Date   

New ShtetLinks Manager #courland #latvia

Joyce Field
 

I am pleased to announce Fred Apel as the new ShtetLinks Project
Manger. Fred will take on a tough role, stepping into the shoes of
Chuck Weinstein, who, as the Project Manager for over four years, has
made ShtetLinks into a major JewishGen project. We are sad to see
Chuck step down but it is understandable that he needs to re- focus
his energies at this particular time in his life. Chuck has
graciously agreed to help acclimate Fred in his new role and for the
time being will continue to moderate the ShtetLinks mail list. I
will certainly miss working with Chuck.

Fred brings to his new position a wealth of experience in Jewish
genealogical activities. He is a Life Member and Vice President of
JGS Michigan and an advisor for the Society's award winning
newsletter,"Generations," and their website. He also produced a
local cable television show about genealogy and JGSMI and has
compiled a book entitled "Beginner's Workshop in Print" that is
presented to all new members of JGSMI. In addition, as a JewishGen
volunteer, he has helped with several necrologies and has done other
work on the Yizkor Book project.

We look forward to his bringing his talents and energies to
ShtetLinks and helping that project develop to its fullest potential.

Joyce Field
JewishGen Vice President, Research
jfield@jewishgen.org


Re: Smous origins #southafrica

mike getz <mgetz@...>
 

Denis,

You have taken this type of discussion to another level - it rings of
broader scholarship than the SA understanding as I remembered it.

It also seems consistent with a Jewish role in many environs over
long periods of time. I enjoyed the insights.

Thanks,
Mike

----- Original Message -----
From: "Kahn" <denmor@xs4all.nl>
To: "South Africa SIG" <safrica@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Monday, September 23, 2002 9:01 AM
Subject: [safrica] Re: Smous origins


Since Afrikaans is derived >from Dutch, the following extract from
'Shaarit/Resten van een taal, woordenboekje van het Nederlandse Jiddisch
(Remains of a language, Dictionary of Dutch Yiddish), by H. Beem may
interest the reader.

" Smous is a term of abuse for Jew; brought into use in 1657 to describe
the
mainly German-Jewish drifter. The word is associated with the given name
mousje (moishe) = Mozes, vulgarly Moos, pronounced Mous in the common
dialect of Amsterdam. It is plausible, that the s was added according to
the
custom with other terms of abuse starting with s. Also possible is that
the
word mousje and the diminutive mousjele (moishele) served as point of
departure; in that case the s could have derived >from the dutch yiddish
article es (= das); thus 's mousjele>smousje>smous; compare mauscheln =
spoken with a jewish accent".
Whereas Beem writes that the term smous originated in the 18th century,
the
Van Dale dictionary specifies the year 1657.

Dennis Kahn,
Amsterdam


Courland SIG #Courland #Latvia New ShtetLinks Manager #courland #latvia

Joyce Field
 

I am pleased to announce Fred Apel as the new ShtetLinks Project
Manger. Fred will take on a tough role, stepping into the shoes of
Chuck Weinstein, who, as the Project Manager for over four years, has
made ShtetLinks into a major JewishGen project. We are sad to see
Chuck step down but it is understandable that he needs to re- focus
his energies at this particular time in his life. Chuck has
graciously agreed to help acclimate Fred in his new role and for the
time being will continue to moderate the ShtetLinks mail list. I
will certainly miss working with Chuck.

Fred brings to his new position a wealth of experience in Jewish
genealogical activities. He is a Life Member and Vice President of
JGS Michigan and an advisor for the Society's award winning
newsletter,"Generations," and their website. He also produced a
local cable television show about genealogy and JGSMI and has
compiled a book entitled "Beginner's Workshop in Print" that is
presented to all new members of JGSMI. In addition, as a JewishGen
volunteer, he has helped with several necrologies and has done other
work on the Yizkor Book project.

We look forward to his bringing his talents and energies to
ShtetLinks and helping that project develop to its fullest potential.

Joyce Field
JewishGen Vice President, Research
jfield@jewishgen.org


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica Re: Smous origins #southafrica

mike getz <mgetz@...>
 

Denis,

You have taken this type of discussion to another level - it rings of
broader scholarship than the SA understanding as I remembered it.

It also seems consistent with a Jewish role in many environs over
long periods of time. I enjoyed the insights.

Thanks,
Mike

----- Original Message -----
From: "Kahn" <denmor@xs4all.nl>
To: "South Africa SIG" <safrica@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Monday, September 23, 2002 9:01 AM
Subject: [safrica] Re: Smous origins


Since Afrikaans is derived >from Dutch, the following extract from
'Shaarit/Resten van een taal, woordenboekje van het Nederlandse Jiddisch
(Remains of a language, Dictionary of Dutch Yiddish), by H. Beem may
interest the reader.

" Smous is a term of abuse for Jew; brought into use in 1657 to describe
the
mainly German-Jewish drifter. The word is associated with the given name
mousje (moishe) = Mozes, vulgarly Moos, pronounced Mous in the common
dialect of Amsterdam. It is plausible, that the s was added according to
the
custom with other terms of abuse starting with s. Also possible is that
the
word mousje and the diminutive mousjele (moishele) served as point of
departure; in that case the s could have derived >from the dutch yiddish
article es (= das); thus 's mousjele>smousje>smous; compare mauscheln =
spoken with a jewish accent".
Whereas Beem writes that the term smous originated in the 18th century,
the
Van Dale dictionary specifies the year 1657.

Dennis Kahn,
Amsterdam


Re: Papierhaendler defined [again] #germany

Roger Lustig <trovato@...>
 

"Johannes Heidecker" <Johannes_Heidecker@Compuserve.com>
wrote: i would guess it is "Papierh=E4ndler" (with =E4 / ae) which means
someone who does commerce with paper. That could be (>from a historic
perspective)
* someone who buys paper >from a factory and sells it, eg. to packaging
industry, newspapers, stores, print shops,
* someone who buys used paper and sells it to paper factories
I would rather not say that this is someone who has a store where he
sells retail, because I do not think that someone would only sell paper.
Such a person would have a "Schreibwarengeschaeft" and also selling
pens, enveloppes, .. and would not necessarily be called "Haendler",
which means dealer. .........

[MOD NOTE: It appears >from the following, and >from comments submitted by
Michael Bernet but not posted, that the definition of the subject term
may have varied depending upon time and location.]
--------

Far be it >from me to argue with someone descended >from one in the trade--
except that I have some small qualification as an Altpapierhaendler
myself. When I was 8 or so, I used to earn pocket-money by collecting the
neighbors' newspapers, filling the family station wagon with them, and
taking them to a nearby recycler--$10 per ton, as I recall.

In parts of Germany a Schreibwarengeschaeft is also called a
Papierwarengeschaeft. In German-speaking Switzerland, it's a Papeterie
(appropriate accents implied). Accordingly, "Stationer" might well be
an appropriate translation of the term in question after all.

Such terms had different meanings depending on time and place.

Roger Lustig, Princeton, NJ please!reply to <julierog@ix.netcom.com>

Descended >from lawyers, chemists, and wine merchants, mostly--at least
the lawyers *wasted* a lot of paper!


German SIG #Germany Re: Papierhaendler defined [again] #germany

Roger Lustig <trovato@...>
 

"Johannes Heidecker" <Johannes_Heidecker@Compuserve.com>
wrote: i would guess it is "Papierh=E4ndler" (with =E4 / ae) which means
someone who does commerce with paper. That could be (>from a historic
perspective)
* someone who buys paper >from a factory and sells it, eg. to packaging
industry, newspapers, stores, print shops,
* someone who buys used paper and sells it to paper factories
I would rather not say that this is someone who has a store where he
sells retail, because I do not think that someone would only sell paper.
Such a person would have a "Schreibwarengeschaeft" and also selling
pens, enveloppes, .. and would not necessarily be called "Haendler",
which means dealer. .........

[MOD NOTE: It appears >from the following, and >from comments submitted by
Michael Bernet but not posted, that the definition of the subject term
may have varied depending upon time and location.]
--------

Far be it >from me to argue with someone descended >from one in the trade--
except that I have some small qualification as an Altpapierhaendler
myself. When I was 8 or so, I used to earn pocket-money by collecting the
neighbors' newspapers, filling the family station wagon with them, and
taking them to a nearby recycler--$10 per ton, as I recall.

In parts of Germany a Schreibwarengeschaeft is also called a
Papierwarengeschaeft. In German-speaking Switzerland, it's a Papeterie
(appropriate accents implied). Accordingly, "Stationer" might well be
an appropriate translation of the term in question after all.

Such terms had different meanings depending on time and place.

Roger Lustig, Princeton, NJ please!reply to <julierog@ix.netcom.com>

Descended >from lawyers, chemists, and wine merchants, mostly--at least
the lawyers *wasted* a lot of paper!


Re: Papierhaendler defined [again] #germany

Jerry Zeisler <jzeisler@...>
 

Just to clarify the origination and time frame of the term that I
requested (Papierha(umlat)ndler), it came >from the 1882 Budapest City
Directory. As I mentioned privately to several respondents after reading
Johannes' reply, it is quite possible that my g-grandfather, Joseph
ZEISLER, may have sold paper >from a factory to a newspaper. His first
cousin's husband, Hermann GROEDEL and his two brothers owned a very
large lumber exporting business that spanned several countries including
Hungary, Austria and others. And shortly afterwards, after arriving in
the US in 1881, he was listed as a Reporter.

Works out very nicely I would say.

Jerry ZEISLER Leesburg, Virginia USA jzeisler@email.com


German SIG #Germany Re: Papierhaendler defined [again] #germany

Jerry Zeisler <jzeisler@...>
 

Just to clarify the origination and time frame of the term that I
requested (Papierha(umlat)ndler), it came >from the 1882 Budapest City
Directory. As I mentioned privately to several respondents after reading
Johannes' reply, it is quite possible that my g-grandfather, Joseph
ZEISLER, may have sold paper >from a factory to a newspaper. His first
cousin's husband, Hermann GROEDEL and his two brothers owned a very
large lumber exporting business that spanned several countries including
Hungary, Austria and others. And shortly afterwards, after arriving in
the US in 1881, he was listed as a Reporter.

Works out very nicely I would say.

Jerry ZEISLER Leesburg, Virginia USA jzeisler@email.com


RV: Re: Rivers in Romania #romania

Gustavo Zaietz <gzaietz@...>
 

My grandfother called Jacov Zaietz was >from Yampol, Povolic, Bucaresti. He
said it was in Besarabia, but I´ve found there are two Yampols in the area.
He also spoke abaut the Dniester river. I wonder how to know which Yampol
was it?

Gustavo Zaietz

Moderator Note: Please sign all messages with your location.


Romania SIG #Romania RV: Re: Rivers in Romania #romania

Gustavo Zaietz <gzaietz@...>
 

My grandfother called Jacov Zaietz was >from Yampol, Povolic, Bucaresti. He
said it was in Besarabia, but I´ve found there are two Yampols in the area.
He also spoke abaut the Dniester river. I wonder how to know which Yampol
was it?

Gustavo Zaietz

Moderator Note: Please sign all messages with your location.


question about ZYMLER family from Biala Rawska #poland #lodz

Dr J-M SIMLER <jms.gastro@...>
 

Searching ZYMLER family >from Biala Rawska and Lodz.

JM SIMLER



Docteur J-M SIMLER
Maladies de l'Appareil Digestif
2 Avenue des Vosges
67000 Strasbourg
France


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland question about ZYMLER family from Biala Rawska #poland #lodz

Dr J-M SIMLER <jms.gastro@...>
 

Searching ZYMLER family >from Biala Rawska and Lodz.

JM SIMLER



Docteur J-M SIMLER
Maladies de l'Appareil Digestif
2 Avenue des Vosges
67000 Strasbourg
France


reading and discussion #latvia

Rachel Fisher <rfisher@...>
 

Latvia SIGers in the New York area might be interested in the following
presentation at the Center for Jewish History, Wednesday October 2 at 7:00
pm. Research in Latvia, in Riga in particular, will be discussed.

Genealogy: Reality and Fantasy
A Discussion with Blake Eskin

When Blake Eskin's family met the author of the award-winning Holocaust
memoir Fragments, they thought Binjamin Wilkomirski might be a long lost
cousin. But within a year, Binjamin was accused of being a gentile imposter.
To find out how Binjamin got entangled in his family tree, Eskin traveled to
Riga, Latvia to trace his own roots. He shares his surprising discoveries
about family members, real and imaginary, and about how genealogy shapes
identity in A Life in
Pieces: The Making and Unmaking of Binjamin Wilkomirski.

Please join author Blake Eskin and Rachel Fisher, the director of the Center
Genealogy Institute, to discuss how family history is shaped by facts,
memory, and imagination.

Co-sponsored by the American Jewish Historical Society.

Wednesday, October 2, 2002 at 7:00 pm
at the Center for Jewish History
$7.50 per person
$3.50 for students, seniors, AJHS members, and Jewish Genealogical Society,
Inc. members

Hope to see some of you there!

Rachel Fisher

Director, Genealogy Institute
Center for Jewish History
15 West 16th Street
New York, NY 10011


Latvia SIG #Latvia reading and discussion #latvia

Rachel Fisher <rfisher@...>
 

Latvia SIGers in the New York area might be interested in the following
presentation at the Center for Jewish History, Wednesday October 2 at 7:00
pm. Research in Latvia, in Riga in particular, will be discussed.

Genealogy: Reality and Fantasy
A Discussion with Blake Eskin

When Blake Eskin's family met the author of the award-winning Holocaust
memoir Fragments, they thought Binjamin Wilkomirski might be a long lost
cousin. But within a year, Binjamin was accused of being a gentile imposter.
To find out how Binjamin got entangled in his family tree, Eskin traveled to
Riga, Latvia to trace his own roots. He shares his surprising discoveries
about family members, real and imaginary, and about how genealogy shapes
identity in A Life in
Pieces: The Making and Unmaking of Binjamin Wilkomirski.

Please join author Blake Eskin and Rachel Fisher, the director of the Center
Genealogy Institute, to discuss how family history is shaped by facts,
memory, and imagination.

Co-sponsored by the American Jewish Historical Society.

Wednesday, October 2, 2002 at 7:00 pm
at the Center for Jewish History
$7.50 per person
$3.50 for students, seniors, AJHS members, and Jewish Genealogical Society,
Inc. members

Hope to see some of you there!

Rachel Fisher

Director, Genealogy Institute
Center for Jewish History
15 West 16th Street
New York, NY 10011


British census 1901 #general

Merv & Naomi Barnett
 

My experience with the 1901 census in searching for an ancestor was
interesting. I wanted to find Abraham COHEN, who lived in Manchester.
That's what I put in and came up with zero. So I left out the
Manchester and my Abraham came up - living in NORTH Manchester.

Interesting.

Naomi Barnett
Melbourne, Australia


Mt. Hebron lookup #general

HENKEN9@...
 

Genners,

I would appreciate it if anyone planning a trip to Mt. Hebron Cemetery in
Queens could provide a lookup for me. Please respond privately.

Regards,

Ty Henken
Centennial, Colo.
Henken9@aol.com


Professional Research Advice? #general

Dov & Varda <yknow@...>
 

I would like to enter into private correspondence with a professional
genealogist in the Jerusalem area on the subject of pricing for services. I
have an offer to do professional research for a private individual.

Varda Epstein
Efrat
Israel

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately


VM1792: letter from Polish Archives #general

Beth Galleto
 

I would greatly appreciate a translation of a brief letter sent to me by
the Polish Archives. It should be easy for anyone who can read Polish
because it is typed and quite short. I suspect it is asking me for more
money. Am I correct? Please go to
http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/ALL/source/vm1792.html
Thank you.
Beth Galleto
Corte Madera, CA
galleto@pacbell.net
Searching: BOLKER, BOLKIER, Poland
AGRESS, AUGRESS, Poland
KOHN, Szirak, Hungary
OSHEROFF(OW, OV), Starodub area, Russia
LEVITIN, Pochep, Russia


Translation tools #general

Cory Streisinger <corys@...>
 

I know there are some free translation websites like Alta
Vista, but I'm looking for one that can translate Polish to
English. Does anyone know of such a site?
An excellent site linking to many translation tools is
http://www.foreignword.com/Tools/tools.htm

The site will take you to a collection of dictionaries:
http://www.foreignword.com/Tools/dictsrch.htm

and also text translators:
http://www.foreignword.com/Tools/transnow.htm

including several options for translation >from Polish to English.
Of course, as with any machine translation, the quality of the
results can vary widely.

Cory Streisinger
Portland, Oregon
corys@worldnet.att.net


records of Great Synagogue, London #general

Frankel Anita <frankel2@...>
 

Hi all:

I am interested in the marriage records of the Great Synagogue
of London.

The Family History Library (Mormon) microfilms apparently end
in 1885. Are more recent records available?

Thank you.

Anita Frankel frankel2@mindspring.com
Storrs, CT USA