Date   

A History of the Grandparents I Never Had #poland

Jean-Pierre Stroweis
 

I'd like to recommend here an interesting book by Ivan Jablonka, A History
of the Grandparents I Never Had (Stanford University Press, 2016). It was
translated >from French where it is a bestseller. For those who read "Konin:
One Man's Quest for a Vanished Jewish Community" by Theo Richmond (1996) or
"The Lost: The Search for Six of Six Millions" by Daniel Mendelsohn (2013),
this is another thorough historical and genealogical research for the
relatives of the author. They came >from Parczew, near Lublin, Poland and
moved to France before WWII. The research is precise and comprehensive. It
uncovers some unusual sources in Poland and on the Holocaust in France. The
author is himself an historian. More details can be obtained from
http://www.sup.org/books/title/?id=25707

For those who can read in French, the original title is "Histoire des
grands-parents que je n'ai pas eus" and it is available in a softcover
(pocket) format.

I have no connection with the author or the publishing company.

Jean-Pierre Stroweis
Jerusalem


JRI Poland #Poland A History of the Grandparents I Never Had #poland

Jean-Pierre Stroweis
 

I'd like to recommend here an interesting book by Ivan Jablonka, A History
of the Grandparents I Never Had (Stanford University Press, 2016). It was
translated >from French where it is a bestseller. For those who read "Konin:
One Man's Quest for a Vanished Jewish Community" by Theo Richmond (1996) or
"The Lost: The Search for Six of Six Millions" by Daniel Mendelsohn (2013),
this is another thorough historical and genealogical research for the
relatives of the author. They came >from Parczew, near Lublin, Poland and
moved to France before WWII. The research is precise and comprehensive. It
uncovers some unusual sources in Poland and on the Holocaust in France. The
author is himself an historian. More details can be obtained from
http://www.sup.org/books/title/?id=25707

For those who can read in French, the original title is "Histoire des
grands-parents que je n'ai pas eus" and it is available in a softcover
(pocket) format.

I have no connection with the author or the publishing company.

Jean-Pierre Stroweis
Jerusalem


JewishGen offers popular class: Independent Study July 10-31 #ciechanow #poland

Nancy Holden
 

JewishGen is offering Independent Study July 10-31. Application required.

If you have a research problem you would love to work on with
individualized instruction...
Set your own project. The instructor will analyze your application data
and help you set goals and objectives for solutions and success.

Independent Study is a way to get a helping hand. We offer a wide range
of problem solving solutions >from techniques to resources.

The JewishGen Forum is a private Internet site through JewishGen/Education
that offers one-on-one instruction and is open 24/7.

Course Description and application: http://www.jewishgen.org/education

Tuition: $200.
Nancy Holden
Email Nancy Holden
nholden@interserv.com


#Ciechanow #Poland JewishGen offers popular class: Independent Study July 10-31 #ciechanow #poland

Nancy Holden
 

JewishGen is offering Independent Study July 10-31. Application required.

If you have a research problem you would love to work on with
individualized instruction...
Set your own project. The instructor will analyze your application data
and help you set goals and objectives for solutions and success.

Independent Study is a way to get a helping hand. We offer a wide range
of problem solving solutions >from techniques to resources.

The JewishGen Forum is a private Internet site through JewishGen/Education
that offers one-on-one instruction and is open 24/7.

Course Description and application: http://www.jewishgen.org/education

Tuition: $200.
Nancy Holden
Email Nancy Holden
nholden@interserv.com


Calling to Bessarabers researchers #bessarabia

Yefim Kogan
 

Hi everybody,

I would like to remind all of you about our Bessarabia related sessions at the conference in Orlando:


Wednesday, July 26,  2:00-3.15pm   Bessarabia/Moldova: Questions and Answers (Pelican 2)
There are many complex questions of geography and history a genealogist, whether a beginner or
an expert, may encounter in the search for family records. Questions may relate to archives,
genealogical records, history, websites, etc. for the region of Bessarabia/Moldova. Yefim Kogan
and Inna Vayner are going to lead this session. Please submit written questions in advance to the
moderator (yefimk@verizon.net). We will choose questions that hold the most interest to the
greatest number of researchers. Audience at the session will be invited to ask questions, too.

Please submit your questions to Yefim Kogan or Inna Vayner. Ask any questions related to
Bessarabia/Moldova region!

Wednesday, July 26, 3.30-4.45pm Bessarabia SIG Progress and the Future (Pelican 2)
The meeting is open to anyone with roots or interest in the region historically known as Bessarabia,
an area now comprising the Moldova Republic and parts of Ukraine. At the end of the 19th century
and before the War, Bessarabia had significant Jewish presence. The Bessarabia SIG was organized
at the end of 2011 to help people in their Bessarabian genealogical research. Here are the topics we
are going to discuss at the meeting: Progress Report; New Projects; Agreement with Miriam Weiner;
Connections with FHL; How Odessa Holocaust Museum helps us; Current connection to Bessarabia
Yefim Kogan and Inna Vayner, Bessarabia SIG Leaders and Coordinators.

We will talk about present and future projects. Questions and good ideas are very welcome.

Please join us (we will lead the sessions via SKYPE).

Ina Vayner, Yefim Kogan
JewishGen Bessarabia SIG Leaders and Coordinators


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia Calling to Bessarabers researchers #bessarabia

Yefim Kogan
 

Hi everybody,

I would like to remind all of you about our Bessarabia related sessions at the conference in Orlando:


Wednesday, July 26,  2:00-3.15pm   Bessarabia/Moldova: Questions and Answers (Pelican 2)
There are many complex questions of geography and history a genealogist, whether a beginner or
an expert, may encounter in the search for family records. Questions may relate to archives,
genealogical records, history, websites, etc. for the region of Bessarabia/Moldova. Yefim Kogan
and Inna Vayner are going to lead this session. Please submit written questions in advance to the
moderator (yefimk@verizon.net). We will choose questions that hold the most interest to the
greatest number of researchers. Audience at the session will be invited to ask questions, too.

Please submit your questions to Yefim Kogan or Inna Vayner. Ask any questions related to
Bessarabia/Moldova region!

Wednesday, July 26, 3.30-4.45pm Bessarabia SIG Progress and the Future (Pelican 2)
The meeting is open to anyone with roots or interest in the region historically known as Bessarabia,
an area now comprising the Moldova Republic and parts of Ukraine. At the end of the 19th century
and before the War, Bessarabia had significant Jewish presence. The Bessarabia SIG was organized
at the end of 2011 to help people in their Bessarabian genealogical research. Here are the topics we
are going to discuss at the meeting: Progress Report; New Projects; Agreement with Miriam Weiner;
Connections with FHL; How Odessa Holocaust Museum helps us; Current connection to Bessarabia
Yefim Kogan and Inna Vayner, Bessarabia SIG Leaders and Coordinators.

We will talk about present and future projects. Questions and good ideas are very welcome.

Please join us (we will lead the sessions via SKYPE).

Ina Vayner, Yefim Kogan
JewishGen Bessarabia SIG Leaders and Coordinators


A History of the Grandparents I Never Had #france

Jean-Pierre Stroweis
 

I'd like to recommend here an interesting book by Ivan Jablonka, A History
of the Grandparents I Never Had (Stanford University Press, 2016). It was
translated >from French where it is a bestseller. For those who read "Konin:
One Man's Quest for a Vanished Jewish Community" by Theo Richmond (1996) or
"The Lost: The Search for Six of Six Millions" by Daniel Mendelsohn (2013),
this is another thorough historical and genealogical research for the
relatives of the author. They came >from Parczew, near Lublin, Poland and
moved to France before WWII. The research is precise and comprehensive. It
uncovers some unusual sources in Poland and on the Holocaust in France. The
author is himself an historian. More details can be obtained from
http://www.sup.org/books/title/?id=25707

For those who can read in French, the original title is "Histoire des
grands-parents que je n'ai pas eus" and it is available in a softcover
(pocket) format.

I have no connection with the author or the publishing company.

Jean-Pierre Stroweis
Jerusalem


French SIG #France A History of the Grandparents I Never Had #france

Jean-Pierre Stroweis
 

I'd like to recommend here an interesting book by Ivan Jablonka, A History
of the Grandparents I Never Had (Stanford University Press, 2016). It was
translated >from French where it is a bestseller. For those who read "Konin:
One Man's Quest for a Vanished Jewish Community" by Theo Richmond (1996) or
"The Lost: The Search for Six of Six Millions" by Daniel Mendelsohn (2013),
this is another thorough historical and genealogical research for the
relatives of the author. They came >from Parczew, near Lublin, Poland and
moved to France before WWII. The research is precise and comprehensive. It
uncovers some unusual sources in Poland and on the Holocaust in France. The
author is himself an historian. More details can be obtained from
http://www.sup.org/books/title/?id=25707

For those who can read in French, the original title is "Histoire des
grands-parents que je n'ai pas eus" and it is available in a softcover
(pocket) format.

I have no connection with the author or the publishing company.

Jean-Pierre Stroweis
Jerusalem


JewishGen offers popular class: Independent Study July 10-31 #yiddish

bounce-3344477-772983@...
 

JewishGen is offering Independent Study July 10-31. Application required.

If you have a research problem you would love to work on with
individualized instruction...
Set your own project. The instructor will analyze your application data
and help you set goals and objectives for solutions and success.

Independent Study is a way to get a helping hand. We offer a wide range
of problem solving solutions >from techniques to resources.

The JewishGen Forum is a private Internet site through JewishGen/Education
that offers one-on-one instruction and is open 24/7.

Course Description and application: http://www.jewishgen.org/education

Tuition: $200.
Nancy Holden
Email Nancy Holden
nholden@interserv.com


Yiddish Theatre and Vadeville #YiddishTheatre JewishGen offers popular class: Independent Study July 10-31 #yiddish

bounce-3344477-772983@...
 

JewishGen is offering Independent Study July 10-31. Application required.

If you have a research problem you would love to work on with
individualized instruction...
Set your own project. The instructor will analyze your application data
and help you set goals and objectives for solutions and success.

Independent Study is a way to get a helping hand. We offer a wide range
of problem solving solutions >from techniques to resources.

The JewishGen Forum is a private Internet site through JewishGen/Education
that offers one-on-one instruction and is open 24/7.

Course Description and application: http://www.jewishgen.org/education

Tuition: $200.
Nancy Holden
Email Nancy Holden
nholden@interserv.com


JewishGen offers popular class: Independent Study July 10-31 #subcarpathia

Nancy Holden
 

JewishGen is offering Independent Study July 10-31. Application required.

If you have a research problem you would love to work on with
individualized instruction...
Set your own project. The instructor will analyze your application data
and help you set goals and objectives for solutions and success.

Independent Study is a way to get a helping hand. We offer a wide range
of problem solving solutions >from techniques to resources.

The JewishGen Forum is a private Internet site through JewishGen/Education
that offers one-on-one instruction and is open 24/7.

Course Description and application: http://www.jewishgen.org/education

Tuition: $200.
Nancy Holden
Email Nancy Holden
nholden@interserv.com


Subcarpathia SIG #Subcarpathia JewishGen offers popular class: Independent Study July 10-31 #subcarpathia

Nancy Holden
 

JewishGen is offering Independent Study July 10-31. Application required.

If you have a research problem you would love to work on with
individualized instruction...
Set your own project. The instructor will analyze your application data
and help you set goals and objectives for solutions and success.

Independent Study is a way to get a helping hand. We offer a wide range
of problem solving solutions >from techniques to resources.

The JewishGen Forum is a private Internet site through JewishGen/Education
that offers one-on-one instruction and is open 24/7.

Course Description and application: http://www.jewishgen.org/education

Tuition: $200.
Nancy Holden
Email Nancy Holden
nholden@interserv.com


JewishGen offers popular class: Independent Study July 10-31 #germany

Nancy Holden
 

JewishGen is offering Independent Study July 10-31. Application required.

If you have a research problem you would love to work on with
individualized instruction...
Set your own project. The instructor will analyze your application data
and help you set goals and objectives for solutions and success.

Independent Study is a way to get a helping hand. We offer a wide range
of problem solving solutions >from techniques to resources.

The JewishGen Forum is a private Internet site through JewishGen/Education
that offers one-on-one instruction and is open 24/7.

Course Description and application: http://www.jewishgen.org/education

Tuition: $200.

Nancy Holden, nholden@interserv.com


German SIG #Germany JewishGen offers popular class: Independent Study July 10-31 #germany

Nancy Holden
 

JewishGen is offering Independent Study July 10-31. Application required.

If you have a research problem you would love to work on with
individualized instruction...
Set your own project. The instructor will analyze your application data
and help you set goals and objectives for solutions and success.

Independent Study is a way to get a helping hand. We offer a wide range
of problem solving solutions >from techniques to resources.

The JewishGen Forum is a private Internet site through JewishGen/Education
that offers one-on-one instruction and is open 24/7.

Course Description and application: http://www.jewishgen.org/education

Tuition: $200.

Nancy Holden, nholden@interserv.com


INTRO - researching ERGAS/COHN from Hamburg, Germany #germany

Jeanne <family@...>
 

Hello GerSiggers!

I think it's best to say I'm a complete and utter novice when it comes
to Jewish German genealogy. I have no knowledge of the times, the
geography, the language, etc., never mind the records! (I am way out of
my comfort zone and experience.)

My native (and only) language is English. When I was (very) young, I
knew some Hebrew and could manage day to day conversations. I can read
Hebrew and use a dictionary -- but don't ask me the meaning of words as
I'm not likely to recall. I can sometimes muddle my way through picking
out proper names in Yiddish but Ladino is far easier for me. I just read
it out loud and my sister (who speaks Spanish) is usually able to
translate!

By now, given my prior allusions, you are probably wondering what I'm
doing digging (pun intended) around in Germany.

That answer is somewhat convoluted. It's all my paternal grandmother's
fault, you know, she just had to be the one and only Sephardi in the
family! And if any of you have worked Sephardic genealogy, you know
there are very few accessible records.

What I have found, though, and some of you may already know this, is
that lots of families married within the same lines (never mind
marrying their own aunts/uncles and/or first cousins).

Which is exactly how I ended up here. With a funny newspaper story I
stumbled onto on FultonHistory.com. It was about a woman, Annie Ergas,
who wanted her marriage annulled >from her husband, Maurice Ergas, who
she learned was her uncle the night of her marriage!

I didn't think too much of it until not to long later I stumbled across
a marriage record for my great grandmother -- only she wasn't getting
married to my great grandfather!

To make what is truly a long story (though quite humorous in it's own
right), at some point I realized my great-grandmother's wedding date to
this unknown man, occurred on exactly the same date as the
aforementioned wedding, as well as in the same city and performed by the
same Rabbi!

Eventually, I dug up enough corroborating records to be certain the
Annie Ergas was indeed sister to my great grandmother and Maurice Ergas
was their father's brother.

But along the way, I also found a missing connection between my family
and another Ergas family I've been working with off and on since about
1998: Ralph Ergas.

from a letter he had received >from another sister to my
great-grandmother and the little bit he knew about his family, we were
fairly certain we knew where the intersection lay -- but could never
prove it.

Until now. Unfortunately, Ralph has since passed away but I feel like I
still should work his mother's side -- because maybe I'll find a way to
send it on to his kids.

So, what I've learned, in so far as Sephardic genealogy is concerned, I
have to work all lines, including the wives, because the families often
intersect again ... and again ...

This began with Ralph ERGAS and his wife, Marge MAY, both >from Germany,
but met and married in the US.

At this point, if I were to narrow my focus, it would be on the
following:

1) Ralph's father, Nachman Raimund ERGAS: I'd like to determine when he
left Roumania and went to Germany. I'd like to know when he met and
married his wife, Sophia LOEBELL. And whether they had any other
children.

2) Ralph's mother, Gertud COHN: I've found where/when she was deported
to Minsk Ghetto. If possible, I'd like to find out what became of her --
it was one of Ralph's dearest wishes to know what became of his mother.
When he was alive, all he knew was that she disappeared during the
Holocaust sometime in late 1941 or early 1942. In the meantime, I've
identified her parents, a few of their siblings, her grandparents and
next to nothing about them. Eventually, I will probably want to find out
more, but that's not as useful to me in the long run. It would just be
great to have more information for Ralph's children.

Ralph's family:
ERGAS: Hamburg, Germany; Ploesti, Roumania; Monastir, Turkish Ottoman
Empire [Bitola, Macedonia]
COHN: Hamburg, Germany
LOEBELL: Vienna, Austria
MEYER: L=FCneburg, Niedersachsen, Germany
HEFSLEIN & FALK: Germany

Ralph's wife's family:
MAY: Buedingen, Wetteraukreis, Hesse, Germany;
Josbach, Marburg-Biedenkopf, Hesse, Germany
KADDEN: Josbach, Marburg-Biedenkopf, Hesse, Germany

(And this reminds me -- can someone offer a (short?) explanation about
the geographical divisions (e.g. in US: city, state, county, ED/AD) for
about 1880's to 1920 and how it relates to the geography as it's
known/used today?)

**** [MODERATOR NOTE: GerSIG website: Historic and current maps:
http://www.jewishgen.org/GerSIG/resources.htm#maps ]

I suppose it's time for me to "shut up" and "sit down!"

Jeanne Gold, Albany, OR, USA JG# 6106 family@digging4roots.com


German SIG #Germany INTRO - researching ERGAS/COHN from Hamburg, Germany #germany

Jeanne <family@...>
 

Hello GerSiggers!

I think it's best to say I'm a complete and utter novice when it comes
to Jewish German genealogy. I have no knowledge of the times, the
geography, the language, etc., never mind the records! (I am way out of
my comfort zone and experience.)

My native (and only) language is English. When I was (very) young, I
knew some Hebrew and could manage day to day conversations. I can read
Hebrew and use a dictionary -- but don't ask me the meaning of words as
I'm not likely to recall. I can sometimes muddle my way through picking
out proper names in Yiddish but Ladino is far easier for me. I just read
it out loud and my sister (who speaks Spanish) is usually able to
translate!

By now, given my prior allusions, you are probably wondering what I'm
doing digging (pun intended) around in Germany.

That answer is somewhat convoluted. It's all my paternal grandmother's
fault, you know, she just had to be the one and only Sephardi in the
family! And if any of you have worked Sephardic genealogy, you know
there are very few accessible records.

What I have found, though, and some of you may already know this, is
that lots of families married within the same lines (never mind
marrying their own aunts/uncles and/or first cousins).

Which is exactly how I ended up here. With a funny newspaper story I
stumbled onto on FultonHistory.com. It was about a woman, Annie Ergas,
who wanted her marriage annulled >from her husband, Maurice Ergas, who
she learned was her uncle the night of her marriage!

I didn't think too much of it until not to long later I stumbled across
a marriage record for my great grandmother -- only she wasn't getting
married to my great grandfather!

To make what is truly a long story (though quite humorous in it's own
right), at some point I realized my great-grandmother's wedding date to
this unknown man, occurred on exactly the same date as the
aforementioned wedding, as well as in the same city and performed by the
same Rabbi!

Eventually, I dug up enough corroborating records to be certain the
Annie Ergas was indeed sister to my great grandmother and Maurice Ergas
was their father's brother.

But along the way, I also found a missing connection between my family
and another Ergas family I've been working with off and on since about
1998: Ralph Ergas.

from a letter he had received >from another sister to my
great-grandmother and the little bit he knew about his family, we were
fairly certain we knew where the intersection lay -- but could never
prove it.

Until now. Unfortunately, Ralph has since passed away but I feel like I
still should work his mother's side -- because maybe I'll find a way to
send it on to his kids.

So, what I've learned, in so far as Sephardic genealogy is concerned, I
have to work all lines, including the wives, because the families often
intersect again ... and again ...

This began with Ralph ERGAS and his wife, Marge MAY, both >from Germany,
but met and married in the US.

At this point, if I were to narrow my focus, it would be on the
following:

1) Ralph's father, Nachman Raimund ERGAS: I'd like to determine when he
left Roumania and went to Germany. I'd like to know when he met and
married his wife, Sophia LOEBELL. And whether they had any other
children.

2) Ralph's mother, Gertud COHN: I've found where/when she was deported
to Minsk Ghetto. If possible, I'd like to find out what became of her --
it was one of Ralph's dearest wishes to know what became of his mother.
When he was alive, all he knew was that she disappeared during the
Holocaust sometime in late 1941 or early 1942. In the meantime, I've
identified her parents, a few of their siblings, her grandparents and
next to nothing about them. Eventually, I will probably want to find out
more, but that's not as useful to me in the long run. It would just be
great to have more information for Ralph's children.

Ralph's family:
ERGAS: Hamburg, Germany; Ploesti, Roumania; Monastir, Turkish Ottoman
Empire [Bitola, Macedonia]
COHN: Hamburg, Germany
LOEBELL: Vienna, Austria
MEYER: L=FCneburg, Niedersachsen, Germany
HEFSLEIN & FALK: Germany

Ralph's wife's family:
MAY: Buedingen, Wetteraukreis, Hesse, Germany;
Josbach, Marburg-Biedenkopf, Hesse, Germany
KADDEN: Josbach, Marburg-Biedenkopf, Hesse, Germany

(And this reminds me -- can someone offer a (short?) explanation about
the geographical divisions (e.g. in US: city, state, county, ED/AD) for
about 1880's to 1920 and how it relates to the geography as it's
known/used today?)

**** [MODERATOR NOTE: GerSIG website: Historic and current maps:
http://www.jewishgen.org/GerSIG/resources.htm#maps ]

I suppose it's time for me to "shut up" and "sit down!"

Jeanne Gold, Albany, OR, USA JG# 6106 family@digging4roots.com


Announcing the Obermayer German Jewish History Awards for 2018 #germany

Arthur Obermayer <obermayer@...>
 

The Obermayer Foundation, in cooperation with the President of the
Berlin House of Representatives, the Leo Baeck Institute, and GerSIG,
is pleased to announce the Call for Nominations for the 2018 Obermayer
German Jewish History Awards.

In recent decades, many individuals in Germany have raised awareness
of a once-vibrant Jewish history and culture in their communities
through educational programs exhibitions, restoration of synagogues and
cemeteries, installation of Holocaust memorials and Stolpersteine,
genealogical research, development of websites, publications, public
programs, and other activities.

Many have assisted genealogists extensively, and their publications
and research are of great value to us. They have forged meaningful
relationships with former residents and descendants of those who
once lived in their towns.

They are teachers and engineers, publishers and judges, artists and
bankers, lawyers and business executives, and they come >from every
region of the country. These volunteers have devoted countless hours
to such projects. The Obermayer Awards recognize and encourage those
who have been devoted to such activities and bring international attention
to their work. Five awardees are honored each year.

The awards were established in 2000 by Dr. Arthur Obermayer, an American
Jewish businessman and visionary philanthropist who died in January 2016.
Karen Franklin is the president of the awards program.

Previously much of this type of work was done by individuals, but many
Jewish history initiatives supported by organizations have sprung up in
recent years. Awards are now open to organizations and will be presented
to one or two representatives of the organization.

The call for nominations can be obtained at:
http://www.obermayer.us/award/nominate.htm

The deadline for submission is September 12, 2017.

ELIGIBILITY

Awards are presented to non-Jewish Germans living in Germany.

Their contributions are evaluated for public impact, educational
relevance, enduring value. The activities shall not have been done
as part of regular professional work, for monetary reward, or for
fulfillment of an academic requirement. The scope of work outlined
in the profiles of previous recipients may be used as a guideline;
other significant contributions are also welcome.

Many of you previously submitted nominations. Those nominees who
were not successful may be eligible for this year’s awards by submitting
an updated application. Instructions may be found on the Obermayer web site:

http://www.obermayer.us/award/nominate.htm.

The award ceremony will take place in Berlin on January 22, 2018
at the Abgeordnetenhaus, the home of the Berlin Parliament. Travel and
hotel expenses for awardees and their spouses will be covered.

Successful nominators are also invited to attend all of the award
ceremony events in Berlin, where they will meet with the award recipients
they have chosen to honor.

Awardees will receive an honorarium to be used for the furtherance
of their work. The awards receive extensive press coverage in the
awardees' communities, throughout Germany and internationally
(see http://www.obermayer.us/award/news.htm).

If you would like to submit a nomination, additional information,
including the Call for Nominations and profiles of previous award winners and the jury, can be obtained at:

http://www.obermayer.us/award.

You may obtain a hard copy of the Call for Nominations by sending an
email request to: germanaward@gmail.com

or a letter to the:

Obermayer Foundation
15 Grey Stone Path
Dedham, MA 02026 USA

Remember that the deadline for submission of nominations is September 12, 2017.

Betty Solbjor (on behalf of the Obermayer Foundation) Dedham, Mass.


German SIG #Germany Announcing the Obermayer German Jewish History Awards for 2018 #germany

Arthur Obermayer <obermayer@...>
 

The Obermayer Foundation, in cooperation with the President of the
Berlin House of Representatives, the Leo Baeck Institute, and GerSIG,
is pleased to announce the Call for Nominations for the 2018 Obermayer
German Jewish History Awards.

In recent decades, many individuals in Germany have raised awareness
of a once-vibrant Jewish history and culture in their communities
through educational programs exhibitions, restoration of synagogues and
cemeteries, installation of Holocaust memorials and Stolpersteine,
genealogical research, development of websites, publications, public
programs, and other activities.

Many have assisted genealogists extensively, and their publications
and research are of great value to us. They have forged meaningful
relationships with former residents and descendants of those who
once lived in their towns.

They are teachers and engineers, publishers and judges, artists and
bankers, lawyers and business executives, and they come >from every
region of the country. These volunteers have devoted countless hours
to such projects. The Obermayer Awards recognize and encourage those
who have been devoted to such activities and bring international attention
to their work. Five awardees are honored each year.

The awards were established in 2000 by Dr. Arthur Obermayer, an American
Jewish businessman and visionary philanthropist who died in January 2016.
Karen Franklin is the president of the awards program.

Previously much of this type of work was done by individuals, but many
Jewish history initiatives supported by organizations have sprung up in
recent years. Awards are now open to organizations and will be presented
to one or two representatives of the organization.

The call for nominations can be obtained at:
http://www.obermayer.us/award/nominate.htm

The deadline for submission is September 12, 2017.

ELIGIBILITY

Awards are presented to non-Jewish Germans living in Germany.

Their contributions are evaluated for public impact, educational
relevance, enduring value. The activities shall not have been done
as part of regular professional work, for monetary reward, or for
fulfillment of an academic requirement. The scope of work outlined
in the profiles of previous recipients may be used as a guideline;
other significant contributions are also welcome.

Many of you previously submitted nominations. Those nominees who
were not successful may be eligible for this year’s awards by submitting
an updated application. Instructions may be found on the Obermayer web site:

http://www.obermayer.us/award/nominate.htm.

The award ceremony will take place in Berlin on January 22, 2018
at the Abgeordnetenhaus, the home of the Berlin Parliament. Travel and
hotel expenses for awardees and their spouses will be covered.

Successful nominators are also invited to attend all of the award
ceremony events in Berlin, where they will meet with the award recipients
they have chosen to honor.

Awardees will receive an honorarium to be used for the furtherance
of their work. The awards receive extensive press coverage in the
awardees' communities, throughout Germany and internationally
(see http://www.obermayer.us/award/news.htm).

If you would like to submit a nomination, additional information,
including the Call for Nominations and profiles of previous award winners and the jury, can be obtained at:

http://www.obermayer.us/award.

You may obtain a hard copy of the Call for Nominations by sending an
email request to: germanaward@gmail.com

or a letter to the:

Obermayer Foundation
15 Grey Stone Path
Dedham, MA 02026 USA

Remember that the deadline for submission of nominations is September 12, 2017.

Betty Solbjor (on behalf of the Obermayer Foundation) Dedham, Mass.


JewishGen offers popular class: Independent Study July 10-31 #hungary

Nancy Holden
 

JewishGen is offering Independent Study July 10-31. Application required.

If you have a research problem you would love to work on with
individualized instruction...
Set your own project. The instructor will analyze your application data
and help you set goals and objectives for solutions and success.

Independent Study is a way to get a helping hand. We offer a wide range
of problem solving solutions >from techniques to resources.

The JewishGen Forum is a private Internet site through JewishGen/Education
that offers one-on-one instruction and is open 24/7.

Course Description and application: http://www.jewishgen.org/education

Tuition: $200.
Nancy Holden
Email Nancy Holden
nholden@interserv.com


Hungary SIG #Hungary JewishGen offers popular class: Independent Study July 10-31 #hungary

Nancy Holden
 

JewishGen is offering Independent Study July 10-31. Application required.

If you have a research problem you would love to work on with
individualized instruction...
Set your own project. The instructor will analyze your application data
and help you set goals and objectives for solutions and success.

Independent Study is a way to get a helping hand. We offer a wide range
of problem solving solutions >from techniques to resources.

The JewishGen Forum is a private Internet site through JewishGen/Education
that offers one-on-one instruction and is open 24/7.

Course Description and application: http://www.jewishgen.org/education

Tuition: $200.
Nancy Holden
Email Nancy Holden
nholden@interserv.com

52881 - 52900 of 658047