Date   

How about my middle name? #general

CARL ANGEL <cjangel@...>
 

My middle name is Johann, my dad chosed it that way. I am thinking of
asking a Jewish Woman named Anat to marry in the near future. I am
spanish, I love the Jewish community and I am interested in everything.
What does my name mean.? Is it really Jewish?

Carl Angel


Re: 1492 #general

Howard Zakai
 

Just because Ferdinand and Isabella had Jewish blood does not rule out
them carrying on with the Inquisition. I am not an expert on this but my
guess is that if they did have Jewish blood, it was probably quite minimal
(going back a significant # of generations) and they either were not aware
of it, did not believe it, or did not care. They obviously did not
affiliate with Judaism, being that they were ardent Catholic kings
striving for Christendom and the potential for having Jewish blood was
iirelevant to their goals. I have read here and there that Christopher
Columbus (Christoph Colon) was an Italian Jew and much of the crew was
Jewish as well. I don't know if it has been proven. But if true, it
seems likely that Ferdinand and Isabella granted Columbus his voyage just
to get rid of Jews >from Spain, i.e. aid their Inquisition efforts. The
royalty did not believe in the earth's roundness, so they were probably
quite content with sending a bunch of Jews 'off the cliff of the world!'
While I am a History major, I do not have any thorough knowledge on
Spanish history so all are welcome to add insight, correct me, etc.

Howie Zakai
Binghamton University, NY


BEJLIS or BAILEYS of Poland (Jewish traitor) #general

Craig Hillman <hilboy@...>
 

Hello Jewishgeners,

It has been awhile. I have a genealogy/history question. My great-aunt,
93 yrs. old, often mentions to me that she and her siblings were
called "Bejlis" (pronounced Baileys) when she was growing up Warsaw.
It seems that Bejlis in Poland was similar to the Dreyfus affair in
France. Does this sound familiar to anyone? Would appreciate any help.

Thanks in advance,
Craig


In praise of common names #general

Sheridan Kern <SheridanSquare@...>
 

Dear JewishGenners,
First I wish to thank those who are responding to the announcement of my
ViewMate upload (VM 515, until 4/8 or 9). Please view the upload, though,
before writing as it may answer your questions.

All of the respondents so far have pointed out that the names associated
with the postcard I uploaded are all "very common names in Romania." Yes,
they are. (Cohen, Katz, Segal, Issac, Legler) Most of you were very kind
about this. However, a few were rather rude.
So--
I feel I must speak up for those of us researching common names. We are not
trying to be difficult! We research the names we have! In order to make any
progress at all, we have to do 2 things: (1)check out every semi-reasonable
lead. (2) Try to assemble as many other details of our family history as
possible. For one of us commoners to read a posting that includes ancestors
with names matching our own ancestors does not mean we have found people in
our family--even if there is a pair of names like father & son or husband &
wife. But, if the hometown is exactly the same, or the occupation, or the
street address, or their point of departure >from Europe, or a type of
illness, or the place they first stayed in the U.S.,--if details like these
can match up, the lead becomes an exciting one.

The postcard I uploaded mentions such details: A return address in
Brooklyn, the name of someone's business, the name of someone who worked
at that business, the recipient's address, the name of a son of the
recipient. These can all help some one separate his own Katz and Segal
from the millions of Katz and Segals out there.
For those of us sorting out branches of a common name, genealogy becomes a
truly historical study. It takes us to the ancient map dept of the library
to trace migrations of peoples. We learn about the Khazars, Tudela, and the
Gaon of Vilna. We venture into the local Jewish book store, some of us for
the first time. These searches take us to the general political and
economic histories as we try to determine what was prompting emigration at
a particular time. We study the history of the Ottoman Empire, of Balfour
and Palestine in 1920.

Those of us who have multi-cultural families, as I do, find a profound
connection both with our Jewish history--perhaps for the first time since
our birth--and with the humanity within other cultures and religions. As I
sort through the mess in the Balkans, trying to understand the current news
while also studying my Greek husband's family history and my Romanian
Jewish one, I learn one thing. We ALL have more in common than we have
differences. We have all suffered enormously. And we all have some things
to apologize for (some more than others, I grant you.)

Now if the names were unique, I would simply search for a name. Any time I
found it would be a success. Everything else would be irrelevant. With my
Katz and Segals and Cohens, I may never find the specific truth of my
family's history. But I will know my heritage and our Jewish past more
fully, and feel it more deeply in my heart than simply recording a long
line of "begats".

To those of you with less common names, have a little patience with us poor
commoners. To my common-name brothers & sisters: If your Katz & Segals are
from the Piatra Neamt district in Romania between 1900 & 1910, then you
should check out this postcard and others I will post in the future.
Otherwise, I agree, it is not worth your time.

(P.S. Katz and Segal is nothing compared to the other side of my family
which is Spencer, Holland and Franklin--most of them named John & Mary. If
you think Cohen is a common name, try doing some research on the
Anglo/Irish side of the world family tree!)

Regards, appreciation & thanks to all.
Sheri Kern
NYC
SheridanSquare@sprintmail.com


Re: Unknowingly marrying a sibling #general

Brandler Institute of Chasidic Thought <bict@...>
 

In Leviticus Chapter 18 verse 9, it specifically forbids marriage with a
sister. Regarding Abraham and Sarah (they actually were uncle and niece-
which is anyway permitted ) since this was before the giving of the Torah
at Sinai they were not responsible for keeping of its laws.

Since this topic is veering off genealogy - I will be glad to respond to
any further inquiries on this matter privately.

Regards,
Avrumy Heschel
Brooklyn, NY

"From: <ctf-genealogy@mindspring.com>
I don't think there is anything against marrying a sibling in Judaism.
Abraham and Sarah were half-siblings. There is, however, a law against it
in the USA. There may also be in other countries. I don't know. I have a
cousin marriage in my tree that left me confused for six months." >>


Happy Passover Part II #general

Glen Strauss <glen.s@...>
 

Dear 'genners

A few weeks ago we sent an e-mail wishing you all a Happy Passover. The
same e-mail also went to nearly 50,000 others who are using JewishGen.
Only 246 people responded with a contribution to help support
JewishGen, the institution which is available to help you connect with
your heritage and document your family history.

Although you've taken that important first step of registering your family
names in the JGFF we hope you are taking advantage of the many other
services and projects that JewishGen offers to increase the possibility
that you will connect with family members. We encourage you to participate
fully in one of the greatest grass roots ever conceived to preserve our
precious history for future generations.

For example, JewishGen offers:

· more than 30 focused mailing lists where you can ask questions, and seek
guidance on specific areas of interest. The JewishGen Discussion Group
provides a forum for beginner and advanced research, a place to share your
research challenges, a place to ask questions and a place to make
connections with thousands of people world wide. Visit JewishGen's home
page at <http://www.jewishgen.org> ,and see the listings in the Discussion
category. Click on the links to be taken to the subscription sites.
Don't miss out on the daily sharing, the information, and the opportunity
to provide and receive assistance >from any one of the thousands of
JewishGen participants, all known for their willingness to guide, support
and share.

· 286 Yizkor Book translations on line at JewishGen and more awaiting your
input and support. Our only limitations in what we can do are the degrees
to which you are willing to support those efforts. Visit the Yizkor Book
Translation site at <http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/> There might just
be a wealth of information about your ancestral city or town and perhaps
even your own family.

· over 5 million records available for you to explore. Begin by visiting
<http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/>

Although 5 million records may seem like a lot, there are hundreds of
millions more that need documenting: in cemeteries, in archives in Eastern
Europe... in family histories of survivors who make up the current Jewish
communities in Eastern Europe... and in millions of records stored in the
archives in Yad Vashem.

Both a huge burial records database and placing Yad Vashem records online
are on the top of JewishGen's "wish list" for this year. The work is
already underway in the Online Worldwide Burial Registry (OWBR) and the
first of the Yad Vashem databases. However, to bring all these records
forth and to provide them to the Jewish community through our website we
absolutely must have greater support >from the people like yourselves who
have shown interest in what we are doing. Make no mistake, new projects
will only happen if each and every person just like yourself, using our
programs and services, makes the commitment to support this effort
financially to the best of their ability. Only then will we achieve major
milestones in the preservation of our family histories and in our
heritage. Only then are you likely to find that still missing piece to
your personal puzzle.

Additional information goes online only as data is acquired,
transliterated and added into data entry templates. There are hundreds
of volunteers making all this happen. They give tirelessly of their skills,
their energy, and their time. But to keep the wheels of progress spinning,
we need your financial support. It is critical that we and all these
volunteers know that the work they are performing is appreciated, is
used, and is deserving of your support. Only those who use the many facets
of JewishGen and are willing to support it financially can convey the
message we who operate behind the scenes and our volunteers worldwide need
to hear.

If you haven't already done so, now is the time to show us that what we are
doing is appreciated, utilized to the fullest and worthy of your support.
And, if you have supported us in the past, please consider renewing your
gift today. The most convenient way to make a donation is to visit our
secure credit card server where you make a donation in dollars and your
credit card will bill you in your local currency if you reside outside the
United States. The secure server is at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen-erosity/contribute.html> If you
prefer you can mail your contribution directly to our new address:

JewishGen, Inc.
2951 Marina Bay Drive, Suite 130-472
League City, TX 77573

Thanks in advance for your support and our best wishes for a Happy Passover.

Susan King Glen Strauss
President Vice President


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen How about my middle name? #general

CARL ANGEL <cjangel@...>
 

My middle name is Johann, my dad chosed it that way. I am thinking of
asking a Jewish Woman named Anat to marry in the near future. I am
spanish, I love the Jewish community and I am interested in everything.
What does my name mean.? Is it really Jewish?

Carl Angel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: 1492 #general

Howard Zakai
 

Just because Ferdinand and Isabella had Jewish blood does not rule out
them carrying on with the Inquisition. I am not an expert on this but my
guess is that if they did have Jewish blood, it was probably quite minimal
(going back a significant # of generations) and they either were not aware
of it, did not believe it, or did not care. They obviously did not
affiliate with Judaism, being that they were ardent Catholic kings
striving for Christendom and the potential for having Jewish blood was
iirelevant to their goals. I have read here and there that Christopher
Columbus (Christoph Colon) was an Italian Jew and much of the crew was
Jewish as well. I don't know if it has been proven. But if true, it
seems likely that Ferdinand and Isabella granted Columbus his voyage just
to get rid of Jews >from Spain, i.e. aid their Inquisition efforts. The
royalty did not believe in the earth's roundness, so they were probably
quite content with sending a bunch of Jews 'off the cliff of the world!'
While I am a History major, I do not have any thorough knowledge on
Spanish history so all are welcome to add insight, correct me, etc.

Howie Zakai
Binghamton University, NY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen BEJLIS or BAILEYS of Poland (Jewish traitor) #general

Craig Hillman <hilboy@...>
 

Hello Jewishgeners,

It has been awhile. I have a genealogy/history question. My great-aunt,
93 yrs. old, often mentions to me that she and her siblings were
called "Bejlis" (pronounced Baileys) when she was growing up Warsaw.
It seems that Bejlis in Poland was similar to the Dreyfus affair in
France. Does this sound familiar to anyone? Would appreciate any help.

Thanks in advance,
Craig


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen In praise of common names #general

Sheridan Kern <SheridanSquare@...>
 

Dear JewishGenners,
First I wish to thank those who are responding to the announcement of my
ViewMate upload (VM 515, until 4/8 or 9). Please view the upload, though,
before writing as it may answer your questions.

All of the respondents so far have pointed out that the names associated
with the postcard I uploaded are all "very common names in Romania." Yes,
they are. (Cohen, Katz, Segal, Issac, Legler) Most of you were very kind
about this. However, a few were rather rude.
So--
I feel I must speak up for those of us researching common names. We are not
trying to be difficult! We research the names we have! In order to make any
progress at all, we have to do 2 things: (1)check out every semi-reasonable
lead. (2) Try to assemble as many other details of our family history as
possible. For one of us commoners to read a posting that includes ancestors
with names matching our own ancestors does not mean we have found people in
our family--even if there is a pair of names like father & son or husband &
wife. But, if the hometown is exactly the same, or the occupation, or the
street address, or their point of departure >from Europe, or a type of
illness, or the place they first stayed in the U.S.,--if details like these
can match up, the lead becomes an exciting one.

The postcard I uploaded mentions such details: A return address in
Brooklyn, the name of someone's business, the name of someone who worked
at that business, the recipient's address, the name of a son of the
recipient. These can all help some one separate his own Katz and Segal
from the millions of Katz and Segals out there.
For those of us sorting out branches of a common name, genealogy becomes a
truly historical study. It takes us to the ancient map dept of the library
to trace migrations of peoples. We learn about the Khazars, Tudela, and the
Gaon of Vilna. We venture into the local Jewish book store, some of us for
the first time. These searches take us to the general political and
economic histories as we try to determine what was prompting emigration at
a particular time. We study the history of the Ottoman Empire, of Balfour
and Palestine in 1920.

Those of us who have multi-cultural families, as I do, find a profound
connection both with our Jewish history--perhaps for the first time since
our birth--and with the humanity within other cultures and religions. As I
sort through the mess in the Balkans, trying to understand the current news
while also studying my Greek husband's family history and my Romanian
Jewish one, I learn one thing. We ALL have more in common than we have
differences. We have all suffered enormously. And we all have some things
to apologize for (some more than others, I grant you.)

Now if the names were unique, I would simply search for a name. Any time I
found it would be a success. Everything else would be irrelevant. With my
Katz and Segals and Cohens, I may never find the specific truth of my
family's history. But I will know my heritage and our Jewish past more
fully, and feel it more deeply in my heart than simply recording a long
line of "begats".

To those of you with less common names, have a little patience with us poor
commoners. To my common-name brothers & sisters: If your Katz & Segals are
from the Piatra Neamt district in Romania between 1900 & 1910, then you
should check out this postcard and others I will post in the future.
Otherwise, I agree, it is not worth your time.

(P.S. Katz and Segal is nothing compared to the other side of my family
which is Spencer, Holland and Franklin--most of them named John & Mary. If
you think Cohen is a common name, try doing some research on the
Anglo/Irish side of the world family tree!)

Regards, appreciation & thanks to all.
Sheri Kern
NYC
SheridanSquare@sprintmail.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Unknowingly marrying a sibling #general

Brandler Institute of Chasidic Thought <bict@...>
 

In Leviticus Chapter 18 verse 9, it specifically forbids marriage with a
sister. Regarding Abraham and Sarah (they actually were uncle and niece-
which is anyway permitted ) since this was before the giving of the Torah
at Sinai they were not responsible for keeping of its laws.

Since this topic is veering off genealogy - I will be glad to respond to
any further inquiries on this matter privately.

Regards,
Avrumy Heschel
Brooklyn, NY

"From: <ctf-genealogy@mindspring.com>
I don't think there is anything against marrying a sibling in Judaism.
Abraham and Sarah were half-siblings. There is, however, a law against it
in the USA. There may also be in other countries. I don't know. I have a
cousin marriage in my tree that left me confused for six months." >>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Happy Passover Part II #general

Glen Strauss <glen.s@...>
 

Dear 'genners

A few weeks ago we sent an e-mail wishing you all a Happy Passover. The
same e-mail also went to nearly 50,000 others who are using JewishGen.
Only 246 people responded with a contribution to help support
JewishGen, the institution which is available to help you connect with
your heritage and document your family history.

Although you've taken that important first step of registering your family
names in the JGFF we hope you are taking advantage of the many other
services and projects that JewishGen offers to increase the possibility
that you will connect with family members. We encourage you to participate
fully in one of the greatest grass roots ever conceived to preserve our
precious history for future generations.

For example, JewishGen offers:

· more than 30 focused mailing lists where you can ask questions, and seek
guidance on specific areas of interest. The JewishGen Discussion Group
provides a forum for beginner and advanced research, a place to share your
research challenges, a place to ask questions and a place to make
connections with thousands of people world wide. Visit JewishGen's home
page at <http://www.jewishgen.org> ,and see the listings in the Discussion
category. Click on the links to be taken to the subscription sites.
Don't miss out on the daily sharing, the information, and the opportunity
to provide and receive assistance >from any one of the thousands of
JewishGen participants, all known for their willingness to guide, support
and share.

· 286 Yizkor Book translations on line at JewishGen and more awaiting your
input and support. Our only limitations in what we can do are the degrees
to which you are willing to support those efforts. Visit the Yizkor Book
Translation site at <http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/> There might just
be a wealth of information about your ancestral city or town and perhaps
even your own family.

· over 5 million records available for you to explore. Begin by visiting
<http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/>

Although 5 million records may seem like a lot, there are hundreds of
millions more that need documenting: in cemeteries, in archives in Eastern
Europe... in family histories of survivors who make up the current Jewish
communities in Eastern Europe... and in millions of records stored in the
archives in Yad Vashem.

Both a huge burial records database and placing Yad Vashem records online
are on the top of JewishGen's "wish list" for this year. The work is
already underway in the Online Worldwide Burial Registry (OWBR) and the
first of the Yad Vashem databases. However, to bring all these records
forth and to provide them to the Jewish community through our website we
absolutely must have greater support >from the people like yourselves who
have shown interest in what we are doing. Make no mistake, new projects
will only happen if each and every person just like yourself, using our
programs and services, makes the commitment to support this effort
financially to the best of their ability. Only then will we achieve major
milestones in the preservation of our family histories and in our
heritage. Only then are you likely to find that still missing piece to
your personal puzzle.

Additional information goes online only as data is acquired,
transliterated and added into data entry templates. There are hundreds
of volunteers making all this happen. They give tirelessly of their skills,
their energy, and their time. But to keep the wheels of progress spinning,
we need your financial support. It is critical that we and all these
volunteers know that the work they are performing is appreciated, is
used, and is deserving of your support. Only those who use the many facets
of JewishGen and are willing to support it financially can convey the
message we who operate behind the scenes and our volunteers worldwide need
to hear.

If you haven't already done so, now is the time to show us that what we are
doing is appreciated, utilized to the fullest and worthy of your support.
And, if you have supported us in the past, please consider renewing your
gift today. The most convenient way to make a donation is to visit our
secure credit card server where you make a donation in dollars and your
credit card will bill you in your local currency if you reside outside the
United States. The secure server is at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen-erosity/contribute.html> If you
prefer you can mail your contribution directly to our new address:

JewishGen, Inc.
2951 Marina Bay Drive, Suite 130-472
League City, TX 77573

Thanks in advance for your support and our best wishes for a Happy Passover.

Susan King Glen Strauss
President Vice President


Chag Sameach from the LitvakSIG Board of Directors #lithuania

Litvaks@...
 

The LitvakSIG Board of Directors sends best wishes for a happy and healthy
Holiday. As we remember our ancestor's journey >from slavery to freedom, let us be grateful for the blessings and privileges that we enjoy today. The festival of Passover bonds our past with our present and our future.

We Litvaks strengthen this bonding by continuing to record the history of our ancestors as we add more names to the All Lithuania Database (ALD). We are very grateful to all that have enabled us to gather and translate the first 300,000 records. Without your support, none of this would have happened. For those who have not yet contributed, we hope that you will be moved to do so during this holiday season.

Chag Sameach.

Davida Noyek Handler, President
Carol Coplin Baker, Research Groups Coordinator
Judy Baston, Moderator
Judith Caplan, Online Journal Editor
Jerry Esterson, Translations/Transliterations/Given Names Database
Dianne Feldman, Secretary
Richard H. Hoffman, Membership/Treasurer
Elliott Lipschultz, Finance Chair
Jeff Miller, Vital Records Indexing Project Manager
Anne Rothman, Database Manager
Trevor Tucker, Webmaster


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Chag Sameach from the LitvakSIG Board of Directors #lithuania

Litvaks@...
 

The LitvakSIG Board of Directors sends best wishes for a happy and healthy
Holiday. As we remember our ancestor's journey >from slavery to freedom, let us be grateful for the blessings and privileges that we enjoy today. The festival of Passover bonds our past with our present and our future.

We Litvaks strengthen this bonding by continuing to record the history of our ancestors as we add more names to the All Lithuania Database (ALD). We are very grateful to all that have enabled us to gather and translate the first 300,000 records. Without your support, none of this would have happened. For those who have not yet contributed, we hope that you will be moved to do so during this holiday season.

Chag Sameach.

Davida Noyek Handler, President
Carol Coplin Baker, Research Groups Coordinator
Judy Baston, Moderator
Judith Caplan, Online Journal Editor
Jerry Esterson, Translations/Transliterations/Given Names Database
Dianne Feldman, Secretary
Richard H. Hoffman, Membership/Treasurer
Elliott Lipschultz, Finance Chair
Jeff Miller, Vital Records Indexing Project Manager
Anne Rothman, Database Manager
Trevor Tucker, Webmaster


Re: looking for obituary in NYC ca 1902-1910 in ukraine digest: April 01, 2001 #ukraine

Judith27
 

In a recent post, Evan Fishman <ebf2001@home.com> had asked:

<< I'm trying to locate the obituary of a relative who died in New York
City
between 1902-1910. Was it common practice then for most people to have an
obituary printed? In which newspaper(s) should I look? What newspapers
would have printed obituaries of immigrant Jews during this period?>>

In my experience, I have frequently found it difficult to find an
obituary or paid death notice for a relative in NYC. Even if an immigrant
family placed an obituary -- and that can be a big if -- there was such a
plethora of papers the possible obituary/death notice could be in, both the
mainstream big metropolitan papers, as well as the local weeklies, plus the
native language ethnic papers, including the Yiddish dailies.
To give you an example, I happen to have a clipping for the funeral of
my grandfather, Jacob Langer, in the early 1940's that must have been placed
by father, who was by then already a NYC College graduate and an ordained
rabbi. The death notice was in Yiddish, and was placed in one of the Yiddish
dailies, but I don't know which daily, as only the clipping itself survived.
Since my late father read the NY Times >from cover to cover daily, obviously
he was trying to notify people who had known his father by using the Yiddish
newspaper instead of the NY Times.
If your relative died in NYC between 1902-1910, I would first look for
a NYC death certificate at the NYC Municipal Archives or contact all the
major NYC Metropolitan Jewish cemeteries to see if he/she is buried there.
Unless you already know the specific date the person died and the papers that
family read, or someone was "well-known" enough to have an obituary that is
indexed by the NYTimes in one of its volumes of Obituary Indexes (and I had
two immigrant relatives who were well-known enough by the time of their
deaths to have obituaries written for them by the Times and thus indexed),
searching for a death certificate or cemetery of burial in NYC usually would
be "easier" than trying to find a possible obituary.
Chag Sameach v'Kosher,
Judi Langer-Surnamer Caplan, Long Beach, NY


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: looking for obituary in NYC ca 1902-1910 in ukraine digest: April 01, 2001 #ukraine

Judith27
 

In a recent post, Evan Fishman <ebf2001@home.com> had asked:

<< I'm trying to locate the obituary of a relative who died in New York
City
between 1902-1910. Was it common practice then for most people to have an
obituary printed? In which newspaper(s) should I look? What newspapers
would have printed obituaries of immigrant Jews during this period?>>

In my experience, I have frequently found it difficult to find an
obituary or paid death notice for a relative in NYC. Even if an immigrant
family placed an obituary -- and that can be a big if -- there was such a
plethora of papers the possible obituary/death notice could be in, both the
mainstream big metropolitan papers, as well as the local weeklies, plus the
native language ethnic papers, including the Yiddish dailies.
To give you an example, I happen to have a clipping for the funeral of
my grandfather, Jacob Langer, in the early 1940's that must have been placed
by father, who was by then already a NYC College graduate and an ordained
rabbi. The death notice was in Yiddish, and was placed in one of the Yiddish
dailies, but I don't know which daily, as only the clipping itself survived.
Since my late father read the NY Times >from cover to cover daily, obviously
he was trying to notify people who had known his father by using the Yiddish
newspaper instead of the NY Times.
If your relative died in NYC between 1902-1910, I would first look for
a NYC death certificate at the NYC Municipal Archives or contact all the
major NYC Metropolitan Jewish cemeteries to see if he/she is buried there.
Unless you already know the specific date the person died and the papers that
family read, or someone was "well-known" enough to have an obituary that is
indexed by the NYTimes in one of its volumes of Obituary Indexes (and I had
two immigrant relatives who were well-known enough by the time of their
deaths to have obituaries written for them by the Times and thus indexed),
searching for a death certificate or cemetery of burial in NYC usually would
be "easier" than trying to find a possible obituary.
Chag Sameach v'Kosher,
Judi Langer-Surnamer Caplan, Long Beach, NY


Writing to Italy #general

Kp Man <Kp_member@...>
 

Writing to Italy:

Where to Write for What:
Comune Archives - (L'Ufficiale Di Anagrafe) Vital Records (Stato Civile)

Certificate of residency (Certificato di Residenza)

Certificate of Family Status (Certificato di Stato di Famiglia Originaria)

State Archives - (Archivio di Stato di _________<Name of Province>) Vital
Records (Stato Civile)

Registers of the Offices of Conscription (Registri degli Uffici di Leva)

Notarial Records (Minute, Attie, Bastardelli, Notarili)

Censuses (Censimenti)

Tax Assessment Records or Lists (Catasti)

Registers of Emigration and Passports (Registri dell'Emigrazione e Passaporti)

How To Format the Addresses:
If you are writing to a Comune (town) use the following (example) of an address
format: L'Ufficiale Di Anagrafe
Comune Di Salerno
84100 Salerno (SA)
ITALIA

No matter which Comune you are going to write you change only the Comune
name, Zipcode and Province code which is the (SA) above.

For the Archivio Di Stato (example): Archivio Di Stato Di Caserta
Via Apia, 1
81100 Caserta (CE)
ITALIA

No matter which Archivio Di Stato you write, you change only the Name,
Street address, Zip and Province code.

By Stephen J. Saviello,
Owner, Comunes_of_Italy Mailing List


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Writing to Italy #general

Kp Man <Kp_member@...>
 

Writing to Italy:

Where to Write for What:
Comune Archives - (L'Ufficiale Di Anagrafe) Vital Records (Stato Civile)

Certificate of residency (Certificato di Residenza)

Certificate of Family Status (Certificato di Stato di Famiglia Originaria)

State Archives - (Archivio di Stato di _________<Name of Province>) Vital
Records (Stato Civile)

Registers of the Offices of Conscription (Registri degli Uffici di Leva)

Notarial Records (Minute, Attie, Bastardelli, Notarili)

Censuses (Censimenti)

Tax Assessment Records or Lists (Catasti)

Registers of Emigration and Passports (Registri dell'Emigrazione e Passaporti)

How To Format the Addresses:
If you are writing to a Comune (town) use the following (example) of an address
format: L'Ufficiale Di Anagrafe
Comune Di Salerno
84100 Salerno (SA)
ITALIA

No matter which Comune you are going to write you change only the Comune
name, Zipcode and Province code which is the (SA) above.

For the Archivio Di Stato (example): Archivio Di Stato Di Caserta
Via Apia, 1
81100 Caserta (CE)
ITALIA

No matter which Archivio Di Stato you write, you change only the Name,
Street address, Zip and Province code.

By Stephen J. Saviello,
Owner, Comunes_of_Italy Mailing List


NY Peassenger Lists 1820-1850 #general

Suzecrazy@...
 

Can anyone help me with the passenger and immigration lists >from
NY 1820-1850? I could use some help with a look up please.
Thanks,
Susan Stock
Agoura Hills, Ca

MODERATOR NOTE: A JewishGen Infofile entitled "Passenger List Microfilms"
identifies for researchers the U.S. National Archives (NARA) microfilms of
U.S. Passenger Arrival Manifests that are available via LDS Family History
Centers. <http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/PassLists/>


Re: NYC birth certificates #general

Phyllis Kramer <phylliskramer1@...>
 

Dorothy Schaefer reported that the NY Archives were unable to find
her fathers birth certificate,

Unfortunately in the late 1800s and early 1900s, spelling was a
big problem... many wrote the surnames as they "sounded"....
When the Muni does research for you....they do not look at
alternate spellings....so I would strongly suggest you do the
research yourself...

The Mormon Family History Centers have locations in every city....
you can find them in your phone book, or at their website
http://www.familysearch.org/eng/Library/FHC/frameset_fhc.asp

You can order the birth indexes for those years....and look at all
the spellings....

Happy hunting!
Phyllis (phylliskramer1@att.net) of Wilton & Savannah
Searching KRAMER, WISNER, BEIM >from JASIENICA, Galicia
STECHER, TRACHMAN, FEIR, KORNREICH >from ZMIGROD,Galicia
LINDNER, MAUER, BERLIN, EICHEL >from ROHATYN, Galicia and YASI
SCHEINER, KANDEL, SCHIMMEL >from Strzyzow, Dubieko,Galicia
GUMBRECHT, ZIEGLER >from Hannover, Germany