Date   

Re: JUDELOWITZ: DM 138740/438740 #general

hennynow
 

I want to thank Stanley Judd for posting the JewishGen website for U.S. Dept. of State Consular Post Records for Jerusalem, Jaffa, and Haifa for the years 1857 through 1935, as compiled by the Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Washington:

http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/group84.htm

I have found one document pertaining to my grandfather Ephraim MOED and a number of others pertaining to a relative by marriage, which, hopefully, may divulge family data.

Shabbat shalom,

Henny

Henriette Moed Roth
Los Angeles, California
hennynow@...


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: JUDELOWITZ: DM 138740/438740 #lithuania

hennynow
 

I want to thank Stanley Judd for posting the JewishGen website for U.S. Dept. of State Consular Post Records for Jerusalem, Jaffa, and Haifa for the years 1857 through 1935, as compiled by the Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Washington:

http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/group84.htm

I have found one document pertaining to my grandfather Ephraim MOED and a number of others pertaining to a relative by marriage, which, hopefully, may divulge family data.

Shabbat shalom,

Henny

Henriette Moed Roth
Los Angeles, California
hennynow@...


New Files Added to Holocaust Database #lithuania

Joyce Field
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce major additions to its Holocaust
Database at <http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/>. 55,000
records are being added to six new individual databases.

The first installment of Dachau Concentration Camp Records, an
indexing project which began in November 2001, includes 36,937
records. A total of more than 120,000 records will be in this database
when it is completed. Rather than wait until all the data are
entered, we intend to put the data online in large increments. We
have an additional 20,000 records which have already been indexed and
are waiting for validation. As explained in the introduction to this
database, we have two levels of validation to ensure the highest
possible level of accuracy. A glossary of abbreviations and terms
used in the Dachau material has also been prepared and can be
accessed through the introduction.

The Borislav-Drohobycz Water Bills file, containing 5,483 records, is
from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. It consists of 120
ledger pages of names of people who had died or been deported and who
had not paid their water bills in 1941/42. Of course, many could not
pay their bills because they had died or been deported!! This file
contains valuable genealogical information--names and addresses of
people >from Borislav and Drohobycz and often their fate.

Peter Lande prepared two lists. One is Sachsenhausen "Arrivals and
Departures" for the period of October 12, 1940 through June 3, 1941.
It consists of 4,991 records. Opened in 1938, the Sachsenhasusen
camp was one of the earliest concentration camps. Initially it was
used to hold Jews and political prisoners; later on it was a forced
labor camp and most of its prisoners were non-Jews >from Germany and
all over Europe. This camp prepared daily lists of arrivals and
departures. Information on persons in this collection includes name,
prisoner number, and, where available, dates of birth and death.

The second list contributed by Peter Lande is "Temporary German
Passports for Jews 1938-1940," an extraction of 485 names >from a
much larger Gestapo collection in the United States Holocaust
Memorial Museum. This file is of historical and genealogical
interest. Prior to the beginning of mass deportations, and even after
war began in 1939, the German Government continued to issue passports
to Jews resident in Germany, including "stateless" Jews, mostly of
Polish origin.

Two major lists provided by Yad Vashem under the data sharing
agreement with JewishGen are >from Szombathely, Hungary and Debrecen,
Hungary. The Szombathely list consists of 3,115 names of Jews who
were forced to register according to a governmental order of 4 April
1944. The registration lists included first and last name, name of
mother, place and date of birth, address, name of spouse, name of
children, occupation, and subscription of telephone and radio. The
list facilitated the concentration of the Jews into a ghetto and
their subsequent deportation to Auschwitz.

The second Yad Vashem file, of 3,945 Jews in Debrecen in 1945, is a
list of Holocaust survivors registered in Debrecen at the end of the
war.

An extensive list of Hungarian terms for occupations/professions is
available at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/holocaust/HungarianOccupations.html>.
This list was compiled >from both the Szombathely and Debrecen files
and should be used for research in these files as well as for a
general Hungarian-to-English translation of occupational titles. For
each unique title, the correct Hungarian term is provided along with
its English translation.

This work is made possible by the enormous efforts of numerous
people--Rachel Reisman, Technical Coordinator for the Holocaust
Database files; the many volunteers who entered and validated the
data; the volunteer project leaders; staff >from Yad Vashem and the
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum--primarily Zvi Bernhardt of
Yad Vashem and Peter Lande of USHMM; and, of course, Michael Tobias
and Warren Blatt of JewishGen, without whose technical skills none of
this material would be available.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Research


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania New Files Added to Holocaust Database #lithuania

Joyce Field
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce major additions to its Holocaust
Database at <http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/>. 55,000
records are being added to six new individual databases.

The first installment of Dachau Concentration Camp Records, an
indexing project which began in November 2001, includes 36,937
records. A total of more than 120,000 records will be in this database
when it is completed. Rather than wait until all the data are
entered, we intend to put the data online in large increments. We
have an additional 20,000 records which have already been indexed and
are waiting for validation. As explained in the introduction to this
database, we have two levels of validation to ensure the highest
possible level of accuracy. A glossary of abbreviations and terms
used in the Dachau material has also been prepared and can be
accessed through the introduction.

The Borislav-Drohobycz Water Bills file, containing 5,483 records, is
from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. It consists of 120
ledger pages of names of people who had died or been deported and who
had not paid their water bills in 1941/42. Of course, many could not
pay their bills because they had died or been deported!! This file
contains valuable genealogical information--names and addresses of
people >from Borislav and Drohobycz and often their fate.

Peter Lande prepared two lists. One is Sachsenhausen "Arrivals and
Departures" for the period of October 12, 1940 through June 3, 1941.
It consists of 4,991 records. Opened in 1938, the Sachsenhasusen
camp was one of the earliest concentration camps. Initially it was
used to hold Jews and political prisoners; later on it was a forced
labor camp and most of its prisoners were non-Jews >from Germany and
all over Europe. This camp prepared daily lists of arrivals and
departures. Information on persons in this collection includes name,
prisoner number, and, where available, dates of birth and death.

The second list contributed by Peter Lande is "Temporary German
Passports for Jews 1938-1940," an extraction of 485 names >from a
much larger Gestapo collection in the United States Holocaust
Memorial Museum. This file is of historical and genealogical
interest. Prior to the beginning of mass deportations, and even after
war began in 1939, the German Government continued to issue passports
to Jews resident in Germany, including "stateless" Jews, mostly of
Polish origin.

Two major lists provided by Yad Vashem under the data sharing
agreement with JewishGen are >from Szombathely, Hungary and Debrecen,
Hungary. The Szombathely list consists of 3,115 names of Jews who
were forced to register according to a governmental order of 4 April
1944. The registration lists included first and last name, name of
mother, place and date of birth, address, name of spouse, name of
children, occupation, and subscription of telephone and radio. The
list facilitated the concentration of the Jews into a ghetto and
their subsequent deportation to Auschwitz.

The second Yad Vashem file, of 3,945 Jews in Debrecen in 1945, is a
list of Holocaust survivors registered in Debrecen at the end of the
war.

An extensive list of Hungarian terms for occupations/professions is
available at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/holocaust/HungarianOccupations.html>.
This list was compiled >from both the Szombathely and Debrecen files
and should be used for research in these files as well as for a
general Hungarian-to-English translation of occupational titles. For
each unique title, the correct Hungarian term is provided along with
its English translation.

This work is made possible by the enormous efforts of numerous
people--Rachel Reisman, Technical Coordinator for the Holocaust
Database files; the many volunteers who entered and validated the
data; the volunteer project leaders; staff >from Yad Vashem and the
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum--primarily Zvi Bernhardt of
Yad Vashem and Peter Lande of USHMM; and, of course, Michael Tobias
and Warren Blatt of JewishGen, without whose technical skills none of
this material would be available.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Research


New Files Added to Holocaust Database #rabbinic

Joyce Field
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce major additions its Holocaust
Database at <http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/>. 55,000
records are being added to six new individual databases.

The first installment of Dachau Concentration Camp Records, an
indexing project which began in November 2001, includes 36,937
records. A total of over120,000 records will be in this database
when it is completed. Rather than wait until all the data are
entered, we intend to put the data online in large increments. We
have an additional 20,000 records which have already been indexed and
are waiting for validation. As explained in the introduction to this
database, we have two levels of validation to ensure the highest
possible level of accuracy. A glossary of abbreviations and terms
used in the Dachau material has also been prepared and can be
accessed through the introduction.

The Borislav-Drohobycz Water Bills file, containing 5,483 records, is
from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. It consists of 120
ledger pages of names of people who had died or been deported and who
had not paid their water bills in 1941/42. Of course, many could not
pay their bills because they had died or been deported!! This file
contains valuable genealogical information--names and addresses of
people >from Borislav and Drohobycz and often their fate.

Peter Lande prepared two lists. One is Sachsenhausen "Arrivals and
Departures" for the period of October 12, 1940 through June 3, 1941.
It consists of 4,991 records. Opened in 1938, the Sachsenhasusen
camp was one of the earliest concentration camps. Initially it was
used to hold Jews and political prisoners; later on it was a forced
labor camp and most of its prisoners were non-Jews >from Germany and
all over Europe. This camp prepared daily lists of arrivals and
departures. Information on persons in this collection includes name,
prisoner number, and, where available, dates of birth and death.

The second list contributed by Peter Lande is "Temporary German
Passports for Jews 1938-1940," an extraction of 485 names >from a
much larger Gestapo collection in the United States Holocaust
Memorial Museum. This file is of historical and genealogical
interest. Prior to the beginning of mass deportations, and even after
war began in 1939, the German Government continued to issue passports
to Jews resident in Germany, including "stateless" Jews, mostly of
Polish origin.

Two major lists provided by Yad Vashem under the data sharing
agreement with JewishGen are >from Szombathely, Hungary and Debrecen,
Hungary. The Szombathely list consists of 3,115 names of Jews who
were forced to register according to a governmental order of 4 April
1944. The registration lists included first and last name, name of
mother, place and date of birth, address, name of spouse, name of
children, occupation, and subscription of telephone and radio. The
list facilitated the concentration of the Jews into a ghetto and
their subsequent deportation to Auschwitz.

The second Yad Vashem file, of 3,945 Jews in Debrecen in 1945, is a
list of Holocaust survivors registered in Debrecen at the end of the
war.

An extensive list of Hungarian terms for occupations/professions is
available at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/holocaust/HungarianOccupations.html>.
This list was compiled >from both the Szombathely and Debrecen files
and should be used for research in these files as well as for a
general Hungarian-to-English translation of occupational titles. For
each unique title, the correct Hungarian term is provided along with
its English translation.

This work is made possible by the enormous efforts of numerous
people--Rachel Reisman, Technical Coordinator for the Holocaust
Database files; the many volunteers who entered and validated the
data; the volunteer project leaders; staff >from Yad Vashem and the
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum--primarily Zvi Bernhardt of
Yad Vashem and Peter Lande of USHMM; and, of course, Michael Tobias
and Warren Blatt of JewishGen, without whose technical skills none of
this material would be available.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Research


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic New Files Added to Holocaust Database #rabbinic

Joyce Field
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce major additions its Holocaust
Database at <http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/>. 55,000
records are being added to six new individual databases.

The first installment of Dachau Concentration Camp Records, an
indexing project which began in November 2001, includes 36,937
records. A total of over120,000 records will be in this database
when it is completed. Rather than wait until all the data are
entered, we intend to put the data online in large increments. We
have an additional 20,000 records which have already been indexed and
are waiting for validation. As explained in the introduction to this
database, we have two levels of validation to ensure the highest
possible level of accuracy. A glossary of abbreviations and terms
used in the Dachau material has also been prepared and can be
accessed through the introduction.

The Borislav-Drohobycz Water Bills file, containing 5,483 records, is
from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. It consists of 120
ledger pages of names of people who had died or been deported and who
had not paid their water bills in 1941/42. Of course, many could not
pay their bills because they had died or been deported!! This file
contains valuable genealogical information--names and addresses of
people >from Borislav and Drohobycz and often their fate.

Peter Lande prepared two lists. One is Sachsenhausen "Arrivals and
Departures" for the period of October 12, 1940 through June 3, 1941.
It consists of 4,991 records. Opened in 1938, the Sachsenhasusen
camp was one of the earliest concentration camps. Initially it was
used to hold Jews and political prisoners; later on it was a forced
labor camp and most of its prisoners were non-Jews >from Germany and
all over Europe. This camp prepared daily lists of arrivals and
departures. Information on persons in this collection includes name,
prisoner number, and, where available, dates of birth and death.

The second list contributed by Peter Lande is "Temporary German
Passports for Jews 1938-1940," an extraction of 485 names >from a
much larger Gestapo collection in the United States Holocaust
Memorial Museum. This file is of historical and genealogical
interest. Prior to the beginning of mass deportations, and even after
war began in 1939, the German Government continued to issue passports
to Jews resident in Germany, including "stateless" Jews, mostly of
Polish origin.

Two major lists provided by Yad Vashem under the data sharing
agreement with JewishGen are >from Szombathely, Hungary and Debrecen,
Hungary. The Szombathely list consists of 3,115 names of Jews who
were forced to register according to a governmental order of 4 April
1944. The registration lists included first and last name, name of
mother, place and date of birth, address, name of spouse, name of
children, occupation, and subscription of telephone and radio. The
list facilitated the concentration of the Jews into a ghetto and
their subsequent deportation to Auschwitz.

The second Yad Vashem file, of 3,945 Jews in Debrecen in 1945, is a
list of Holocaust survivors registered in Debrecen at the end of the
war.

An extensive list of Hungarian terms for occupations/professions is
available at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/holocaust/HungarianOccupations.html>.
This list was compiled >from both the Szombathely and Debrecen files
and should be used for research in these files as well as for a
general Hungarian-to-English translation of occupational titles. For
each unique title, the correct Hungarian term is provided along with
its English translation.

This work is made possible by the enormous efforts of numerous
people--Rachel Reisman, Technical Coordinator for the Holocaust
Database files; the many volunteers who entered and validated the
data; the volunteer project leaders; staff >from Yad Vashem and the
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum--primarily Zvi Bernhardt of
Yad Vashem and Peter Lande of USHMM; and, of course, Michael Tobias
and Warren Blatt of JewishGen, without whose technical skills none of
this material would be available.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Research


Re: Search for district/shtetl based on street names #lithuania

Joelrat@...
 

I've been away for several days and several people have been good enough to offer responses to the question regarding certain streets in Vilna.

To begin with, as Howard Margol correctly noted, Nemetskiy is the Russian
word for German. Deutsche is the German equivalent. The three appropriate
equivalents for this street are as follows:

in Russian: Nemetskaya ul. - source: 1915 Vsia Vilna business directory

in Polish: Niemiecka ul. - source: Jerusalem of Lithuania by Leyzer Ran

in Yiddish: Deitsche Gass

I thank everyone who pitched in with a reply in my absence.


Joel Ratner
Coordinator, Vilna District Research Group


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re:Search for district/shtetl based on street names #lithuania

Joelrat@...
 

I've been away for several days and several people have been good enough to offer responses to the question regarding certain streets in Vilna.

To begin with, as Howard Margol correctly noted, Nemetskiy is the Russian
word for German. Deutsche is the German equivalent. The three appropriate
equivalents for this street are as follows:

in Russian: Nemetskaya ul. - source: 1915 Vsia Vilna business directory

in Polish: Niemiecka ul. - source: Jerusalem of Lithuania by Leyzer Ran

in Yiddish: Deitsche Gass

I thank everyone who pitched in with a reply in my absence.


Joel Ratner
Coordinator, Vilna District Research Group


Photos from Panevezys & Pusalotas #lithuania

Howard Margol
 

On my Yiskor Book website on Jewishgen, I have a number of photographs taken in the 1920-1930's in Panevezys and in Pusalotas. Most are group photos and some are school group photos. I have identified many of those in the photos but not all. If you had ancestors in that area, of school age, perhaps you can help to identify the others. You may even find one of your ancestors in the picture!!

http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pusalotas/Pusalotas.html

Howard Margol
Researching - MARGOLIS - ZUK - in Pusalotas.

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately.


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Photos from Panevezys & Pusalotas #lithuania

Howard Margol
 

On my Yiskor Book website on Jewishgen, I have a number of photographs taken in the 1920-1930's in Panevezys and in Pusalotas. Most are group photos and some are school group photos. I have identified many of those in the photos but not all. If you had ancestors in that area, of school age, perhaps you can help to identify the others. You may even find one of your ancestors in the picture!!

http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Pusalotas/Pusalotas.html

Howard Margol
Researching - MARGOLIS - ZUK - in Pusalotas.

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately.


New Files Added to Holocaust Database #latinamerica

Joyce Field
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce major additions its Holocaust
Database at <http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/>. 55,000
records are being added to six new individual databases.

The first installment of Dachau Concentration Camp Records, an
indexing project which began in November 2001, includes 36,937
records. A total of over120,000 records will be in this database
when it is completed. Rather than wait until all the data are
entered, we intend to put the data online in large increments. We
have an additional 20,000 records which have already been indexed and
are waiting for validation. As explained in the introduction to this
database, we have two levels of validation to ensure the highest
possible level of accuracy. A glossary of abbreviations and terms
used in the Dachau material has also been prepared and can be
accessed through the introduction.

The Borislav-Drohobycz Water Bills file, containing 5,483 records, is
from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. It consists of 120
ledger pages of names of people who had died or been deported and who
had not paid their water bills in 1941/42. Of course, many could not
pay their bills because they had died or been deported!! This file
contains valuable genealogical information--names and addresses of
people >from Borislav and Drohobycz and often their fate.

Peter Lande prepared two lists. One is Sachsenhausen "Arrivals and
Departures" for the period of October 12, 1940 through June 3, 1941.
It consists of 4,991 records. Opened in 1938, the Sachsenhasusen
camp was one of the earliest concentration camps. Initially it was
used to hold Jews and political prisoners; later on it was a forced
labor camp and most of its prisoners were non-Jews >from Germany and
all over Europe. This camp prepared daily lists of arrivals and
departures. Information on persons in this collection includes name,
prisoner number, and, where available, dates of birth and death.

The second list contributed by Peter Lande is "Temporary German
Passports for Jews 1938-1940," an extraction of 485 names >from a
much larger Gestapo collection in the United States Holocaust
Memorial Museum. This file is of historical and genealogical
interest. Prior to the beginning of mass deportations, and even after
war began in 1939, the German Government continued to issue passports
to Jews resident in Germany, including "stateless" Jews, mostly of
Polish origin.

Two major lists provided by Yad Vashem under the data sharing
agreement with JewishGen are >from Szombathely, Hungary and Debrecen,
Hungary. The Szombathely list consists of 3,115 names of Jews who
were forced to register according to a governmental order of 4 April
1944. The registration lists included first and last name, name of
mother, place and date of birth, address, name of spouse, name of
children, occupation, and subscription of telephone and radio. The
list facilitated the concentration of the Jews into a ghetto and
their subsequent deportation to Auschwitz.

The second Yad Vashem file, of 3,945 Jews in Debrecen in 1945, is a
list of Holocaust survivors registered in Debrecen at the end of the
war.

An extensive list of Hungarian terms for occupations/professions is
available at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/holocaust/HungarianOccupations.html>.
This list was compiled >from both the Szombathely and Debrecen files
and should be used for research in these files as well as for a
general Hungarian-to-English translation of occupational titles. For
each unique title, the correct Hungarian term is provided along with
its English translation.

This work is made possible by the enormous efforts of numerous
people--Rachel Reisman, Technical Coordinator for the Holocaust
Database files; the many volunteers who entered and validated the
data; the volunteer project leaders; staff >from Yad Vashem and the
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum--primarily Zvi Bernhardt of
Yad Vashem and Peter Lande of USHMM; and, of course, Michael Tobias
and Warren Blatt of JewishGen, without whose technical skills none of
this material would be available.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Research


Latin America #LatinAmerica New Files Added to Holocaust Database #latinamerica

Joyce Field
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce major additions its Holocaust
Database at <http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/>. 55,000
records are being added to six new individual databases.

The first installment of Dachau Concentration Camp Records, an
indexing project which began in November 2001, includes 36,937
records. A total of over120,000 records will be in this database
when it is completed. Rather than wait until all the data are
entered, we intend to put the data online in large increments. We
have an additional 20,000 records which have already been indexed and
are waiting for validation. As explained in the introduction to this
database, we have two levels of validation to ensure the highest
possible level of accuracy. A glossary of abbreviations and terms
used in the Dachau material has also been prepared and can be
accessed through the introduction.

The Borislav-Drohobycz Water Bills file, containing 5,483 records, is
from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. It consists of 120
ledger pages of names of people who had died or been deported and who
had not paid their water bills in 1941/42. Of course, many could not
pay their bills because they had died or been deported!! This file
contains valuable genealogical information--names and addresses of
people >from Borislav and Drohobycz and often their fate.

Peter Lande prepared two lists. One is Sachsenhausen "Arrivals and
Departures" for the period of October 12, 1940 through June 3, 1941.
It consists of 4,991 records. Opened in 1938, the Sachsenhasusen
camp was one of the earliest concentration camps. Initially it was
used to hold Jews and political prisoners; later on it was a forced
labor camp and most of its prisoners were non-Jews >from Germany and
all over Europe. This camp prepared daily lists of arrivals and
departures. Information on persons in this collection includes name,
prisoner number, and, where available, dates of birth and death.

The second list contributed by Peter Lande is "Temporary German
Passports for Jews 1938-1940," an extraction of 485 names >from a
much larger Gestapo collection in the United States Holocaust
Memorial Museum. This file is of historical and genealogical
interest. Prior to the beginning of mass deportations, and even after
war began in 1939, the German Government continued to issue passports
to Jews resident in Germany, including "stateless" Jews, mostly of
Polish origin.

Two major lists provided by Yad Vashem under the data sharing
agreement with JewishGen are >from Szombathely, Hungary and Debrecen,
Hungary. The Szombathely list consists of 3,115 names of Jews who
were forced to register according to a governmental order of 4 April
1944. The registration lists included first and last name, name of
mother, place and date of birth, address, name of spouse, name of
children, occupation, and subscription of telephone and radio. The
list facilitated the concentration of the Jews into a ghetto and
their subsequent deportation to Auschwitz.

The second Yad Vashem file, of 3,945 Jews in Debrecen in 1945, is a
list of Holocaust survivors registered in Debrecen at the end of the
war.

An extensive list of Hungarian terms for occupations/professions is
available at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/holocaust/HungarianOccupations.html>.
This list was compiled >from both the Szombathely and Debrecen files
and should be used for research in these files as well as for a
general Hungarian-to-English translation of occupational titles. For
each unique title, the correct Hungarian term is provided along with
its English translation.

This work is made possible by the enormous efforts of numerous
people--Rachel Reisman, Technical Coordinator for the Holocaust
Database files; the many volunteers who entered and validated the
data; the volunteer project leaders; staff >from Yad Vashem and the
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum--primarily Zvi Bernhardt of
Yad Vashem and Peter Lande of USHMM; and, of course, Michael Tobias
and Warren Blatt of JewishGen, without whose technical skills none of
this material would be available.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Research


New Files Added to Holocaust Database #galicia

Joyce Field
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce major additions its Holocaust
Database at <http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/>. 55,000
records are being added to six new individual databases.

The first installment of Dachau Concentration Camp Records, an
indexing project which began in November 2001, includes 36,937
records. A total of over120,000 records will be in this database
when it is completed. Rather than wait until all the data are
entered, we intend to put the data online in large increments. We
have an additional 20,000 records which have already been indexed and
are waiting for validation. As explained in the introduction to this
database, we have two levels of validation to ensure the highest
possible level of accuracy. A glossary of abbreviations and terms
used in the Dachau material has also been prepared and can be
accessed through the introduction.

The Borislav-Drohobycz Water Bills file, containing 5,483 records, is
from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. It consists of 120
ledger pages of names of people who had died or been deported and who
had not paid their water bills in 1941/42. Of course, many could not
pay their bills because they had died or been deported!! This file
contains valuable genealogical information--names and addresses of
people >from Borislav and Drohobycz and often their fate.

Peter Lande prepared two lists. One is Sachsenhausen "Arrivals and
Departures" for the period of October 12, 1940 through June 3, 1941.
It consists of 4,991 records. Opened in 1938, the Sachsenhasusen
camp was one of the earliest concentration camps. Initially it was
used to hold Jews and political prisoners; later on it was a forced
labor camp and most of its prisoners were non-Jews >from Germany and
all over Europe. This camp prepared daily lists of arrivals and
departures. Information on persons in this collection includes name,
prisoner number, and, where available, dates of birth and death.

The second list contributed by Peter Lande is "Temporary German
Passports for Jews 1938-1940," an extraction of 485 names >from a
much larger Gestapo collection in the United States Holocaust
Memorial Museum. This file is of historical and genealogical
interest. Prior to the beginning of mass deportations, and even after
war began in 1939, the German Government continued to issue passports
to Jews resident in Germany, including "stateless" Jews, mostly of
Polish origin.

Two major lists provided by Yad Vashem under the data sharing
agreement with JewishGen are >from Szombathely, Hungary and Debrecen,
Hungary. The Szombathely list consists of 3,115 names of Jews who
were forced to register according to a governmental order of 4 April
1944. The registration lists included first and last name, name of
mother, place and date of birth, address, name of spouse, name of
children, occupation, and subscription of telephone and radio. The
list facilitated the concentration of the Jews into a ghetto and
their subsequent deportation to Auschwitz.

The second Yad Vashem file, of 3,945 Jews in Debrecen in 1945, is a
list of Holocaust survivors registered in Debrecen at the end of the
war.

An extensive list of Hungarian terms for occupations/professions is
available at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/holocaust/HungarianOccupations.html>.
This list was compiled >from both the Szombathely and Debrecen files
and should be used for research in these files as well as for a
general Hungarian-to-English translation of occupational titles. For
each unique title, the correct Hungarian term is provided along with
its English translation.

This work is made possible by the enormous efforts of numerous
people--Rachel Reisman, Technical Coordinator for the Holocaust
Database files; the many volunteers who entered and validated the
data; the volunteer project leaders; staff >from Yad Vashem and the
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum--primarily Zvi Bernhardt of
Yad Vashem and Peter Lande of USHMM; and, of course, Michael Tobias
and Warren Blatt of JewishGen, without whose technical skills none of
this material would be available.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Research


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia New Files Added to Holocaust Database #galicia

Joyce Field
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce major additions its Holocaust
Database at <http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/>. 55,000
records are being added to six new individual databases.

The first installment of Dachau Concentration Camp Records, an
indexing project which began in November 2001, includes 36,937
records. A total of over120,000 records will be in this database
when it is completed. Rather than wait until all the data are
entered, we intend to put the data online in large increments. We
have an additional 20,000 records which have already been indexed and
are waiting for validation. As explained in the introduction to this
database, we have two levels of validation to ensure the highest
possible level of accuracy. A glossary of abbreviations and terms
used in the Dachau material has also been prepared and can be
accessed through the introduction.

The Borislav-Drohobycz Water Bills file, containing 5,483 records, is
from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. It consists of 120
ledger pages of names of people who had died or been deported and who
had not paid their water bills in 1941/42. Of course, many could not
pay their bills because they had died or been deported!! This file
contains valuable genealogical information--names and addresses of
people >from Borislav and Drohobycz and often their fate.

Peter Lande prepared two lists. One is Sachsenhausen "Arrivals and
Departures" for the period of October 12, 1940 through June 3, 1941.
It consists of 4,991 records. Opened in 1938, the Sachsenhasusen
camp was one of the earliest concentration camps. Initially it was
used to hold Jews and political prisoners; later on it was a forced
labor camp and most of its prisoners were non-Jews >from Germany and
all over Europe. This camp prepared daily lists of arrivals and
departures. Information on persons in this collection includes name,
prisoner number, and, where available, dates of birth and death.

The second list contributed by Peter Lande is "Temporary German
Passports for Jews 1938-1940," an extraction of 485 names >from a
much larger Gestapo collection in the United States Holocaust
Memorial Museum. This file is of historical and genealogical
interest. Prior to the beginning of mass deportations, and even after
war began in 1939, the German Government continued to issue passports
to Jews resident in Germany, including "stateless" Jews, mostly of
Polish origin.

Two major lists provided by Yad Vashem under the data sharing
agreement with JewishGen are >from Szombathely, Hungary and Debrecen,
Hungary. The Szombathely list consists of 3,115 names of Jews who
were forced to register according to a governmental order of 4 April
1944. The registration lists included first and last name, name of
mother, place and date of birth, address, name of spouse, name of
children, occupation, and subscription of telephone and radio. The
list facilitated the concentration of the Jews into a ghetto and
their subsequent deportation to Auschwitz.

The second Yad Vashem file, of 3,945 Jews in Debrecen in 1945, is a
list of Holocaust survivors registered in Debrecen at the end of the
war.

An extensive list of Hungarian terms for occupations/professions is
available at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/holocaust/HungarianOccupations.html>.
This list was compiled >from both the Szombathely and Debrecen files
and should be used for research in these files as well as for a
general Hungarian-to-English translation of occupational titles. For
each unique title, the correct Hungarian term is provided along with
its English translation.

This work is made possible by the enormous efforts of numerous
people--Rachel Reisman, Technical Coordinator for the Holocaust
Database files; the many volunteers who entered and validated the
data; the volunteer project leaders; staff >from Yad Vashem and the
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum--primarily Zvi Bernhardt of
Yad Vashem and Peter Lande of USHMM; and, of course, Michael Tobias
and Warren Blatt of JewishGen, without whose technical skills none of
this material would be available.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Research


New Files Added to Holocaust Database #belarus

Joyce Field
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce major additions its Holocaust
Database at <http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/>. 55,000
records are being added to six new individual databases.

The first installment of Dachau Concentration Camp Records, an
indexing project which began in November 2001, includes 36,937
records. A total of over120,000 records will be in this database
when it is completed. Rather than wait until all the data are
entered, we intend to put the data online in large increments. We
have an additional 20,000 records which have already been indexed and
are waiting for validation. As explained in the introduction to this
database, we have two levels of validation to ensure the highest
possible level of accuracy. A glossary of abbreviations and terms
used in the Dachau material has also been prepared and can be
accessed through the introduction.

The Borislav-Drohobycz Water Bills file, containing 5,483 records, is
from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. It consists of 120
ledger pages of names of people who had died or been deported and who
had not paid their water bills in 1941/42. Of course, many could not
pay their bills because they had died or been deported!! This file
contains valuable genealogical information--names and addresses of
people >from Borislav and Drohobycz and often their fate.

Peter Lande prepared two lists. One is Sachsenhausen "Arrivals and
Departures" for the period of October 12, 1940 through June 3, 1941.
It consists of 4,991 records. Opened in 1938, the Sachsenhasusen
camp was one of the earliest concentration camps. Initially it was
used to hold Jews and political prisoners; later on it was a forced
labor camp and most of its prisoners were non-Jews >from Germany and
all over Europe. This camp prepared daily lists of arrivals and
departures. Information on persons in this collection includes name,
prisoner number, and, where available, dates of birth and death.

The second list contributed by Peter Lande is "Temporary German
Passports for Jews 1938-1940," an extraction of 485 names >from a
much larger Gestapo collection in the United States Holocaust
Memorial Museum. This file is of historical and genealogical
interest. Prior to the beginning of mass deportations, and even after
war began in 1939, the German Government continued to issue passports
to Jews resident in Germany, including "stateless" Jews, mostly of
Polish origin.

Two major lists provided by Yad Vashem under the data sharing
agreement with JewishGen are >from Szombathely, Hungary and Debrecen,
Hungary. The Szombathely list consists of 3,115 names of Jews who
were forced to register according to a governmental order of 4 April
1944. The registration lists included first and last name, name of
mother, place and date of birth, address, name of spouse, name of
children, occupation, and subscription of telephone and radio. The
list facilitated the concentration of the Jews into a ghetto and
their subsequent deportation to Auschwitz.

The second Yad Vashem file, of 3,945 Jews in Debrecen in 1945, is a
list of Holocaust survivors registered in Debrecen at the end of the
war.

An extensive list of Hungarian terms for occupations/professions is
available at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/holocaust/HungarianOccupations.html>.
This list was compiled >from both the Szombathely and Debrecen files
and should be used for research in these files as well as for a
general Hungarian-to-English translation of occupational titles. For
each unique title, the correct Hungarian term is provided along with
its English translation.

This work is made possible by the enormous efforts of numerous
people--Rachel Reisman, Technical Coordinator for the Holocaust
Database files; the many volunteers who entered and validated the
data; the volunteer project leaders; staff >from Yad Vashem and the
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum--primarily Zvi Bernhardt of
Yad Vashem and Peter Lande of USHMM; and, of course, Michael Tobias
and Warren Blatt of JewishGen, without whose technical skills none of
this material would be available.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Research


Ulla Uller Benevolent Association #belarus

JSelig3460@...
 

Genners:
In order to avoid duplication of effort if you have investigated this
landsmanshaft please contact me privately. If you have any reason to believe
that it is not located 114 miles northeast of Minsk please advise me.
My study of Tomcovici is complete and will be placed on the belarus website
subsequent to the Toronto Conference.

Jerome Seligsohn
NYC
SELIGSOHN and ELKIN of Mogilev/Dnepr


Belarus SIG #Belarus New Files Added to Holocaust Database #belarus

Joyce Field
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce major additions its Holocaust
Database at <http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/>. 55,000
records are being added to six new individual databases.

The first installment of Dachau Concentration Camp Records, an
indexing project which began in November 2001, includes 36,937
records. A total of over120,000 records will be in this database
when it is completed. Rather than wait until all the data are
entered, we intend to put the data online in large increments. We
have an additional 20,000 records which have already been indexed and
are waiting for validation. As explained in the introduction to this
database, we have two levels of validation to ensure the highest
possible level of accuracy. A glossary of abbreviations and terms
used in the Dachau material has also been prepared and can be
accessed through the introduction.

The Borislav-Drohobycz Water Bills file, containing 5,483 records, is
from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. It consists of 120
ledger pages of names of people who had died or been deported and who
had not paid their water bills in 1941/42. Of course, many could not
pay their bills because they had died or been deported!! This file
contains valuable genealogical information--names and addresses of
people >from Borislav and Drohobycz and often their fate.

Peter Lande prepared two lists. One is Sachsenhausen "Arrivals and
Departures" for the period of October 12, 1940 through June 3, 1941.
It consists of 4,991 records. Opened in 1938, the Sachsenhasusen
camp was one of the earliest concentration camps. Initially it was
used to hold Jews and political prisoners; later on it was a forced
labor camp and most of its prisoners were non-Jews >from Germany and
all over Europe. This camp prepared daily lists of arrivals and
departures. Information on persons in this collection includes name,
prisoner number, and, where available, dates of birth and death.

The second list contributed by Peter Lande is "Temporary German
Passports for Jews 1938-1940," an extraction of 485 names >from a
much larger Gestapo collection in the United States Holocaust
Memorial Museum. This file is of historical and genealogical
interest. Prior to the beginning of mass deportations, and even after
war began in 1939, the German Government continued to issue passports
to Jews resident in Germany, including "stateless" Jews, mostly of
Polish origin.

Two major lists provided by Yad Vashem under the data sharing
agreement with JewishGen are >from Szombathely, Hungary and Debrecen,
Hungary. The Szombathely list consists of 3,115 names of Jews who
were forced to register according to a governmental order of 4 April
1944. The registration lists included first and last name, name of
mother, place and date of birth, address, name of spouse, name of
children, occupation, and subscription of telephone and radio. The
list facilitated the concentration of the Jews into a ghetto and
their subsequent deportation to Auschwitz.

The second Yad Vashem file, of 3,945 Jews in Debrecen in 1945, is a
list of Holocaust survivors registered in Debrecen at the end of the
war.

An extensive list of Hungarian terms for occupations/professions is
available at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/holocaust/HungarianOccupations.html>.
This list was compiled >from both the Szombathely and Debrecen files
and should be used for research in these files as well as for a
general Hungarian-to-English translation of occupational titles. For
each unique title, the correct Hungarian term is provided along with
its English translation.

This work is made possible by the enormous efforts of numerous
people--Rachel Reisman, Technical Coordinator for the Holocaust
Database files; the many volunteers who entered and validated the
data; the volunteer project leaders; staff >from Yad Vashem and the
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum--primarily Zvi Bernhardt of
Yad Vashem and Peter Lande of USHMM; and, of course, Michael Tobias
and Warren Blatt of JewishGen, without whose technical skills none of
this material would be available.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Research


Belarus SIG #Belarus Ulla Uller Benevolent Association #belarus

JSelig3460@...
 

Genners:
In order to avoid duplication of effort if you have investigated this
landsmanshaft please contact me privately. If you have any reason to believe
that it is not located 114 miles northeast of Minsk please advise me.
My study of Tomcovici is complete and will be placed on the belarus website
subsequent to the Toronto Conference.

Jerome Seligsohn
NYC
SELIGSOHN and ELKIN of Mogilev/Dnepr


Found Berman-Need additional advise #belarus

hat1946@...
 

Have been searching for years for gggrandfather the
only family member who arrived thru Ellis Island (in
1894) As a matter of fact one of his sons my
ggrandfather became a citizen in 1893. All other
family members had imm. prior to 1892 Of course
original passenger list is not very clear, and name
was spelled Elje Bermann (Elis/Eli) Berman.
Question is now how do I get a copy >from the
Hamburg-America Line and what inf. will their records
have ?The ship was the Prussia. I know they have a web
site but I can not read German.

Any help will be appreciated.

Hattie Berman Murphy

Searching: Berman, Connors, Michaelson, Davidoff,
Davidow- Minsk


Belarus SIG #Belarus Found Berman-Need additional advise #belarus

hat1946@...
 

Have been searching for years for gggrandfather the
only family member who arrived thru Ellis Island (in
1894) As a matter of fact one of his sons my
ggrandfather became a citizen in 1893. All other
family members had imm. prior to 1892 Of course
original passenger list is not very clear, and name
was spelled Elje Bermann (Elis/Eli) Berman.
Question is now how do I get a copy >from the
Hamburg-America Line and what inf. will their records
have ?The ship was the Prussia. I know they have a web
site but I can not read German.

Any help will be appreciated.

Hattie Berman Murphy

Searching: Berman, Connors, Michaelson, Davidoff,
Davidow- Minsk