Date   

Status of present and future orders for documents #poland

Mel Sofian <msofian@...>
 

Please advise status of orders for documents sent to PSA (particularly
the Pultusk Archives Branch). I there any hope of receiving documents
ordered as long ago as March? Has the problem of redeeming cashiers'
checks been solved?
(Latest info >from my bank is that check sent with order had not yet been
paid.

When will we be able to send new orders for documents. We were advised
not to send orders until word was received that previous problems have
been cleared up -- have I somehow missed this information?

Mel Sofian
Studio City, CA

Searching for:
SAFIAN / SOFIAN
JOSKOWICZ
ZARYWACZ
=A0=A0=A0=A0=D0=C5WIDOWICZ


JRI Poland #Poland Status of present and future orders for documents #poland

Mel Sofian <msofian@...>
 

Please advise status of orders for documents sent to PSA (particularly
the Pultusk Archives Branch). I there any hope of receiving documents
ordered as long ago as March? Has the problem of redeeming cashiers'
checks been solved?
(Latest info >from my bank is that check sent with order had not yet been
paid.

When will we be able to send new orders for documents. We were advised
not to send orders until word was received that previous problems have
been cleared up -- have I somehow missed this information?

Mel Sofian
Studio City, CA

Searching for:
SAFIAN / SOFIAN
JOSKOWICZ
ZARYWACZ
=A0=A0=A0=A0=D0=C5WIDOWICZ


Re: NYC Birth Records (c. 1900) - Question #general

sallybru <sallybru@...>
 

Shawn Weil wrote:

My GGreatgrandmother had 9 children, 8 of which survived to adulthood.
Family lore says that the child who passed away before his time was run
over in the streets of the Lower East Side by a beer wagon, while my
grandfather was supposed to be supervising. However, my grandfather was
the youngest of the 8 siblings that survived, and he wouldn't have been
older than 3 years old himself. I doubt the family story, and would like
corroboration in documentation.

I am trying to figure out when this missing sibling was born and killed.
Here are my clues.
1) The 1900 census does not indicate that a child passed away.
2) The 1910 census does indicate the passing of a child.
3) I know that siblings were born 6/1899, 8/11/1901, 7/28/1903
*4) NYC Birth Certificates >from 1901 and 1903 seem to indicate that the
child was born in 1902. However, I do not know if I am interpreting the
questions correctly.

In NYC Birth records of this era, there are two questions that seem
pertinent to my mystery:
- Number of Previous Children
- How Many Now Living (in all)

The answers in the 1901 Certificate:
- Number of Previous Children: 6
- How Many Now Living (in all): 7
(Does this mean that all of her children are living?)

The answers in the 1903 Certificate:
- Number of Previous Children: 8
- How Many Now Living (in all): 8
(Does this mean that a child has passed away?)

Now, I would interpret the first question to reflect the number of
successful pregnancies that the mother had had before(and not including)
the birth of the current child I would interpret the second question to
reflect the number of children that are currently living, including the
current child.

Is this the correct interpretation?

You have a mystery! The way that the birth records are written could be
confusing: if all her 'previous kids' were still alive the number should be
the same. In 1901 more of them were alive than were born!

Is there a name listed in the 1900 census which is missing in 1910,
indicating a death? Or do you think the child died before it got to a
census year? Every 2 years for births is common-if you have all the
birthdates, is there a longer gap?

I would go to the Columbus FHL and get the Death index for New York.
Unless the surname is common, you should be able to find the death.

Sally Bruckheimer
Albany, NY


Re: Any other index for Boston arrivals besides NARA microfilm? #general

Linda <altmanlh@...>
 

The LDS has films for HIAS. I know that they have them for NY and
Philadelphia, there may be some for Boston as well. You can check online
at http://www.familysearch.org

Hope that this helps.


Linda Altman - Raleigh, NC
researching:
ALTMAN, >from Russia to NY City. TYRNAUER >from Hungary. BERGMAN >from Warsaw
& Sokolow-Podlaski, Poland to the UK, Israel and US.
CYBULA/CYBULKA/CYBULKO/CYBULKSI, Ostrow Maz., Siedlce,& Zambrow, Poland to
UK, and US. GOLDFINGIER, Sokolow-Podlaski, Poland. SINGER, Austria.
KRIEDBERG/KREIDBERG/KZAIBURG/KRITBERG/KRITZBERG >from Russia to US.
LIEBERMAN, Austria and Romania to US.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: NYC Birth Records (c. 1900) - Question #general

sallybru <sallybru@...>
 

Shawn Weil wrote:

My GGreatgrandmother had 9 children, 8 of which survived to adulthood.
Family lore says that the child who passed away before his time was run
over in the streets of the Lower East Side by a beer wagon, while my
grandfather was supposed to be supervising. However, my grandfather was
the youngest of the 8 siblings that survived, and he wouldn't have been
older than 3 years old himself. I doubt the family story, and would like
corroboration in documentation.

I am trying to figure out when this missing sibling was born and killed.
Here are my clues.
1) The 1900 census does not indicate that a child passed away.
2) The 1910 census does indicate the passing of a child.
3) I know that siblings were born 6/1899, 8/11/1901, 7/28/1903
*4) NYC Birth Certificates >from 1901 and 1903 seem to indicate that the
child was born in 1902. However, I do not know if I am interpreting the
questions correctly.

In NYC Birth records of this era, there are two questions that seem
pertinent to my mystery:
- Number of Previous Children
- How Many Now Living (in all)

The answers in the 1901 Certificate:
- Number of Previous Children: 6
- How Many Now Living (in all): 7
(Does this mean that all of her children are living?)

The answers in the 1903 Certificate:
- Number of Previous Children: 8
- How Many Now Living (in all): 8
(Does this mean that a child has passed away?)

Now, I would interpret the first question to reflect the number of
successful pregnancies that the mother had had before(and not including)
the birth of the current child I would interpret the second question to
reflect the number of children that are currently living, including the
current child.

Is this the correct interpretation?

You have a mystery! The way that the birth records are written could be
confusing: if all her 'previous kids' were still alive the number should be
the same. In 1901 more of them were alive than were born!

Is there a name listed in the 1900 census which is missing in 1910,
indicating a death? Or do you think the child died before it got to a
census year? Every 2 years for births is common-if you have all the
birthdates, is there a longer gap?

I would go to the Columbus FHL and get the Death index for New York.
Unless the surname is common, you should be able to find the death.

Sally Bruckheimer
Albany, NY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Any other index for Boston arrivals besides NARA microfilm? #general

Linda <altmanlh@...>
 

The LDS has films for HIAS. I know that they have them for NY and
Philadelphia, there may be some for Boston as well. You can check online
at http://www.familysearch.org

Hope that this helps.


Linda Altman - Raleigh, NC
researching:
ALTMAN, >from Russia to NY City. TYRNAUER >from Hungary. BERGMAN >from Warsaw
& Sokolow-Podlaski, Poland to the UK, Israel and US.
CYBULA/CYBULKA/CYBULKO/CYBULKSI, Ostrow Maz., Siedlce,& Zambrow, Poland to
UK, and US. GOLDFINGIER, Sokolow-Podlaski, Poland. SINGER, Austria.
KRIEDBERG/KREIDBERG/KZAIBURG/KRITBERG/KRITZBERG >from Russia to US.
LIEBERMAN, Austria and Romania to US.


Highland Park, Illinois, USA: Obituary Index 1874-2001 #general

hennynow
 

Hi, Genners:

By chance, I came upon an Obituary Index for the years 1874-2001
maintained by the librarians of the Public Library of Highland Park,
Illinois, which is a northern suburb of Chicago, Ill. The site is:

http://www.highlandpark.org/obits/a.html

It is very easy to consult. It lists obituaries that appeared in the
above-mentioned years in at least four local papers. I noticed many
Jewish names. Just thought I'd share this with y'all.

Henny

Henriette Moed Roth
Los Angeles, California
hennynow@pacbell.net


Warsaw marriage in 1903 #general

Primpark <primpark@...>
 

Could anyone please advise me regarding the best way to obtain information
on a marriage which took place in Warsaw in 1903?

Thanks in advance - and please respond privately.

Jonathan Newman,
Leeds, England.
Primpark@aol.com


Re: Help on Yiddish names into English diminutives #general

sallybru <sallybru@...>
 

As we have pointed out many times, any English name could be used with any
Hebrew/Yiddish/Russian/ Polish/Whatever name. My gr grandfather used a
different name in Britain and the US.

However, Sarah is already a Hebrew name, so if she was Sarah, why change.
Of course, she could have been something else and liked Sarah better.

My gr gr grandmother, Zepora, was Ida, Helen, and Birdie on her kids' death
certificates (she was never in the US). So Ida could be Zepora, but I
would think Ida would more likely be Ita or Etta.

My gr grandmother Merle was Mary or Marian in English so that is possible,
but Mera is fine also. Of course my grandmother Rosa was called Matilda.

As you can see, the initial sound usually stayed the same, but not always.
Anything is possible.

Sally Bruckheimer
Albany, NY


Re: *Bessie* in Russian #general

Judith27
 

I am currently researching a Bessie Surinamer Levine who came >from the
ubiquitous *Russia* and seems to have arrived in America under the first
name of Feige.
Shalom,
Judi Langer-Surnamer Caplan
Long Beach, NY

Burt Altman <baltman@mailer.fsu.edu> recently asked:

Does anyone on the list know what the Russian name is for *Bessie?* She
was my maternal grandmother and came >from the Crimean region.


ROSENBERG GREENBERG in UK #general

Mike Ross <nister@...>
 

I would like to hear >from ROSENBERGs and GREENBERGs in the UK as I need to
get some information on my Paternal Grandparents.

thanks

Mike Ross
Perth, Western Australia


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Highland Park, Illinois, USA: Obituary Index 1874-2001 #general

hennynow
 

Hi, Genners:

By chance, I came upon an Obituary Index for the years 1874-2001
maintained by the librarians of the Public Library of Highland Park,
Illinois, which is a northern suburb of Chicago, Ill. The site is:

http://www.highlandpark.org/obits/a.html

It is very easy to consult. It lists obituaries that appeared in the
above-mentioned years in at least four local papers. I noticed many
Jewish names. Just thought I'd share this with y'all.

Henny

Henriette Moed Roth
Los Angeles, California
hennynow@pacbell.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Warsaw marriage in 1903 #general

Primpark <primpark@...>
 

Could anyone please advise me regarding the best way to obtain information
on a marriage which took place in Warsaw in 1903?

Thanks in advance - and please respond privately.

Jonathan Newman,
Leeds, England.
Primpark@aol.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Help on Yiddish names into English diminutives #general

sallybru <sallybru@...>
 

As we have pointed out many times, any English name could be used with any
Hebrew/Yiddish/Russian/ Polish/Whatever name. My gr grandfather used a
different name in Britain and the US.

However, Sarah is already a Hebrew name, so if she was Sarah, why change.
Of course, she could have been something else and liked Sarah better.

My gr gr grandmother, Zepora, was Ida, Helen, and Birdie on her kids' death
certificates (she was never in the US). So Ida could be Zepora, but I
would think Ida would more likely be Ita or Etta.

My gr grandmother Merle was Mary or Marian in English so that is possible,
but Mera is fine also. Of course my grandmother Rosa was called Matilda.

As you can see, the initial sound usually stayed the same, but not always.
Anything is possible.

Sally Bruckheimer
Albany, NY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: *Bessie* in Russian #general

Judith27
 

I am currently researching a Bessie Surinamer Levine who came >from the
ubiquitous *Russia* and seems to have arrived in America under the first
name of Feige.
Shalom,
Judi Langer-Surnamer Caplan
Long Beach, NY

Burt Altman <baltman@mailer.fsu.edu> recently asked:

Does anyone on the list know what the Russian name is for *Bessie?* She
was my maternal grandmother and came >from the Crimean region.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ROSENBERG GREENBERG in UK #general

Mike Ross <nister@...>
 

I would like to hear >from ROSENBERGs and GREENBERGs in the UK as I need to
get some information on my Paternal Grandparents.

thanks

Mike Ross
Perth, Western Australia


Re: Chassidic dress #general

Brandler Institute of Chasidic Thought <bict@...>
 

On 2002.08.25, Bernard Rosinsky <rosinskyb@yahoo.com> wrote:

I have pictures of family members at the turn of the 20th century
(some end of 19th century). I know that it is possible to categorize
a tradiional Jew by his clothing: Is he a Chassid or a Mitnaged and
if a Chassid, what group he belonged to. Is there a reference book
that can help me determine where I should categorize my ancestor?
Though nowadays it is usually possible to ascertain Chasidic
affiliation by dress, it is important to note that one hundred years
ago it was not only the Chassidim who wore a particular dress,
rather it depended generally on specific geographical location and
sometimes social status (i.e., a rabbi would have a specific type of
dress) the Chasidim were the ones who chose to retain the
traditional dress and thus are there only ones wearing for instance
Polish/Galician traditional Jewish clothing. On the other hand
there were very few Misnagdim in Poland at the turn of the century,
most were in Lithuania, although many Jews in Polan and Galicia were
not Chasidic per se, they were not opposed to Chassidus and would
occassionally even visit a Rebbe.

Avraham Heschel
Brooklyn, NY


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Re: Chassidic dress #rabbinic

Brandler Institute of Chasidic Thought <bict@...>
 

On 2002.08.25, Bernard Rosinsky <rosinskyb@yahoo.com> wrote:

I have pictures of family members at the turn of the 20th century
(some end of 19th century). I know that it is possible to categorize
a tradiional Jew by his clothing: Is he a Chassid or a Mitnaged and
if a Chassid, what group he belonged to. Is there a reference book
that can help me determine where I should categorize my ancestor?
Though nowadays it is usually possible to ascertain Chasidic
affiliation by dress, it is important to note that one hundred years
ago it was not only the Chassidim who wore a particular dress,
rather it depended generally on specific geographical location and
sometimes social status (i.e., a rabbi would have a specific type of
dress) the Chasidim were the ones who chose to retain the
traditional dress and thus are there only ones wearing for instance
Polish/Galician traditional Jewish clothing. On the other hand
there were very few Misnagdim in Poland at the turn of the century,
most were in Lithuania, although many Jews in Polan and Galicia were
not Chasidic per se, they were not opposed to Chassidus and would
occassionally even visit a Rebbe.

Avraham Heschel
Brooklyn, NY


Sefer Hatzezoim #rabbinic

zerakodesh@...
 

Where can I find or purchase

Sefer Hatzezoim by Rabbi Shmuel Elazor Halperin (1980)

George Sackheim
Skokie, Illinois
mailto:ZeraKodesh@aol.com


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Sefer Hatzezoim #rabbinic

zerakodesh@...
 

Where can I find or purchase

Sefer Hatzezoim by Rabbi Shmuel Elazor Halperin (1980)

George Sackheim
Skokie, Illinois
mailto:ZeraKodesh@aol.com