Date   

New Files Added to Holocaust Database #belarus

Joyce Field
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce major additions its Holocaust
Database at <http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/>. 55,000
records are being added to six new individual databases.

The first installment of Dachau Concentration Camp Records, an
indexing project which began in November 2001, includes 36,937
records. A total of over120,000 records will be in this database
when it is completed. Rather than wait until all the data are
entered, we intend to put the data online in large increments. We
have an additional 20,000 records which have already been indexed and
are waiting for validation. As explained in the introduction to this
database, we have two levels of validation to ensure the highest
possible level of accuracy. A glossary of abbreviations and terms
used in the Dachau material has also been prepared and can be
accessed through the introduction.

The Borislav-Drohobycz Water Bills file, containing 5,483 records, is
from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. It consists of 120
ledger pages of names of people who had died or been deported and who
had not paid their water bills in 1941/42. Of course, many could not
pay their bills because they had died or been deported!! This file
contains valuable genealogical information--names and addresses of
people >from Borislav and Drohobycz and often their fate.

Peter Lande prepared two lists. One is Sachsenhausen "Arrivals and
Departures" for the period of October 12, 1940 through June 3, 1941.
It consists of 4,991 records. Opened in 1938, the Sachsenhasusen
camp was one of the earliest concentration camps. Initially it was
used to hold Jews and political prisoners; later on it was a forced
labor camp and most of its prisoners were non-Jews >from Germany and
all over Europe. This camp prepared daily lists of arrivals and
departures. Information on persons in this collection includes name,
prisoner number, and, where available, dates of birth and death.

The second list contributed by Peter Lande is "Temporary German
Passports for Jews 1938-1940," an extraction of 485 names >from a
much larger Gestapo collection in the United States Holocaust
Memorial Museum. This file is of historical and genealogical
interest. Prior to the beginning of mass deportations, and even after
war began in 1939, the German Government continued to issue passports
to Jews resident in Germany, including "stateless" Jews, mostly of
Polish origin.

Two major lists provided by Yad Vashem under the data sharing
agreement with JewishGen are >from Szombathely, Hungary and Debrecen,
Hungary. The Szombathely list consists of 3,115 names of Jews who
were forced to register according to a governmental order of 4 April
1944. The registration lists included first and last name, name of
mother, place and date of birth, address, name of spouse, name of
children, occupation, and subscription of telephone and radio. The
list facilitated the concentration of the Jews into a ghetto and
their subsequent deportation to Auschwitz.

The second Yad Vashem file, of 3,945 Jews in Debrecen in 1945, is a
list of Holocaust survivors registered in Debrecen at the end of the
war.

An extensive list of Hungarian terms for occupations/professions is
available at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/holocaust/HungarianOccupations.html>.
This list was compiled >from both the Szombathely and Debrecen files
and should be used for research in these files as well as for a
general Hungarian-to-English translation of occupational titles. For
each unique title, the correct Hungarian term is provided along with
its English translation.

This work is made possible by the enormous efforts of numerous
people--Rachel Reisman, Technical Coordinator for the Holocaust
Database files; the many volunteers who entered and validated the
data; the volunteer project leaders; staff >from Yad Vashem and the
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum--primarily Zvi Bernhardt of
Yad Vashem and Peter Lande of USHMM; and, of course, Michael Tobias
and Warren Blatt of JewishGen, without whose technical skills none of
this material would be available.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Research


Ulla Uller Benevolent Association #belarus

JSelig3460@...
 

Genners:
In order to avoid duplication of effort if you have investigated this
landsmanshaft please contact me privately. If you have any reason to believe
that it is not located 114 miles northeast of Minsk please advise me.
My study of Tomcovici is complete and will be placed on the belarus website
subsequent to the Toronto Conference.

Jerome Seligsohn
NYC
SELIGSOHN and ELKIN of Mogilev/Dnepr


Belarus SIG #Belarus New Files Added to Holocaust Database #belarus

Joyce Field
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce major additions its Holocaust
Database at <http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/>. 55,000
records are being added to six new individual databases.

The first installment of Dachau Concentration Camp Records, an
indexing project which began in November 2001, includes 36,937
records. A total of over120,000 records will be in this database
when it is completed. Rather than wait until all the data are
entered, we intend to put the data online in large increments. We
have an additional 20,000 records which have already been indexed and
are waiting for validation. As explained in the introduction to this
database, we have two levels of validation to ensure the highest
possible level of accuracy. A glossary of abbreviations and terms
used in the Dachau material has also been prepared and can be
accessed through the introduction.

The Borislav-Drohobycz Water Bills file, containing 5,483 records, is
from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. It consists of 120
ledger pages of names of people who had died or been deported and who
had not paid their water bills in 1941/42. Of course, many could not
pay their bills because they had died or been deported!! This file
contains valuable genealogical information--names and addresses of
people >from Borislav and Drohobycz and often their fate.

Peter Lande prepared two lists. One is Sachsenhausen "Arrivals and
Departures" for the period of October 12, 1940 through June 3, 1941.
It consists of 4,991 records. Opened in 1938, the Sachsenhasusen
camp was one of the earliest concentration camps. Initially it was
used to hold Jews and political prisoners; later on it was a forced
labor camp and most of its prisoners were non-Jews >from Germany and
all over Europe. This camp prepared daily lists of arrivals and
departures. Information on persons in this collection includes name,
prisoner number, and, where available, dates of birth and death.

The second list contributed by Peter Lande is "Temporary German
Passports for Jews 1938-1940," an extraction of 485 names >from a
much larger Gestapo collection in the United States Holocaust
Memorial Museum. This file is of historical and genealogical
interest. Prior to the beginning of mass deportations, and even after
war began in 1939, the German Government continued to issue passports
to Jews resident in Germany, including "stateless" Jews, mostly of
Polish origin.

Two major lists provided by Yad Vashem under the data sharing
agreement with JewishGen are >from Szombathely, Hungary and Debrecen,
Hungary. The Szombathely list consists of 3,115 names of Jews who
were forced to register according to a governmental order of 4 April
1944. The registration lists included first and last name, name of
mother, place and date of birth, address, name of spouse, name of
children, occupation, and subscription of telephone and radio. The
list facilitated the concentration of the Jews into a ghetto and
their subsequent deportation to Auschwitz.

The second Yad Vashem file, of 3,945 Jews in Debrecen in 1945, is a
list of Holocaust survivors registered in Debrecen at the end of the
war.

An extensive list of Hungarian terms for occupations/professions is
available at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/holocaust/HungarianOccupations.html>.
This list was compiled >from both the Szombathely and Debrecen files
and should be used for research in these files as well as for a
general Hungarian-to-English translation of occupational titles. For
each unique title, the correct Hungarian term is provided along with
its English translation.

This work is made possible by the enormous efforts of numerous
people--Rachel Reisman, Technical Coordinator for the Holocaust
Database files; the many volunteers who entered and validated the
data; the volunteer project leaders; staff >from Yad Vashem and the
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum--primarily Zvi Bernhardt of
Yad Vashem and Peter Lande of USHMM; and, of course, Michael Tobias
and Warren Blatt of JewishGen, without whose technical skills none of
this material would be available.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Research


Belarus SIG #Belarus Ulla Uller Benevolent Association #belarus

JSelig3460@...
 

Genners:
In order to avoid duplication of effort if you have investigated this
landsmanshaft please contact me privately. If you have any reason to believe
that it is not located 114 miles northeast of Minsk please advise me.
My study of Tomcovici is complete and will be placed on the belarus website
subsequent to the Toronto Conference.

Jerome Seligsohn
NYC
SELIGSOHN and ELKIN of Mogilev/Dnepr


Found Berman-Need additional advise #belarus

hat1946@...
 

Have been searching for years for gggrandfather the
only family member who arrived thru Ellis Island (in
1894) As a matter of fact one of his sons my
ggrandfather became a citizen in 1893. All other
family members had imm. prior to 1892 Of course
original passenger list is not very clear, and name
was spelled Elje Bermann (Elis/Eli) Berman.
Question is now how do I get a copy >from the
Hamburg-America Line and what inf. will their records
have ?The ship was the Prussia. I know they have a web
site but I can not read German.

Any help will be appreciated.

Hattie Berman Murphy

Searching: Berman, Connors, Michaelson, Davidoff,
Davidow- Minsk


Belarus SIG #Belarus Found Berman-Need additional advise #belarus

hat1946@...
 

Have been searching for years for gggrandfather the
only family member who arrived thru Ellis Island (in
1894) As a matter of fact one of his sons my
ggrandfather became a citizen in 1893. All other
family members had imm. prior to 1892 Of course
original passenger list is not very clear, and name
was spelled Elje Bermann (Elis/Eli) Berman.
Question is now how do I get a copy >from the
Hamburg-America Line and what inf. will their records
have ?The ship was the Prussia. I know they have a web
site but I can not read German.

Any help will be appreciated.

Hattie Berman Murphy

Searching: Berman, Connors, Michaelson, Davidoff,
Davidow- Minsk


Searching for Siegel relatives #belarus

Jon Ogur <jmogur@...>
 

I am researching my OGUR ancestors, who emigrated >from Minsk to New York in
1906-7. According to the Ellis Island ships manifests, several family
members were joining their Uncle Jacob SIEGEL, who lived at 10 West 112th
Street in Manhattan. Family stories say that Jacob and Sosha SIEGEL had
seven sons. Family members who stayed with the SIEGELS included my paternal
great-grandparents, Morduch and Hene OGUR, my paternal grandparents, Ellis
OGUR (Elias OGOR) and Edith LEVINE OGUR (Chasche LEWIN), and my paternal
grandfather’s brother, Felik (Eugene) OGUR. However, we have lost contact
with our SIEGEL relatives. If any of these names sound familiar, please
contact Jonathan Ogur at jmogur@....


Belarus Trip: Sharing the Story #belarus

LindaJim Morzillo <jmorzil1@...>
 

Doron H wrote:

<<My uncle has written up our family roots trip to Belarus. I wondered how
to
share it with this list. It is about 12 pages, so it would not be possible
to put within a single email. If someone could email me with a suggestion
or protocol that would be great.>>

Doesn't the Belarus site have an online newsletter where this can be posted?
Check
with the site coordinator.

Another idea would be to divide the story into 12 parts (more or less) and
post it on consecutive days to the discussion. If you do that, please wait
until after the Toronto Convention, I would not like to miss it!!

Linda Morzillo
Saratoga Springs, NY
Jmorzil1@...

Researching:

PRESS and SCHNEIDER in Vidukle and other Raseiniai towns
AMCHISLAVSKY and ERLICHMAN in Rostov-on-Don and previously Kozelsk and
Oster, Chernigov Gubernia
COHEN/KAGAN and BORNSTEIN in Oshmyany, Vilna and France
KOSOFSKY in Stuchin/Szczuczyn/Shchuchyn/Scucyn
SWOTINSKY in Grodno Gubernia Poland/Russia/Belarus


Belarus SIG #Belarus Searching for Siegel relatives #belarus

Jon Ogur <jmogur@...>
 

I am researching my OGUR ancestors, who emigrated >from Minsk to New York in
1906-7. According to the Ellis Island ships manifests, several family
members were joining their Uncle Jacob SIEGEL, who lived at 10 West 112th
Street in Manhattan. Family stories say that Jacob and Sosha SIEGEL had
seven sons. Family members who stayed with the SIEGELS included my paternal
great-grandparents, Morduch and Hene OGUR, my paternal grandparents, Ellis
OGUR (Elias OGOR) and Edith LEVINE OGUR (Chasche LEWIN), and my paternal
grandfather’s brother, Felik (Eugene) OGUR. However, we have lost contact
with our SIEGEL relatives. If any of these names sound familiar, please
contact Jonathan Ogur at jmogur@....


Belarus SIG #Belarus Belarus Trip: Sharing the Story #belarus

LindaJim Morzillo <jmorzil1@...>
 

Doron H wrote:

<<My uncle has written up our family roots trip to Belarus. I wondered how
to
share it with this list. It is about 12 pages, so it would not be possible
to put within a single email. If someone could email me with a suggestion
or protocol that would be great.>>

Doesn't the Belarus site have an online newsletter where this can be posted?
Check
with the site coordinator.

Another idea would be to divide the story into 12 parts (more or less) and
post it on consecutive days to the discussion. If you do that, please wait
until after the Toronto Convention, I would not like to miss it!!

Linda Morzillo
Saratoga Springs, NY
Jmorzil1@...

Researching:

PRESS and SCHNEIDER in Vidukle and other Raseiniai towns
AMCHISLAVSKY and ERLICHMAN in Rostov-on-Don and previously Kozelsk and
Oster, Chernigov Gubernia
COHEN/KAGAN and BORNSTEIN in Oshmyany, Vilna and France
KOSOFSKY in Stuchin/Szczuczyn/Shchuchyn/Scucyn
SWOTINSKY in Grodno Gubernia Poland/Russia/Belarus


Good news for Talalay researchers! #belarus

Bernard Kouchel <koosh@...>
 

-Posted at the request of the author, who is on-the-road.-

Good news for Talalay researchers!

the long awaited 23 page report >from the Historical Archives in Minsk has
been received. it included "reviskie skaskie" >from 1850-58, as well as a
host of other records, including births, deaths, marriages.
It has given us a better idea on how the Chaussy branch is related to the
Mogilev branch, and given us many records on family members living on the
agricultural colony of Vorotinshtina and its neighboring village of
Zaverezhye.
Family relationships were cleared in many cases, and as is to be expected
with an influx of new records, just as many new questions have arisen.
While the long-hoped for birth record of my great-grandfather, Aron Peretz
Talalay, was not found, nor that of his brother, David Aryeh, there were the
birth records of two other children, unknown to me, listing Aron's parents,
Mendel and Musha Kreina (Jassen/Yasin).
It also listed Aron and Riva's first two children who died in the late
1890s.
Was the charge of $2 each for 200 records worth it? Absolutely! And I have
ordered copies of the documents (with the Russian as well as Hebrew pages as
available).
It also indicated several new (to me) families to whom we are related in
Mogilev, such as MENDELSON, and additional information on the ancestors of
the branches that later emigrated to Springfield, Massachusetts; Detroit,
Michigan; and Brooklyn, New York.

Best wishes to all,
Hope to see many of you in Toronto.
--
Schelly Talalay Dardashti
dardasht@... (while travelling in the US)


Belarus SIG #Belarus Fwd: Good news for Talalay researchers! #belarus

Bernard Kouchel <koosh@...>
 

-Posted at the request of the author, who is on-the-road.-

Good news for Talalay researchers!

the long awaited 23 page report >from the Historical Archives in Minsk has
been received. it included "reviskie skaskie" >from 1850-58, as well as a
host of other records, including births, deaths, marriages.
It has given us a better idea on how the Chaussy branch is related to the
Mogilev branch, and given us many records on family members living on the
agricultural colony of Vorotinshtina and its neighboring village of
Zaverezhye.
Family relationships were cleared in many cases, and as is to be expected
with an influx of new records, just as many new questions have arisen.
While the long-hoped for birth record of my great-grandfather, Aron Peretz
Talalay, was not found, nor that of his brother, David Aryeh, there were the
birth records of two other children, unknown to me, listing Aron's parents,
Mendel and Musha Kreina (Jassen/Yasin).
It also listed Aron and Riva's first two children who died in the late
1890s.
Was the charge of $2 each for 200 records worth it? Absolutely! And I have
ordered copies of the documents (with the Russian as well as Hebrew pages as
available).
It also indicated several new (to me) families to whom we are related in
Mogilev, such as MENDELSON, and additional information on the ancestors of
the branches that later emigrated to Springfield, Massachusetts; Detroit,
Michigan; and Brooklyn, New York.

Best wishes to all,
Hope to see many of you in Toronto.
--
Schelly Talalay Dardashti
dardasht@... (while travelling in the US)


story of family roots trip #belarus

Rose Feldman <rosef@...>
 

Dear Doron

You can do a number of things.
1. Prepare it as a word file, post a summary of 2-3 sentences here and
people who ask for it >from you.
2. If it connects with a specific shtetl, have it posted on the shtetl. For
example I am responsible for 2 shtetl pages and on each one have
photographic journals >from trips of various people. On one I have the
interview in the newspaper of one of those who went on the trip.
www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Mscibow
www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Ruzhany
At the Belarus site (listed below) you can also find out if there is a site
for one or more of the places he visited.
3. Another possibility is to see the Belarus site -
http://www.jewishgen.org/belarus/index.html
at "contact us" at the bottom of the page who can contact them. Maybe they
are willing or can direct you.

Rose Feldman
rosef@...
EPSTEIN/BOYARSKY Amstiveva, Mstibov or Mstibovo or Mscibow (Belarus);
Ruzhany or maybe Rozhno; Petach Tikvah, Chicago, Argentine
GITNER/LULKIN/REZNIK Litin (Lityn) Ukraine,Kalinovka Ukraine, Israel,
Chicago
ILEWICKI/ILIWITSKY/ELEVITSKY Kusava Grodno Belarus
TREPMAN/SOJCHER/SLOVIK Warsaw, Israel
FELDMAN/LICHT Warsaw, Israel
Litin www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Littin
Kalinovka www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kalinovka
Mscibow www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Mscibow
Ruzhany www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Ruzhany
The Israel Genealogical Society


Belarus SIG #Belarus story of family roots trip #belarus

Rose Feldman <rosef@...>
 

Dear Doron

You can do a number of things.
1. Prepare it as a word file, post a summary of 2-3 sentences here and
people who ask for it >from you.
2. If it connects with a specific shtetl, have it posted on the shtetl. For
example I am responsible for 2 shtetl pages and on each one have
photographic journals >from trips of various people. On one I have the
interview in the newspaper of one of those who went on the trip.
www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Mscibow
www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Ruzhany
At the Belarus site (listed below) you can also find out if there is a site
for one or more of the places he visited.
3. Another possibility is to see the Belarus site -
http://www.jewishgen.org/belarus/index.html
at "contact us" at the bottom of the page who can contact them. Maybe they
are willing or can direct you.

Rose Feldman
rosef@...
EPSTEIN/BOYARSKY Amstiveva, Mstibov or Mstibovo or Mscibow (Belarus);
Ruzhany or maybe Rozhno; Petach Tikvah, Chicago, Argentine
GITNER/LULKIN/REZNIK Litin (Lityn) Ukraine,Kalinovka Ukraine, Israel,
Chicago
ILEWICKI/ILIWITSKY/ELEVITSKY Kusava Grodno Belarus
TREPMAN/SOJCHER/SLOVIK Warsaw, Israel
FELDMAN/LICHT Warsaw, Israel
Litin www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Littin
Kalinovka www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Kalinovka
Mscibow www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Mscibow
Ruzhany www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Ruzhany
The Israel Genealogical Society


New Files Added to Holocaust Database #southafrica

Joyce Field
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce major additions to its Holocaust
Database at <http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/> . 55,000
records are being added to six new individual databases.

The first installment of Dachau Concentration Camp Records, an
indexing project which began in November 2001, includes 36,937
records. A total of over 120,000 records will be in this database
when it is completed. Rather than wait until all the data are
entered, we intend to put the data online in large increments. We
have an additional 20,000 records which have already been indexed and
are waiting for validation. As explained in the introduction to this
database, we have two levels of validation to ensure the highest
possible level of accuracy. A glossary of abbreviations and terms
used in the Dachau material has also been prepared and can be
accessed through the introduction.

The Borislav-Drohobycz Water Bills file, containing 5,483 records, is
from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. It consists of 120
ledger pages of names of people who had died or been deported and who
had not paid their water bills in 1941/42. Of course, many could not
pay their bills because they had died or been deported!! This file
contains valuable genealogical information--names and addresses of
people >from Borislav and Drohobycz and often their fate.

Peter Lande prepared two lists. One is Sachsenhausen "Arrivals and
Departures" for the period of October 12, 1940 through June 3, 1941.
It consists of 4,991 records. Opened in 1938, the Sachsenhasusen
camp was one of the earliest concentration camps. Initially it was
used to hold Jews and political prisoners; later on it was a forced
labor camp and most of its prisoners were non-Jews >from Germany and
all over Europe. This camp prepared daily lists of arrivals and
departures. Information on persons in this collection includes name,
prisoner number, and, where available, dates of birth and death.

The second list contributed by Peter Lande is "Temporary German
Passports for Jews 1938-1940," an extraction of 485 names >from a
much larger Gestapo collection in the United States Holocaust
Memorial Museum. This file is of historical and genealogical
interest. Prior to the beginning of mass deportations, and even after
war began in 1939, the German Government continued to issue passports
to Jews resident in Germany, including "stateless" Jews, mostly of
Polish origin.

Two major lists provided by Yad Vashem under the data sharing
agreement with JewishGen are >from Szombathely, Hungary and Debrecen,
Hungary. The Szombathely list consists of 3,115 names of Jews who
were forced to register according to a governmental order of 4 April
1944. The registration lists included first and last name, name of
mother, place and date of birth, address, name of spouse, name of
children, occupation, and subscription of telephone and radio. The
list facilitated the concentration of the Jews into a ghetto and
their subsequent deportation to Auschwitz.

The second Yad Vashem file, of 3,945 Jews in Debrecen in 1945, is a
list of Holocaust survivors registered in Debrecen at the end of the
war.

An extensive list of Hungarian terms for occupations/professions is
available at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/holocaust/HungarianOccupations.html> .
This list was compiled >from both the Szombathely and Debrecen files
and should be used for research in these files as well as for a
general Hungarian-to-English translation of occupational titles. For
each unique title, the correct Hungarian term is provided along with
its English translation.

This work is made possible by the enormous efforts of numerous
people--Rachel Reisman, Technical Coordinator for the Holocaust
Database files; the many volunteers who entered and validated the
data; the volunteer project leaders; staff >from Yad Vashem and the
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum--primarily Zvi Bernhardt of
Yad Vashem and Peter Lande of USHMM; and, of course, Michael Tobias
and Warren Blatt of JewishGen, without whose technical skills none of
this material would be available.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Research


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica New Files Added to Holocaust Database #southafrica

Joyce Field
 

JewishGen is pleased to announce major additions to its Holocaust
Database at <http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Holocaust/> . 55,000
records are being added to six new individual databases.

The first installment of Dachau Concentration Camp Records, an
indexing project which began in November 2001, includes 36,937
records. A total of over 120,000 records will be in this database
when it is completed. Rather than wait until all the data are
entered, we intend to put the data online in large increments. We
have an additional 20,000 records which have already been indexed and
are waiting for validation. As explained in the introduction to this
database, we have two levels of validation to ensure the highest
possible level of accuracy. A glossary of abbreviations and terms
used in the Dachau material has also been prepared and can be
accessed through the introduction.

The Borislav-Drohobycz Water Bills file, containing 5,483 records, is
from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. It consists of 120
ledger pages of names of people who had died or been deported and who
had not paid their water bills in 1941/42. Of course, many could not
pay their bills because they had died or been deported!! This file
contains valuable genealogical information--names and addresses of
people >from Borislav and Drohobycz and often their fate.

Peter Lande prepared two lists. One is Sachsenhausen "Arrivals and
Departures" for the period of October 12, 1940 through June 3, 1941.
It consists of 4,991 records. Opened in 1938, the Sachsenhasusen
camp was one of the earliest concentration camps. Initially it was
used to hold Jews and political prisoners; later on it was a forced
labor camp and most of its prisoners were non-Jews >from Germany and
all over Europe. This camp prepared daily lists of arrivals and
departures. Information on persons in this collection includes name,
prisoner number, and, where available, dates of birth and death.

The second list contributed by Peter Lande is "Temporary German
Passports for Jews 1938-1940," an extraction of 485 names >from a
much larger Gestapo collection in the United States Holocaust
Memorial Museum. This file is of historical and genealogical
interest. Prior to the beginning of mass deportations, and even after
war began in 1939, the German Government continued to issue passports
to Jews resident in Germany, including "stateless" Jews, mostly of
Polish origin.

Two major lists provided by Yad Vashem under the data sharing
agreement with JewishGen are >from Szombathely, Hungary and Debrecen,
Hungary. The Szombathely list consists of 3,115 names of Jews who
were forced to register according to a governmental order of 4 April
1944. The registration lists included first and last name, name of
mother, place and date of birth, address, name of spouse, name of
children, occupation, and subscription of telephone and radio. The
list facilitated the concentration of the Jews into a ghetto and
their subsequent deportation to Auschwitz.

The second Yad Vashem file, of 3,945 Jews in Debrecen in 1945, is a
list of Holocaust survivors registered in Debrecen at the end of the
war.

An extensive list of Hungarian terms for occupations/professions is
available at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/holocaust/HungarianOccupations.html> .
This list was compiled >from both the Szombathely and Debrecen files
and should be used for research in these files as well as for a
general Hungarian-to-English translation of occupational titles. For
each unique title, the correct Hungarian term is provided along with
its English translation.

This work is made possible by the enormous efforts of numerous
people--Rachel Reisman, Technical Coordinator for the Holocaust
Database files; the many volunteers who entered and validated the
data; the volunteer project leaders; staff >from Yad Vashem and the
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum--primarily Zvi Bernhardt of
Yad Vashem and Peter Lande of USHMM; and, of course, Michael Tobias
and Warren Blatt of JewishGen, without whose technical skills none of
this material would be available.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Research


Re: More KATZINS #southafrica

hiprice@...
 

Dolly Katzin married Louis Price and lived in Boksburg. They had no
children.Louis was related to me .


Hilton Price, St Louis Mo.
hiprice@...

----- Original Message -----
From: "adamandlopa yamey" <adamandlopa@...>
To: "South Africa SIG" <safrica@...>
Sent: Monday, July 22, 2002 5:06 PM
Subject: [safrica] More KATZINS


Phillip KATZIN, son of Israel Katzin (brother of my
gt-gt-gr-mother), emigrated >from Lithuania to South
Africa with his brothers Nathaniel, Louis and Moritz.

Phillip married (who? I do not know) and had three
children: Sonny, Bob and Dolly. Dolly married a Mr
PRICE (may originally have been PURVETSKY).

I do not know where in South Africa these people were
located. Nathaniel died in Vereeniging.

I would be very grateful for any more information
about any of these people.

Adam Yamey, London, UK<adamandlopa@...>


IWAN BLOCH #southafrica

adamandlopa yamey <adamandlopa@...>
 

Thank you very much everyone who offered me help in
tracing the grave of my mother's mother, Ilse Levy.

I am now very keen to see a photograph of the grave of
my mother's father Iwan BLOCH (born 1886, Gailingen)
who died 12.dec.1933 (or 1931). He is, I believe,
buried in the Braamfontein Cemetery of Johannesburg.

Please contact Adam Yamey,London, UK<adamandlopa@...>


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica Re: More KATZINS #southafrica

hiprice@...
 

Dolly Katzin married Louis Price and lived in Boksburg. They had no
children.Louis was related to me .


Hilton Price, St Louis Mo.
hiprice@...

----- Original Message -----
From: "adamandlopa yamey" <adamandlopa@...>
To: "South Africa SIG" <safrica@...>
Sent: Monday, July 22, 2002 5:06 PM
Subject: [safrica] More KATZINS


Phillip KATZIN, son of Israel Katzin (brother of my
gt-gt-gr-mother), emigrated >from Lithuania to South
Africa with his brothers Nathaniel, Louis and Moritz.

Phillip married (who? I do not know) and had three
children: Sonny, Bob and Dolly. Dolly married a Mr
PRICE (may originally have been PURVETSKY).

I do not know where in South Africa these people were
located. Nathaniel died in Vereeniging.

I would be very grateful for any more information
about any of these people.

Adam Yamey, London, UK<adamandlopa@...>


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica IWAN BLOCH #southafrica

adamandlopa yamey <adamandlopa@...>
 

Thank you very much everyone who offered me help in
tracing the grave of my mother's mother, Ilse Levy.

I am now very keen to see a photograph of the grave of
my mother's father Iwan BLOCH (born 1886, Gailingen)
who died 12.dec.1933 (or 1931). He is, I believe,
buried in the Braamfontein Cemetery of Johannesburg.

Please contact Adam Yamey,London, UK<adamandlopa@...>