Date   

database of Jewish burials in Louisville, Kentucky #general

Renee Steinig <rsteinig@...>
 

The web site of Herman Meyer and Son Funeral Directors in
Louisville, Kentucky

www.meyerfuneral.com

mentions free lookups in "an extensive data base of all Jewish
burials in Louisville since 1910." The database is not online.
Send requests for information to <sonny@meyerfuneral.com>.

Renee

Renee Steinig
RSteinig@suffolk.lib.ny.us

Nachman Goldwasser <thgold@netvision.net.il> wrote...

looking for information about Michael Dubin
Lived in Louisville Kentucky


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen database of Jewish burials in Louisville, Kentucky #general

Renee Steinig <rsteinig@...>
 

The web site of Herman Meyer and Son Funeral Directors in
Louisville, Kentucky

www.meyerfuneral.com

mentions free lookups in "an extensive data base of all Jewish
burials in Louisville since 1910." The database is not online.
Send requests for information to <sonny@meyerfuneral.com>.

Renee

Renee Steinig
RSteinig@suffolk.lib.ny.us

Nachman Goldwasser <thgold@netvision.net.il> wrote...

looking for information about Michael Dubin
Lived in Louisville Kentucky


Utica #general

Cherie lifton <clifton208@...>
 

Would Steve Axelrod please email me directly at
clifton208@yahoo.com. Thanks.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Utica #general

Cherie lifton <clifton208@...>
 

Would Steve Axelrod please email me directly at
clifton208@yahoo.com. Thanks.


Is This Bill Customary for Genealogical Research? #general

Steve Axelrath <saxelrat@...>
 

Recently, I received a bill for 550 American Dollars for research
performed for us by am Eastern European researcher. I?d like some
feedback as to whether these charges fit within what is customary in the
field.

The researcher charged me for travel and hotel costs. While the prices
charged seem high (the apparent equivalent of American prices), I assume
they are legitimate.

Before performing his work, the researcher stated that we would be
billed $20 for each document found and translated and copied for us. I
thought this was a reasonable charge?.BUT, I assumed that the documents
would describe members of our family.

When the package of research materials arrived, there were 17 documents
from the largish city in question which listed people with the
same?common?last name we were searching for and in the appropriate time
period. BUT? we have no reason to believe that any of these people are
related to us. We were searching for my wife?s great grandfather
Ignatz KAUFMAN, and the researcher seems to have merely sent us birth,
marriage, and death records of all KAUFMANS he could find in that city.
Six or seven of the records were about the same two people.

As we understand the situation, the only reason the researcher had for
copying and translating ("translating" meaning identifying it as a death
record, for example) was that the record included the last name of our
relative. He had no specific reason to believe that any of the
documents referred to our relative or a member of our relative?s
family. >from my point of view, we are being billed $340 for information
that the researcher knew was in no presently documentable way pertinent
to our search for Ignatz Kaufman. Let me repeat that Ignatz Kaufman
lived in a city, not a village. This general Kaufman information is
unlikely to ever provide us a link to my wife?s grandfather.

Questions.
Should my wife and I have understood that we were agreeing to pay for
documents regarding people who had the same last name of our relative
but had no apparent relationship with our relative?
Is this researcher?s billing within the bounds of customary genealogical
research?

Steve Axelrath
Centennial, Colorado


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Is This Bill Customary for Genealogical Research? #general

Steve Axelrath <saxelrat@...>
 

Recently, I received a bill for 550 American Dollars for research
performed for us by am Eastern European researcher. I?d like some
feedback as to whether these charges fit within what is customary in the
field.

The researcher charged me for travel and hotel costs. While the prices
charged seem high (the apparent equivalent of American prices), I assume
they are legitimate.

Before performing his work, the researcher stated that we would be
billed $20 for each document found and translated and copied for us. I
thought this was a reasonable charge?.BUT, I assumed that the documents
would describe members of our family.

When the package of research materials arrived, there were 17 documents
from the largish city in question which listed people with the
same?common?last name we were searching for and in the appropriate time
period. BUT? we have no reason to believe that any of these people are
related to us. We were searching for my wife?s great grandfather
Ignatz KAUFMAN, and the researcher seems to have merely sent us birth,
marriage, and death records of all KAUFMANS he could find in that city.
Six or seven of the records were about the same two people.

As we understand the situation, the only reason the researcher had for
copying and translating ("translating" meaning identifying it as a death
record, for example) was that the record included the last name of our
relative. He had no specific reason to believe that any of the
documents referred to our relative or a member of our relative?s
family. >from my point of view, we are being billed $340 for information
that the researcher knew was in no presently documentable way pertinent
to our search for Ignatz Kaufman. Let me repeat that Ignatz Kaufman
lived in a city, not a village. This general Kaufman information is
unlikely to ever provide us a link to my wife?s grandfather.

Questions.
Should my wife and I have understood that we were agreeing to pay for
documents regarding people who had the same last name of our relative
but had no apparent relationship with our relative?
Is this researcher?s billing within the bounds of customary genealogical
research?

Steve Axelrath
Centennial, Colorado


April meeting #general

Anne Fendrich <fendrich@...>
 

Jewish Genealogical Society of Colorado will have problem-solving panel
to help those who have "come to the end of the road" in their
genealogical endeavors and need to "find a new path." The meeting will
be at Temple Emanuel, First and Forest, at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, April
10.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen April meeting #general

Anne Fendrich <fendrich@...>
 

Jewish Genealogical Society of Colorado will have problem-solving panel
to help those who have "come to the end of the road" in their
genealogical endeavors and need to "find a new path." The meeting will
be at Temple Emanuel, First and Forest, at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, April
10.


Arlene Beare's New Book on Latvian Research #lithuania

MWhippman@...
 

Lots of you with Litvak ancestors will also have intermarriages and other
connections with the area which is now Latvia. If so, Arlene Beare's
practical new guide to researching our Baltic ancestors will be a real boon.

"A Guide to Jewish Genealogy in Latvia and Estonia" ISBN 0-9537669-2-6: No. 3 in the series "Jewish Ancestors?" has just been published by the Jewish Genealogical Society of Great Britain under the general editorship of Rosemary Wenzerul, Chairman, JGSGB Education Committee.

This is an excellent guide for researching your family. Everything is in
one place: background information, addresses, references to the web, sources, practical tips etc etc. This book would have saved me hours of time when I started and as I read through it now I see loads of tips and tricks I hadn't even begun to to think about.

What can I say except WOW! and warmest congratulations. I think I am
required by JewishGen rules to point out I don't have any financial interest in this book, nor does Arlene since the profits are going to the JGSGB. This book is another wonderful example of how far Jewish family history research has come over the last year. Arlene is the President of of the Latvia SIG and I am sure that I join all its members in sending warmest congratulations on this new publication.

Constance Whippman


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Arlene Beare's New Book on Latvian Research #lithuania

MWhippman@...
 

Lots of you with Litvak ancestors will also have intermarriages and other
connections with the area which is now Latvia. If so, Arlene Beare's
practical new guide to researching our Baltic ancestors will be a real boon.

"A Guide to Jewish Genealogy in Latvia and Estonia" ISBN 0-9537669-2-6: No. 3 in the series "Jewish Ancestors?" has just been published by the Jewish Genealogical Society of Great Britain under the general editorship of Rosemary Wenzerul, Chairman, JGSGB Education Committee.

This is an excellent guide for researching your family. Everything is in
one place: background information, addresses, references to the web, sources, practical tips etc etc. This book would have saved me hours of time when I started and as I read through it now I see loads of tips and tricks I hadn't even begun to to think about.

What can I say except WOW! and warmest congratulations. I think I am
required by JewishGen rules to point out I don't have any financial interest in this book, nor does Arlene since the profits are going to the JGSGB. This book is another wonderful example of how far Jewish family history research has come over the last year. Arlene is the President of of the Latvia SIG and I am sure that I join all its members in sending warmest congratulations on this new publication.

Constance Whippman


New emails? #hungary

melody amsel <melodya@...>
 

Happy Pesach to all --

I wonder if Charles Honig or Aaron Rosenburg is on this list--or if
anyone has their updated email addresses.

And--for those of you following the last tortuous five years: my book
on Stropkov is now finally at the publishers and we are looking at a
publication date around Rosh HaShana.

Hooray!

Melody Amsel


Hungary SIG #Hungary New emails? #hungary

melody amsel <melodya@...>
 

Happy Pesach to all --

I wonder if Charles Honig or Aaron Rosenburg is on this list--or if
anyone has their updated email addresses.

And--for those of you following the last tortuous five years: my book
on Stropkov is now finally at the publishers and we are looking at a
publication date around Rosh HaShana.

Hooray!

Melody Amsel


Pesach #hungary

Norman Lapedus <magdil@...>
 

To all H-Sigers,
Additional words to our friend Tom Venetianer's eloquent prayer:
"Let Freedom Ring" Amen
Chag Pesach Sameach
With love,
Magda Lapedus
Menlo Park, CA


Hungarian/Yiddish/german #hungary

Loripaul2@...
 

My two cents now:
My father always told me that his grandfather, born in Brezova (Slovakia,
Nitra province) and his grandmother, born in Miskolz, did NOT speak yiddish
at their home, in Antwerp. Yet, they were VERY orthodox, and his grandfather
even went to the Pressburg Yeshiva.
As a matter of fact, my father, who grew up in Antwerp, learned Yiddish on
his own, because of his close links to the very important jewish community
there.
Apparently, the language of choice of my greatgrandparents was...german!
Paul Freudman
Great Neck, NY
Researching HOLLANDER, in Miskolz and Nowy Sacz; and FREUDMAN in Brezova and
Vrbove, Slovakia.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Pesach #hungary

Norman Lapedus <magdil@...>
 

To all H-Sigers,
Additional words to our friend Tom Venetianer's eloquent prayer:
"Let Freedom Ring" Amen
Chag Pesach Sameach
With love,
Magda Lapedus
Menlo Park, CA


Hungary SIG #Hungary Hungarian/Yiddish/german #hungary

Loripaul2@...
 

My two cents now:
My father always told me that his grandfather, born in Brezova (Slovakia,
Nitra province) and his grandmother, born in Miskolz, did NOT speak yiddish
at their home, in Antwerp. Yet, they were VERY orthodox, and his grandfather
even went to the Pressburg Yeshiva.
As a matter of fact, my father, who grew up in Antwerp, learned Yiddish on
his own, because of his close links to the very important jewish community
there.
Apparently, the language of choice of my greatgrandparents was...german!
Paul Freudman
Great Neck, NY
Researching HOLLANDER, in Miskolz and Nowy Sacz; and FREUDMAN in Brezova and
Vrbove, Slovakia.


Blessing #hungary

Mario <m_xeneize@...>
 

Wish You All a JAG PESAJ KASHER VESAMEAJ
a very happy Pesaj
Mario


Hungary SIG #Hungary Blessing #hungary

Mario <m_xeneize@...>
 

Wish You All a JAG PESAJ KASHER VESAMEAJ
a very happy Pesaj
Mario


Need a guide #hungary

pescado0 <pescado0@...>
 

I was asked to pass this along to the H-Sig. Please respond to the
address at the bottom of this request.
Thanks, Victor A. Fischer

Hello. My name is Katy Chansky and I was born in Hungary in 1946 and
I live in Los Angeles, California. I received your email address >from a
friend of mine, Susan Fisher Boyer who suggested that contact you for
help in posting to receive information on my trip. I will be
traveling to Budapest next week, >from April 12-16,2001 and will be
visiting Gyongyos where my mother's family lived. (1) I would like to
hire a guide for the day to take me >from Budapest to Gyongyos (2) I
would like suggestions for Jewish tours of Budapest (3) I would like
any help possible to connect with any people who know of the
grandparents - Cantor Jonas Weinberger and Fanny Weiszhaus - my
grandfather was the cantor in the synagogue. Susan suggested that you
may be able to post a request for me as I have no time before my holiday
to join the groups. Please email me at this email address:
jackiesmith11@hotmail.com


quarterly update for Necrology Index #hungary

Joyce Field <jfield@...>
 

The Yiskor Book Project's necrology index has an Erev Pesach present
for the JewishGen family. The quarterly update to the Necrology
index at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/yizkor has just gone
online in time for Pesach.

Thanks to the work of Ernie Fine, Necrology Project Coordinator,
Warren Blatt, Michael Tobias, and Martin Kessel, over 14,000 new
entries >from 12 yizkor books are now in the Necrology Index, for a
total of 105,000+ entries. Thanks are also due to the Yizkor Book
Project team of John Berman, Lance Ackerfeld, Mike Kalt, Carol Edan,
and Osnat Ramaty who volunteer their efforts day in and day out in
htmling the yizkor translations >from which the names in the Necrology
Index are taken.

The JewishGen Yizkor Book Necrology Database indexes the names of
persons in the necrologies -- the lists of Holocaust martyrs --
published in the Yizkor Books appearing at
http://www.JewishGen.org/JewishGen-erosity/YizkorTrans.html. This
database is only an index of names; it directs researchers back to
the Yizkor Book itself, where more complete information may be
available.

The new entries represent the following countries:

Belarus: 519 records
Hungary: 2160 records
Lithuania: 231 records
Poland: 5830 records
Ukraine: 6102 records


Towns and number of entries >from each town:

Gorodenka, Ukraine: 876
Kolbuszowa, Poland 379
Merkine, Lithuania 231
Oswiecim, Poland 4223
Papa, Hungary 2160
Rogatin, Ukraine 387
Stryy, Ukraine 2721
Suchowola, Poland 342
Turka, Ukraine 1902
Volozhin, Belarus 519
Vysotsk, Ukraine 216
Warsaw, Poland 886

Hag Pesach Sameach to all.

Joyce Field
JewishGen VP, Research
jfield@jewishgen.org