Date   

Wislica: JRI-Poland / Polish State Archives project update #general

S. Javinsky
 

The indexing of the Jewish vital records of Wislica is complete. Wislica
is a town in the former Kielce guberniya (coordinates 5021,2041) and is
located about 36 miles south of Kielce. The Wislica records cover the
years 1849, 1865, 1878/1886. There are 798 records in this database: 276
births, 278 marriages (139 brides, 139 grooms), and 244 deaths.

These indexes were created by Jewish Records Indexing - Poland's data entry
team in Warsaw, who transcribed the index entries >from the original Polish
and Cyrillic. The most common surnames in these records are: BAUM, FLAUM,
NISENBAUM, OKSENCHENDLER, OSTROWICZ, PILCZ, PRAJS, and TOPER.

A complete list of the surnames found in the Wislica records will soon be
linked to the Pinczow PSA status page at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/psa/psastat1.htm#Pinczow

If you are interested in any of these surnames or in how to help bring this
project to fruition, please contact me at the e-mail address below.

I would like to thank Stanley Diamond and all those involved with JRI-
Poland and their data entry team for their work on this project. Without
JRI-Poland, records >from dozens of towns like Wislica would remain very
difficult for researchers to access.

Susan Javinsky
Town Leader: Dzialoszyce, Pacanow, Wislica
Archive Coordinator: Pinczow PSA project
Ottawa, Canada
mailto: SusanLittleDVM@compuserve.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Wislica: JRI-Poland / Polish State Archives project update #general

S. Javinsky
 

The indexing of the Jewish vital records of Wislica is complete. Wislica
is a town in the former Kielce guberniya (coordinates 5021,2041) and is
located about 36 miles south of Kielce. The Wislica records cover the
years 1849, 1865, 1878/1886. There are 798 records in this database: 276
births, 278 marriages (139 brides, 139 grooms), and 244 deaths.

These indexes were created by Jewish Records Indexing - Poland's data entry
team in Warsaw, who transcribed the index entries >from the original Polish
and Cyrillic. The most common surnames in these records are: BAUM, FLAUM,
NISENBAUM, OKSENCHENDLER, OSTROWICZ, PILCZ, PRAJS, and TOPER.

A complete list of the surnames found in the Wislica records will soon be
linked to the Pinczow PSA status page at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl/psa/psastat1.htm#Pinczow

If you are interested in any of these surnames or in how to help bring this
project to fruition, please contact me at the e-mail address below.

I would like to thank Stanley Diamond and all those involved with JRI-
Poland and their data entry team for their work on this project. Without
JRI-Poland, records >from dozens of towns like Wislica would remain very
difficult for researchers to access.

Susan Javinsky
Town Leader: Dzialoszyce, Pacanow, Wislica
Archive Coordinator: Pinczow PSA project
Ottawa, Canada
mailto: SusanLittleDVM@compuserve.com


Re: Death certificate not a primary source of birth information #general

Dottie Miller
 

Dear Genners:

Another anecdote re: death certificates as a source of primary
information--When I obtained the death certificate of a gggrandmother,
Caroline MEYER, her place of birth was a phonetic spelling of a town,
Goersdorf, France . While I have not yet found a record of her birth on
25 June 1827, the knowledge that she was known to her family as having
come >from Goersdorf narrows the search and fits with family lore. Her
parents, Simon and Helena MEYER, were said to have been notable for
walking to synagogue >from some distance away, well into advanced old
age. There was a synagogue in Goersdorf during their lifetime. I have
been told that 4 or 5 km is a likely notable but possible distance.
There is a website, http://cdip.com/cv/ , that provides the perimeter
towns; the viewer chooses the distance. While I am going to contact all
the mairies at the 5km perimeter, I would not have any hope of "finding"
this ancestor's birthplace or confirmation of her parents' names and,
hopefully, their paretnage, dates and birthplaces if it weren't for the
birthplace on her death certificate supplied by her daughter. ( of
course, if anyone has any thoughts on finding Caroline's record of
birth, I would truly welcome any unconventional suggestions. I have
tried all the conventional ones.)

Thanks!

Dottie J. Miller
San Antonio, TX

MEYER
GUGENHEIM (Breisach, Baden, Germany, New Orleans, LA, USA)
DREYFUS (Duppigheim and Brumath, Bas-Rhin, France)
WEIL (Bretten and Eichstetten, Baden, Germany)
GERNSBACHER (Buhl, Baden, Germany) BIGART (Gerstheim, Bas-Rhin, France)
BRANDEIS (Bretten, Baden, Germany) SEREINSKY (Ukraine)


Sons with fathers name #general

Nachum <nachum@...>
 

Dear List,

Deborah has posed, what I think to be an interesting question, although it
probably wasn't her intention . Can one assume that her ancestor
Jankel-Schmul was the son of Schmul. I ask this based on her reporting
that Jankel-Schmul was born around 1849, long after Jews took last names.
I wrote her and said I wouldn't make that assumption. I would keep it in
my list of theories to try to prove.

I'd also like to ask if anyone has any proof, other than non-Jewish
sources, that the middle name being the fathers name was actually used for
any purpose other than identification. In other words, if Avraham
Yitzchak son of Yaakov was Avraham Yitzchak Yaakov for id purposes, and
I'm purposely giving him a middle name, what name appears on his Ketubah
(marriage contract) or grave stone. Hopefully someone has a Ketubah or
picture of a grave stone for someone with these circumstances. Was he
Avraham Yitzchak ben Yaakov, or Avraham Yitzchak Yaakov ben Yaacov. (Next
time I'll choose shorter names.)


Nachum Tuchman
Tekoa, Israel

-----Original Message-----
From: Deborah.Scheimer@alltel.com [mailto:Deborah.Scheimer@alltel.com]

By the way, thank you to everyone posting answers to questions in this
discussion group. Since this ancestor's name is Jankel-Schmul, I now
know that his father's name was probably Schmul. Not that that helps me
at all yet, but it's great to know!

Deborah SCHEIMER, deborah.scheimer@alltel.com


Searching HELLMAN, Max/Mordechai, Mary/Miriam #general

Rlberliner@...
 

I am still trying to help my cousin find his grandfather, Max HELLMAN. We
believe he was born in Russia or Prussia. He had a sister who was known as
Mary but her Hebrew name could have been Miriam. Max' Hebrew name was
probably Mordechai.

We know Max married Annie JACOBS >from Poznan who immigrated to London and
then to the U.S. >from 1879 to 1882. She lived in Baltimore and we believe
married there and she and Max later moved to Brooklyn and the Bronx in NY.
Their first child was Abraham Joseph HELLMAN, born in 1889 in Baltimore.
They had 6 living children.

I have received replies >from wonderful genners with suggestions of
searching the 1910,1920 and 1930 census. One was even kind enough to
search for us and she did, in fact, find this family on the 1910 census
herself and forward the information.

This continued search is to try to find Max's country of origin and obtain
a birth certificate, in addition to checking with Baltimore, MD to find a
marriage license. There is that possibility that with Baltimore being so
Yiddishkite, and the family being Orthodox, that they got married in the
synagogue, probably Aitz Chaim which included Annie's parents, Joseph and
Rachel, as among the founders. They may not even have gotten a civil
marriage license, but we hope they did. Aitz is now defunct but we are
checking records in the Baltimore Jewish Archives and History Museum.

If any of these names appear on your family tree, or are familiar to you
in any way, please contact me privately. It will be greatly appreciated.

Many thanks,
Rachelle Leaf Berliner
Savannah, GA
rlberliner@aol.com


death cert. info. #general

HENKEN9@...
 

Genners,

Steve Snyder poses some questions in his follow up to Gloria Bailey's
posting on family info provided on a death cert. Steve did not mention
in which jurisdiction the death occurred. The certs. I accumulated >from
NYC have the family informant sign, but I suspect that may not be the case
everywhere and at all times. And I can imagine a scenario with 2 or 3
family members present when the info is provided, each with varying family
history knowledge.

The other tidbit on the death cert. that could be of assistance is the
name of the funeral home. If they're still in business, their records
would indicate who made the arrangements and would be a possible source
for the family info.

Ty Henken
Centennial, Colo.
Henken9@aol.com


Re: NY area cemeteries #general

RAWhite123@...
 

Anita,
I have been to Washington Cemetery in Brooklyn to visit the graves of my
GGrandparents. I called first to confirm and ascertain the location of
their graves.

You will need to visit the office when you get there to get directions
to the plots. The cemetery is spread over a large area and they will give
you a map and directions. The office is not well marked, but is across
the street >from a main portion of the cemetery - there are also a number
of graves (much smaller) where the office is located.

Good luck.

Roberta White


<<I recently spent two very productive days at the NYC Municipal Archives
on Chambers Street, where I was able to find the death certificates of
some of our ancestors. The death certificates tell where they are
buried. I would next like to visit the cemetaries but have never done
this before and so could use some advice to make this a productive trip.>>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Death certificate not a primary source of birth information #general

Dottie Miller
 

Dear Genners:

Another anecdote re: death certificates as a source of primary
information--When I obtained the death certificate of a gggrandmother,
Caroline MEYER, her place of birth was a phonetic spelling of a town,
Goersdorf, France . While I have not yet found a record of her birth on
25 June 1827, the knowledge that she was known to her family as having
come >from Goersdorf narrows the search and fits with family lore. Her
parents, Simon and Helena MEYER, were said to have been notable for
walking to synagogue >from some distance away, well into advanced old
age. There was a synagogue in Goersdorf during their lifetime. I have
been told that 4 or 5 km is a likely notable but possible distance.
There is a website, http://cdip.com/cv/ , that provides the perimeter
towns; the viewer chooses the distance. While I am going to contact all
the mairies at the 5km perimeter, I would not have any hope of "finding"
this ancestor's birthplace or confirmation of her parents' names and,
hopefully, their paretnage, dates and birthplaces if it weren't for the
birthplace on her death certificate supplied by her daughter. ( of
course, if anyone has any thoughts on finding Caroline's record of
birth, I would truly welcome any unconventional suggestions. I have
tried all the conventional ones.)

Thanks!

Dottie J. Miller
San Antonio, TX

MEYER
GUGENHEIM (Breisach, Baden, Germany, New Orleans, LA, USA)
DREYFUS (Duppigheim and Brumath, Bas-Rhin, France)
WEIL (Bretten and Eichstetten, Baden, Germany)
GERNSBACHER (Buhl, Baden, Germany) BIGART (Gerstheim, Bas-Rhin, France)
BRANDEIS (Bretten, Baden, Germany) SEREINSKY (Ukraine)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Sons with fathers name #general

Nachum <nachum@...>
 

Dear List,

Deborah has posed, what I think to be an interesting question, although it
probably wasn't her intention . Can one assume that her ancestor
Jankel-Schmul was the son of Schmul. I ask this based on her reporting
that Jankel-Schmul was born around 1849, long after Jews took last names.
I wrote her and said I wouldn't make that assumption. I would keep it in
my list of theories to try to prove.

I'd also like to ask if anyone has any proof, other than non-Jewish
sources, that the middle name being the fathers name was actually used for
any purpose other than identification. In other words, if Avraham
Yitzchak son of Yaakov was Avraham Yitzchak Yaakov for id purposes, and
I'm purposely giving him a middle name, what name appears on his Ketubah
(marriage contract) or grave stone. Hopefully someone has a Ketubah or
picture of a grave stone for someone with these circumstances. Was he
Avraham Yitzchak ben Yaakov, or Avraham Yitzchak Yaakov ben Yaacov. (Next
time I'll choose shorter names.)


Nachum Tuchman
Tekoa, Israel

-----Original Message-----
From: Deborah.Scheimer@alltel.com [mailto:Deborah.Scheimer@alltel.com]

By the way, thank you to everyone posting answers to questions in this
discussion group. Since this ancestor's name is Jankel-Schmul, I now
know that his father's name was probably Schmul. Not that that helps me
at all yet, but it's great to know!

Deborah SCHEIMER, deborah.scheimer@alltel.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching HELLMAN, Max/Mordechai, Mary/Miriam #general

Rlberliner@...
 

I am still trying to help my cousin find his grandfather, Max HELLMAN. We
believe he was born in Russia or Prussia. He had a sister who was known as
Mary but her Hebrew name could have been Miriam. Max' Hebrew name was
probably Mordechai.

We know Max married Annie JACOBS >from Poznan who immigrated to London and
then to the U.S. >from 1879 to 1882. She lived in Baltimore and we believe
married there and she and Max later moved to Brooklyn and the Bronx in NY.
Their first child was Abraham Joseph HELLMAN, born in 1889 in Baltimore.
They had 6 living children.

I have received replies >from wonderful genners with suggestions of
searching the 1910,1920 and 1930 census. One was even kind enough to
search for us and she did, in fact, find this family on the 1910 census
herself and forward the information.

This continued search is to try to find Max's country of origin and obtain
a birth certificate, in addition to checking with Baltimore, MD to find a
marriage license. There is that possibility that with Baltimore being so
Yiddishkite, and the family being Orthodox, that they got married in the
synagogue, probably Aitz Chaim which included Annie's parents, Joseph and
Rachel, as among the founders. They may not even have gotten a civil
marriage license, but we hope they did. Aitz is now defunct but we are
checking records in the Baltimore Jewish Archives and History Museum.

If any of these names appear on your family tree, or are familiar to you
in any way, please contact me privately. It will be greatly appreciated.

Many thanks,
Rachelle Leaf Berliner
Savannah, GA
rlberliner@aol.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen death cert. info. #general

HENKEN9@...
 

Genners,

Steve Snyder poses some questions in his follow up to Gloria Bailey's
posting on family info provided on a death cert. Steve did not mention
in which jurisdiction the death occurred. The certs. I accumulated >from
NYC have the family informant sign, but I suspect that may not be the case
everywhere and at all times. And I can imagine a scenario with 2 or 3
family members present when the info is provided, each with varying family
history knowledge.

The other tidbit on the death cert. that could be of assistance is the
name of the funeral home. If they're still in business, their records
would indicate who made the arrangements and would be a possible source
for the family info.

Ty Henken
Centennial, Colo.
Henken9@aol.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: NY area cemeteries #general

RAWhite123@...
 

Anita,
I have been to Washington Cemetery in Brooklyn to visit the graves of my
GGrandparents. I called first to confirm and ascertain the location of
their graves.

You will need to visit the office when you get there to get directions
to the plots. The cemetery is spread over a large area and they will give
you a map and directions. The office is not well marked, but is across
the street >from a main portion of the cemetery - there are also a number
of graves (much smaller) where the office is located.

Good luck.

Roberta White


<<I recently spent two very productive days at the NYC Municipal Archives
on Chambers Street, where I was able to find the death certificates of
some of our ancestors. The death certificates tell where they are
buried. I would next like to visit the cemetaries but have never done
this before and so could use some advice to make this a productive trip.>>


Zamosc #general

Dan Oberrotman <danielo@...>
 

Some of my family came >from Zamosc, Poland, and I am trying to find anyone
who might still be living who was part of the Jewish community there
before the war. Any ideas for how I could locate such people? Thank you.

Dan


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Zamosc #general

Dan Oberrotman <danielo@...>
 

Some of my family came >from Zamosc, Poland, and I am trying to find anyone
who might still be living who was part of the Jewish community there
before the war. Any ideas for how I could locate such people? Thank you.

Dan


Need help with Romanian translation (ViewMate) #general

Robert Mandelbaum
 

I've just received a short letter in Romanian >from the man at the Town
Hall of my ancestral town (Saveni) who has been researching the town's
records for me. I've posted the letter to the JewishGen ViewMate web site
at <http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/toview.html>. The particular file
number of my letter is VM1313, which can be accessed directly by going to
<http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/source/vm1313.html>. Would anyone
be willing and able to translate this for me? Any help would be greatly
appreciated. Please e-mail any responses directly to me at
rmandelbau@aol.com.

Thank you very much,
Robert Mandelbaum
New York, New York
rmandelbau@aol.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Need help with Romanian translation (ViewMate) #general

Robert Mandelbaum
 

I've just received a short letter in Romanian >from the man at the Town
Hall of my ancestral town (Saveni) who has been researching the town's
records for me. I've posted the letter to the JewishGen ViewMate web site
at <http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/toview.html>. The particular file
number of my letter is VM1313, which can be accessed directly by going to
<http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ALL/source/vm1313.html>. Would anyone
be willing and able to translate this for me? Any help would be greatly
appreciated. Please e-mail any responses directly to me at
rmandelbau@aol.com.

Thank you very much,
Robert Mandelbaum
New York, New York
rmandelbau@aol.com


Rebbe Elimelech's Mausoleum #rabbinic

Asher Bar-Zev <barzev@...>
 

I know that an ohel or mausoleum building has been erected over the
grave of the Rebbe Elimelech of Lezajsk in that town in Poland.

I am most anxious to acquire a photo of the ohel. If anyone has a
photo of that ohel, I would greatly appreciate receiving it as an
attachment to an email. (I can read any photo format readable by
Adobe Photoshop). Alternatively, any information as to where such a
photo is published (books, magazine articles, etc.) would also be
greatly appreciated.

Private replies are welcome.

Asher Bar-Zev


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Rebbe Elimelech's Mausoleum #rabbinic

Asher Bar-Zev <barzev@...>
 

I know that an ohel or mausoleum building has been erected over the
grave of the Rebbe Elimelech of Lezajsk in that town in Poland.

I am most anxious to acquire a photo of the ohel. If anyone has a
photo of that ohel, I would greatly appreciate receiving it as an
attachment to an email. (I can read any photo format readable by
Adobe Photoshop). Alternatively, any information as to where such a
photo is published (books, magazine articles, etc.) would also be
greatly appreciated.

Private replies are welcome.

Asher Bar-Zev


Benjamin LEVITZ #general

Rena and Alan Steinfeld <poohtoes@...>
 

Benjamin LEVITZ was born in Russia circa 1900 and came to the US circa
1915. He married Rose YOSELOWITZ. Benjamin had a sister name Sarah who
married a Mr. Goldman. Benjamin and Sarah's father was Beryl Mayer LEVITZ.

Looking for any contacts.

Alan Steinfeld
Scarsdale, NY


Learning to read Hebrew #general

MBernet@...
 

The ability to read Hebrew--even just to decipher the letters--is a great
asset to anyone engaged in Jewish genealogy.

The National Jewish Outreach Program teaches Hebrew reading in four or
five session, I believe without charge. Lessons are usually schedule for
the period before Passover and the period before the Jewish New Year, and
take place at hundreds of locations simultaneously. They will probably be
starting a new series about now. You can find them at www.njop.org, or
call 1-800-44-HEBRE.

My only connection with NJOP is that some of my friends learned to read
Hebrew through their program, and that I make occasional small donations
to them (which means that I get various mailings). I believe there is no
charge for the Hebrew courses

Michael Bernet, New York