Date   

R. Eliezer EIDES/EDES #rabbinic

James R. Platt <jrplatt@...>
 

Below is the translation >from a tombstone >from my great-grandfather
Eliezer EIDES, but I don't have the name of the cemetery or the name
of the town, which is what I'm seeking. Does this look familiar to
anybody? The family may have been >from the Pamazupiai. The tombstone
says:

"Buried here
The Rabbi (ha'Rabbani/Harabani) Eliezer son of Rabbi Baruch
died on friday 2nd of Iyar 5645 LPK
May His Soul Be Packed With Those Of The Living"

James R. Platt


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic R. Eliezer EIDES/EDES #rabbinic

James R. Platt <jrplatt@...>
 

Below is the translation >from a tombstone >from my great-grandfather
Eliezer EIDES, but I don't have the name of the cemetery or the name
of the town, which is what I'm seeking. Does this look familiar to
anybody? The family may have been >from the Pamazupiai. The tombstone
says:

"Buried here
The Rabbi (ha'Rabbani/Harabani) Eliezer son of Rabbi Baruch
died on friday 2nd of Iyar 5645 LPK
May His Soul Be Packed With Those Of The Living"

James R. Platt


Jeremicze, surname and town name #general

Jalaine Madura <jalaine_madura@...>
 

I am researching the surname *Jeremicz* (my grandparents, >from Wolpa) and
understand that Jeremicze is the name of a town in a similar region of
Belarus and is alternately known as Yeremichi. I also believe that
Jeremias, a phonetic equivalent, is a derivative of the name of the
prophet Yirmiahu. Given all that, can anyone tell me how Jeremicze then
relates to Jeremias, if at all? Are they variations of the same root word,
or are the two word origins very different? All advice welcomed...thank
you!
Jalaine Madura
Seattle, Washington


Need Help #general

ms nodrog
 

My remaining Aunt says that her family entered America >from Europe,
through New Bedford, MA. I have tried rhe microfilms at the Family
History Library for New Bedford but most of those ships came from
Portugal.
I am looking for a RUDNICK family (Rochel, Chia 8 and Wolf 4) that
came about 1918 or 1919. They came to a Meyer Levin in New Bedford.

Any help or suggestions will be appreciated.

Hope Gordon
msnodrog@yahoo.com


Montefiore Cemetery in St. Albans, NY #general

Josh Brown <gettysburg63@...>
 

Hello:

Could someone please take a picture of any SEITZMAN graves there might be at
Montefiore Cemetery in NY? I know my gggrandparents are buried there, but I
also think that some of my uncles and aunts might be there as well. Any
help would be greatly appreciated. Have a good sukkos.

Thanks,
Josh Brown in CA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jeremicze, surname and town name #general

Jalaine Madura <jalaine_madura@...>
 

I am researching the surname *Jeremicz* (my grandparents, >from Wolpa) and
understand that Jeremicze is the name of a town in a similar region of
Belarus and is alternately known as Yeremichi. I also believe that
Jeremias, a phonetic equivalent, is a derivative of the name of the
prophet Yirmiahu. Given all that, can anyone tell me how Jeremicze then
relates to Jeremias, if at all? Are they variations of the same root word,
or are the two word origins very different? All advice welcomed...thank
you!
Jalaine Madura
Seattle, Washington


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Need Help #general

ms nodrog
 

My remaining Aunt says that her family entered America >from Europe,
through New Bedford, MA. I have tried rhe microfilms at the Family
History Library for New Bedford but most of those ships came from
Portugal.
I am looking for a RUDNICK family (Rochel, Chia 8 and Wolf 4) that
came about 1918 or 1919. They came to a Meyer Levin in New Bedford.

Any help or suggestions will be appreciated.

Hope Gordon
msnodrog@yahoo.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Montefiore Cemetery in St. Albans, NY #general

Josh Brown <gettysburg63@...>
 

Hello:

Could someone please take a picture of any SEITZMAN graves there might be at
Montefiore Cemetery in NY? I know my gggrandparents are buried there, but I
also think that some of my uncles and aunts might be there as well. Any
help would be greatly appreciated. Have a good sukkos.

Thanks,
Josh Brown in CA


The MaHaRaSHa #rabbinic

Susan Edel
 

Does anyone know anything about the MaHaRaSHa, Rabbi Shmuel Eliezer
Halevi EDELS? Family tradition says that my husband is descended
from him.
Many thanks,

Susan Edel
Petach Tikva, Israel


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic The MaHaRaSHa #rabbinic

Susan Edel
 

Does anyone know anything about the MaHaRaSHa, Rabbi Shmuel Eliezer
Halevi EDELS? Family tradition says that my husband is descended
from him.
Many thanks,

Susan Edel
Petach Tikva, Israel


Fw: records of Great Synagogue, London #unitedkingdom

Frankel Anita <frankel2@...>
 

Hi all:

I am interested in the marriage records of the Great Synagogue
of London.

The Family History Library (Mormon) microfilms apparently end
in 1885. Are more recent records available?

Thank you.

Anita Frankel frankel2@mindspring.com
Storrs, CT USA


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Fw: records of Great Synagogue, London #unitedkingdom

Frankel Anita <frankel2@...>
 

Hi all:

I am interested in the marriage records of the Great Synagogue
of London.

The Family History Library (Mormon) microfilms apparently end
in 1885. Are more recent records available?

Thank you.

Anita Frankel frankel2@mindspring.com
Storrs, CT USA


Elye Bocher Halevi Levitas, author of the Bovebuch--and Bobe Mayses #general

MBernet@...
 

This discussion is veering adrift >from our mission topic of jewish
genealogy. Therefore, I would ask that any further discussion on this
topic be conducted privately.

Moderator on Duty

In a message dated 9/22/2002 5:03:53 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
tom.vene@uol.com.br writes:

<< Mr. Bernarrt missed a bit the origin of the the Bobe Mayse story:
Bovo d'Antonia (or Bovo d'Antona) is a yiddish poem-romance written
by Elia Levita (pseudonym of Elia Ben Asher Ashkenasi aka Elia
Bachur) a quite reputed linguist, writer and humanist. See
<http://www.ipsheim.de/levita.html>. According to lore, Bovo
d'Antonia was one of the Round Table cavaliers. I don't know if he is
the same character as Bevis of Hampton but the stories could be
similar. So I suspect that the 'bobe mayse' expression originates
>from the fact that Elia Levita wrote a piece in yiddish about a
fictional character, and of course 'bobe mayse' means exactly that: a
tall tale. >>
==I want to express my gratitude for the as-always erudite comments of Dr.
Veniceianer, and for giving the url for the home page of the German town of
Ipsheim. These local histories that are available on the web for almost
every German town, county or village and are a great help for genealogists
and historian, but we should treat them with caution because their authors
are generally not qualified historians, and much of the information on local
Jews and their customs is either second- or third-hand or based on 65-year
old memories, biased, of course, by German attitudes and beliefs, and
dedicated primarily to boosting the reputation of their villages.

Nevertheless, the site gave much, much information (some of it a little
confused or confusing) on its claimed native son the Jew "Elia Levita" who,
it is said, was originally believed to be a native of Venice (obviously the
original home of Tom's family) or, Neustadt and der Aisch (according to the
Encyclopedia Judaica Levitas was >from Neustadt near Nurnberg which would have
made him a near-neighbor of my family, and since he was a Levite, perhaps
even a relative). The Ipsheim site reports that Levitas's own copies of one
of the books he had published, which had been discovered in a library in
Vienna, bore his autograph on the flyleaf and stated that his father was reb
Asher of Ipsheim.

In any event, the Encyclopedia Judaica has a very long article on Levitas,
and is worth consulting. Levitas was a brilliant scholar, linguist,
philologist, grammarian, and lexicographer, fluent in many languages, who
lived most of his life in Italy where he tutored leading churchmen in Hebrew
and Jewish scholarship. Levitas may be said, also, to have been the first
major author of works in (and about) Judeo-German--the source of
East-European Yiddish.

The original publication of Levitas's "Bovo d'Antona" (it became known as the
"Bove-Buch" in later editions), is dated to 1507. It was not an original
composition, as Dr. Veniceianer suggests, but an adaptation in verse of an
Italian translation (as is obvious >from its Italian name) of the Anglo-French
romance, Sir Bevis of Hampton.

In any event, Bobbe Mayseh, current Yiddish for a "tall tale," has no
connection with Bubbe, a grandmother--except by folk etymology. And thanks
to Dr. Veniceianer for forcing me to consult my encyclopedia and learn more
about my near-neighbor, the verbal polymath Elye Bocher Halevi Levitas and
about the origin of lay books in Judeo-German subsequent to the introduction
of movable type.

Michael Bernet, New York <mBernet@aol.com>

WOLFF (Pfungstadt, Frankfurt/M, Koenigsberg, Amsterdam, N.Carolina); BERNET,
BERNERT, JONDORF(Frensdorf, Bamberg, Nurnberg); FEUCHTWANGER
(Schwabach, Hagenbach & Fuerth); KONIGSHOFER (anywhere); BERG, WOLF(F),
(Demmelsdorf & Zeckendorf); Shim`on GUTENSTEIN (Bad Homburg ca 1760);
FRENSDORF/ER (anywhere); MAINZER (Lorsch); anyone in Ermreuth or Floss;
GOLDSCHMIDT (B. Homburg, Hessdorf). ALTMANN (Silesia); TIMMENDORFER


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Elye Bocher Halevi Levitas, author of the Bovebuch--and Bobe Mayses #general

MBernet@...
 

This discussion is veering adrift >from our mission topic of jewish
genealogy. Therefore, I would ask that any further discussion on this
topic be conducted privately.

Moderator on Duty

In a message dated 9/22/2002 5:03:53 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
tom.vene@uol.com.br writes:

<< Mr. Bernarrt missed a bit the origin of the the Bobe Mayse story:
Bovo d'Antonia (or Bovo d'Antona) is a yiddish poem-romance written
by Elia Levita (pseudonym of Elia Ben Asher Ashkenasi aka Elia
Bachur) a quite reputed linguist, writer and humanist. See
<http://www.ipsheim.de/levita.html>. According to lore, Bovo
d'Antonia was one of the Round Table cavaliers. I don't know if he is
the same character as Bevis of Hampton but the stories could be
similar. So I suspect that the 'bobe mayse' expression originates
>from the fact that Elia Levita wrote a piece in yiddish about a
fictional character, and of course 'bobe mayse' means exactly that: a
tall tale. >>
==I want to express my gratitude for the as-always erudite comments of Dr.
Veniceianer, and for giving the url for the home page of the German town of
Ipsheim. These local histories that are available on the web for almost
every German town, county or village and are a great help for genealogists
and historian, but we should treat them with caution because their authors
are generally not qualified historians, and much of the information on local
Jews and their customs is either second- or third-hand or based on 65-year
old memories, biased, of course, by German attitudes and beliefs, and
dedicated primarily to boosting the reputation of their villages.

Nevertheless, the site gave much, much information (some of it a little
confused or confusing) on its claimed native son the Jew "Elia Levita" who,
it is said, was originally believed to be a native of Venice (obviously the
original home of Tom's family) or, Neustadt and der Aisch (according to the
Encyclopedia Judaica Levitas was >from Neustadt near Nurnberg which would have
made him a near-neighbor of my family, and since he was a Levite, perhaps
even a relative). The Ipsheim site reports that Levitas's own copies of one
of the books he had published, which had been discovered in a library in
Vienna, bore his autograph on the flyleaf and stated that his father was reb
Asher of Ipsheim.

In any event, the Encyclopedia Judaica has a very long article on Levitas,
and is worth consulting. Levitas was a brilliant scholar, linguist,
philologist, grammarian, and lexicographer, fluent in many languages, who
lived most of his life in Italy where he tutored leading churchmen in Hebrew
and Jewish scholarship. Levitas may be said, also, to have been the first
major author of works in (and about) Judeo-German--the source of
East-European Yiddish.

The original publication of Levitas's "Bovo d'Antona" (it became known as the
"Bove-Buch" in later editions), is dated to 1507. It was not an original
composition, as Dr. Veniceianer suggests, but an adaptation in verse of an
Italian translation (as is obvious >from its Italian name) of the Anglo-French
romance, Sir Bevis of Hampton.

In any event, Bobbe Mayseh, current Yiddish for a "tall tale," has no
connection with Bubbe, a grandmother--except by folk etymology. And thanks
to Dr. Veniceianer for forcing me to consult my encyclopedia and learn more
about my near-neighbor, the verbal polymath Elye Bocher Halevi Levitas and
about the origin of lay books in Judeo-German subsequent to the introduction
of movable type.

Michael Bernet, New York <mBernet@aol.com>

WOLFF (Pfungstadt, Frankfurt/M, Koenigsberg, Amsterdam, N.Carolina); BERNET,
BERNERT, JONDORF(Frensdorf, Bamberg, Nurnberg); FEUCHTWANGER
(Schwabach, Hagenbach & Fuerth); KONIGSHOFER (anywhere); BERG, WOLF(F),
(Demmelsdorf & Zeckendorf); Shim`on GUTENSTEIN (Bad Homburg ca 1760);
FRENSDORF/ER (anywhere); MAINZER (Lorsch); anyone in Ermreuth or Floss;
GOLDSCHMIDT (B. Homburg, Hessdorf). ALTMANN (Silesia); TIMMENDORFER


Understanding an East Galician birth record #general

IsraelP <zach4v6@...>
 

I have a small puzzle there in which reading a comment of the birth record might
help.

If you have a moment, please have a look at www.pikholz.org/BrandesNote.html

Israel Pickholtz


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Understanding an East Galician birth record #general

IsraelP <zach4v6@...>
 

I have a small puzzle there in which reading a comment of the birth record might
help.

If you have a moment, please have a look at www.pikholz.org/BrandesNote.html

Israel Pickholtz


Re: Smous origins #southafrica

Kahn <denmor@...>
 

Since Afrikaans is derived >from Dutch, the following extract from
'Shaarit/Resten van een taal, woordenboekje van het Nederlandse Jiddisch
(Remains of a language, Dictionary of Dutch Yiddish), by H. Beem may
interest the reader.

" Smous is a term of abuse for Jew; brought into use in 1657 to describe the
mainly German-Jewish drifter. The word is associated with the given name
mousje (moishe) = Mozes, vulgarly Moos, pronounced Mous in the common
dialect of Amsterdam. It is plausible, that the s was added according to the
custom with other terms of abuse starting with s. Also possible is that the
word mousje and the diminutive mousjele (moishele) served as point of
departure; in that case the s could have derived >from the dutch yiddish
article es (= das); thus 's mousjele>smousje>smous; compare mauscheln =
spoken with a jewish accent".
Whereas Beem writes that the term smous originated in the 18th century, the
Van Dale dictionary specifies the year 1657.

Dennis Kahn,
Amsterdam

----- Original Message -----
From: shaul <shaul@shaul.homechoice.co.uk>
To: South Africa SIG <safrica@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Friday, September 20, 2002 1:55 PM
Subject: [safrica] Smous origins


Following recent posts I asked the guru of SA Yiddish, Prof Joseph Sherman
and :

<<Joseph Sherman writes
"Smous" is an Afrikaans word that passed into use in both English and
Yiddish in South Africa. It is not an native Yiddish word. For derivation
see Bamford, A Dictionary of South African English (OUP).>>


At 11:49 19/09/02 you wrote:

Is this correct? Funny, I always thought that "smous" was an Afrikaans
word!

Roy


Saul Issroff


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica Re: Smous origins #southafrica

Kahn <denmor@...>
 

Since Afrikaans is derived >from Dutch, the following extract from
'Shaarit/Resten van een taal, woordenboekje van het Nederlandse Jiddisch
(Remains of a language, Dictionary of Dutch Yiddish), by H. Beem may
interest the reader.

" Smous is a term of abuse for Jew; brought into use in 1657 to describe the
mainly German-Jewish drifter. The word is associated with the given name
mousje (moishe) = Mozes, vulgarly Moos, pronounced Mous in the common
dialect of Amsterdam. It is plausible, that the s was added according to the
custom with other terms of abuse starting with s. Also possible is that the
word mousje and the diminutive mousjele (moishele) served as point of
departure; in that case the s could have derived >from the dutch yiddish
article es (= das); thus 's mousjele>smousje>smous; compare mauscheln =
spoken with a jewish accent".
Whereas Beem writes that the term smous originated in the 18th century, the
Van Dale dictionary specifies the year 1657.

Dennis Kahn,
Amsterdam

----- Original Message -----
From: shaul <shaul@shaul.homechoice.co.uk>
To: South Africa SIG <safrica@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Friday, September 20, 2002 1:55 PM
Subject: [safrica] Smous origins


Following recent posts I asked the guru of SA Yiddish, Prof Joseph Sherman
and :

<<Joseph Sherman writes
"Smous" is an Afrikaans word that passed into use in both English and
Yiddish in South Africa. It is not an native Yiddish word. For derivation
see Bamford, A Dictionary of South African English (OUP).>>


At 11:49 19/09/02 you wrote:

Is this correct? Funny, I always thought that "smous" was an Afrikaans
word!

Roy


Saul Issroff


Krukienice #general

GHaristan@...
 

In checking copies of family birth, marriage and death records, I have come
across "Krukienice" as the place of these events. Much of the family came
from Mostiska and perhaps Przemysl so I believe Krukienice must have been in
the same vicinity in Galicia. Would appreciate any info anyone might have.
Thanks.

Harriet Drucker Goldstein
New York


SA Jewish Year Books #southafrica

Ann Rabinowitz <annrab@...>
 

Dear Adam:

When attempting to do any research on South Africa, it is best to look first
at the SA SIG web site which is located at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/safrica. There you will find the best information
on how and where to find information as well as a wealth of databases you
can search through.

In this vein, you can go to the SA SIG web site and look at my piece on the
SA Jewish Year Books for the specific information you seek.

Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@bellsouth.net