Date   

Fw: Translation of town name #hungary

Ing. Lang Tomás <novotrade@...>
 

Friends :
the correct spelling of the POZNOY as mentioned in Leslie´s mail
is a Hungarian-sounding" POZSONY " , which is derivated
from the ancient Latin " POSONIUM " .
The official name of the City during the Habsburg´s time
was PRESSBURG, transcribed into Slovak as PRESPOROK.
After 1918 the name was changed into Slovak BRATISLAVA
as a modern form of an ancient Slavic name of BRASLAVA.

Have a Nice, Peacefull, quiet and Kosher Pesach.
WBR
Tomas Lang, PhD
JewCommunity President
Ceska basta 5
SK-940 60 NOVÉ ZÁMKY / Slovakia
E-mail: novotrade@nz.sknet.sk
www http://www.angelfire.com/hi/novezamky
---------------------------FIN--------------------------


----- Original Message -----
From: "Leslie Gyi" <leslie.gyi@businessengine.com>
To: "Hungarian SIG" <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Thursday, March 22, 2001 7:34 PM
Subject: RE: Translation of town name


Poznoy (not sure I have the exact spelling on this as I am away >from my
travel library) is the Hungarian name for Bratislava when it was the
capital
of Hungary I believe >from 16th through 18th century, during the Turkish
occupation of Budapest. There is a fairly good write up on this in guide
books on either Bratislava and Slovakia, and even some of the Vienna
books,
which list it as a day trip, approximately 1 hr driving time, though the
border crossing was rather slow. It is also a nice place to visit with a
castle and museum on the Danube, and orchards and a pharmaceutical museum
within 20km. I didn't spend much time there, 1 day to be exact, as a day
trip >from Vienna, but thoroughly enjoyed it! If I were to go again, I
might
do it in reverse, stay in Poznoy, which is much more reasonable and day
trip
to Vienna. In between on the road is a wonderful old, walled city.

Leslie Gyi nee FEIG
Researching FEIGs Anywhere
POLLOKs in Carpathia & Poland
GOLDENBERGs in Carpathia & Poland
HAJNIKs/HAYNICKs in Poland

---
Odchádzajúca správa neobsahuje vírusy.
Skontrolované antivírusovým systémom AVG (http://www.grisoft.cz).
Verzia: 6.0.231 / Vírusová databáza: 112 - dátum vydania: 12.2.2001


Hungary SIG #Hungary Fw: Translation of town name #hungary

Ing. Lang Tomás <novotrade@...>
 

Friends :
the correct spelling of the POZNOY as mentioned in Leslie´s mail
is a Hungarian-sounding" POZSONY " , which is derivated
from the ancient Latin " POSONIUM " .
The official name of the City during the Habsburg´s time
was PRESSBURG, transcribed into Slovak as PRESPOROK.
After 1918 the name was changed into Slovak BRATISLAVA
as a modern form of an ancient Slavic name of BRASLAVA.

Have a Nice, Peacefull, quiet and Kosher Pesach.
WBR
Tomas Lang, PhD
JewCommunity President
Ceska basta 5
SK-940 60 NOVÉ ZÁMKY / Slovakia
E-mail: novotrade@nz.sknet.sk
www http://www.angelfire.com/hi/novezamky
---------------------------FIN--------------------------


----- Original Message -----
From: "Leslie Gyi" <leslie.gyi@businessengine.com>
To: "Hungarian SIG" <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Sent: Thursday, March 22, 2001 7:34 PM
Subject: RE: Translation of town name


Poznoy (not sure I have the exact spelling on this as I am away >from my
travel library) is the Hungarian name for Bratislava when it was the
capital
of Hungary I believe >from 16th through 18th century, during the Turkish
occupation of Budapest. There is a fairly good write up on this in guide
books on either Bratislava and Slovakia, and even some of the Vienna
books,
which list it as a day trip, approximately 1 hr driving time, though the
border crossing was rather slow. It is also a nice place to visit with a
castle and museum on the Danube, and orchards and a pharmaceutical museum
within 20km. I didn't spend much time there, 1 day to be exact, as a day
trip >from Vienna, but thoroughly enjoyed it! If I were to go again, I
might
do it in reverse, stay in Poznoy, which is much more reasonable and day
trip
to Vienna. In between on the road is a wonderful old, walled city.

Leslie Gyi nee FEIG
Researching FEIGs Anywhere
POLLOKs in Carpathia & Poland
GOLDENBERGs in Carpathia & Poland
HAJNIKs/HAYNICKs in Poland

---
Odchádzajúca správa neobsahuje vírusy.
Skontrolované antivírusovým systémom AVG (http://www.grisoft.cz).
Verzia: 6.0.231 / Vírusová databáza: 112 - dátum vydania: 12.2.2001


DAVIDOW on Yiddish stage in Russia #yiddish

Botwinick@...
 

Searching DAVIDOW family >from Odessa? and Minsk that was alleged to have
been on the Yiddish Stage in Russia early 1900's and late 1800's. Most
of family moved to states.

Hessia DAVIDOW-died Phila
Droshia DAVIDOW-died Detroit

milt botwinick
phila


Yiddish Theatre and Vadeville #YiddishTheatre DAVIDOW on Yiddish stage in Russia #yiddish

Botwinick@...
 

Searching DAVIDOW family >from Odessa? and Minsk that was alleged to have
been on the Yiddish Stage in Russia early 1900's and late 1800's. Most
of family moved to states.

Hessia DAVIDOW-died Phila
Droshia DAVIDOW-died Detroit

milt botwinick
phila


ANNOUNCING THE SLUTSK SHTETLINK #belarus

Margot Tutun <gramto@...>
 

On this first day of Passover I am happy to announce the arrival of the
Slutsk Shtetlink!

This, along with our expanding participation in the yiskor book translation
project, puts Slutsk squarely in the midst of the JewishGen community

Please go to:

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/slutsk/slutsk.html

Very, very special thanks go to our incredible Harry Boonin, whose works on
the page predominate. Harry, President Emeritus of the Historical Society of
Slutsk, knows more about Slutsk than anyone now living, and he has shared
much of what he has gleaned over the years with us on our site.

Other contributors, like Carlton Brooks and Paul Pascal, are there as well,
and there are links to some very informative and genealogically relevant
sites.

Edward Rosenbaum deserves special praise and thanks. Edward created the HTML
without a murmur and says he will continue to be my responsive ally in
keeping this Shtetlink current.

Special thanks also go to that very focussed leader, David Fox, whose
personally expended energy and tireless determination were key factors in
both formulating the project and bringing it to completion.

And thanks also to Risa Heywood, who inspired and pushed so effectively from
the very beginning.

Mike Meshenberg, too, deserves a very sincere thank you, for "being there"
at times that were important.

Thanks also to John Berman and Chuck Weinstein who assisted in the final
stages of bringing about this cybernetic event.

I hope all Slutskers and those with roots in surrounding towns and villages
will come to the page and start clicking. We urge you to submit any
material you might have been saving or collecting--letters, photos,
memorabilia--to make the site more valuable to us all.

We also encourage you to join in corresponding about Slutsk right here on
this Belarus SIG mailing list, as we get to the serious work of expanding
our data bases and translating our Yiskor Book.

Other shtetl leaders are asked to inform their participants about our new
Shtetlink.

Margot Topkins Tutun
Lexington MA

Searching BUSLAVSKY, NACHMANOVICH, KUSTANOVICH, KATZNELSON, Lyuban/ Slutsk
Belarus;
TAUBKIN, TOBKIN, TOPKIN, TOPKI NS,Vitebsk; St. Johns, NB; NYC
ASHKENAZY, ASHKENS, ASHKINS, ADLER, Warsawa, Clevenand, NYC


Belarus SIG #Belarus ANNOUNCING THE SLUTSK SHTETLINK #belarus

Margot Tutun <gramto@...>
 

On this first day of Passover I am happy to announce the arrival of the
Slutsk Shtetlink!

This, along with our expanding participation in the yiskor book translation
project, puts Slutsk squarely in the midst of the JewishGen community

Please go to:

http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/slutsk/slutsk.html

Very, very special thanks go to our incredible Harry Boonin, whose works on
the page predominate. Harry, President Emeritus of the Historical Society of
Slutsk, knows more about Slutsk than anyone now living, and he has shared
much of what he has gleaned over the years with us on our site.

Other contributors, like Carlton Brooks and Paul Pascal, are there as well,
and there are links to some very informative and genealogically relevant
sites.

Edward Rosenbaum deserves special praise and thanks. Edward created the HTML
without a murmur and says he will continue to be my responsive ally in
keeping this Shtetlink current.

Special thanks also go to that very focussed leader, David Fox, whose
personally expended energy and tireless determination were key factors in
both formulating the project and bringing it to completion.

And thanks also to Risa Heywood, who inspired and pushed so effectively from
the very beginning.

Mike Meshenberg, too, deserves a very sincere thank you, for "being there"
at times that were important.

Thanks also to John Berman and Chuck Weinstein who assisted in the final
stages of bringing about this cybernetic event.

I hope all Slutskers and those with roots in surrounding towns and villages
will come to the page and start clicking. We urge you to submit any
material you might have been saving or collecting--letters, photos,
memorabilia--to make the site more valuable to us all.

We also encourage you to join in corresponding about Slutsk right here on
this Belarus SIG mailing list, as we get to the serious work of expanding
our data bases and translating our Yiskor Book.

Other shtetl leaders are asked to inform their participants about our new
Shtetlink.

Margot Topkins Tutun
Lexington MA

Searching BUSLAVSKY, NACHMANOVICH, KUSTANOVICH, KATZNELSON, Lyuban/ Slutsk
Belarus;
TAUBKIN, TOBKIN, TOPKIN, TOPKI NS,Vitebsk; St. Johns, NB; NYC
ASHKENAZY, ASHKENS, ASHKINS, ADLER, Warsawa, Clevenand, NYC


Re: Questions on double-name "Ruchla Bayla" #general

Stanley Diamond
 

Subj: Re: Questions on double-name "Ruchla Bayla"
Date: 4/8/2001
To: Jewishgen@lyris.jewishgen.org

In a message dated 07 Apr 2001 17:03:54 -0500 Lilli Sprintz
<spri0037@tc.umn.edu> writes

My mother's Hebrew name is Ruchla Bayla. She told me that Ruchla is
Rachael, but I didn't quite get what "Bayla" meant.

Also, When I was re-checking the listings for my maternal grandmother's
name in the JRI-Poland archives database, I saw the name Ruchla Bayla
listed just like my mother's name. Is is possible that these two names
are normally given to a girl child together? Or did I just pick up on a
name being passed down through the family as a double name?
Is this clear? Thanks!
It may not be the final answer to Lilli's question, but here
is a statistical analysis of the incidence of the names
Ruchla Bajla/Bejla and Bajla/Bejla Ruchla >from among
the records of Polish town and a Galician town:

Lodz: 1878 to 1898 (21642 births - male and female):

Bajla/Bejla: 387
Bajla/Bejla with other second names: 49
Bajla Ruchla: 7

Ruchla: 260
Ruchla with other second names: 90
Ruchla Bajla/Bejla: 2

To offer some contrasting data, I used the Galician town of
Tarnopol. There were 4342 male and female births between
1866 and 1881. While the spellings are different, the incidence
of the two names together is even less evident. Out of a total
of 63 combinations of the two names in question, there was
only one Ruchel Beile and not one Beile Ruchel.

So, the answer to Lili's question (as far as Lodz and Tarnopol
are concerned) - "Is it possible that these two names are
normally given to a girl child together? - seems to be a clear "no."

Researchers will shortly be the beneficiary of a new book on
Jewish given names for which JRI-Poland is proud to have
shared its given name data. The following is an excerpt from
the most recent edition of Avotaynu's Nu? What's New? -
Vol. 2, No. 6. It is reprinted with the permission of editor
Gary Mokotoff:

"Names, Names, Names
===================
The subject of names has occupied a good portion of my life in
recent months; first through Alexander Beider's newest book and
second through a new film by Alan Berliner.

I have just finished reading, editing and rereading Alexander
Beider's newest magnum opus "A Dictionary of Ashkenazic Given
Names: Their Origins, Structure, Pronunciation and Migrations."
It is yet another incredible accomplishment of this remarkable
person. Zachary Baker, former head librarian of YIVO Institute and
and now curator of Judaica and Hebraica Collections at Stanford
University Libraries, received a preview copy of the book. His
immediate reaction was that "...it takes my breath away -- he has
truly outdone himself! It will be THE authority on the subject from
now on."

To give you a taste of how comprehensive a study Dr. Beider has
made, we posted the dictionary entry for the feminine name Yentl
[of Barbra Streisand fame] at http://www.avotaynu.com/books/yentl.htm.
The dictionary comprises only 60% of the book. The balance is a
300-page thesis on the origins, structure, pronunciation, and
migrations of Ashkenazic given names. Readers of Dr. Beider's
previous books "A Dictionary of Jewish Surnames >from the
Russian Empire" and "A Dictionary of Jewish Surnames >from the
Kingdom of Poland" know his works not only inform but educate.
Avotaynu will publish the book in July..."

Stanley Diamond
Project Coordinator, Jewish Records Indexing - Poland


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Questions on double-name "Ruchla Bayla" #general

Stanley Diamond
 

Subj: Re: Questions on double-name "Ruchla Bayla"
Date: 4/8/2001
To: Jewishgen@lyris.jewishgen.org

In a message dated 07 Apr 2001 17:03:54 -0500 Lilli Sprintz
<spri0037@tc.umn.edu> writes

My mother's Hebrew name is Ruchla Bayla. She told me that Ruchla is
Rachael, but I didn't quite get what "Bayla" meant.

Also, When I was re-checking the listings for my maternal grandmother's
name in the JRI-Poland archives database, I saw the name Ruchla Bayla
listed just like my mother's name. Is is possible that these two names
are normally given to a girl child together? Or did I just pick up on a
name being passed down through the family as a double name?
Is this clear? Thanks!
It may not be the final answer to Lilli's question, but here
is a statistical analysis of the incidence of the names
Ruchla Bajla/Bejla and Bajla/Bejla Ruchla >from among
the records of Polish town and a Galician town:

Lodz: 1878 to 1898 (21642 births - male and female):

Bajla/Bejla: 387
Bajla/Bejla with other second names: 49
Bajla Ruchla: 7

Ruchla: 260
Ruchla with other second names: 90
Ruchla Bajla/Bejla: 2

To offer some contrasting data, I used the Galician town of
Tarnopol. There were 4342 male and female births between
1866 and 1881. While the spellings are different, the incidence
of the two names together is even less evident. Out of a total
of 63 combinations of the two names in question, there was
only one Ruchel Beile and not one Beile Ruchel.

So, the answer to Lili's question (as far as Lodz and Tarnopol
are concerned) - "Is it possible that these two names are
normally given to a girl child together? - seems to be a clear "no."

Researchers will shortly be the beneficiary of a new book on
Jewish given names for which JRI-Poland is proud to have
shared its given name data. The following is an excerpt from
the most recent edition of Avotaynu's Nu? What's New? -
Vol. 2, No. 6. It is reprinted with the permission of editor
Gary Mokotoff:

"Names, Names, Names
===================
The subject of names has occupied a good portion of my life in
recent months; first through Alexander Beider's newest book and
second through a new film by Alan Berliner.

I have just finished reading, editing and rereading Alexander
Beider's newest magnum opus "A Dictionary of Ashkenazic Given
Names: Their Origins, Structure, Pronunciation and Migrations."
It is yet another incredible accomplishment of this remarkable
person. Zachary Baker, former head librarian of YIVO Institute and
and now curator of Judaica and Hebraica Collections at Stanford
University Libraries, received a preview copy of the book. His
immediate reaction was that "...it takes my breath away -- he has
truly outdone himself! It will be THE authority on the subject from
now on."

To give you a taste of how comprehensive a study Dr. Beider has
made, we posted the dictionary entry for the feminine name Yentl
[of Barbra Streisand fame] at http://www.avotaynu.com/books/yentl.htm.
The dictionary comprises only 60% of the book. The balance is a
300-page thesis on the origins, structure, pronunciation, and
migrations of Ashkenazic given names. Readers of Dr. Beider's
previous books "A Dictionary of Jewish Surnames >from the
Russian Empire" and "A Dictionary of Jewish Surnames >from the
Kingdom of Poland" know his works not only inform but educate.
Avotaynu will publish the book in July..."

Stanley Diamond
Project Coordinator, Jewish Records Indexing - Poland


GELFENBEIN - origin of name? #general

Wilfried Schuster <Wilfried.Schuster@...>
 

Would anyone know the etymology of this name or where on-line one can
research the origin of Jewish family names.

Many thanks,

W. Schuster


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen GELFENBEIN - origin of name? #general

Wilfried Schuster <Wilfried.Schuster@...>
 

Would anyone know the etymology of this name or where on-line one can
research the origin of Jewish family names.

Many thanks,

W. Schuster


Arlene Beare's Research Guide to Latvia and Estonia #southafrica

MWhippman@...
 

I know all of you will join me in congratulating Arlene Beare, the President
of the Latvia SIG on the publication of her excellent new book on researching
Jewish ancestors >from the Baltics. Arlene Beare has just published "A Guide
to Jewish Genealogy in Latvia and Estonia" ISBN 0-9537669-2-6: No. 3 in the
series"Jewish Ancestors?" brought out by the
Jewish Genealogical Society of Great Britain under the general editorship of
Rosemary Wenzerul, Chairman, JGSGB Education Committee.

This is an excellent guide for researching your family. Everything is in
one place: background information, addresses, references to the web, sources,
practical tips etc etc. This book would have saved me hours of time when I
started and as I read through it now I see loads of tips and tricks I hadn't
even begun to to think about.

What can I say except WOW! and warmest congratulations. I think I am
required by JewishGen rules to point out I don't have any financial interest
in this book, nor does Arlene since the profits are going to the JGSGB. This
book is another wonderful example of how far Latvian Jewish family history
research
has come over the last year.
The timing on Erev Pesach could not be better.
Constance Whippman [All Latvia Database Co-ordinator]


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica Arlene Beare's Research Guide to Latvia and Estonia #southafrica

MWhippman@...
 

I know all of you will join me in congratulating Arlene Beare, the President
of the Latvia SIG on the publication of her excellent new book on researching
Jewish ancestors >from the Baltics. Arlene Beare has just published "A Guide
to Jewish Genealogy in Latvia and Estonia" ISBN 0-9537669-2-6: No. 3 in the
series"Jewish Ancestors?" brought out by the
Jewish Genealogical Society of Great Britain under the general editorship of
Rosemary Wenzerul, Chairman, JGSGB Education Committee.

This is an excellent guide for researching your family. Everything is in
one place: background information, addresses, references to the web, sources,
practical tips etc etc. This book would have saved me hours of time when I
started and as I read through it now I see loads of tips and tricks I hadn't
even begun to to think about.

What can I say except WOW! and warmest congratulations. I think I am
required by JewishGen rules to point out I don't have any financial interest
in this book, nor does Arlene since the profits are going to the JGSGB. This
book is another wonderful example of how far Latvian Jewish family history
research
has come over the last year.
The timing on Erev Pesach could not be better.
Constance Whippman [All Latvia Database Co-ordinator]


Re: Smith from Russia #general

Michael A Kassner <mikehanna@...>
 

mikehanna@juno.com

Linda Altman

Please give me the information that you have on the Lieberman name.
Here is what I have to share with you.

I believe my aunt Bessie (Smith) Lieberman married in the Midwest area,
either St. Paul or Chicago.
I don't know her husband first name.
They may have moved to the East Coast after the war; in 1945.

Michael (Smith) Kassner
Valparaiso, Indiana

mikehanna@juno.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Smith from Russia #general

Michael A Kassner <mikehanna@...>
 

mikehanna@juno.com

Linda Altman

Please give me the information that you have on the Lieberman name.
Here is what I have to share with you.

I believe my aunt Bessie (Smith) Lieberman married in the Midwest area,
either St. Paul or Chicago.
I don't know her husband first name.
They may have moved to the East Coast after the war; in 1945.

Michael (Smith) Kassner
Valparaiso, Indiana

mikehanna@juno.com


researching ZELMANOWICZ and ROZENSZTEIN #general

Marty Meyers <marty@...>
 

Hi,

I just discovered two new names in researching my family in
the area north of Warsaw (Przasnysz, Mlawa, Ciechanow).

My maternal great-grandparent's wedding record shows the following:

In 1883, town of Przasnysz:
Mendel Bordowicz, 20 year old son of Melach and Malka (Zelmanowicz)
Bordowicz marries Chana Laja Zilberman, 17 year old daughter of Juda Leib
and Chaia (Rozensztein) Zilberman.

No one in my family had known ZELMANOWICZ or ROZENSZTEIN although they
knew the names first names, Malka and Chaia Soorah, for my great-great
grandmothers.

I have lots of info on the Bordowicz and Zilberman sides.

Do anyone have any knowledge of a Malka (ZELMANOWICZ) Bordowicz or Chaia
Soorah (ROZENSZTEIN) Zylberman?
My mother's cousin thinks Chaia Soorah Rozensztein was born in the town of
Yanova.

Thanks,

Marty
direct email replies should go to <meyers01@home.com>

researching:
BORDOWICZ/BORDOWITZ/BARDOWITZ/BRODOWICZ >from Przasnysz/Prushnitz to Boston
MEYEROWITZ/MEYERS >from Russia to New York/Worcester, KIRSHNER/SIDMAN >from
Austria to Leeds to Massachsetts, LANDSMAN >from Russia to Massachusetts
ZELMANOVICH >from Poland (Przasnysz/Prushnitz area?)
ZYLBERMAN/SILVERMAN >from Przasnysz/Prushnitz to Boston, Detroit, Chicago
ROZENSZTEIN >from Poland (Przasnysz/Prushnitz area?)

Marty Meyers
<meyers01@home.com>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen researching ZELMANOWICZ and ROZENSZTEIN #general

Marty Meyers <marty@...>
 

Hi,

I just discovered two new names in researching my family in
the area north of Warsaw (Przasnysz, Mlawa, Ciechanow).

My maternal great-grandparent's wedding record shows the following:

In 1883, town of Przasnysz:
Mendel Bordowicz, 20 year old son of Melach and Malka (Zelmanowicz)
Bordowicz marries Chana Laja Zilberman, 17 year old daughter of Juda Leib
and Chaia (Rozensztein) Zilberman.

No one in my family had known ZELMANOWICZ or ROZENSZTEIN although they
knew the names first names, Malka and Chaia Soorah, for my great-great
grandmothers.

I have lots of info on the Bordowicz and Zilberman sides.

Do anyone have any knowledge of a Malka (ZELMANOWICZ) Bordowicz or Chaia
Soorah (ROZENSZTEIN) Zylberman?
My mother's cousin thinks Chaia Soorah Rozensztein was born in the town of
Yanova.

Thanks,

Marty
direct email replies should go to <meyers01@home.com>

researching:
BORDOWICZ/BORDOWITZ/BARDOWITZ/BRODOWICZ >from Przasnysz/Prushnitz to Boston
MEYEROWITZ/MEYERS >from Russia to New York/Worcester, KIRSHNER/SIDMAN >from
Austria to Leeds to Massachsetts, LANDSMAN >from Russia to Massachusetts
ZELMANOVICH >from Poland (Przasnysz/Prushnitz area?)
ZYLBERMAN/SILVERMAN >from Przasnysz/Prushnitz to Boston, Detroit, Chicago
ROZENSZTEIN >from Poland (Przasnysz/Prushnitz area?)

Marty Meyers
<meyers01@home.com>


Kate ELLISON- Minneapolis #general

delete_this_to_reply_stacy_harris@...
 

While looking at a photo of the I took almost five years ago of the
stone marking my family's section of those buried at the Minneapolis
Jewish Cemetery, I now notice that behind that stone is one that might be
of interest to someone who doesn't know that their loved one is buried
there.

Below the Hebrew inscription, that headstone reads "Beloved wife
and mother, Kate ELLISON 1895-1951. I hope this information is helpful
to someone searching for information on Kate or the ELLISON family.

Stacy Harris


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Kate ELLISON- Minneapolis #general

delete_this_to_reply_stacy_harris@...
 

While looking at a photo of the I took almost five years ago of the
stone marking my family's section of those buried at the Minneapolis
Jewish Cemetery, I now notice that behind that stone is one that might be
of interest to someone who doesn't know that their loved one is buried
there.

Below the Hebrew inscription, that headstone reads "Beloved wife
and mother, Kate ELLISON 1895-1951. I hope this information is helpful
to someone searching for information on Kate or the ELLISON family.

Stacy Harris


Re: finding a phone number with just an address and no last name #general

Eve Line Blum <eve.line.blum@...>
 

In the Jewishgen digest dated Fri, 06 Apr 2001 01:02:21 -0500, message #31,
Denise Feldman wrote :

I need to find my step grandmother. Her name is Anita Feldman (I dont
remember >her maiden name). She lives in Augsburg, (West) Germany. I know
she lives with
her sister, and that the phone is listed in the sister's name (Edith).
Again, I dont know Edith's last name. I thought I could do a "reverse
lookup" with just an address, but everything I try tells me I *must* have
a last name. Any suggestions???
Here is my personal suggestion which often worked : you have to search on
the Web for some official site in the country you are interested in
(Townhall, Chamber of Commerce, etc.) and look for their e-mail adress.
Then you have to write them a friendly message asking them to search in
their own directory, with a direct or reverse lookup.

Eve Line Blum
Besancon (France)
and also
Cercle de Genealogie Juive (French JGS in Paris)
http://www.genealoj.org


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: finding a phone number with just an address and no last name #general

Eve Line Blum <eve.line.blum@...>
 

In the Jewishgen digest dated Fri, 06 Apr 2001 01:02:21 -0500, message #31,
Denise Feldman wrote :

I need to find my step grandmother. Her name is Anita Feldman (I dont
remember >her maiden name). She lives in Augsburg, (West) Germany. I know
she lives with
her sister, and that the phone is listed in the sister's name (Edith).
Again, I dont know Edith's last name. I thought I could do a "reverse
lookup" with just an address, but everything I try tells me I *must* have
a last name. Any suggestions???
Here is my personal suggestion which often worked : you have to search on
the Web for some official site in the country you are interested in
(Townhall, Chamber of Commerce, etc.) and look for their e-mail adress.
Then you have to write them a friendly message asking them to search in
their own directory, with a direct or reverse lookup.

Eve Line Blum
Besancon (France)
and also
Cercle de Genealogie Juive (French JGS in Paris)
http://www.genealoj.org