Date   

New Files Added to Holocaust Database #latvia #courland

Joyce Field
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce major additions to its Holocaust
Database at <http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/> . 55,000
records are being added to six new individual databases.

The first installment of Dachau Concentration Camp Records, an
indexing project which began in November 2001, includes 36,937
records. A total of over 120,000 records will be in this database
when it is completed. Rather than wait until all the data are
entered, we intend to put the data online in large increments. We
have an additional 20,000 records which have already been indexed and
are waiting for validation. As explained in the introduction to this
database, we have two levels of validation to ensure the highest
possible level of accuracy. A glossary of abbreviations and terms
used in the Dachau material has also been prepared and can be
accessed through the introduction.

The Borislav-Drohobycz Water Bills file, containing 5,483 records, is
from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. It consists of 120
ledger pages of names of people who had died or been deported and who
had not paid their water bills in 1941/42. Of course, many could not
pay their bills because they had died or been deported!! This file
contains valuable genealogical information--names and addresses of
people >from Borislav and Drohobycz and often their fate.

Peter Lande prepared two lists. One is Sachsenhausen "Arrivals and
Departures" for the period of October 12, 1940 through June 3, 1941.
It consists of 4,991 records. Opened in 1938, the Sachsenhasusen
camp was one of the earliest concentration camps. Initially it was
used to hold Jews and political prisoners; later on it was a forced
labor camp and most of its prisoners were non-Jews >from Germany and
all over Europe. This camp prepared daily lists of arrivals and
departures. Information on persons in this collection includes name,
prisoner number, and, where available, dates of birth and death.

The second list contributed by Peter Lande is "Temporary German
Passports for Jews 1938-1940," an extraction of 485 names >from a
much larger Gestapo collection in the United States Holocaust
Memorial Museum. This file is of historical and genealogical
interest. Prior to the beginning of mass deportations, and even after
war began in 1939, the German Government continued to issue passports
to Jews resident in Germany, including "stateless" Jews, mostly of
Polish origin.

Two major lists provided by Yad Vashem under the data sharing
agreement with JewishGen are >from Szombathely, Hungary and Debrecen,
Hungary. The Szombathely list consists of 3,115 names of Jews who
were forced to register according to a governmental order of 4 April
1944. The registration lists included first and last name, name of
mother, place and date of birth, address, name of spouse, name of
children, occupation, and subscription of telephone and radio. The
list facilitated the concentration of the Jews into a ghetto and
their subsequent deportation to Auschwitz.

The second Yad Vashem file, of 3,945 Jews in Debrecen in 1945, is a
list of Holocaust survivors registered in Debrecen at the end of the
war.

An extensive list of Hungarian terms for occupations/professions is
available at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/holocaust/HungarianOccupations.html> .
This list was compiled >from both the Szombathely and Debrecen files
and should be used for research in these files as well as for a
general Hungarian-to-English translation of occupational titles. For
each unique title, the correct Hungarian term is provided along with
its English translation.

This work is made possible by the enormous efforts of numerous
people--Rachel Reisman, Technical Coordinator for the Holocaust
Database files; the many volunteers who entered and validated the
data; the volunteer project leaders; staff >from Yad Vashem and the
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum--primarily Zvi Bernhardt of
Yad Vashem and Peter Lande of USHMM; and, of course, Michael Tobias
and Warren Blatt of JewishGen, without whose technical skills none of
this material would be available.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Research


Courland SIG #Courland #Latvia New Files Added to Holocaust Database #courland #latvia

Joyce Field
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce major additions to its Holocaust
Database at <http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/> . 55,000
records are being added to six new individual databases.

The first installment of Dachau Concentration Camp Records, an
indexing project which began in November 2001, includes 36,937
records. A total of over 120,000 records will be in this database
when it is completed. Rather than wait until all the data are
entered, we intend to put the data online in large increments. We
have an additional 20,000 records which have already been indexed and
are waiting for validation. As explained in the introduction to this
database, we have two levels of validation to ensure the highest
possible level of accuracy. A glossary of abbreviations and terms
used in the Dachau material has also been prepared and can be
accessed through the introduction.

The Borislav-Drohobycz Water Bills file, containing 5,483 records, is
from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. It consists of 120
ledger pages of names of people who had died or been deported and who
had not paid their water bills in 1941/42. Of course, many could not
pay their bills because they had died or been deported!! This file
contains valuable genealogical information--names and addresses of
people >from Borislav and Drohobycz and often their fate.

Peter Lande prepared two lists. One is Sachsenhausen "Arrivals and
Departures" for the period of October 12, 1940 through June 3, 1941.
It consists of 4,991 records. Opened in 1938, the Sachsenhasusen
camp was one of the earliest concentration camps. Initially it was
used to hold Jews and political prisoners; later on it was a forced
labor camp and most of its prisoners were non-Jews >from Germany and
all over Europe. This camp prepared daily lists of arrivals and
departures. Information on persons in this collection includes name,
prisoner number, and, where available, dates of birth and death.

The second list contributed by Peter Lande is "Temporary German
Passports for Jews 1938-1940," an extraction of 485 names >from a
much larger Gestapo collection in the United States Holocaust
Memorial Museum. This file is of historical and genealogical
interest. Prior to the beginning of mass deportations, and even after
war began in 1939, the German Government continued to issue passports
to Jews resident in Germany, including "stateless" Jews, mostly of
Polish origin.

Two major lists provided by Yad Vashem under the data sharing
agreement with JewishGen are >from Szombathely, Hungary and Debrecen,
Hungary. The Szombathely list consists of 3,115 names of Jews who
were forced to register according to a governmental order of 4 April
1944. The registration lists included first and last name, name of
mother, place and date of birth, address, name of spouse, name of
children, occupation, and subscription of telephone and radio. The
list facilitated the concentration of the Jews into a ghetto and
their subsequent deportation to Auschwitz.

The second Yad Vashem file, of 3,945 Jews in Debrecen in 1945, is a
list of Holocaust survivors registered in Debrecen at the end of the
war.

An extensive list of Hungarian terms for occupations/professions is
available at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/holocaust/HungarianOccupations.html> .
This list was compiled >from both the Szombathely and Debrecen files
and should be used for research in these files as well as for a
general Hungarian-to-English translation of occupational titles. For
each unique title, the correct Hungarian term is provided along with
its English translation.

This work is made possible by the enormous efforts of numerous
people--Rachel Reisman, Technical Coordinator for the Holocaust
Database files; the many volunteers who entered and validated the
data; the volunteer project leaders; staff >from Yad Vashem and the
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum--primarily Zvi Bernhardt of
Yad Vashem and Peter Lande of USHMM; and, of course, Michael Tobias
and Warren Blatt of JewishGen, without whose technical skills none of
this material would be available.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Research


New Files Added to Holocaust Database #yizkorbooks

Joyce Field
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce major additions its Holocaust
Database at <http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/>. 55,000
records are being added to six new individual databases.

The first installment of Dachau Concentration Camp Records, an
indexing project which began in November 2001, includes 36,937
records. A total of over120,000 records will be in this database
when it is completed. Rather than wait until all the data are
entered, we intend to put the data online in large increments. We
have an additional 20,000 records which have already been indexed and
are waiting for validation. As explained in the introduction to this
database, we have two levels of validation to ensure the highest
possible level of accuracy. A glossary of abbreviations and terms
used in the Dachau material has also been prepared and can be
accessed through the introduction.

The Borislav-Drohobycz Water Bills file, containing 5,483 records, is
from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. It consists of 120
ledger pages of names of people who had died or been deported and who
had not paid their water bills in 1941/42. Of course, many could not
pay their bills because they had died or been deported!! This file
contains valuable genealogical information--names and addresses of
people >from Borislav and Drohobycz and often their fate.

Peter Lande prepared two lists. One is Sachsenhausen "Arrivals and
Departures" for the period of October 12, 1940 through June 3, 1941.
It consists of 4,991 records. Opened in 1938, the Sachsenhasusen
camp was one of the earliest concentration camps. Initially it was
used to hold Jews and political prisoners; later on it was a forced
labor camp and most of its prisoners were non-Jews >from Germany and
all over Europe. This camp prepared daily lists of arrivals and
departures. Information on persons in this collection includes name,
prisoner number, and, where available, dates of birth and death.

The second list contributed by Peter Lande is "Temporary German
Passports for Jews 1938-1940," an extraction of 485 names >from a
much larger Gestapo collection in the United States Holocaust
Memorial Museum. This file is of historical and genealogical
interest. Prior to the beginning of mass deportations, and even after
war began in 1939, the German Government continued to issue passports
to Jews resident in Germany, including "stateless" Jews, mostly of
Polish origin.

Two major lists provided by Yad Vashem under the data sharing
agreement with JewishGen are >from Szombathely, Hungary and Debrecen,
Hungary. The Szombathely list consists of 3,115 names of Jews who
were forced to register according to a governmental order of 4 April
1944. The registration lists included first and last name, name of
mother, place and date of birth, address, name of spouse, name of
children, occupation, and subscription of telephone and radio. The
list facilitated the concentration of the Jews into a ghetto and
their subsequent deportation to Auschwitz.

The second Yad Vashem file, of 3,945 Jews in Debrecen in 1945, is a
list of Holocaust survivors registered in Debrecen at the end of the
war.

An extensive list of Hungarian terms for occupations/professions is
available at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/holocaust/HungarianOccupations.html>.
This list was compiled >from both the Szombathely and Debrecen files
and should be used for research in these files as well as for a
general Hungarian-to-English translation of occupational titles. For
each unique title, the correct Hungarian term is provided along with
its English translation.

This work is made possible by the enormous efforts of numerous
people--Rachel Reisman, Technical Coordinator for the Holocaust
Database files; the many volunteers who entered and validated the
data; the volunteer project leaders; staff >from Yad Vashem and the
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum--primarily Zvi Bernhardt of
Yad Vashem and Peter Lande of USHMM; and, of course, Michael Tobias
and Warren Blatt of JewishGen, without whose technical skills none of
this material would be available.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Research


Yizkor Books #YizkorBooks New Files Added to Holocaust Database #yizkorbooks

Joyce Field
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce major additions its Holocaust
Database at <http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/>. 55,000
records are being added to six new individual databases.

The first installment of Dachau Concentration Camp Records, an
indexing project which began in November 2001, includes 36,937
records. A total of over120,000 records will be in this database
when it is completed. Rather than wait until all the data are
entered, we intend to put the data online in large increments. We
have an additional 20,000 records which have already been indexed and
are waiting for validation. As explained in the introduction to this
database, we have two levels of validation to ensure the highest
possible level of accuracy. A glossary of abbreviations and terms
used in the Dachau material has also been prepared and can be
accessed through the introduction.

The Borislav-Drohobycz Water Bills file, containing 5,483 records, is
from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. It consists of 120
ledger pages of names of people who had died or been deported and who
had not paid their water bills in 1941/42. Of course, many could not
pay their bills because they had died or been deported!! This file
contains valuable genealogical information--names and addresses of
people >from Borislav and Drohobycz and often their fate.

Peter Lande prepared two lists. One is Sachsenhausen "Arrivals and
Departures" for the period of October 12, 1940 through June 3, 1941.
It consists of 4,991 records. Opened in 1938, the Sachsenhasusen
camp was one of the earliest concentration camps. Initially it was
used to hold Jews and political prisoners; later on it was a forced
labor camp and most of its prisoners were non-Jews >from Germany and
all over Europe. This camp prepared daily lists of arrivals and
departures. Information on persons in this collection includes name,
prisoner number, and, where available, dates of birth and death.

The second list contributed by Peter Lande is "Temporary German
Passports for Jews 1938-1940," an extraction of 485 names >from a
much larger Gestapo collection in the United States Holocaust
Memorial Museum. This file is of historical and genealogical
interest. Prior to the beginning of mass deportations, and even after
war began in 1939, the German Government continued to issue passports
to Jews resident in Germany, including "stateless" Jews, mostly of
Polish origin.

Two major lists provided by Yad Vashem under the data sharing
agreement with JewishGen are >from Szombathely, Hungary and Debrecen,
Hungary. The Szombathely list consists of 3,115 names of Jews who
were forced to register according to a governmental order of 4 April
1944. The registration lists included first and last name, name of
mother, place and date of birth, address, name of spouse, name of
children, occupation, and subscription of telephone and radio. The
list facilitated the concentration of the Jews into a ghetto and
their subsequent deportation to Auschwitz.

The second Yad Vashem file, of 3,945 Jews in Debrecen in 1945, is a
list of Holocaust survivors registered in Debrecen at the end of the
war.

An extensive list of Hungarian terms for occupations/professions is
available at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/holocaust/HungarianOccupations.html>.
This list was compiled >from both the Szombathely and Debrecen files
and should be used for research in these files as well as for a
general Hungarian-to-English translation of occupational titles. For
each unique title, the correct Hungarian term is provided along with
its English translation.

This work is made possible by the enormous efforts of numerous
people--Rachel Reisman, Technical Coordinator for the Holocaust
Database files; the many volunteers who entered and validated the
data; the volunteer project leaders; staff >from Yad Vashem and the
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum--primarily Zvi Bernhardt of
Yad Vashem and Peter Lande of USHMM; and, of course, Michael Tobias
and Warren Blatt of JewishGen, without whose technical skills none of
this material would be available.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Research


Re: MtDNA study published in June #dna

Al Bell <allbell@...>
 


Subject: Jewish MtDNA study published in June ("exciting, important")
From: howard sachs <hfsachs@...>
Date: Fri, 26 Jul 2002 13:13:19 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 1

It is said "the mothers' mitochondrial DNA seems to
indicate local Diaspora origin" for the women. This
contrasts with "data on the Y chromosome (that)
indicates that the males originated in the Middle
East."
One thing to keep in mind is that the public Jewish mtDNA databases are
still fairly small, and that there's still room for some of us to
fantasize about having tough matrilineal ancestors who traveled along the
Silk Road.

Example: My earliest known matrilineal ancestor was a Jewish woman named
Bertha DOBRIN ROZOVSKY who lived in southeastern Belarus.

My mtDNA type was differences >from the norm at positions 16111, 16223,
16235 and 16362, which is part of "haplogroup" M.

There are some folks with mtDNA patterns on the Web who share three of the
four differences in the Middle East, Asia and the Americas, but the only
exact match is for someone >from Turkey. So, it seems possible that Bertha
was descended >from a Jewish woman who migrated to Belarus >from somewhere
around Turkey, Bukhara, etc. In other words, she might not necessarily
have been descended >from a woman >from Jerusalem -- although that's
possible. But she could be descended >from a Jewish woman who
moved to Belarus >from somewhere else, rather than a native Belarusian who
agreed to marry a Jewish immigrant.

A.L. Bell
Kansas City, Missouri


DNA Research #DNA Re: MtDNA study published in June #dna

Al Bell <allbell@...>
 


Subject: Jewish MtDNA study published in June ("exciting, important")
From: howard sachs <hfsachs@...>
Date: Fri, 26 Jul 2002 13:13:19 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 1

It is said "the mothers' mitochondrial DNA seems to
indicate local Diaspora origin" for the women. This
contrasts with "data on the Y chromosome (that)
indicates that the males originated in the Middle
East."
One thing to keep in mind is that the public Jewish mtDNA databases are
still fairly small, and that there's still room for some of us to
fantasize about having tough matrilineal ancestors who traveled along the
Silk Road.

Example: My earliest known matrilineal ancestor was a Jewish woman named
Bertha DOBRIN ROZOVSKY who lived in southeastern Belarus.

My mtDNA type was differences >from the norm at positions 16111, 16223,
16235 and 16362, which is part of "haplogroup" M.

There are some folks with mtDNA patterns on the Web who share three of the
four differences in the Middle East, Asia and the Americas, but the only
exact match is for someone >from Turkey. So, it seems possible that Bertha
was descended >from a Jewish woman who migrated to Belarus >from somewhere
around Turkey, Bukhara, etc. In other words, she might not necessarily
have been descended >from a woman >from Jerusalem -- although that's
possible. But she could be descended >from a Jewish woman who
moved to Belarus >from somewhere else, rather than a native Belarusian who
agreed to marry a Jewish immigrant.

A.L. Bell
Kansas City, Missouri


Re: Complaints #general

Harry Zimmerman <JoelWire@...>
 

To Everyone Who Reads Jewishgen:
It is very easy to complain about almost anything and I personally am
tired of seeing posts like this. The people at Jewish Gen are volunteers
who work their butts off for nothing but the love of Genealogy and in the
end it is something which benefits us all. Additionally there are a lot of
first time genealogist who post here too. So what if sometimes their
questions seem very elementary you who have been doing Genealogy for a
long time once asked these same questions of someone more knowledgeable
than you too.
>from now on it would be nice if people who posted here looked at
life and their comments as the cup being half full instead of half empty.

Will the person who wasn't a beginner when they first started
please stand up!

Sandy Zimmerman


Re: OBA Cemetery in Minneapolis -need address & 'phone # #general

Ted Margulis <tmargulis@...>
 

You can find the name, address and phone number of the cemetery in my home
town of Minneapolis, by going to my United States by State web page at my
web site http://jewishwebindex.com and scroll down to Minnesota.

Warm Regards,
Ted Margulis
Palm Desert, CA
tmargulis@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Complaints #general

Harry Zimmerman <JoelWire@...>
 

To Everyone Who Reads Jewishgen:
It is very easy to complain about almost anything and I personally am
tired of seeing posts like this. The people at Jewish Gen are volunteers
who work their butts off for nothing but the love of Genealogy and in the
end it is something which benefits us all. Additionally there are a lot of
first time genealogist who post here too. So what if sometimes their
questions seem very elementary you who have been doing Genealogy for a
long time once asked these same questions of someone more knowledgeable
than you too.
>from now on it would be nice if people who posted here looked at
life and their comments as the cup being half full instead of half empty.

Will the person who wasn't a beginner when they first started
please stand up!

Sandy Zimmerman


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: OBA Cemetery in Minneapolis -need address & 'phone # #general

Ted Margulis <tmargulis@...>
 

You can find the name, address and phone number of the cemetery in my home
town of Minneapolis, by going to my United States by State web page at my
web site http://jewishwebindex.com and scroll down to Minnesota.

Warm Regards,
Ted Margulis
Palm Desert, CA
tmargulis@...


Re: Hessen, Germany Postal Zip Codes #general

Roger Lustig <trovato@...>
 

ERNKAUF@... wrote:
Would anyone be able to give me the Postal ZIP codes for the following
towns in the province of Hessen, Germany

Staden --- Lauterbach-----Obber Semen-- Storndorf--- Mochstadt---Friedberg

Do you also know if theres a directory somewhere where one can find the
Postal Zone codes for other towns. I can not get mail to any of the
officials of the towns I have mentioned without knowing the Postal codes.
http://www.deutschepost.de/postdirekt/index.html?
inhalt=/postdirekt/produkte/plzsuche.html

...gets you any PLZ you want!

Best,

Roger Lustig


New information #general

Jan Brugge <jbrugge@...>
 

Hello,

You can find a lot of information on my homepage.

I have modify my homepage with several descendants. For new free software
just look on my homepage. If you understand Dutch I have a lot of
information >from Hoogezand - Sappemeer.
If you like very old pictures >from the province Groningen, Friesland,
Drenthe

If you have any information about my family, please inform me.

Jan Brugge
http://members.home.nl/jbrugge/


BROCHSZTAJN/BROCHSTEIN #general

Steinhe@...
 

Seeking any information about David BROCHSZTAJN as may be available.

Born: Jan 24, 1893 in Ozarow, Poland
Father: Sender BROCHSZTAJN
Died: 1914 in or around NYC

Probably unmarried.
Cannot find him in the Ellis Island data base.
He is rumored to have arrived in the United State >from Brazil.
Cannot find him in death records of the boroughs of NY.

Any assistance or ideas would be helpful to include the main port of entry
to the united States >from Brazil. David BROCHSZTAJN would be my Uncle.

Your efforts would be appreciated.

Harry Stein


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Hessen, Germany Postal Zip Codes #general

Roger Lustig <trovato@...>
 

ERNKAUF@... wrote:
Would anyone be able to give me the Postal ZIP codes for the following
towns in the province of Hessen, Germany

Staden --- Lauterbach-----Obber Semen-- Storndorf--- Mochstadt---Friedberg

Do you also know if theres a directory somewhere where one can find the
Postal Zone codes for other towns. I can not get mail to any of the
officials of the towns I have mentioned without knowing the Postal codes.
http://www.deutschepost.de/postdirekt/index.html?
inhalt=/postdirekt/produkte/plzsuche.html

...gets you any PLZ you want!

Best,

Roger Lustig


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen New information #general

Jan Brugge <jbrugge@...>
 

Hello,

You can find a lot of information on my homepage.

I have modify my homepage with several descendants. For new free software
just look on my homepage. If you understand Dutch I have a lot of
information >from Hoogezand - Sappemeer.
If you like very old pictures >from the province Groningen, Friesland,
Drenthe

If you have any information about my family, please inform me.

Jan Brugge
http://members.home.nl/jbrugge/


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen BROCHSZTAJN/BROCHSTEIN #general

Steinhe@...
 

Seeking any information about David BROCHSZTAJN as may be available.

Born: Jan 24, 1893 in Ozarow, Poland
Father: Sender BROCHSZTAJN
Died: 1914 in or around NYC

Probably unmarried.
Cannot find him in the Ellis Island data base.
He is rumored to have arrived in the United State >from Brazil.
Cannot find him in death records of the boroughs of NY.

Any assistance or ideas would be helpful to include the main port of entry
to the united States >from Brazil. David BROCHSZTAJN would be my Uncle.

Your efforts would be appreciated.

Harry Stein


Kreindl #general

sanvic366@...
 

The given name of my gggmother was Kreindl. I assume that it is a Yiddish
name. Does anyone know the meaning and/or origin of the name and, most
important to me, does anyone know the Hebrew equivalent? Thank you for
your help!

Victor Singer, New York


Genealogy e-zines #general

Bkhait@...
 

If you currently subscribe to e-zines such as Nu, What's New, Dick
Eastman's online newsletter, NGS Upfront, or others, I'd like to hear your
views on them: why you subscribe, what you get >from it, etc. for an
article I'm writing for an upcoming issue of Family Chronicle. I'd be glad
to send you a copy of the article when it's published. Please contact me
privately at bkhait@....

Barbara Khait
bkhait@...
Somerset, NJ


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Kreindl #general

sanvic366@...
 

The given name of my gggmother was Kreindl. I assume that it is a Yiddish
name. Does anyone know the meaning and/or origin of the name and, most
important to me, does anyone know the Hebrew equivalent? Thank you for
your help!

Victor Singer, New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Genealogy e-zines #general

Bkhait@...
 

If you currently subscribe to e-zines such as Nu, What's New, Dick
Eastman's online newsletter, NGS Upfront, or others, I'd like to hear your
views on them: why you subscribe, what you get >from it, etc. for an
article I'm writing for an upcoming issue of Family Chronicle. I'd be glad
to send you a copy of the article when it's published. Please contact me
privately at bkhait@....

Barbara Khait
bkhait@...
Somerset, NJ