Date   

Re: LEVIN (JANKELOWITZ) #belarus

Yekkey@...
 

At one time South Dakota had a governor named Janklow whose grandfather was a
Jew name Janklowitz.

Dan Nussbaum
Fall River, Massachusetts

Searching for
NUSSBAUM, KATZENSTEIN-Raboldshausen, Bad Hersfeld and Rhina Germany
TEPLITZKY, BENDERSKY, KASZKIET, KASHKET, GREENBERG-Uman, Ukraine
ROSENTHAL, S(C)HENK(EL)MAN-Zinkov, Ukraine
BILD, KASHLEVSKY-anywhere


Re: MENASCHE #latvia

BREST (Lapedus) Family <angi@...>
 

Hallo

would the person who was asking for MENASCHE/MANASCHE information please
contact me at angi@icon.co.za as I have a little information on this
surname in South Africa.

sincerely
Anne Lapedus Brest (Ex Dublin, Ireland)
RESEARCHING. LAPEDUS (Vieksniai, Lithuania) MARCUS Ackmene, Lithuania,
BREST (Bauska, Latvia) MIRRELSON (Kourland, Latvia), ORKIN (Joniskis,
Lithuania) KLAPMAN (Ackmene, Lithuania) SHILLMAN (Kreutzburg, Latvia)
KARLIN, (Zagera , Lithuania) ORKIN (Zagera, Lithuania) NOVOGOROD
(Yoniskis, Yaneshik, Lithuania) KAHN (Vieksniai, Lithuania).


Latvia SIG #Latvia Re: LEVIN (JANKELOWITZ) #latvia

Yekkey@...
 

At one time South Dakota had a governor named Janklow whose grandfather was a
Jew name Janklowitz.

Dan Nussbaum
Fall River, Massachusetts

Searching for
NUSSBAUM, KATZENSTEIN-Raboldshausen, Bad Hersfeld and Rhina Germany
TEPLITZKY, BENDERSKY, KASZKIET, KASHKET, GREENBERG-Uman, Ukraine
ROSENTHAL, S(C)HENK(EL)MAN-Zinkov, Ukraine
BILD, KASHLEVSKY-anywhere


Latvia SIG #Latvia Re: MENASCHE #latvia

BREST (Lapedus) Family <angi@...>
 

Hallo

would the person who was asking for MENASCHE/MANASCHE information please
contact me at angi@icon.co.za as I have a little information on this
surname in South Africa.

sincerely
Anne Lapedus Brest (Ex Dublin, Ireland)
RESEARCHING. LAPEDUS (Vieksniai, Lithuania) MARCUS Ackmene, Lithuania,
BREST (Bauska, Latvia) MIRRELSON (Kourland, Latvia), ORKIN (Joniskis,
Lithuania) KLAPMAN (Ackmene, Lithuania) SHILLMAN (Kreutzburg, Latvia)
KARLIN, (Zagera , Lithuania) ORKIN (Zagera, Lithuania) NOVOGOROD
(Yoniskis, Yaneshik, Lithuania) KAHN (Vieksniai, Lithuania).


Does the Yizkor list include only Holocaust victims? #yizkorbooks

Eva Floersheim <evaflor@...>
 

My name is Eva Floersheim and I have translated two Yizkor lists during the
last few years (Lubaczow and Lviv/Lwow).
These two lists were compiled by the two Landsmannschafts for Lubaczow and
Lwow, but were never published in any Yizkor book. Perhaps this must be
taken into consideration when you read the rest of this message.

As you probably all know, translating names that were written in Hebrew back
to Latin letters is always a problem, so this is why such a translation is
never really finished. Getting to know more and more relevant lists that
were originally written in Latin letter >from those places, makes it
necessary every now and then to revise the translation.
I hope to improve the Yizkor lists for Lubaczow and Lwow within the coming
year. While preparing for this, I have come upon a difficult problem.

I will use the Lubaczow list as an example.

A reconstructed chain of events:

Stage One:
When those >from Lubaczow who lived in Israel in 1954 submitted the names of
their dead relatives for the Yizkor list, they themselves were no longer
living in their hometown Lubaczow. They could no longer go to the cemetery
in Lubaczow for the Jahrzeit of that relative. Some of them had managed to
flee in the 1930's , some of them even earlier. A few were survivors.
They wrote the names of their relatives for the Yizkor list. Most of those
relatives had died in Holocaust, but a few of their relatives had died
before the war.
They wanted to commemorate their relatives each time the Landsmannschaft for
Lubaczow met.
Giving the names to the Yizkor list was about remembering their relatives,
and not ONLY those relatives who died in Holocaust. Also, the list is only a
list of names, without any personal information about each person.

Stage Two:
During the last forty years many of the old generation who came to Israel
died, so at one point, the knowledge that some of those listed had died
BEFORE the war, was more or less lost. The Yizkor list became a Yizkor list
for Holocaust.

Stage Three:
I translated the Yizkor list , I think it was in 1999, and it was added to
the Yizkor lists on JewishGen.

Stage Four:
from learning more and more about the Jews of Lubaczow >from relatives, from
Pages of Testimony at Yad Vashem, and >from other sources, I discovered that
some of those listed had died BEFORE Holocaust.

Stage Five:
The list must now be revised, but how?
Should I make special notes under those names who I now know were not
Holocaust victims?
Should I add some short explanation before the list that most of those
listed died in Holocaust, but a few died before the war, and in the case of
the Lwow list, some died AFTER the war?

Has anybody else come upon this problem while translating Yizkor lists?


Eva Floersheim
Shadmot Dvorah
Israel


Yizkor Books #YizkorBooks Does the Yizkor list include only Holocaust victims? #yizkorbooks

Eva Floersheim <evaflor@...>
 

My name is Eva Floersheim and I have translated two Yizkor lists during the
last few years (Lubaczow and Lviv/Lwow).
These two lists were compiled by the two Landsmannschafts for Lubaczow and
Lwow, but were never published in any Yizkor book. Perhaps this must be
taken into consideration when you read the rest of this message.

As you probably all know, translating names that were written in Hebrew back
to Latin letters is always a problem, so this is why such a translation is
never really finished. Getting to know more and more relevant lists that
were originally written in Latin letter >from those places, makes it
necessary every now and then to revise the translation.
I hope to improve the Yizkor lists for Lubaczow and Lwow within the coming
year. While preparing for this, I have come upon a difficult problem.

I will use the Lubaczow list as an example.

A reconstructed chain of events:

Stage One:
When those >from Lubaczow who lived in Israel in 1954 submitted the names of
their dead relatives for the Yizkor list, they themselves were no longer
living in their hometown Lubaczow. They could no longer go to the cemetery
in Lubaczow for the Jahrzeit of that relative. Some of them had managed to
flee in the 1930's , some of them even earlier. A few were survivors.
They wrote the names of their relatives for the Yizkor list. Most of those
relatives had died in Holocaust, but a few of their relatives had died
before the war.
They wanted to commemorate their relatives each time the Landsmannschaft for
Lubaczow met.
Giving the names to the Yizkor list was about remembering their relatives,
and not ONLY those relatives who died in Holocaust. Also, the list is only a
list of names, without any personal information about each person.

Stage Two:
During the last forty years many of the old generation who came to Israel
died, so at one point, the knowledge that some of those listed had died
BEFORE the war, was more or less lost. The Yizkor list became a Yizkor list
for Holocaust.

Stage Three:
I translated the Yizkor list , I think it was in 1999, and it was added to
the Yizkor lists on JewishGen.

Stage Four:
from learning more and more about the Jews of Lubaczow >from relatives, from
Pages of Testimony at Yad Vashem, and >from other sources, I discovered that
some of those listed had died BEFORE Holocaust.

Stage Five:
The list must now be revised, but how?
Should I make special notes under those names who I now know were not
Holocaust victims?
Should I add some short explanation before the list that most of those
listed died in Holocaust, but a few died before the war, and in the case of
the Lwow list, some died AFTER the war?

Has anybody else come upon this problem while translating Yizkor lists?


Eva Floersheim
Shadmot Dvorah
Israel


The 22nd IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy #latinamerica

JGS of Canada (Toronto) <info@...>
 

Gala Banquet Announcements

The 22nd IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy is pleased to
announce an outstanding programme for its closing Gala Banquet on Thursday
evening, August 8, in the Grand Ballroom of the Sheraton Centre Hotel.

Entertainment will be provided by performers Beyond the Pale (see
http://www.borealisrecords.com/a_beyond.html), specializing in Klezmer
music, the traditional folk music of eastern-European Jews. The strictly
kosher Banquet will provide a venue for attendees to the Conference to
celebrate the culmination of a great Conference and the achievements of the
world of Jewish genealogy. During the evening the International Association
of Jewish Genealogical Societies will present its Annual Achievement Awards:
the Lifetime Achievement Award and awards for Outstanding Publication,
Outstanding Project and Outstanding Contribution to Jewish Genealogy.

The highlight of the evening will be the featured guest speaker. The 22nd
IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy is pleased to feature an
address by author, academic, historian, commentator and community leader –
Dr. Irving Abella - an outstanding Canadian and an international Jewish
Personality. Dr. Abella not only teaches history but he makes history. Dr.
Abella will be speaking on “The Tides of Jewish Immigration – Our Coat of
Many Colours”. His comments will touch on the untold history of the waves
of Jewish immigration to Canada, how it replicates the experience in other
“new world” countries and how that experience affected our ancestors and
have made us what we are today.

Participants will definitely not want to miss the excitement of the Gala
Banquet and outside guests are also welcome. Don’t miss the fun, the
stimulating conversation and the entertainment. If you haven’t yet
registered for the Conference go to the Conference registration page at
http://www.jgstoronto2002.ca/Registration.html and make sure to choose the
Banquet option. If you are already registered for the Conference or have a
friend who would like to attend the Banquet, simply e-mail the Conference
info line at info@jgstoronto2002.ca and indicate your food preference and
the number of tickets. Banquet tickets are CDN $75 ($US $54) per person and
must be purchased in advance of the Conference. Don’t delay! Register now
for the Gala Closing Banquet and join the party.


Latin America #LatinAmerica The 22nd IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy #latinamerica

JGS of Canada (Toronto) <info@...>
 

Gala Banquet Announcements

The 22nd IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy is pleased to
announce an outstanding programme for its closing Gala Banquet on Thursday
evening, August 8, in the Grand Ballroom of the Sheraton Centre Hotel.

Entertainment will be provided by performers Beyond the Pale (see
http://www.borealisrecords.com/a_beyond.html), specializing in Klezmer
music, the traditional folk music of eastern-European Jews. The strictly
kosher Banquet will provide a venue for attendees to the Conference to
celebrate the culmination of a great Conference and the achievements of the
world of Jewish genealogy. During the evening the International Association
of Jewish Genealogical Societies will present its Annual Achievement Awards:
the Lifetime Achievement Award and awards for Outstanding Publication,
Outstanding Project and Outstanding Contribution to Jewish Genealogy.

The highlight of the evening will be the featured guest speaker. The 22nd
IAJGS International Conference on Jewish Genealogy is pleased to feature an
address by author, academic, historian, commentator and community leader –
Dr. Irving Abella - an outstanding Canadian and an international Jewish
Personality. Dr. Abella not only teaches history but he makes history. Dr.
Abella will be speaking on “The Tides of Jewish Immigration – Our Coat of
Many Colours”. His comments will touch on the untold history of the waves
of Jewish immigration to Canada, how it replicates the experience in other
“new world” countries and how that experience affected our ancestors and
have made us what we are today.

Participants will definitely not want to miss the excitement of the Gala
Banquet and outside guests are also welcome. Don’t miss the fun, the
stimulating conversation and the entertainment. If you haven’t yet
registered for the Conference go to the Conference registration page at
http://www.jgstoronto2002.ca/Registration.html and make sure to choose the
Banquet option. If you are already registered for the Conference or have a
friend who would like to attend the Banquet, simply e-mail the Conference
info line at info@jgstoronto2002.ca and indicate your food preference and
the number of tickets. Banquet tickets are CDN $75 ($US $54) per person and
must be purchased in advance of the Conference. Don’t delay! Register now
for the Gala Closing Banquet and join the party.


counties in England #unitedkingdom

Pierre Hahn <pierre28@...>
 

I am using <FreeBMD.rootsweb.com> but I am not knowledgeable with the
counties mentioned; is there an index that would give me the location of
the county nd possibly the distance beween counties. My interest is in
the area around Manchester.
TIA
Pierre M Hahn, San Francisco


*****CORRECTION***** #unitedkingdom

Lara Samet <Lara.Samet@...>
 

The email address that all responses should be sent to regarding the
previous posting, "Seeking to Honor Heroic Act," is
Valery_Bazarov@hias.org


Sorry for the inconvenience.
Lara Samet


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom counties in England #unitedkingdom

Pierre Hahn <pierre28@...>
 

I am using <FreeBMD.rootsweb.com> but I am not knowledgeable with the
counties mentioned; is there an index that would give me the location of
the county nd possibly the distance beween counties. My interest is in
the area around Manchester.
TIA
Pierre M Hahn, San Francisco


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom *****CORRECTION***** #unitedkingdom

Lara Samet <Lara.Samet@...>
 

The email address that all responses should be sent to regarding the
previous posting, "Seeking to Honor Heroic Act," is
Valery_Bazarov@hias.org


Sorry for the inconvenience.
Lara Samet


Re: Restoring Letters On Tombstone #general

Stan Goodman <safeq@...>
 

On Tue, 16 Jul 2002 16:46:32 UTC, solschlussel@juno.com (Solomon
Schlussel) opined:


We recovered an old cemetery in the Ukraine but we can't read any thing
what written on the tombstones. Is there any way to restore them to be
able to read?
Solomon Schlussel
solschlussel@juno.com
You might try making a rubbing of the stones, using ordinary carbon
paper. Assuming that something remains of the carved characters, the
resulting rubbing may produce outlines sufficiently well-defined to
make them legible.

If you are looking for some chemical treatment to bring out the
characters, I think you will be disappointed.

Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, ROKITA: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better):
http://www.hashkedim.com
Although the given Reply address is a valid one, mail is retrieved
from it only infrequently.
If you wish a more timely response >from me, please visit my website
(see the address just
above), where you will find my primary address.


Re: Letter *A* preceding surnames GULNIK & COHEN #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 7/16/2002 10:17:36 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
YVES.GOULNIK@Roche.COM writes:

<< I was wondering whether the letter 'A' in front
of a surname had any meaning. I have come across
a few AGULNIK also >from Odessa but was not able
to assess whether there was any relationship to
my own surname GULNIK.

However, reading the story of Jewish Agricultural
Colonies in Russia, one of the web pages lists
people with Elcana ACOHEN as their father and
KOHAN/KOHEN as their surname. >>

==I cannot think of any instance where an A has been plaed before a name, nor
can I think of a plausible reason. I think your two initial A's are a
coincidence, and that we have two different situations.

==I recall a family AGULNI[c]K with whom my parents were familiar. I believe
they had lived in Germany (Nurnberg/Furth?) and came to the UK (Gateshead?)
before WW 2. I have vague memories also that the name is of Spanish origin;
"eagle" and "needle" come to mind--perhaps someone knowledgable in Spanish
can help here.

==There is no H in Russian. G is usually used to replace it (e.g. Goffman
for Hoffman; Kogan for Kohen). My assumption is that in your case the
father's name was followed by the qualifier HaKohen (the priest), as is the
norm when giving the Hebrew names of members of the Kohanic caste. Since
Gakohen sounds rather wierd, the name would more likely have been transcribed
without the initial H. When the time came to choose surnames, his children
simply took Kohen as their new family names. All very well and good, but how
did the H get into the middle of the KOHEN name in Russia--where there is no
such letter.

Any better suggestions out there?

Michael Bernet, New York <mBernet@aol.com>
Seeking
WOLFF (Pfungstadt, Frankfurt/M, Koenigsberg, Amsterdam, N.Carolina); BERNET,
BERNERT, JONDORF(Frensdorf, Bamberg, Nurnberg); FEUCHTWANGER
(Schwabach, Hagenbach & Fuerth); KONIGSHOFER (anywhere); BERG, WOLF(F),
(Demmelsdorf & Zeckendorf); Shim`on GUTENSTEIN (Bad Homburg ca 1760);
FRENSDORF/ER (anywhere); MAINZER (Lorsch); anyone in Ermreuth or Floss;
GOLDSCHMIDT (B. Homburg, Hessdorf). ALTMANN (Silesia); TIMMENDORFER


Re: Firstname "Emanuel" on JRI-Poland data base #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 7/16/2002 11:46:29 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
mendelssohn@worldonline.fr writes:

<< Is it possible to learn what is the frequency of the firstname "Emanuel"
on
the JRI-Poland data-base?
It seems to be very rare and I wonder if I should research my ancestor
(born around 1820) under another firstname ,... even if he was indead
registered in Warszawa business Directory as "Emanuel Mendel(s)sohn " in
1870. >>

==Many of my ancestors in 19th century Germany were know *officially* as
Emanuel (which is, of course, >from the Hebrew), but their Hebrew names were
Menachem most together with the common kinnuy, Mendel. The fact that his
family name was Mendel(s)sohn (Mendel's Son), confirms the probability that
this Emanuel in the business directory was Menachem in the synagogue and
Mendel to his friends. Incidentally, toward the start of the 20th century,
Menachem Mendels were more likely to be called Emil than Emanuel, which had
become *too Jewish*.

The Immanuel/Emanuel names are, as you stated, relatively rare as Jewish
names. The name comes >from Isaiah, is written as to words, Immanu El (which
means *God is with Us*), and is not known to have been used as a personal
name at the time of the Mishna or the Gemara. The Immanuel/Emanuel name is
from the New Testament, which interpreted the phrase >from Isaiah to refer to
Jesus of Nazareth. It is therefore likely that Jews deliberately avoided the
Emanue/Immanuel names.

The only references I could find in the Encyc. Jud to the use among Jews of
the name Emanuel or Immanuel before the 19th century came >from among
Sephardim--and not many at that. Beider declares that the use of Emanuel
among Askenazim before the 18th century was *very unusual*.

Manuel was a variant of Emanuel that was known in Eastern Europe; it, too,
was probably derived >from Menachem/Mendel/Manes

Michael Bernet, New York <mBernet@aol.com>
seeking
WOLFF (Pfungstadt, Frankfurt/M, Koenigsberg, Amsterdam, N.Carolina); BERNET,
BERNERT, JONDORF(Frensdorf, Bamberg, Nurnberg); FEUCHTWANGER
(Schwabach, Hagenbach & Fuerth); KONIGSHOFER (anywhere); BERG, WOLF(F),
(Demmelsdorf & Zeckendorf); Shim`on GUTENSTEIN (Bad Homburg ca 1760);
FRENSDORF/ER (anywhere); MAINZER (Lorsch); anyone in Ermreuth or Floss;
GOLDSCHMIDT (B. Homburg, Hessdorf). ALTMANN (Silesia); TIMMENDORFER


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Restoring Letters On Tombstone #general

Stan Goodman <safeq@...>
 

On Tue, 16 Jul 2002 16:46:32 UTC, solschlussel@juno.com (Solomon
Schlussel) opined:


We recovered an old cemetery in the Ukraine but we can't read any thing
what written on the tombstones. Is there any way to restore them to be
able to read?
Solomon Schlussel
solschlussel@juno.com
You might try making a rubbing of the stones, using ordinary carbon
paper. Assuming that something remains of the carved characters, the
resulting rubbing may produce outlines sufficiently well-defined to
make them legible.

If you are looking for some chemical treatment to bring out the
characters, I think you will be disappointed.

Stan Goodman, Qiryat Tiv'on, Israel

Searching:
NEACHOWICZ/NOACHOWICZ, NEJMAN/NAJMAN, ROKITA: >from Lomza Gubernia
ISMACH: >from Lomza Gubernia, Galicia, and Ukraina
HERTANU, ABRAMOVICI, LAUER: >from Dorohoi District, Romania
GRISARU, VATARU: >from Iasi, Romania

See my interactive family tree (requires Java 1.1.6 or better):
http://www.hashkedim.com
Although the given Reply address is a valid one, mail is retrieved
from it only infrequently.
If you wish a more timely response >from me, please visit my website
(see the address just
above), where you will find my primary address.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Letter *A* preceding surnames GULNIK & COHEN #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 7/16/2002 10:17:36 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
YVES.GOULNIK@Roche.COM writes:

<< I was wondering whether the letter 'A' in front
of a surname had any meaning. I have come across
a few AGULNIK also >from Odessa but was not able
to assess whether there was any relationship to
my own surname GULNIK.

However, reading the story of Jewish Agricultural
Colonies in Russia, one of the web pages lists
people with Elcana ACOHEN as their father and
KOHAN/KOHEN as their surname. >>

==I cannot think of any instance where an A has been plaed before a name, nor
can I think of a plausible reason. I think your two initial A's are a
coincidence, and that we have two different situations.

==I recall a family AGULNI[c]K with whom my parents were familiar. I believe
they had lived in Germany (Nurnberg/Furth?) and came to the UK (Gateshead?)
before WW 2. I have vague memories also that the name is of Spanish origin;
"eagle" and "needle" come to mind--perhaps someone knowledgable in Spanish
can help here.

==There is no H in Russian. G is usually used to replace it (e.g. Goffman
for Hoffman; Kogan for Kohen). My assumption is that in your case the
father's name was followed by the qualifier HaKohen (the priest), as is the
norm when giving the Hebrew names of members of the Kohanic caste. Since
Gakohen sounds rather wierd, the name would more likely have been transcribed
without the initial H. When the time came to choose surnames, his children
simply took Kohen as their new family names. All very well and good, but how
did the H get into the middle of the KOHEN name in Russia--where there is no
such letter.

Any better suggestions out there?

Michael Bernet, New York <mBernet@aol.com>
Seeking
WOLFF (Pfungstadt, Frankfurt/M, Koenigsberg, Amsterdam, N.Carolina); BERNET,
BERNERT, JONDORF(Frensdorf, Bamberg, Nurnberg); FEUCHTWANGER
(Schwabach, Hagenbach & Fuerth); KONIGSHOFER (anywhere); BERG, WOLF(F),
(Demmelsdorf & Zeckendorf); Shim`on GUTENSTEIN (Bad Homburg ca 1760);
FRENSDORF/ER (anywhere); MAINZER (Lorsch); anyone in Ermreuth or Floss;
GOLDSCHMIDT (B. Homburg, Hessdorf). ALTMANN (Silesia); TIMMENDORFER


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Firstname "Emanuel" on JRI-Poland data base #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 7/16/2002 11:46:29 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
mendelssohn@worldonline.fr writes:

<< Is it possible to learn what is the frequency of the firstname "Emanuel"
on
the JRI-Poland data-base?
It seems to be very rare and I wonder if I should research my ancestor
(born around 1820) under another firstname ,... even if he was indead
registered in Warszawa business Directory as "Emanuel Mendel(s)sohn " in
1870. >>

==Many of my ancestors in 19th century Germany were know *officially* as
Emanuel (which is, of course, >from the Hebrew), but their Hebrew names were
Menachem most together with the common kinnuy, Mendel. The fact that his
family name was Mendel(s)sohn (Mendel's Son), confirms the probability that
this Emanuel in the business directory was Menachem in the synagogue and
Mendel to his friends. Incidentally, toward the start of the 20th century,
Menachem Mendels were more likely to be called Emil than Emanuel, which had
become *too Jewish*.

The Immanuel/Emanuel names are, as you stated, relatively rare as Jewish
names. The name comes >from Isaiah, is written as to words, Immanu El (which
means *God is with Us*), and is not known to have been used as a personal
name at the time of the Mishna or the Gemara. The Immanuel/Emanuel name is
from the New Testament, which interpreted the phrase >from Isaiah to refer to
Jesus of Nazareth. It is therefore likely that Jews deliberately avoided the
Emanue/Immanuel names.

The only references I could find in the Encyc. Jud to the use among Jews of
the name Emanuel or Immanuel before the 19th century came >from among
Sephardim--and not many at that. Beider declares that the use of Emanuel
among Askenazim before the 18th century was *very unusual*.

Manuel was a variant of Emanuel that was known in Eastern Europe; it, too,
was probably derived >from Menachem/Mendel/Manes

Michael Bernet, New York <mBernet@aol.com>
seeking
WOLFF (Pfungstadt, Frankfurt/M, Koenigsberg, Amsterdam, N.Carolina); BERNET,
BERNERT, JONDORF(Frensdorf, Bamberg, Nurnberg); FEUCHTWANGER
(Schwabach, Hagenbach & Fuerth); KONIGSHOFER (anywhere); BERG, WOLF(F),
(Demmelsdorf & Zeckendorf); Shim`on GUTENSTEIN (Bad Homburg ca 1760);
FRENSDORF/ER (anywhere); MAINZER (Lorsch); anyone in Ermreuth or Floss;
GOLDSCHMIDT (B. Homburg, Hessdorf). ALTMANN (Silesia); TIMMENDORFER


Re: Uncle Katzin #southafrica

Ann Rabinowitz <annrab@...>
 

In response to the "Uncle Katzin" inquiry, there was an Abraham William
Katzen, born Plunge, September 25, 1889, son of Isaac and Sara Katzen. He
married Phoebe Stusser. He had a son Arnold Katzen, born 1917, and a
daughter. Although this is a KATZEN rather than a KATZIN family, they may
possibly be another branch as this family is also >from Plunge as was the
family of Adam Yamey's gggrandmother Etta Katzin.

Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@bellsouth.net


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica RE: Uncle Katzin #southafrica

Ann Rabinowitz <annrab@...>
 

In response to the "Uncle Katzin" inquiry, there was an Abraham William
Katzen, born Plunge, September 25, 1889, son of Isaac and Sara Katzen. He
married Phoebe Stusser. He had a son Arnold Katzen, born 1917, and a
daughter. Although this is a KATZEN rather than a KATZIN family, they may
possibly be another branch as this family is also >from Plunge as was the
family of Adam Yamey's gggrandmother Etta Katzin.

Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@bellsouth.net