Date   

ROZZIN / ROSEN from Minsk region #belarus #usa

Tammy
 

Hello,
I am searching for a "needle in a haystack" and am hoping that some networking may help.

I am searching for the man in the attached immigration record, line 17. His name upon arrival was:
Mordukh ROZZIN age 24 from Minsk. He was a tailor and his immigration sponsor was his cousin, Zorach WISHNEFSKY 366 Cherry Street, New York, NY. He arrived at the Port of New York on March 6, 1905 on the ship named "Caronia" that left Liverpool on February 25, 1905.

This is the only information I have. Perhaps someone else has this individual on their tree.

Thank you in advance to anyone who can help me find out more information about this individual.

Tammy Weingarten
searching: RABINOWITZ, WISHNEFSKY, CHERNIN, GRUBIN, PHENES, ROZZIN from Minsk region


Re: magazine article on restoration of Eastern European Jewish cemeteries #general

Dan Oren
 

The author of this article made a number of journalistic errors as it highlighted the important work of a good number of people in a good number of places in Eastern Europe. Please make sure to read Myrna Teck's letter to the editor in response to the article as well. The link is <https://www.bnaibrith.org/uploads/1/1/6/9/116999275/-letteronly2_unfinishedbusiness_2020bbm_winter_24.pdf>. Those who wish to read more about the ongoing work in towns mentioned in the article such as Goniądz or towns anywhere else in Poland not mentioned in the article are encouraged to read more at <jewishheritagepoland.org>.
--
Dan A. Oren
Friends of Jewish Heritage in Poland
info@...


Re: Good New Tool: Thru Lines on Ancestry #general #announcements #dna #education

mandy.molava@...
 

I spoke with Ancestry about someone on my throughlines and who'd done their tree also, they put the wrong relation in their tree and so it made mine appear wrong when in fact I'm the decendant so I would know!... Ancestry told me to reach out to this person to let them know it wasn't correct. I think this needs to be changed by Ancestry, I know it's in small print somewhere that it may not be 100% much like our matches on there, but this can offend. 

Mandy Molava 
Researching mainly Krakow Russia Brest Slovakia 


Iso KAIDAN surname #general #names

janice kaidan
 

 
We have hit a longstanding brick wall in our search for relatives of my grandfather Leo/Aryeh Leib Kaidan and/or his wife Chana/Chane/Annie Zekcer (sp.?). Leo was born in 1877. Is anyone familiar with this surname? Can anyone help us find extended family?
Many thanks and all the best.
Janice kaidan 
 
 
Sent via the Samsung Galaxy, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone
 


Re: Help with extra person mentioned in Slutsk Chevra Kadisha record #belarus #records

nordell7@...
 

I believe the general practice in the Slutsk cemetary was to bury men in the men's section and women the women's section, wherever there was the next space.  In the one case I have seen in my family where a man was buried next to his brother in law, that relationship was stated in the Chevra Kedisha record (these are the husbands of my great grandmother's two sisters):

2650. On Friday the eve of the holy day of Shabat the ninth day of Tamuz (21 June 1907) passed away the elderly mh"r r' Y' LEIB the son of M' SHMUEL LIFSHITS IVANER and he rests by his brother-in-law mh"r ELIYAHU who passed away on the seventh day of the aforementioned Adar (21 February 1907) row "six" by the "geonim" to the town side.

In cases where no relationship is stated I think the working assumption is there was no family relationship.

Larry Nordell
nordell7@...


American Religious Ecologies Digitizes 1926 Census of Religious Bodies #usa #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

 

 

 

The American Religious Ecologies (ARE) is a project of the Roy Rozenzweig Center for History and New Media located at George Mason University and supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities. They are digitizing the 1926 U.S. Census of Religious Bodies which has individual schedules for approximately 232,000 congregations. The American Religious Ecologies documents and maps denominational choices and studies why certain groups thrive in particular places and how they were divided by race and social class. Did cities, towns, and rural areas feature meaningful religious pluralism and diversity, or were they dominated by some particular religious group?  The American Religious Ecologies project is creating new datasets from historical sources and new ways of visualizing them so that we can better understand the history of American religion. The website can be accessed at: https://omeka.religiousecologies.org/s/census-1926/page/home

 

The 1926 US Census of Religious Bodies

 

Prior to the Congressionally-created Census Bureau in 1902, the US government collected data about houses of worship as part of its decennial population census. After the Bureau of Census became a permanent agency, it authorized to undertake a separate decennial survey of “religious bodies”.  Every ten years from 1906 to 1946, the U.S. Census Bureau surveyed congregations, synagogues, and other religious groups in the United States.

 

While the Census Bureau published summary reports from that data, the forms (or schedules) filled out by each congregation have not been widely used. Only the schedules from the 1926 Census survive, housed in a collection at the National Archives and Records Administration in Washington, DC.

 

They contain a wealth of information about each congregation, including its membership by age and sex, its expenditures on buildings and missions, its clergy’s  name and whether he or she had gone to seminary, and its denominational affiliation, which the Census Bureau cataloged into 213 different groups. The schedules also include the location of the congregations, usually by county and city or town, and in many cases the street address as well.

 

The Census Bureau asked for three different kinds of location information on the schedules they collected from religious bodies, and it kept track of a fourth.

 

The first is the state and county of each congregation, contained in schedule fields (e) and (f). As a part of cataloging of schedules, this information has been recorded in the American Religious Ecologies database, and you can use this page to find schedules from every denomination in a particular location.

The Census Bureau also kept track of the name of the “city, town, village, or township” in field (d). This information contains the name of the populated place nearest to the congregation. The Census Bureau also asked for the mailing address of the person who filled out the form in the lower right. Sometimes, but not always, this contains the street address of the congregation’s meeting place. Finally, the Census Bureau classified a congregation as urban if it was located in a place with a population of at least 2,500, and otherwise as rural.

 

On the URL, https://omeka.religiousecologies.org/s/census-1926/page/home,  there are databases where one can find schedules by state and count, location of schedules on their map for the top 25 by denomination and top 25 by County, find schedules by state and county and more.

 

The Census Bureau used the terms “bodies” and “denominations” synonymously, to signify religious organizations or groupings that included more than one local religious congregation.

 

In so doing, the Bureau adopted a Protestant American concept of what religious groups look like. As the historian Sidney Mead explained, a denomination is “a voluntary association of like-hearted and like-minded individuals, who are united on the basis of common beliefs for the purpose of accomplishing tangible and defined objectives.” In the American context, denominations sometimes competed with one another for members and influence, but groups such as the Presbyterians, the Methodists, and the Baptists acknowledged one another as branches of genuine Christianity. The Census Bureau then assumed that the institutional model followed by Presbyterians, Methodists, and Baptists was universal. Not all religious groups fit into the American model of denominationalism. While Census Bureau officials were aware of these fundamental differences in the ways that Americans understood their religious identities and affiliations, they classified everything from the “Roman Catholic Church" to the “Salvation Army” to the “Disciples of Christ” as “denominations.”

 

However, in order to help researchers better navigate the schedules of the census, The ARE project has adopted the “Religious Groups” or families created by the Association of Religion Data Archives (ARDA). The ARDA’s taxonomy of religious families includes the categories “Pentecostal” and “Holiness,” leaves fewer denominations uncategorized, and arranges denominations into fewer families.

 

If you are seeking the schedules of a particular denomination, select its denominational family and then select the individual denomination. If you are unsure where to locate a particular denomination, consult the ARDA Religious Groups, and check for uncategorized denominations in “Other Groups.”  https://www.thearda.com/denoms/families/groups.asp

 

For example for Judaism go to: https://www.thearda.com/denoms/families/F_106.asp and for Jewish Congregations go to: https://www.thearda.com/denoms/D_1210.asp. One can look at the information of denominational profile, trends, member profile, related surveys and more for each of the different religions.

 

Jewish Congregations

The list of Jewish Congregations and members for 1926 can be viewed at:

https://omeka.religiousecologies.org/files/original/401b6d83bfa186d91dcea984d9b08a1ea83d395a.pdf

 

Their website https://religiousecologies.org/ depicts a 1910 photograph from the Library of Congress of Congregation Sha’arai Shomayim, Mobile, Alabama. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Jan Meisels Allen

Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

 


magazine article on restoration of Eastern European Jewish cemeteries #general

Renee Steinig
 

Thank you to Phyllis Nierel Simon for sharing an interesting article in the Winter 2020 issue of B'nai B'rith Magazine (https://www.bnaibrith.org/2020-winter-bnai-brith-magazine.html).

The article, "Unfinished Business: Restoring Eastern Europe’s Desecrated Jewish Cemeteries," describes a number of organizations that are working to restore cemeteries:
 
- ESJF (European Jewish Cemetery Initiative)
- FODZ (Foundation for Preservation of Jewish Heritage in Poland)
- Matzevah Foundation
- Avoyseinu (Heritage Foundation for Preservation of Jewish Cemeteries)
 
as well as several groups focused on individual towns.

Towns that are mentioned: 

Goniadz, Milejczyce, and Przerosl, Poland
Huklyvyi and Rohaytn, Ukraine 
 
It was nice to see the names of some genealogy friends as well!

Renee

Renee Stern Steinig
Dix Hills NY
genmaven@...
 


film of deportation of Jews from Makow #general

Paul Silverstone
 

A distant cousin of mine who was a child during WWII and who was taken
away from his home in 1939 (age 6), reported having seen a film showing
Jews being deported from Makow Mazowiecki, and seeing his grandfather in
it. This may be a kid thinking he saw what he expected to see.
My question, does anyone know about such a film. Where would I look to
find such a film, if it exists.
--
Paul Silverstone
West Vancouver, BC

see: www.paulsilverstone.com


Re: Sephardic instruments popular in Bodrum and Rhodes #sephardic #general

Leon Taranto
 

I am Rhodesli, and from Atlanta. My mother had an uncle, born in the 1880s in Izmir, who played a pear-shaped string instrument, an oud, which is of Middle Eastern origin. It variously has from 9-10 to about 13 strings. Since the Jewish community of Rhodes was, before the island’s transfer to Italy in 1912, very closely connected to the much larger community of Izmir, the oud might have been popular also on Rhodes. HIs mother, by the way, was from Rhodes, from a Capelluto-Alhadeff family. My mother’s family is largely from Izmir, and before that from Rhodes. My father’s family, similarly and conversely, is largely from Rhodes, and before that from Izmir.

Leon Taranto
Rockville, MD


Death registration in 1916 Warsaw. Where would I locate a "street map" to locate the addresses? #warsaw

Our Jewish Family History Research
 

Hi all:
I am posting information from a translated Warsaw death registration. I am hoping that one of our fellow members would kindly share where I may locate those 
addresses. In particular, House #670  is most important for my research. No street name?

Here it is:
Death registration took place in Warsaw in the 
Powązki, fifth precinct, on March 11, 1916
-Date of death:  March 10, 1916
-Place of death: House # 670

Witnesses:
-Gersh Zilberstein, a tradesman, an adult living at 1 Bayun Street in Warsaw,
appeared in the presence of an adult witness -Nuson Moore, a house manager living in house number 8 in Warsaw.

Many thanks in advance.
Best,
Jacqueline GRUSZECKI
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Researching: GRUSZECKI/GRUSZECKA from Warsaw and possibly Kotłówka,  Zelechow
 
 
 
Sent from my Galaxy
 


Naturalization record index cards #records

Bob Silverstein
 

How can I use the naturalization record card to find the naturalization petition and related documents?

Thanks, --
Bob Silverstein
bobsilverstein@...
Elk Grove Village, IL

Researching Kaplan (Krynki, Poland) Tzipershteyn (Logishin, Pinsk, Belarus), Friedson/Fridzon (Motol, Cuba, Massachusetts), Israel and Goodman (Mishnitz, Warsaw, Manchester).


Re: Deciphering Gravestone #translation

Mark A. Roseman <rosemanlawoffice@...>
 

Can anyone recommend photo editing software to make it easier to read a tombstone? I understand that such software exists.--
Mark Roseman


Re: Naturalization Papers #records

jbonline1111@...
 

She stated that she needs it for dual citizenship; hence the need for certification.
--
Barbara Sloan
Conway, SC


Re: Help with extra person mentioned in Slutsk Chevra Kadisha record #belarus #records

jbonline1111@...
 

Is this cemetery still actively managed? If so, is it possible to ask the cemetery for information about this Abraham?  Alternatively, is it possible to search various cemetery databases? I quickly searched dead fred without results, but there are others.
--
Barbara Sloan
Conway, SC


Re: another Louis Koshkin question #translation

Susan&David
 

Does not look like but sounds like Chernigov
http://www.fallingrain.com/world/UP/02/Chernihiv.html

David Rosen
Boston, MA

On 12/28/2020 1:32 PM, Lee Jaffe wrote:
This list has been so helpful with interpreting some of the details from my great-great-grandfather's gravestone, that I'd ask for help with an entry from his manifest record.  

On the manifest record for Lieb and Stische Koschkin (SS Campania arrived 8 Sept 1906), they report their hometown but I can't make out what is written. It looks like Zernign but I can't find any location that aligns with that name. A lot depends on how you read the initial letter – probably a Z but possibly a J or even a B, based on other examples on the page. For many other Koschkin family members, they report their hometown as Snovsk (Ukraine) or other towns in the Chernigov region, so I've focused my search in that area. JewishGen's Town Finder and Gazetteer provide no options for this name. I also posted this question to Tracing the Tribe in April 2019 and some guesses are "Zernig" (where is that?) or a variant of Chernigov. But as I renew my efforts to explore the Koshkin family, I am back to trying to work out some of these details. Any help with identifying the town would be appreciated. Lee Jaffe


ViewMate translation request - Yiddish #translation #yiddish

rzatlin@...
 

I'm requesting a translation of a 3 page letter written in Yiddish. It is on ViewMate at the following addresses:

https://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM89223

https://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM89225

https://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM89226

Please respond using the online ViewMate Form.

Thank you so much for any help.

Roslyn Zatlin
Glen Cove New York 


another Louis Koshkin question #translation

Lee Jaffe
 

This list has been so helpful with interpreting some of the details from my great-great-grandfather's gravestone, that I'd ask for help with an entry from his manifest record.  

On the manifest record for Lieb and Stische Koschkin (SS Campania arrived 8 Sept 1906), they report their hometown but I can't make out what is written. It looks like Zernign but I can't find any location that aligns with that name. A lot depends on how you read the initial letter – probably a Z but possibly a J or even a B, based on other examples on the page. For many other Koschkin family members, they report their hometown as Snovsk (Ukraine) or other towns in the Chernigov region, so I've focused my search in that area. JewishGen's Town Finder and Gazetteer provide no options for this name. I also posted this question to Tracing the Tribe in April 2019 and some guesses are "Zernig" (where is that?) or a variant of Chernigov. But as I renew my efforts to explore the Koshkin family, I am back to trying to work out some of these details. Any help with identifying the town would be appreciated.

Lee Jaffe
RAPPAPORT/KOSHKIN/JOROFF/SCHWARTZ/WEINBLATT


Excellent book about Hungary/WWII for teens and adults #hungary #holocaust

sjgwed@...
 

There is a very good book, YOUNG PEOPLE SPEAK - SURVIVING THE HOLOCAUST IN HUNGARY, edit by Andrew Handler & Susan V. Meschel, 1993 Franklin Watts publ, which contains adults' recollections about their experiences as children. (I found this book in my public library, and subsequently purchased a copy because it contained so much info about Budapest in 1944, which I wrote about, subsequently, in my memoir, BECAUSE OF EVA.) One writer, Peter Bartas (deceased now) wrote "The Brickyard." and described how he was taken to it, north of the city, and how he escaped.
 
He also referred to "Eva the Swede," the nickname given to my late cousin, who in 1944 used her protection under Swedish security to help and save others.
 
Good luck!
Susan J. Gordon


Re: Naturalization Papers #records

rv Kaplan
 

Not following this thread previously, but guessing you'd need it certified if it was for a passport application?

Harvey Kaplan
Glasgow, Scotland 

On Mon, 28 Dec 2020 at 17:28, <m_tobiasiewicz@...> wrote:
Why do you need  it to be certified? It costs more and is not necessary for genealogy research.
--
Maryellen Tobiasiewicz
family from: Bielsko-Biala powiat Poland
Gorlice powiat Poland
Lviv Oblast Ukraine


Picture of Rabbi Jacob DOLGINOS and Rabbi Morris JERUSHALMY #rabbinic

Yonatan Ben-Ari
 

---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Yonatan Ben-Ari <yonibenari@...>
Date: Mon, Dec 21, 2020 at 8:10 PM
Subject: Picture of Rabbi Jacob DOLGINOS and Rabbi Morris JERUSHALMY
To: JewishGen Discussion Group <jewishgen@...>


Several months ago I corresponded with someone regarding
identification of a picture of Rabbi Jacob DOLGINOS (I believe). I
lost the picture, and also the name of the correspondent and have now
found the picture. Would the person contact me again and I will send
him the picture.

TIA

Yoni Ben-Ari, Jerusalem

4921 - 4940 of 658933