukraine LASKOWITZ: near Vilnius, Lithuania

MODERATOR NOTE: Surname list truncated at six lines


Help translating; Viewmate 1672 & 1673 #general

M. Faber <mfaber@...>
 

Hi,
I've just uploaded two files to viewmate and would appreciate any help in
translations. They are # VM 1672
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/source/vm1672.html and VM#1673:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/source/vm1673.html.

I don't know if they are in Polish or Russian as my family was
"bi-lingual".
Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Please respond privately to me at mailto:mfaber@...

Thanks,
Monica Faber
Bells, TX

FABER & LINDENBAUM; Yedintsy, Moldavia & Rhode Island
ROSKAM; Bavaria & Virginia
KALVORISKY, KANOVITZ; Germany & Texas
MIROCHNIK & SPECTOR; Zhitomir, Ukraine & Texas
ROTHSCHILD & FRIEDBERG; Poland & Texas
SALASKY/SALAFSKY & ZASLOFF; Virginia


German/French/Polish translation assistance sought #general

Stephanie Weiner <laguna@...>
 

Dear Genners,

I have posted 2 files to ViewMate for Genner Caren Rubio. She is seeking
translations of documents in German, French, and Polish. Please reply to
Caren at carenru@...

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/toview.html

Document 1660 at ViewMate contains handwritten notations in German and
in French.

Document 1661 is a Word file that I transcribed >from copies of the
documents to help improve legibility and, hopefully, to retain the
diacritical marks in their correct locations. There are four documents:
1 in Polish, 2 in French, 1 in German.

I believe Caren is seeking verbatim translations of these documents.

Again, please send all replies and assistance to Caren at
carenru@...

Thank you all for all of your wonderful help.

Stephanie Weiner
San Diego, CA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Help translating; Viewmate 1672 & 1673 #general

M. Faber <mfaber@...>
 

Hi,
I've just uploaded two files to viewmate and would appreciate any help in
translations. They are # VM 1672
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/source/vm1672.html and VM#1673:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/source/vm1673.html.

I don't know if they are in Polish or Russian as my family was
"bi-lingual".
Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Please respond privately to me at mailto:mfaber@...

Thanks,
Monica Faber
Bells, TX

FABER & LINDENBAUM; Yedintsy, Moldavia & Rhode Island
ROSKAM; Bavaria & Virginia
KALVORISKY, KANOVITZ; Germany & Texas
MIROCHNIK & SPECTOR; Zhitomir, Ukraine & Texas
ROTHSCHILD & FRIEDBERG; Poland & Texas
SALASKY/SALAFSKY & ZASLOFF; Virginia


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen German/French/Polish translation assistance sought #general

Stephanie Weiner <laguna@...>
 

Dear Genners,

I have posted 2 files to ViewMate for Genner Caren Rubio. She is seeking
translations of documents in German, French, and Polish. Please reply to
Caren at carenru@...

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/toview.html

Document 1660 at ViewMate contains handwritten notations in German and
in French.

Document 1661 is a Word file that I transcribed >from copies of the
documents to help improve legibility and, hopefully, to retain the
diacritical marks in their correct locations. There are four documents:
1 in Polish, 2 in French, 1 in German.

I believe Caren is seeking verbatim translations of these documents.

Again, please send all replies and assistance to Caren at
carenru@...

Thank you all for all of your wonderful help.

Stephanie Weiner
San Diego, CA


Viewmate VM1665 Recognize name of town in Ukraine from manifest #general

Joe Newman <pcmanager@...>
 

I was surprised to find that family members who had always said they were
from Ekaterinaslov (Dnepropetrovsk) were shown as emigrating >from there but
with a different birthplace in Russia.

Does anyone recognize this town name?

Click the link below to go directly to the scan:
http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/source/vm1665.html


Please reply in private. Send responses directly to my email, not to the
newsgroup.


Searching: LENCZER > Ranaana, Israel, Post WWII #general

desrx <desrx@...>
 

I am looking for the family of a David Lenczner. After surviving the camps,
he relocated to Rananna, Israel. He has since passed on. I have been told
he had at least two children, a son and daughter, but I am not sure if it
would be proper to give their names here. It is a very vague time frame so
I presume the children were born in the 1940's or 1950's. I believe David
might have been >from the Szczekociny, Sosnowiec area.

I would like to contact the family. Not sure if they are related to my
Lenczner family but they are connected to my Kalkopf clan.

H. Michael McTeer
desrx@...
CA USA


HOROWITZ family - possibly of Brooklyn, 1930 #general

Brandler Institute of Chasidic Thought <bict@...>
 

Dear All:

I am posting the following on behalf of a :

Does anyone know of any surviving relatives/descendants of the following
family,
Surname: HOROWITZ,
Father's initials Y.L. died in 1930 probably in Brooklyn.

Children:

Harry
Richard
Sophie
Sheila

Please respond privately,

Abraham Heschel
Brooklyn, NY


Re: Does enyone know of these Jewish newspaper editors in New York? #general

Brandler Institute of Chasidic Thought <bict@...>
 

If I recall correctly, there might be papers belonging to Abe Kahn in the
Archives of the YIVO Institute in New York.

Regards,

Abraham Heschel
Brooklyn, NY