Date   

researching: LANDSMAN, GORWICZ from Vilna (BROSLIN in CT) #lithuania

Marty Meyers <meyers01@...>
 

I have am trying to trace a Elke LANDSMAN who came >from Vilna at age 21
in 1920 to the U.S. Her father was listed as Abraham GORWICZ in Vilna.
She was going to her brother in law in Waterbury, CT, a Mr. BROSLIN who
lived on Willow St.

If this sounds familiar, please contact me privately at <meyers01@comcast.net>.

My grandmother >from Vilna was a LANDSMAN.

Thanks,

Marty Meyers


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania researching: LANDSMAN, GORWICZ from Vilna (BROSLIN in CT) #lithuania

Marty Meyers <meyers01@...>
 

I have am trying to trace a Elke LANDSMAN who came >from Vilna at age 21
in 1920 to the U.S. Her father was listed as Abraham GORWICZ in Vilna.
She was going to her brother in law in Waterbury, CT, a Mr. BROSLIN who
lived on Willow St.

If this sounds familiar, please contact me privately at <meyers01@comcast.net>.

My grandmother >from Vilna was a LANDSMAN.

Thanks,

Marty Meyers


JGS of Los Angeles Meeting October 21, 2002 Speaker- Arthur Kurzweil #belarus

Marion5301@...
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Los Angeles (JGSLA) and the Skirball
Cultural Center are pleased to announce a jointly sponsored program on
October 21, 2002 "Jewish Genealogy as a Tool for Rebuilding of the Jewish
People". The speaker is Arthur Kurzweil, renowned author of >from Generation
to Generation: How to Trace Your Jewish Genealogy and Family History. Mr.
Kurzweil has spoken before hundreds of Jewish groups over the past two
decades. His name has become synonymous with Jewish Genealogy.

Mr. Kurzweil will explore the field of Jewish genealogical research and
discuss its importance as a tool for Jews today. Jewish genealogical research
is far more than just a fascinating pastime! >from the very beginning of the
Jewish people, genealogy has been an important tool for education,
continuity and rebuilding. In our generation, living in the shadow of the
Holocaust, Jewish genealogy has become a powerful and important activity
within the Jewish community. Both beginners and experienced researchers will
gain a wealth of information and insight >from this program.

Our traveling library (not a lending library) will be available for use 30
minutes before the meeting.

Date and Place:The meeting is Monday, October 21, 2002 7:30 p.m. at the
Skirball Cultural Center, Magnin Auditorium 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd. Los
Angeles, CA .

Directions: Exit the San Diego Freeway (405) at Skirball Center Drive.
Right onto Sepulveda Blvd. and right again into the Skirball parking lot
opposite the Center entrance ; or, after turning right on Sepulveda Blvd.
turn left on Herscher Drive, north of the Center to the underground parking
lot.

There is no fee and parking is free as well. Non-members are welcome.

For more information on the JGSLA and our future meeting dates and speakers,
visit our website: www.jgsla.org .


Marion Diamond
JGSLA, Co-Chair, Publicity


Belarus SIG #Belarus JGS of Los Angeles Meeting October 21, 2002 Speaker- Arthur Kurzweil #belarus

Marion5301@...
 

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Los Angeles (JGSLA) and the Skirball
Cultural Center are pleased to announce a jointly sponsored program on
October 21, 2002 "Jewish Genealogy as a Tool for Rebuilding of the Jewish
People". The speaker is Arthur Kurzweil, renowned author of >from Generation
to Generation: How to Trace Your Jewish Genealogy and Family History. Mr.
Kurzweil has spoken before hundreds of Jewish groups over the past two
decades. His name has become synonymous with Jewish Genealogy.

Mr. Kurzweil will explore the field of Jewish genealogical research and
discuss its importance as a tool for Jews today. Jewish genealogical research
is far more than just a fascinating pastime! >from the very beginning of the
Jewish people, genealogy has been an important tool for education,
continuity and rebuilding. In our generation, living in the shadow of the
Holocaust, Jewish genealogy has become a powerful and important activity
within the Jewish community. Both beginners and experienced researchers will
gain a wealth of information and insight >from this program.

Our traveling library (not a lending library) will be available for use 30
minutes before the meeting.

Date and Place:The meeting is Monday, October 21, 2002 7:30 p.m. at the
Skirball Cultural Center, Magnin Auditorium 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd. Los
Angeles, CA .

Directions: Exit the San Diego Freeway (405) at Skirball Center Drive.
Right onto Sepulveda Blvd. and right again into the Skirball parking lot
opposite the Center entrance ; or, after turning right on Sepulveda Blvd.
turn left on Herscher Drive, north of the Center to the underground parking
lot.

There is no fee and parking is free as well. Non-members are welcome.

For more information on the JGSLA and our future meeting dates and speakers,
visit our website: www.jgsla.org .


Marion Diamond
JGSLA, Co-Chair, Publicity


Answer to Mikhail Freider's question #ukraine

Rose Feldman <rosef@...>
 

Dear Mikhail,
Your email address keeps bouncing, so here is the answer I wrote you.
This is one of two documents I have >from them. I suggest you write to them.
Rose Feldman

Hi, Rose!

Maybe you had in your hands some sources in " Central Archives
for the History of the Jewish People" (CAHJP) about Frampol
(your and my region)? I have information that some of them from
Kiev and Kamenets-Podlskiy are in CAHJP ?


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Answer to Mikhail Freider's question #ukraine

Rose Feldman <rosef@...>
 

Dear Mikhail,
Your email address keeps bouncing, so here is the answer I wrote you.
This is one of two documents I have >from them. I suggest you write to them.
Rose Feldman

Hi, Rose!

Maybe you had in your hands some sources in " Central Archives
for the History of the Jewish People" (CAHJP) about Frampol
(your and my region)? I have information that some of them from
Kiev and Kamenets-Podlskiy are in CAHJP ?


Re: Warsaw Archive Charges #poland #warsaw

Hadassah Lipsius <kesher@...>
 

can someone please advise me - i sent a polish archive letter to the
group for translation, and it seems apparant that i have been heavily
>over charged for genological research they quoted me ?165.00 initial
search for my
FREEDMAN family followed by a further ?215.00 totalling ?380.00.
>By the additional emails i have recieved >from you all it is quite
>apparent that this is a high fee.

I do not know if you were overcharged. The Polish State Archives now has
standard rates for research. I believe the rates that they quoted you are
in line with the new rates. The problem is just what you have stated
previously in that you are researching a very common surname. There can be
many Mosiek/Moshe FREEDMAN's in their registers and it may be hard to
figure out which is the correct one.

Have you searched the JRI-Poland database? http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl

I searched for the surname FREEDMAN using the D-M soundex and specified
Warsaw and got back 378 matching results? See if any other those can be
your family. If you find a hit >from the LDS data then you get the record
at the FHC.

If you find a record in the PSA data then you can order the record thru the
Warsaw Archives and you would not have to pay the search charges. Just the
copying charges.

There is a new database list which is not yet on the JRI-Poland database.
I will be announcing the status of JRI-Poland's Warsaw PSA activities
later on this month on the JRI-Poland listserv.

I have had one suggestion suggesting that i log onto
Jewishgen and submit the form with my names on and it will be
>cheaper is that the best option?

Actually the form that was suggested to you by someone was on the
JRI-Poland website and not Jewishgen. It seems to be a common confusion
amongst people. JRI-Poland and Jewishgen are two separate independent
organizations. JRI-Poland is hosted by Jewishgen but maintains an
independent administrative and financial framework. I am a supporter of
both organizations.


The Warszawa Research Group is sponsored by Jewishgen. They host our
Homeowners list and Death notices database. They support us in our
endeavors and I only assume that all of our members make contributions to
Jewishgen to support them.
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen-erosity/contribute.ihtml

Hadassah Lipsius
Kew Gardens Hills, NY


Warszawa Research Group #Warsaw #Poland RE: Warsaw Archive Charges #warsaw #poland

Hadassah Lipsius <kesher@...>
 

can someone please advise me - i sent a polish archive letter to the
group for translation, and it seems apparant that i have been heavily
>over charged for genological research they quoted me ?165.00 initial
search for my
FREEDMAN family followed by a further ?215.00 totalling ?380.00.
>By the additional emails i have recieved >from you all it is quite
>apparent that this is a high fee.

I do not know if you were overcharged. The Polish State Archives now has
standard rates for research. I believe the rates that they quoted you are
in line with the new rates. The problem is just what you have stated
previously in that you are researching a very common surname. There can be
many Mosiek/Moshe FREEDMAN's in their registers and it may be hard to
figure out which is the correct one.

Have you searched the JRI-Poland database? http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl

I searched for the surname FREEDMAN using the D-M soundex and specified
Warsaw and got back 378 matching results? See if any other those can be
your family. If you find a hit >from the LDS data then you get the record
at the FHC.

If you find a record in the PSA data then you can order the record thru the
Warsaw Archives and you would not have to pay the search charges. Just the
copying charges.

There is a new database list which is not yet on the JRI-Poland database.
I will be announcing the status of JRI-Poland's Warsaw PSA activities
later on this month on the JRI-Poland listserv.

I have had one suggestion suggesting that i log onto
Jewishgen and submit the form with my names on and it will be
>cheaper is that the best option?

Actually the form that was suggested to you by someone was on the
JRI-Poland website and not Jewishgen. It seems to be a common confusion
amongst people. JRI-Poland and Jewishgen are two separate independent
organizations. JRI-Poland is hosted by Jewishgen but maintains an
independent administrative and financial framework. I am a supporter of
both organizations.


The Warszawa Research Group is sponsored by Jewishgen. They host our
Homeowners list and Death notices database. They support us in our
endeavors and I only assume that all of our members make contributions to
Jewishgen to support them.
http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen-erosity/contribute.ihtml

Hadassah Lipsius
Kew Gardens Hills, NY


Warsaw Cemetery #warsaw #poland

Hadassah Lipsius <kesher@...>
 

The following item appears in the Jewish Press - October 14, 2002

I do not know any futher details.

"The Warsaw Jewish Cemetery community fired the caretaker of the Jewish
cemetery after police destroyed a plot of marijuana growing in the vast
graveyard. According to sources within the community, police three weeks
ago discovered and destroyed a number of cannibis plants in the cemetery.
This week, police interogated the chair and vice chair of the Jewish
community, who said it was the first they had heard about the incident.
The community board decided to remove the caretaker as a disciplinary
action, both for having allowed the cannabis to grow in the cemetery and
for not having informed community officials of last month's police action"


Hadassah Lipsius
Kew Gardens Hills, NY


Warszawa Research Group #Warsaw #Poland Warsaw Cemetery #warsaw #poland

Hadassah Lipsius <kesher@...>
 

The following item appears in the Jewish Press - October 14, 2002

I do not know any futher details.

"The Warsaw Jewish Cemetery community fired the caretaker of the Jewish
cemetery after police destroyed a plot of marijuana growing in the vast
graveyard. According to sources within the community, police three weeks
ago discovered and destroyed a number of cannibis plants in the cemetery.
This week, police interogated the chair and vice chair of the Jewish
community, who said it was the first they had heard about the incident.
The community board decided to remove the caretaker as a disciplinary
action, both for having allowed the cannabis to grow in the cemetery and
for not having informed community officials of last month's police action"


Hadassah Lipsius
Kew Gardens Hills, NY


Re: please post message from Yad Vashem #poland #warsaw

Hadassah Lipsius <kesher@...>
 

Yad Vashem's policy on Pages of Testimony:


<a) Pages of Testimony are an excellent source of material, but they
are just that: Pages of Testimony, based on people's memories. It is
important, when using the information >from Pages of Testimony, to be
aware of their source.>

I would like to vouch for the excellent source the Pages of Testimony has
been for me. In December, I was in Israel and I spent two whole days
searching through the database. Most of my maternal grandparent's family
were in Warsaw in September 1939. Almost nobody survived.


I plugged away at the computer in Yad Vashem typing in all the family
surname that I could think of. When I put in the married name of my
grandfather's sister, it showed that someone had filed a page of testimony
for someone with the same surname >from Warsaw. I clicked on the place to
look at the image of the Page of Testimony. To my surprise it was written
in Russian. It was filed in 1997 by a man living in Moscow who had filled
out the document for his father. So thanks to the Pages of Testimony
Database, I now correspond with my second cousin living in Moscow.

Hadassah Lipsius
Kew Gardens Hills, NY USA


Warszawa Research Group #Warsaw #Poland RE: please post message from Yad Vashem #warsaw #poland

Hadassah Lipsius <kesher@...>
 

Yad Vashem's policy on Pages of Testimony:


<a) Pages of Testimony are an excellent source of material, but they
are just that: Pages of Testimony, based on people's memories. It is
important, when using the information >from Pages of Testimony, to be
aware of their source.>

I would like to vouch for the excellent source the Pages of Testimony has
been for me. In December, I was in Israel and I spent two whole days
searching through the database. Most of my maternal grandparent's family
were in Warsaw in September 1939. Almost nobody survived.


I plugged away at the computer in Yad Vashem typing in all the family
surname that I could think of. When I put in the married name of my
grandfather's sister, it showed that someone had filed a page of testimony
for someone with the same surname >from Warsaw. I clicked on the place to
look at the image of the Page of Testimony. To my surprise it was written
in Russian. It was filed in 1997 by a man living in Moscow who had filled
out the document for his father. So thanks to the Pages of Testimony
Database, I now correspond with my second cousin living in Moscow.

Hadassah Lipsius
Kew Gardens Hills, NY USA


Judelowitz, Yudelowitz and other spellings #courland #latvia

Stanley Judd <stanleyjudd@...>
 

Greetings:

I have been collecting data on individuals with these surnames for many
years in the United States and in eastern Europe (Lithuania, Latvia,
Russian Poland, Byelorussia, etc.). My own Judelowitz family is from
Courland and northern Lithuania. I have a large database in which I am
attempting to assemble these individuals into their proper families. I
would like to exchange data with anyone who has an interest in families
using these surnames. Hopefully I can assist them with data on members
of their families and they can assist me with data I am missing. With
luck, I may even learn more about my family. I would appreciate your
making this message available to your members.

I can be contacted as: stanleyjudd@earthlink.net

Thank you for any help you can provide.

Stanley H. Judd Los Altos Hills, CA
Searching JUDELOWITZ/YUDELOWITZ, BRILLIANT, JANKOWSKY, ROTCHILD, BAER
Locations northern Lithuania and Latvia


Courland SIG #Courland #Latvia Judelowitz, Yudelowitz and other spellings #courland #latvia

Stanley Judd <stanleyjudd@...>
 

Greetings:

I have been collecting data on individuals with these surnames for many
years in the United States and in eastern Europe (Lithuania, Latvia,
Russian Poland, Byelorussia, etc.). My own Judelowitz family is from
Courland and northern Lithuania. I have a large database in which I am
attempting to assemble these individuals into their proper families. I
would like to exchange data with anyone who has an interest in families
using these surnames. Hopefully I can assist them with data on members
of their families and they can assist me with data I am missing. With
luck, I may even learn more about my family. I would appreciate your
making this message available to your members.

I can be contacted as: stanleyjudd@earthlink.net

Thank you for any help you can provide.

Stanley H. Judd Los Altos Hills, CA
Searching JUDELOWITZ/YUDELOWITZ, BRILLIANT, JANKOWSKY, ROTCHILD, BAER
Locations northern Lithuania and Latvia


Jewish genealogy in other languages #general

Schelly Dardashti <dardasht@...>
 

This is a report on an experience which might encourage others who are
fluent in various languages.

Earlier this week, I presented a talk -- in Farsi (Persian) -- to the
Iranian Women's Organization in Holon, Israel. The group numbered about
50, mostly grandmothers, but some younger women, who meet every week at
the Iranian cultural center for various programs. The group included
women who had arrived in Israel 50 years ago as well as those who came
in the 1980s.

This was their first exposure to why so many people around the world are
involved in this endeavor.

I was very happy that there were so many grandmothers, who are the real
(and sometimes only) repositories of family history in the oral Iranian
Jewish culture.

I offered the many reasons why we do this and how to begin, in a
low-tech way (this is not the computer generation!), and handed out some
simple forms. I asked them about their shoeboxes and albums full of
unlabeled photographs -- a universal cross-cultural theme!
I talked about my husband's eldest aunt Nane-jan whose stories of her
life as the first Jewish girl to attend school in Teheran and other
family lore, was what probably set me on the road to discovery. Some of
the older women had known Nane-jan in Teheran and knew the difficulties
she had faced, and the problems her family had faced when her father
sent his first eight children (all girls) to the Alliance school when it
opened -- in the face of strong community objections a century ago.

We discussed cultural considerations which impact this group of
Israelis, foremost is the feeling that they don't want to talk about
things that happened when times were bad (which unfortunately includes
historical periods of difficulty in Iran and their experiences as early
immigrants in Israel).
It was a far-ranging discussion on many topics. I stressed their
recording of family history for their grandchildren and their children.

The comments and questions were enlightening. Many women said that their
children, who came here at a young age or were born here, rarely asked a
question, but that their grandchildren are now coming to them and asking
"Savta (grandmother), tell me about our family, where do we come from,
who are we?"

The Family Tree Project which Israeli schoolchildren participate in has
served as an impetus for this, and several women said they had helped
their grandchildren to prepare projects, but didn't really know enough
how to do it.

It also elicited comments (when I suggested they check prayerbooks and
other religious books for notes made by their parents, grandparents,
etc.) that an uncle here, or another relative there, had actually
prepared a history, but these were few.
Others said they had always wanted to do this but never knew how to get
started.

I also unrolled my Dardashti scroll, about 20 feet now without this
year's updates, as well as the circular one (about 5 feet square) that I
print out for bar/bat mitzvah/wedding/brit gifts. These elicited much
interest.

The program went on for at least 30 minutes longer than their meetings
usually last, and there were many questions.

I have suggested to the group leaders that we plan a family tree project
created by the women of the community, to be exhibited at the cultural
center, and this idea was received very enthusiastically.
I will be working with them on this, and expect to have various JFRA
members assisting as well as help is needed.

We ended with "mashk" (homework, in Farsi). I asked them to get a
notebook and start writing down the names in their families, the towns
and cities their families lived in, the story of their immigration to
Israel, anything and everything, including special recipes handed down.
And in a month or so, we'll plan another meeting during which they can
share what they have achieved, and build on this.
The evening ended with a very Iranian cultural event that cuts across
all ethnic and religious lines, with women reading Farsi poetry they had
written, or sang Farsi songs to which they had composed different words.

So what does this mean for others in the Jewish genealogy community?
If you have language ability in a specific language, consider speaking
to a group of seniors whose first language it is.
Outreach is very important and is a way of getting the elders involved
in what we know is a very rewarding endeavor. Presenting a program in a
first language can be very emotional to the elders, and brings back more
memories and connections in an original cultural setting, without the
need to translate into a second or third language.

Schelly Talalay Dardashti
JFRA Irael - Tel Aviv
dardasht@barak-online.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jewish genealogy in other languages #general

Schelly Dardashti <dardasht@...>
 

This is a report on an experience which might encourage others who are
fluent in various languages.

Earlier this week, I presented a talk -- in Farsi (Persian) -- to the
Iranian Women's Organization in Holon, Israel. The group numbered about
50, mostly grandmothers, but some younger women, who meet every week at
the Iranian cultural center for various programs. The group included
women who had arrived in Israel 50 years ago as well as those who came
in the 1980s.

This was their first exposure to why so many people around the world are
involved in this endeavor.

I was very happy that there were so many grandmothers, who are the real
(and sometimes only) repositories of family history in the oral Iranian
Jewish culture.

I offered the many reasons why we do this and how to begin, in a
low-tech way (this is not the computer generation!), and handed out some
simple forms. I asked them about their shoeboxes and albums full of
unlabeled photographs -- a universal cross-cultural theme!
I talked about my husband's eldest aunt Nane-jan whose stories of her
life as the first Jewish girl to attend school in Teheran and other
family lore, was what probably set me on the road to discovery. Some of
the older women had known Nane-jan in Teheran and knew the difficulties
she had faced, and the problems her family had faced when her father
sent his first eight children (all girls) to the Alliance school when it
opened -- in the face of strong community objections a century ago.

We discussed cultural considerations which impact this group of
Israelis, foremost is the feeling that they don't want to talk about
things that happened when times were bad (which unfortunately includes
historical periods of difficulty in Iran and their experiences as early
immigrants in Israel).
It was a far-ranging discussion on many topics. I stressed their
recording of family history for their grandchildren and their children.

The comments and questions were enlightening. Many women said that their
children, who came here at a young age or were born here, rarely asked a
question, but that their grandchildren are now coming to them and asking
"Savta (grandmother), tell me about our family, where do we come from,
who are we?"

The Family Tree Project which Israeli schoolchildren participate in has
served as an impetus for this, and several women said they had helped
their grandchildren to prepare projects, but didn't really know enough
how to do it.

It also elicited comments (when I suggested they check prayerbooks and
other religious books for notes made by their parents, grandparents,
etc.) that an uncle here, or another relative there, had actually
prepared a history, but these were few.
Others said they had always wanted to do this but never knew how to get
started.

I also unrolled my Dardashti scroll, about 20 feet now without this
year's updates, as well as the circular one (about 5 feet square) that I
print out for bar/bat mitzvah/wedding/brit gifts. These elicited much
interest.

The program went on for at least 30 minutes longer than their meetings
usually last, and there were many questions.

I have suggested to the group leaders that we plan a family tree project
created by the women of the community, to be exhibited at the cultural
center, and this idea was received very enthusiastically.
I will be working with them on this, and expect to have various JFRA
members assisting as well as help is needed.

We ended with "mashk" (homework, in Farsi). I asked them to get a
notebook and start writing down the names in their families, the towns
and cities their families lived in, the story of their immigration to
Israel, anything and everything, including special recipes handed down.
And in a month or so, we'll plan another meeting during which they can
share what they have achieved, and build on this.
The evening ended with a very Iranian cultural event that cuts across
all ethnic and religious lines, with women reading Farsi poetry they had
written, or sang Farsi songs to which they had composed different words.

So what does this mean for others in the Jewish genealogy community?
If you have language ability in a specific language, consider speaking
to a group of seniors whose first language it is.
Outreach is very important and is a way of getting the elders involved
in what we know is a very rewarding endeavor. Presenting a program in a
first language can be very emotional to the elders, and brings back more
memories and connections in an original cultural setting, without the
need to translate into a second or third language.

Schelly Talalay Dardashti
JFRA Irael - Tel Aviv
dardasht@barak-online.net


Re: Forename Yacha #general

Nathalie and David klein <d_n_a@...>
 

Dear Harold,

Look into the Hebrew name Yocheved, Yachet in Yiddish.

Nathalie Klein
Rehovot, Israel
www.wajzer.com

Research:
WAJZER / PERSYK / FRIEDHEIM >from Lublin area, Poland
KARPMAN /PUTERMAN >from Tarczyn, Karczew, Warsaw area, Poland
KRYKSMAN / GLIKSMAN >from Tarczyn, Warka, Warsaw area, Poland

I haven't come across Yacha before. Is it unusual?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Forename Yacha #general

Nathalie and David klein <d_n_a@...>
 

Dear Harold,

Look into the Hebrew name Yocheved, Yachet in Yiddish.

Nathalie Klein
Rehovot, Israel
www.wajzer.com

Research:
WAJZER / PERSYK / FRIEDHEIM >from Lublin area, Poland
KARPMAN /PUTERMAN >from Tarczyn, Karczew, Warsaw area, Poland
KRYKSMAN / GLIKSMAN >from Tarczyn, Warka, Warsaw area, Poland

I haven't come across Yacha before. Is it unusual?


Re: Given name Jekvsiel #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 10/10/2002 12:01:08 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
educonser@hotmail.com writes:

<< I had the Hehrew on my ggrandfather's tombstone translated. His given name
was Jekvsiel Hersh.He was called Harry (surname)Becker. Any help with
Jekvsiel. Is there an English translation? I cannot find him in the EIDB. >>

==Jekusiel, Yekutiel, Kusi, Kusiel, Kuti
-------------------------------------

Michael Bernet, New York
<mBernet@aol.com>
WOLFF (Pfungstadt, Frankfurt/M, Koenigsberg, Amsterdam, N.Carolina); BERNET,
BERNERT, JONDORF(Frensdorf, Bamberg, Nurnberg); FEUCHTWANGER
(Schwabach, Hagenbach & Fuerth); KONIGSHOFER (anywhere); BERG, WOLF(F),
(Demmelsdorf & Zeckendorf); Shim`on GUTENSTEIN (Bad Homburg ca 1760);
FRENSDORF/ER (anywhere); MAINZER (Lorsch); anyone in Ermreuth or Floss;
GOLDSCHMIDT (B. Homburg, Hessdorf). ALTMANN (Silesia); TIMMENDORFER


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Given name Jekvsiel #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 10/10/2002 12:01:08 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
educonser@hotmail.com writes:

<< I had the Hehrew on my ggrandfather's tombstone translated. His given name
was Jekvsiel Hersh.He was called Harry (surname)Becker. Any help with
Jekvsiel. Is there an English translation? I cannot find him in the EIDB. >>

==Jekusiel, Yekutiel, Kusi, Kusiel, Kuti
-------------------------------------

Michael Bernet, New York
<mBernet@aol.com>
WOLFF (Pfungstadt, Frankfurt/M, Koenigsberg, Amsterdam, N.Carolina); BERNET,
BERNERT, JONDORF(Frensdorf, Bamberg, Nurnberg); FEUCHTWANGER
(Schwabach, Hagenbach & Fuerth); KONIGSHOFER (anywhere); BERG, WOLF(F),
(Demmelsdorf & Zeckendorf); Shim`on GUTENSTEIN (Bad Homburg ca 1760);
FRENSDORF/ER (anywhere); MAINZER (Lorsch); anyone in Ermreuth or Floss;
GOLDSCHMIDT (B. Homburg, Hessdorf). ALTMANN (Silesia); TIMMENDORFER