Date   

Hungarian Lunch on Thursday #hungary

Florence & Henry Wellisch <kelwel@...>
 

I will be there and I hope you all will come to my presentation just =
before (11.15 to 12.30). The title is:
Hungarian Jews-Where Did They Come From?
Henry Wellisch

Moderator: Although there were Jews in Hungary during the time of the Romans, even before the Magyars came riding in >from the east, most of our relatives arrived much more recently. Come to Henry's session and find out where your ancestors were before they became Hungarians. And then join H-SIG for an informal lunch meeting >from 12:30 to 2 pm on Thursday, Aug. 8, at the Cafe on the Square, on the ground floor of Toronto City Hall, across the street >from the conference hotel.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Hungarian Lunch on Thursday #hungary

Florence & Henry Wellisch <kelwel@...>
 

I will be there and I hope you all will come to my presentation just =
before (11.15 to 12.30). The title is:
Hungarian Jews-Where Did They Come From?
Henry Wellisch

Moderator: Although there were Jews in Hungary during the time of the Romans, even before the Magyars came riding in >from the east, most of our relatives arrived much more recently. Come to Henry's session and find out where your ancestors were before they became Hungarians. And then join H-SIG for an informal lunch meeting >from 12:30 to 2 pm on Thursday, Aug. 8, at the Cafe on the Square, on the ground floor of Toronto City Hall, across the street >from the conference hotel.


Family SACHS Connections #latvia

Edward Walter Fabisak Jr. <kasibafe@...>
 

Searching for information concerning the following family members:
Jenny SACHS who passed through Ellis Island on Nov. 29, 1920 >from Riga,
Lettland, Latvia. Her father was Herman SACHS who lived at
Marisstrasse, 36, in Riga. She had traveled to America to visit or live
with her cousin, Julius SACHS, whose residence was at 161 Leonardt St.,
Brooklyn, NY. I am interested in these individuals because they may
have been related to my grandmother, Jeanette SACHS (1890-1973), who
arrived in the U.S. >from Riga in 1912-13 and her sister, Anna SACHS,
whose arrival at Ellis Island was in 1908. Anna and Jeanette lived a
few years with their uncle, a Mr. SMULYAN, who lived at 33 Union across
the street >from Union Square in Manhattan. Do you know of any
individuals who connect with any of the above persons?

[MODERATOR NOTE: Please sign all posts with you name and location.]


Latvia SIG #Latvia Family SACHS Connections #latvia

Edward Walter Fabisak Jr. <kasibafe@...>
 

Searching for information concerning the following family members:
Jenny SACHS who passed through Ellis Island on Nov. 29, 1920 >from Riga,
Lettland, Latvia. Her father was Herman SACHS who lived at
Marisstrasse, 36, in Riga. She had traveled to America to visit or live
with her cousin, Julius SACHS, whose residence was at 161 Leonardt St.,
Brooklyn, NY. I am interested in these individuals because they may
have been related to my grandmother, Jeanette SACHS (1890-1973), who
arrived in the U.S. >from Riga in 1912-13 and her sister, Anna SACHS,
whose arrival at Ellis Island was in 1908. Anna and Jeanette lived a
few years with their uncle, a Mr. SMULYAN, who lived at 33 Union across
the street >from Union Square in Manhattan. Do you know of any
individuals who connect with any of the above persons?

[MODERATOR NOTE: Please sign all posts with you name and location.]


Genealogy Conference, Toronto - on Bialystok #general

Steve Gabai <sgabai@...>
 

I remember a post about a scheduled conference about Bialystok. Can
someone please send me the specifics (date/time, etc) and how one would
go about signing up before, as well as the day of, the meeting?

Reply privately.

Thanks,

Steve Gabai


Re: Hessen, Germany Postal Zip Codes #general

ROBERT WEISS
 

In a message dated 7/28/02 1:13:36 PM,Ernest Kaufman writes:

<< Do you also know if theres a directory somewhere where one can find the
Postal Zone codes for other towns. I can not get mail to any of the
officials of the towns I have mentioned without knowing the Postal codes.>>

They may be found in "Address Book for Germanic Genealogy" by Ernest
Thode, Genealogical Publishing Company.

Bob Weiss
Northridge, CA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Genealogy Conference, Toronto - on Bialystok #general

Steve Gabai <sgabai@...>
 

I remember a post about a scheduled conference about Bialystok. Can
someone please send me the specifics (date/time, etc) and how one would
go about signing up before, as well as the day of, the meeting?

Reply privately.

Thanks,

Steve Gabai


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Hessen, Germany Postal Zip Codes #general

ROBERT WEISS
 

In a message dated 7/28/02 1:13:36 PM,Ernest Kaufman writes:

<< Do you also know if theres a directory somewhere where one can find the
Postal Zone codes for other towns. I can not get mail to any of the
officials of the towns I have mentioned without knowing the Postal codes.>>

They may be found in "Address Book for Germanic Genealogy" by Ernest
Thode, Genealogical Publishing Company.

Bob Weiss
Northridge, CA


Search for district/ shetl based on street names from 1915-1916 #lithuania

Ellen Wallace <yellench@...>
 

I would like to thank those of you that helped me verify the location of
Deutsche/ Nemetskaya, Bolshaya Streets. This will definately help me in my
attempt to find more information through the Lithuanian State Archives.
I now have a few questions which stem >from the above:

1) Recommendations for books dealing with Jewish Lithuanian History up until the period of WWI and thereafter (please respond privately)

2) Where can I find information on Jewish Businesses in Vilinus before and
during WWI? For example, does anyone have a source at the Jewish Museum in
Lithuania perhaps?

3)Did families live in the same building (i.e. above) as their business? I
assume that people did not commute to work, i.e >from a surrounding shetl
(as we now do today).

4) Would it have been quite radical for a son to go into a business totally different >from that of his father's in the early 1900's?

5) Would the Lithuanian State Archives have information as to the history of a particular building on a certain street?

Your help is appreciated.

Ellen Wallace-researching CHWOLES/KHVOLES >from Vilinus; STELLMAN, >from
Elisawetgrad; MATTLER, Minsk

MODERATOR'S NOTE: With this message, the thread on the streets Ellen was seeking is closed. For information on books, check the LitvakSIG Publications Database at <www.jewishgen.org/Litvak/publications.htm> Answers to the other questions that would be of general interest may be posted to the list.


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Search for district/ shetl based on street names from 1915-1916 #lithuania

Ellen Wallace <yellench@...>
 

I would like to thank those of you that helped me verify the location of
Deutsche/ Nemetskaya, Bolshaya Streets. This will definately help me in my
attempt to find more information through the Lithuanian State Archives.
I now have a few questions which stem >from the above:

1) Recommendations for books dealing with Jewish Lithuanian History up until the period of WWI and thereafter (please respond privately)

2) Where can I find information on Jewish Businesses in Vilinus before and
during WWI? For example, does anyone have a source at the Jewish Museum in
Lithuania perhaps?

3)Did families live in the same building (i.e. above) as their business? I
assume that people did not commute to work, i.e >from a surrounding shetl
(as we now do today).

4) Would it have been quite radical for a son to go into a business totally different >from that of his father's in the early 1900's?

5) Would the Lithuanian State Archives have information as to the history of a particular building on a certain street?

Your help is appreciated.

Ellen Wallace-researching CHWOLES/KHVOLES >from Vilinus; STELLMAN, >from
Elisawetgrad; MATTLER, Minsk

MODERATOR'S NOTE: With this message, the thread on the streets Ellen was seeking is closed. For information on books, check the LitvakSIG Publications Database at <www.jewishgen.org/Litvak/publications.htm> Answers to the other questions that would be of general interest may be posted to the list.


German Street #lithuania

Jon Myers <emquad@...>
 

The mention of German Street is very interesting to me. One of my ancestral
lines is named HERMAN and in recent years I found that the family came
(c.1874) >from Vilijampole where they were called GERMAN. After further
research it turned out that they lived at an inn on German Street (ul.
German). The street name was "German" (or possibly "Czermen") and not
"Nemetskaya." This is what it says according to a photocopy of the original
page >from the census of 1765.

Jon Myers
Try the Myers family tree search engine:
http://emquad.home.att.net/ancestry.html
NB. For reasons unknown, some browsers
will reject this address the first time
it is entered but accept it the second.


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania German Street #lithuania

Jon Myers <emquad@...>
 

The mention of German Street is very interesting to me. One of my ancestral
lines is named HERMAN and in recent years I found that the family came
(c.1874) >from Vilijampole where they were called GERMAN. After further
research it turned out that they lived at an inn on German Street (ul.
German). The street name was "German" (or possibly "Czermen") and not
"Nemetskaya." This is what it says according to a photocopy of the original
page >from the census of 1765.

Jon Myers
Try the Myers family tree search engine:
http://emquad.home.att.net/ancestry.html
NB. For reasons unknown, some browsers
will reject this address the first time
it is entered but accept it the second.


Re: Looking for a town in Maramaros (Budest) #hungary

Moshe & Esther Davis <davis@...>
 

The town Budest (in Yiddish) aka Budfalva (Hungarian) or Budesti
(Romanian) is located about 25 km south of Sziget. JGSS: 47
degrees 44 minutes north latitude, 23 degrees 57 minutes east
longitude.

There is an informative two page article on the town in Sefer
Marmaros. General information includes that the earliest Jewish
resident mentioned was in 1722; in 1830, 64 of the 1164 residents
were Jewish; in 1930 15% of the population was Jewish (405
individuals). The Rabbi of the neighboring town Berbest usually
served also as the Rabbi of Budest.

What surnames are you interested in >from Budest?

If you might be interested in sponsoring a translation of the article
to be put online as part of the JewishGen translation project for
Sefer Marmaros, please contact me privately.

Moshe Davis
Jerusalem

I'm looking for a town in Maramaros county (as of 1913).
It is pronounced like "Bu-de-sh[t]" (I'm not sure whether the 't' is
pronounced) The town should be not too far >from Sighet as far as I
understood. I already looked for it in the 1913 Gazetteer on Radix,
but found nothing in the vicinity.
Moderator: You're probably looiking for Budfalu, also known as
Budesci, Budest, Budes, Budesti, and Budfalva. According to the 1877
Gazetteer there were 246 Jewish residents who


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Looking for a town in Maramaros (Budest) #hungary

Moshe & Esther Davis <davis@...>
 

The town Budest (in Yiddish) aka Budfalva (Hungarian) or Budesti
(Romanian) is located about 25 km south of Sziget. JGSS: 47
degrees 44 minutes north latitude, 23 degrees 57 minutes east
longitude.

There is an informative two page article on the town in Sefer
Marmaros. General information includes that the earliest Jewish
resident mentioned was in 1722; in 1830, 64 of the 1164 residents
were Jewish; in 1930 15% of the population was Jewish (405
individuals). The Rabbi of the neighboring town Berbest usually
served also as the Rabbi of Budest.

What surnames are you interested in >from Budest?

If you might be interested in sponsoring a translation of the article
to be put online as part of the JewishGen translation project for
Sefer Marmaros, please contact me privately.

Moshe Davis
Jerusalem

I'm looking for a town in Maramaros county (as of 1913).
It is pronounced like "Bu-de-sh[t]" (I'm not sure whether the 't' is
pronounced) The town should be not too far >from Sighet as far as I
understood. I already looked for it in the 1913 Gazetteer on Radix,
but found nothing in the vicinity.
Moderator: You're probably looiking for Budfalu, also known as
Budesci, Budest, Budes, Budesti, and Budfalva. According to the 1877
Gazetteer there were 246 Jewish residents who


Re: Rudwina? #hungary

Ing. Lang Tomás <tlang@...>
 

Hello :

RUDWINA means nothing in Hungarian. All sttelemnts now in
Slovakia they hade hungarian sounding names beginning with "
RUD... " are as follow :

RUDAS now RUDINA
RUDNA now RUDNO
RUDNYIKIRTVANY now RUDNIK
RUDNOK now RUDNIK / not the same /
RUDNOSZABADI now RUDNIANSKA LEHOTA
RUNYA now RUMINCE
noe RUNINA WAS KNOWN AS juhaszlak
-----------------------------------
wbr
Tomas Lang, PhD
Jewish Community President
Ceska basta 5
SK-940 60 NOVÉ ZÁMKY
Slovak Republic
Phone +421 (0) 35 / 64 01 759
Fax : +421 (0) 35 / 64 44 640
www : http://www.kehilanz.sk
E-mail: kehilanz@...

PLEASE NOTE the new phone- and fax numbers
and E-mail address of the Community and use
them even you have got our message >from an
other one. THANKS.
------------------------THE END-------------------------

|

| ----- Original Message -----
| From: <bormanjl@...>
| To: "Hungarian SIG" <h-sig@...>
| Sent: Tuesday, July 23, 2002 5:54 PM
| Subject: [h-sig] Rudwina?
|
|
| > Hello,
| > My Grandmother's brother had 'Rudwina' as a middle name.
| My cousin believes this is the name of the town in Hungary
| where the ENGEL family lived. I have found a 'Runyina' in
| Zemplen Megye. Does anyone know of another possibility, or
| if Rudwina means something in Hungarian? Thank you in
| advance!
| >
| > Julie Maltz Borman
| > Los Angeles, CA
| >
| > Moderator: "Rud" means bar, rod, or beam in Hungarian.
I
| don't see any place names that fit, but check the 1891 and
| 1913 Gazetteers posted by Janos Bogardi at
| <http://www.bogardi.com/gen/index.shtml> to see if you can
| find a match.
| > This SIG (h-sig@...) is hosted by
| > JewishGen: The Home of Jewish Genealogy
| > Visit our home page at http://www.jewishgen.org
| > To post a message to this mailing list please address it
| to <h-sig@...>
| >
| > Visit our website at http://www.jewishgen.org/hungary/ ,
| and remember the
| > H-SIG message archives at
| >
http://www.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.isa?jg~jgsys~sigspop
|


---
Odchádzajúca správa neobsahuje vírusy.
Message checked by AVG Anti-Virus System Vers.6.0
No virus neighter in message nor in attachments.
Skontrolované antivírusovým systémom AVG
(http://www.grisoft.cz).
Verzia: 6.0.375 / Vírusová databáza: 210 - dátum vydania:
10.7.2002


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Rudwina? #hungary

Ing. Lang Tomás <tlang@...>
 

Hello :

RUDWINA means nothing in Hungarian. All sttelemnts now in
Slovakia they hade hungarian sounding names beginning with "
RUD... " are as follow :

RUDAS now RUDINA
RUDNA now RUDNO
RUDNYIKIRTVANY now RUDNIK
RUDNOK now RUDNIK / not the same /
RUDNOSZABADI now RUDNIANSKA LEHOTA
RUNYA now RUMINCE
noe RUNINA WAS KNOWN AS juhaszlak
-----------------------------------
wbr
Tomas Lang, PhD
Jewish Community President
Ceska basta 5
SK-940 60 NOVÉ ZÁMKY
Slovak Republic
Phone +421 (0) 35 / 64 01 759
Fax : +421 (0) 35 / 64 44 640
www : http://www.kehilanz.sk
E-mail: kehilanz@...

PLEASE NOTE the new phone- and fax numbers
and E-mail address of the Community and use
them even you have got our message >from an
other one. THANKS.
------------------------THE END-------------------------

|

| ----- Original Message -----
| From: <bormanjl@...>
| To: "Hungarian SIG" <h-sig@...>
| Sent: Tuesday, July 23, 2002 5:54 PM
| Subject: [h-sig] Rudwina?
|
|
| > Hello,
| > My Grandmother's brother had 'Rudwina' as a middle name.
| My cousin believes this is the name of the town in Hungary
| where the ENGEL family lived. I have found a 'Runyina' in
| Zemplen Megye. Does anyone know of another possibility, or
| if Rudwina means something in Hungarian? Thank you in
| advance!
| >
| > Julie Maltz Borman
| > Los Angeles, CA
| >
| > Moderator: "Rud" means bar, rod, or beam in Hungarian.
I
| don't see any place names that fit, but check the 1891 and
| 1913 Gazetteers posted by Janos Bogardi at
| <http://www.bogardi.com/gen/index.shtml> to see if you can
| find a match.
| > This SIG (h-sig@...) is hosted by
| > JewishGen: The Home of Jewish Genealogy
| > Visit our home page at http://www.jewishgen.org
| > To post a message to this mailing list please address it
| to <h-sig@...>
| >
| > Visit our website at http://www.jewishgen.org/hungary/ ,
| and remember the
| > H-SIG message archives at
| >
http://www.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.isa?jg~jgsys~sigspop
|


---
Odchádzajúca správa neobsahuje vírusy.
Message checked by AVG Anti-Virus System Vers.6.0
No virus neighter in message nor in attachments.
Skontrolované antivírusovým systémom AVG
(http://www.grisoft.cz).
Verzia: 6.0.375 / Vírusová databáza: 210 - dátum vydania:
10.7.2002


New Files Added to Holocaust Database #lodz #poland

Joyce Field
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce major additions its Holocaust
Database at <http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/>. 55,000
records are being added to six new individual databases.

The first installment of Dachau Concentration Camp Records, an
indexing project which began in November 2001, includes 36,937
records. A total of over120,000 records will be in this database
when it is completed. Rather than wait until all the data are
entered, we intend to put the data online in large increments. We
have an additional 20,000 records which have already been indexed and
are waiting for validation. As explained in the introduction to this
database, we have two levels of validation to ensure the highest
possible level of accuracy. A glossary of abbreviations and terms
used in the Dachau material has also been prepared and can be
accessed through the introduction.

The Borislav-Drohobycz Water Bills file, containing 5,483 records, is
from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. It consists of 120
ledger pages of names of people who had died or been deported and who
had not paid their water bills in 1941/42. Of course, many could not
pay their bills because they had died or been deported!! This file
contains valuable genealogical information--names and addresses of
people >from Borislav and Drohobycz and often their fate.

Peter Lande prepared two lists. One is Sachsenhausen "Arrivals and
Departures" for the period of October 12, 1940 through June 3, 1941.
It consists of 4,991 records. Opened in 1938, the Sachsenhasusen
camp was one of the earliest concentration camps. Initially it was
used to hold Jews and political prisoners; later on it was a forced
labor camp and most of its prisoners were non-Jews >from Germany and
all over Europe. This camp prepared daily lists of arrivals and
departures. Information on persons in this collection includes name,
prisoner number, and, where available, dates of birth and death.

The second list contributed by Peter Lande is "Temporary German
Passports for Jews 1938-1940," an extraction of 485 names >from a
much larger Gestapo collection in the United States Holocaust
Memorial Museum. This file is of historical and genealogical
interest. Prior to the beginning of mass deportations, and even after
war began in 1939, the German Government continued to issue passports
to Jews resident in Germany, including "stateless" Jews, mostly of
Polish origin.

Two major lists provided by Yad Vashem under the data sharing
agreement with JewishGen are >from Szombathely, Hungary and Debrecen,
Hungary. The Szombathely list consists of 3,115 names of Jews who
were forced to register according to a governmental order of 4 April
1944. The registration lists included first and last name, name of
mother, place and date of birth, address, name of spouse, name of
children, occupation, and subscription of telephone and radio. The
list facilitated the concentration of the Jews into a ghetto and
their subsequent deportation to Auschwitz.

The second Yad Vashem file, of 3,945 Jews in Debrecen in 1945, is a
list of Holocaust survivors registered in Debrecen at the end of the
war.

An extensive list of Hungarian terms for occupations/professions is
available at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/holocaust/HungarianOccupations.html>.
This list was compiled >from both the Szombathely and Debrecen files
and should be used for research in these files as well as for a
general Hungarian-to-English translation of occupational titles. For
each unique title, the correct Hungarian term is provided along with
its English translation.

This work is made possible by the enormous efforts of numerous
people--Rachel Reisman, Technical Coordinator for the Holocaust
Database files; the many volunteers who entered and validated the
data; the volunteer project leaders; staff >from Yad Vashem and the
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum--primarily Zvi Bernhardt of
Yad Vashem and Peter Lande of USHMM; and, of course, Michael Tobias
and Warren Blatt of JewishGen, without whose technical skills none of
this material would be available.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Research


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland New Files Added to Holocaust Database #lodz #poland

Joyce Field
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce major additions its Holocaust
Database at <http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/>. 55,000
records are being added to six new individual databases.

The first installment of Dachau Concentration Camp Records, an
indexing project which began in November 2001, includes 36,937
records. A total of over120,000 records will be in this database
when it is completed. Rather than wait until all the data are
entered, we intend to put the data online in large increments. We
have an additional 20,000 records which have already been indexed and
are waiting for validation. As explained in the introduction to this
database, we have two levels of validation to ensure the highest
possible level of accuracy. A glossary of abbreviations and terms
used in the Dachau material has also been prepared and can be
accessed through the introduction.

The Borislav-Drohobycz Water Bills file, containing 5,483 records, is
from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. It consists of 120
ledger pages of names of people who had died or been deported and who
had not paid their water bills in 1941/42. Of course, many could not
pay their bills because they had died or been deported!! This file
contains valuable genealogical information--names and addresses of
people >from Borislav and Drohobycz and often their fate.

Peter Lande prepared two lists. One is Sachsenhausen "Arrivals and
Departures" for the period of October 12, 1940 through June 3, 1941.
It consists of 4,991 records. Opened in 1938, the Sachsenhasusen
camp was one of the earliest concentration camps. Initially it was
used to hold Jews and political prisoners; later on it was a forced
labor camp and most of its prisoners were non-Jews >from Germany and
all over Europe. This camp prepared daily lists of arrivals and
departures. Information on persons in this collection includes name,
prisoner number, and, where available, dates of birth and death.

The second list contributed by Peter Lande is "Temporary German
Passports for Jews 1938-1940," an extraction of 485 names >from a
much larger Gestapo collection in the United States Holocaust
Memorial Museum. This file is of historical and genealogical
interest. Prior to the beginning of mass deportations, and even after
war began in 1939, the German Government continued to issue passports
to Jews resident in Germany, including "stateless" Jews, mostly of
Polish origin.

Two major lists provided by Yad Vashem under the data sharing
agreement with JewishGen are >from Szombathely, Hungary and Debrecen,
Hungary. The Szombathely list consists of 3,115 names of Jews who
were forced to register according to a governmental order of 4 April
1944. The registration lists included first and last name, name of
mother, place and date of birth, address, name of spouse, name of
children, occupation, and subscription of telephone and radio. The
list facilitated the concentration of the Jews into a ghetto and
their subsequent deportation to Auschwitz.

The second Yad Vashem file, of 3,945 Jews in Debrecen in 1945, is a
list of Holocaust survivors registered in Debrecen at the end of the
war.

An extensive list of Hungarian terms for occupations/professions is
available at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/holocaust/HungarianOccupations.html>.
This list was compiled >from both the Szombathely and Debrecen files
and should be used for research in these files as well as for a
general Hungarian-to-English translation of occupational titles. For
each unique title, the correct Hungarian term is provided along with
its English translation.

This work is made possible by the enormous efforts of numerous
people--Rachel Reisman, Technical Coordinator for the Holocaust
Database files; the many volunteers who entered and validated the
data; the volunteer project leaders; staff >from Yad Vashem and the
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum--primarily Zvi Bernhardt of
Yad Vashem and Peter Lande of USHMM; and, of course, Michael Tobias
and Warren Blatt of JewishGen, without whose technical skills none of
this material would be available.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Research


New Files Added to Holocaust Database #latvia

Joyce Field
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce major additions its Holocaust
Database at <http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/>. 55,000
records are being added to six new individual databases.

The first installment of Dachau Concentration Camp Records, an
indexing project which began in November 2001, includes 36,937
records. A total of over120,000 records will be in this database
when it is completed. Rather than wait until all the data are
entered, we intend to put the data online in large increments. We
have an additional 20,000 records which have already been indexed and
are waiting for validation. As explained in the introduction to this
database, we have two levels of validation to ensure the highest
possible level of accuracy. A glossary of abbreviations and terms
used in the Dachau material has also been prepared and can be
accessed through the introduction.

The Borislav-Drohobycz Water Bills file, containing 5,483 records, is
from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. It consists of 120
ledger pages of names of people who had died or been deported and who
had not paid their water bills in 1941/42. Of course, many could not
pay their bills because they had died or been deported!! This file
contains valuable genealogical information--names and addresses of
people >from Borislav and Drohobycz and often their fate.

Peter Lande prepared two lists. One is Sachsenhausen "Arrivals and
Departures" for the period of October 12, 1940 through June 3, 1941.
It consists of 4,991 records. Opened in 1938, the Sachsenhasusen
camp was one of the earliest concentration camps. Initially it was
used to hold Jews and political prisoners; later on it was a forced
labor camp and most of its prisoners were non-Jews >from Germany and
all over Europe. This camp prepared daily lists of arrivals and
departures. Information on persons in this collection includes name,
prisoner number, and, where available, dates of birth and death.

The second list contributed by Peter Lande is "Temporary German
Passports for Jews 1938-1940," an extraction of 485 names >from a
much larger Gestapo collection in the United States Holocaust
Memorial Museum. This file is of historical and genealogical
interest. Prior to the beginning of mass deportations, and even after
war began in 1939, the German Government continued to issue passports
to Jews resident in Germany, including "stateless" Jews, mostly of
Polish origin.

Two major lists provided by Yad Vashem under the data sharing
agreement with JewishGen are >from Szombathely, Hungary and Debrecen,
Hungary. The Szombathely list consists of 3,115 names of Jews who
were forced to register according to a governmental order of 4 April
1944. The registration lists included first and last name, name of
mother, place and date of birth, address, name of spouse, name of
children, occupation, and subscription of telephone and radio. The
list facilitated the concentration of the Jews into a ghetto and
their subsequent deportation to Auschwitz.

The second Yad Vashem file, of 3,945 Jews in Debrecen in 1945, is a
list of Holocaust survivors registered in Debrecen at the end of the
war.

An extensive list of Hungarian terms for occupations/professions is
available at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/holocaust/HungarianOccupations.html>.
This list was compiled >from both the Szombathely and Debrecen files
and should be used for research in these files as well as for a
general Hungarian-to-English translation of occupational titles. For
each unique title, the correct Hungarian term is provided along with
its English translation.

This work is made possible by the enormous efforts of numerous
people--Rachel Reisman, Technical Coordinator for the Holocaust
Database files; the many volunteers who entered and validated the
data; the volunteer project leaders; staff >from Yad Vashem and the
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum--primarily Zvi Bernhardt of
Yad Vashem and Peter Lande of USHMM; and, of course, Michael Tobias
and Warren Blatt of JewishGen, without whose technical skills none of
this material would be available.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Research


Latvia SIG #Latvia New Files Added to Holocaust Database #latvia

Joyce Field
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce major additions its Holocaust
Database at <http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/>. 55,000
records are being added to six new individual databases.

The first installment of Dachau Concentration Camp Records, an
indexing project which began in November 2001, includes 36,937
records. A total of over120,000 records will be in this database
when it is completed. Rather than wait until all the data are
entered, we intend to put the data online in large increments. We
have an additional 20,000 records which have already been indexed and
are waiting for validation. As explained in the introduction to this
database, we have two levels of validation to ensure the highest
possible level of accuracy. A glossary of abbreviations and terms
used in the Dachau material has also been prepared and can be
accessed through the introduction.

The Borislav-Drohobycz Water Bills file, containing 5,483 records, is
from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. It consists of 120
ledger pages of names of people who had died or been deported and who
had not paid their water bills in 1941/42. Of course, many could not
pay their bills because they had died or been deported!! This file
contains valuable genealogical information--names and addresses of
people >from Borislav and Drohobycz and often their fate.

Peter Lande prepared two lists. One is Sachsenhausen "Arrivals and
Departures" for the period of October 12, 1940 through June 3, 1941.
It consists of 4,991 records. Opened in 1938, the Sachsenhasusen
camp was one of the earliest concentration camps. Initially it was
used to hold Jews and political prisoners; later on it was a forced
labor camp and most of its prisoners were non-Jews >from Germany and
all over Europe. This camp prepared daily lists of arrivals and
departures. Information on persons in this collection includes name,
prisoner number, and, where available, dates of birth and death.

The second list contributed by Peter Lande is "Temporary German
Passports for Jews 1938-1940," an extraction of 485 names >from a
much larger Gestapo collection in the United States Holocaust
Memorial Museum. This file is of historical and genealogical
interest. Prior to the beginning of mass deportations, and even after
war began in 1939, the German Government continued to issue passports
to Jews resident in Germany, including "stateless" Jews, mostly of
Polish origin.

Two major lists provided by Yad Vashem under the data sharing
agreement with JewishGen are >from Szombathely, Hungary and Debrecen,
Hungary. The Szombathely list consists of 3,115 names of Jews who
were forced to register according to a governmental order of 4 April
1944. The registration lists included first and last name, name of
mother, place and date of birth, address, name of spouse, name of
children, occupation, and subscription of telephone and radio. The
list facilitated the concentration of the Jews into a ghetto and
their subsequent deportation to Auschwitz.

The second Yad Vashem file, of 3,945 Jews in Debrecen in 1945, is a
list of Holocaust survivors registered in Debrecen at the end of the
war.

An extensive list of Hungarian terms for occupations/professions is
available at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/holocaust/HungarianOccupations.html>.
This list was compiled >from both the Szombathely and Debrecen files
and should be used for research in these files as well as for a
general Hungarian-to-English translation of occupational titles. For
each unique title, the correct Hungarian term is provided along with
its English translation.

This work is made possible by the enormous efforts of numerous
people--Rachel Reisman, Technical Coordinator for the Holocaust
Database files; the many volunteers who entered and validated the
data; the volunteer project leaders; staff >from Yad Vashem and the
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum--primarily Zvi Bernhardt of
Yad Vashem and Peter Lande of USHMM; and, of course, Michael Tobias
and Warren Blatt of JewishGen, without whose technical skills none of
this material would be available.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Research