Date   

Looking for Juliet Zonan or Zonand in Israel??? #general

Liverlip1 <liverlip1@...>
 

Hi there, I am looking for a Juliet Zonan (maiden name) or Zonand, who's
father's name was Max. Juliet is probably married, living in Israel, and
would be most likely in her late 60's or early 70's. If anybody can
provide any information, I would be greatful. Thank you in advance.

David Feldman

Looking for: HERMAN, FELDMAN, ZONAN or ZONAND, AND LANDSBERG

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately.


Important Soundex Guide for Wegrow/JRI-Poland Searches #general

Susan Stone <stonegs@...>
 

Recently I announced that the indices to Wegrow marriages
(1849-1895) have been added to the online Jewish Records
Indexing - Poland database.

One of the options for narrowing a JRI-Poland database search
is to select the name of the town. Generally, town searches
are not recommended by JRI-Poland because they not only
limit your potential for hits >from nearby towns, but also
they slow down the entire search system.

But, if you insist <grin> on using the Town Search feature,
there is a special point to keep in mind when searching
Wegrow indices.

There are a number of Polish letters with diacritical marks
(accents) which affect pronounciation. Some are ignored by
the search system.. such as the letters "o" and l with accents.
However, the mark under the "e" in Wegrow produces the
sound "en" and sounded out, the town becomes "Wengrow."
A search on "Wegrow" will *not* produce any results.

To successfully use the town option, you must spell the town
name as it is pronounced, "Wengrow."

To search the database go to the Jewish Records Indexing -
Poland web site at: http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/

Susan Stone
Siedlce Archive Coordinator


Superior Court,NY Co.Naturalization #general

Marcia Katzel DeVries <marciadv@...>
 

I found a record in an FHL film index to petitions for naturalizations. It
indicates that the naturalization took place at the Superior Court, NY
County, in Oct. 1890..also had the volume number and copy record number. Is
there an address for the Superior Court to obtain a copy of this
naturalization? If not, where do I write for it?

Thanks,
Marcia Katzel DeVries
Concord, CA
marciadv@msn.com

Researching:
KATZEL: Vilkomir,Lithuania>Cleveland,Ohio
BRAUER: Lithuania?;Novogrodek,Belarus?>England
BOOKATZ: Birzai,Lithuania?;Riga,Latvia?>England>Philadelphia>Cleveland,Ohio
GOLDSTEIN: Bogoslaviskis,Vilkomir,Lithuania>Cleveland,Ohio
BURSTEIN: Bogoslaviskis,Vilkomir,Lithuania>Cleveland,Ohio


Re: Buffalo (New York) Passenger List #general

BetteJoy <bettejoy@...>
 

Daniel: MC means that they entered Michigan via Michigan Central Railway.
Those records can be found at the National Archives or the Family History
Library listed under St. Albens.


Betty Provizer Starkman
Bloomfield Hills, MI


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Looking for Juliet Zonan or Zonand in Israel??? #general

Liverlip1 <liverlip1@...>
 

Hi there, I am looking for a Juliet Zonan (maiden name) or Zonand, who's
father's name was Max. Juliet is probably married, living in Israel, and
would be most likely in her late 60's or early 70's. If anybody can
provide any information, I would be greatful. Thank you in advance.

David Feldman

Looking for: HERMAN, FELDMAN, ZONAN or ZONAND, AND LANDSBERG

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Important Soundex Guide for Wegrow/JRI-Poland Searches #general

Susan Stone <stonegs@...>
 

Recently I announced that the indices to Wegrow marriages
(1849-1895) have been added to the online Jewish Records
Indexing - Poland database.

One of the options for narrowing a JRI-Poland database search
is to select the name of the town. Generally, town searches
are not recommended by JRI-Poland because they not only
limit your potential for hits >from nearby towns, but also
they slow down the entire search system.

But, if you insist <grin> on using the Town Search feature,
there is a special point to keep in mind when searching
Wegrow indices.

There are a number of Polish letters with diacritical marks
(accents) which affect pronounciation. Some are ignored by
the search system.. such as the letters "o" and l with accents.
However, the mark under the "e" in Wegrow produces the
sound "en" and sounded out, the town becomes "Wengrow."
A search on "Wegrow" will *not* produce any results.

To successfully use the town option, you must spell the town
name as it is pronounced, "Wengrow."

To search the database go to the Jewish Records Indexing -
Poland web site at: http://www.jewishgen.org/JRI-PL/

Susan Stone
Siedlce Archive Coordinator


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Superior Court,NY Co.Naturalization #general

Marcia Katzel DeVries <marciadv@...>
 

I found a record in an FHL film index to petitions for naturalizations. It
indicates that the naturalization took place at the Superior Court, NY
County, in Oct. 1890..also had the volume number and copy record number. Is
there an address for the Superior Court to obtain a copy of this
naturalization? If not, where do I write for it?

Thanks,
Marcia Katzel DeVries
Concord, CA
marciadv@msn.com

Researching:
KATZEL: Vilkomir,Lithuania>Cleveland,Ohio
BRAUER: Lithuania?;Novogrodek,Belarus?>England
BOOKATZ: Birzai,Lithuania?;Riga,Latvia?>England>Philadelphia>Cleveland,Ohio
GOLDSTEIN: Bogoslaviskis,Vilkomir,Lithuania>Cleveland,Ohio
BURSTEIN: Bogoslaviskis,Vilkomir,Lithuania>Cleveland,Ohio


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Buffalo (New York) Passenger List #general

BetteJoy <bettejoy@...>
 

Daniel: MC means that they entered Michigan via Michigan Central Railway.
Those records can be found at the National Archives or the Family History
Library listed under St. Albens.


Betty Provizer Starkman
Bloomfield Hills, MI


Re: belarus archive in MInsk #belarus

David M. Fox <fox@...>
 

Zvi Shefet wrote:

I have already mentioned to Mr. David Fox that Yad Vashem Jerusalem had
copied all the relevant documentation on Jewish subjects in the archives
of Minsk, Brest and Grodno and a part of it is already catalogued and
computorized for the use of people and institutions, gratis. There is
still a big part of the documentation to be catalogued and computorized
awaiting the appropriate budget to contineou the work. The search and
copying of the documentation was done according to the official agreement
between the institutions, some years ago. Therefor I suggest to everyone
to ask Yad Vasem Jerusalem for the equired documentation and I am sure
that you will get a good sevice.
I just want everyone to know that I did write to Yad Vashem and received
the following response:

Much of our documentation >from Belarus is in RG M.41. This record group
contains some thousands of files, and many of them are described in our
computerized databank. This databank is open to the public, but not on the
net; at the moment, most of the descriptions are not in Engllish, tho we are
working on this. Eventually the databank will be on the internet, but not
this year, and I don't know exactly when. As you correctly surmise, we do
not deal with the early 20th century - for the Soviet Union, the period of
our interest starts about 1938-19.

Sincerely,
Yaacov Lozowick
As you can see, the records >from Belarus prior to 1938 are not part of
the Yad Vashem collection. The database of holdings is not available on
the Internet and while it is available for use at Yad Vashem, we will
need someone with Hebrew language skills to view the database. If there
is anyone in Israel who can review the database and report back to the
SIG if there are any holding that would be beneficial to our
genealogical research, I am sure our members would be interested in
hearing your report.

Dave
--
David M. Fox
mailto:fox@erols.com
Arnold, MD USA
Belarus SIG Coordinator
<http://www.jewishgen.org/belarus>


Belarus SIG #Belarus RE: belarus archive in MInsk #belarus

David M. Fox <fox@...>
 

Zvi Shefet wrote:

I have already mentioned to Mr. David Fox that Yad Vashem Jerusalem had
copied all the relevant documentation on Jewish subjects in the archives
of Minsk, Brest and Grodno and a part of it is already catalogued and
computorized for the use of people and institutions, gratis. There is
still a big part of the documentation to be catalogued and computorized
awaiting the appropriate budget to contineou the work. The search and
copying of the documentation was done according to the official agreement
between the institutions, some years ago. Therefor I suggest to everyone
to ask Yad Vasem Jerusalem for the equired documentation and I am sure
that you will get a good sevice.
I just want everyone to know that I did write to Yad Vashem and received
the following response:

Much of our documentation >from Belarus is in RG M.41. This record group
contains some thousands of files, and many of them are described in our
computerized databank. This databank is open to the public, but not on the
net; at the moment, most of the descriptions are not in Engllish, tho we are
working on this. Eventually the databank will be on the internet, but not
this year, and I don't know exactly when. As you correctly surmise, we do
not deal with the early 20th century - for the Soviet Union, the period of
our interest starts about 1938-19.

Sincerely,
Yaacov Lozowick
As you can see, the records >from Belarus prior to 1938 are not part of
the Yad Vashem collection. The database of holdings is not available on
the Internet and while it is available for use at Yad Vashem, we will
need someone with Hebrew language skills to view the database. If there
is anyone in Israel who can review the database and report back to the
SIG if there are any holding that would be beneficial to our
genealogical research, I am sure our members would be interested in
hearing your report.

Dave
--
David M. Fox
mailto:fox@erols.com
Arnold, MD USA
Belarus SIG Coordinator
<http://www.jewishgen.org/belarus>


Lechovitz #belarus

Paulayne Epstein <epstein2@...>
 

Lechowitzer Ladies Auxiliary, Records 1946 - 1961 - Thank you for this
information. I'm not sure I remember that there were only ladies present,
but I do remember the topic discussed. There was someone who had survived
the Nazi slaughter of the Jewish population of Lechovitz and perhaps that
it why there was a mixed group.

Perhaps you can help solve a town name. My great-grandparents Hersh Wolf
Bressloff and Sora Rifka Trubovits Shapiro Bressloff lived a town or city
call "Kalcicinna" in Belarus. They lived on a lumber land grant >from the
Tzar to her father Tana Trubovits. Hersh died around 1914 and Sora Rofka
relocated to Kletsk before 1922.


Paulayne Epstein, Columbus, Ohio

Researching:
Shapiro family Lechowitz, Bressloff family Kletsk, Trubovits family
Belarus, Sklarsky (Shklyarsky) family Boyerka, Astrofsky family Lysanka


Belarus SIG #Belarus Lechovitz #belarus

Paulayne Epstein <epstein2@...>
 

Lechowitzer Ladies Auxiliary, Records 1946 - 1961 - Thank you for this
information. I'm not sure I remember that there were only ladies present,
but I do remember the topic discussed. There was someone who had survived
the Nazi slaughter of the Jewish population of Lechovitz and perhaps that
it why there was a mixed group.

Perhaps you can help solve a town name. My great-grandparents Hersh Wolf
Bressloff and Sora Rifka Trubovits Shapiro Bressloff lived a town or city
call "Kalcicinna" in Belarus. They lived on a lumber land grant >from the
Tzar to her father Tana Trubovits. Hersh died around 1914 and Sora Rofka
relocated to Kletsk before 1922.


Paulayne Epstein, Columbus, Ohio

Researching:
Shapiro family Lechowitz, Bressloff family Kletsk, Trubovits family
Belarus, Sklarsky (Shklyarsky) family Boyerka, Astrofsky family Lysanka


National Historical Archives of Belarus in Minsk #belarus

Stephen A. Cohen
 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------
Name: Stephen A. Cohen (JewishGen #12106)
East Meadow NY (Long Island) - USA
E-mail: gen@optonline.net
Fax: (516) 826-5056 (24 hrs)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
Steve Rosen who is a member of the Vilieka Uyezd (district) research
group forwarded the below web site to me. Although it certainly has
a lot of information for our district, in exploring it further I found
the following page which will be of interest to most members of the SIG:

http://www.president.gov.by/gosarchives/EMk/eMetrprav.htm#vvileyk

Many of the Belarus links were in Belarussian I hope one or more members
of the SIG who can understand the language will explore the site in
greater detail to find out what addition data it contains which may be
helpful to our membership.

Some of the English links to this site proved to be fascinating like the
UNESCO list of archives worldwide:

http://www.unesco.org/webworld/portal_archives/

Best regards,

Stephen A. Cohen


Coordinator: Vilieka Uyezd (district) of Belarus

Researching:
Germany: BAUM in Bosen; EISENKRAMER, MARX & LEFEVRE, LEFEBVRE, LEFEBRE
in Rhineland Palatine//Belarus: BASIST, BASHIST in Lida Dist; COHEN
formerly SHINHAUS SHEINHOUS, SHEINHOUSE,SHEINHAUS,SCHEINHAUS,SHEINHUEZ,
SHEINGAUZ,SHEINHAUZ in Radoshkovichi, Molodechno in the Vilieka Dist//
Galicia: BIRNBAUM,GOLDBERG, LEINKRAM in Krakow; GELLER in Mielec;
SCHNEPS, SHNEPS,SZNEPS in Dembitz, Tarnow; KREINDLER; ECKSTEIN


Belarus SIG #Belarus National Historical Archives of Belarus in Minsk #belarus

Stephen A. Cohen
 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------
Name: Stephen A. Cohen (JewishGen #12106)
East Meadow NY (Long Island) - USA
E-mail: gen@optonline.net
Fax: (516) 826-5056 (24 hrs)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
Steve Rosen who is a member of the Vilieka Uyezd (district) research
group forwarded the below web site to me. Although it certainly has
a lot of information for our district, in exploring it further I found
the following page which will be of interest to most members of the SIG:

http://www.president.gov.by/gosarchives/EMk/eMetrprav.htm#vvileyk

Many of the Belarus links were in Belarussian I hope one or more members
of the SIG who can understand the language will explore the site in
greater detail to find out what addition data it contains which may be
helpful to our membership.

Some of the English links to this site proved to be fascinating like the
UNESCO list of archives worldwide:

http://www.unesco.org/webworld/portal_archives/

Best regards,

Stephen A. Cohen


Coordinator: Vilieka Uyezd (district) of Belarus

Researching:
Germany: BAUM in Bosen; EISENKRAMER, MARX & LEFEVRE, LEFEBVRE, LEFEBRE
in Rhineland Palatine//Belarus: BASIST, BASHIST in Lida Dist; COHEN
formerly SHINHAUS SHEINHOUS, SHEINHOUSE,SHEINHAUS,SCHEINHAUS,SHEINHUEZ,
SHEINGAUZ,SHEINHAUZ in Radoshkovichi, Molodechno in the Vilieka Dist//
Galicia: BIRNBAUM,GOLDBERG, LEINKRAM in Krakow; GELLER in Mielec;
SCHNEPS, SHNEPS,SZNEPS in Dembitz, Tarnow; KREINDLER; ECKSTEIN


Re: The Rashi Connection/Correction #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 3/6/2001 11:24:31 PM Eastern Standard Time, dver@yucs.org
cites me:

<<
> ==I don't think that's borne out by the facts. 5 generations a century
> suggests that the average age of a parent when a child was born was 20.
> That is most ulikely; even 4 generations would suggest an average age of
> 25 at the birth of a child. >from the data I have collected (back to the
> 16th/17th century, in Germany) the avergae age would have been more like
> 33, or three generations per century.

and responds:
. . . The following is conjecture on my part. You have been warned.
Your data going bach to the 16th and 17th centuries is not necessarily
valid for the earlier centuries.
==Not necessarily--which is why I defined it carefully

I am writing in detail here because it is often necessary to guess an age
of parenthood (or of the father's and grandfather's date of birth) and
there are many facors involved in this estimation. And, as explained
below, men were likely to become fathers somewhat earlier in Eastern
Europe where the Jews were usually welcomed by the princelings and had no
need to accumulate personal wealth before they could marry.

Marc DVer continues:
. . . Its reasonable to assume that the
traditions of marrying early, that were seen in Litvish country for the
longest times, would have been prevalent in the 10th and 11th century
German communities.
==Nothing reasonable in this argument. I think you will find that early
marriages in Litta started only after the area fell under Russian rule and
Jewish boys were forcibly conscripted into the army to "Russianize" them

. . . This is based on the cultural differences between the
Jews of the earlier and later time periods. Though very traditional in
both periods, the cultural environment in Germany in the later parts of
the millennium, especially starting in the 17th century, would have
brought about a more "modern" approach to Judaism. That would have
caused an increase in the marrige age. However, in earlier times, the
Jewish community was more isolated >from the Gentile community. Such
separation would have increased the practice of traditional Judaism, with
a resultant earlier marrige age.

==Jews, except for the select few, were isolated >from the non-Jewish
culture and values. Significant cultural "modernization" started only
after 1805 (Napoleon).

==The Mishna in "Avot" (ca 200 CE) states "when a boy is 18 he is ready
for marriage," i.e. 18 is the minimum age. This obtained in the Hold
Land, during a period of relative stability and security with Jews still
firmly settled in rural areas, living on family land.

==even assuming that the average age at marriage in Western/central Europe
was 18, the oldest child in a family would be born when the father was 19
years old, the youngest when he was 45. That gives us an average age of
father at birth of child as 32.

==However, life for Jews in the Germanic region was far >from tranquil
after the first crusade. Jews were continuously driven out of one town,
or one region, after another (which is the reason why so many of them
migrated eastward). Before he could marry, a young man would have to
establish himself financially, and pay a considerable sum in "protection"
money to the local princeling or bishop. Very often a son had to wait
until his father was dead before he could obtain the right to live in his
village.

==The oldest son would be more likely to be given the opportunity to marry
young, and if his fatherr was a rabbi, he too might become a rabbi and
marry fairly young, but only *after* he was ordained and earned a
reputation. Younger sons had to struggle to have the means to support a
family--and were often not allowed by community pressure to marry until
they had "married off" all their sisters.

==An examination of rabbinic family trees going back to Rashi would give
some indications of how many generations passed between, say 1000 and
1600. When you do that, however, remember that these lists will give you
mostly the rabbis in each generation and these would marry at a much
younger age than their brothers. So when we count generations, this
rabbinic descent is a significant underestimation of the average age of a
father at the son's birth and an overestimation of the average number of
generations per century.

Happy Purim to all

Michael Bernet, New York

WOLFF (Pfungstadt, Frankfurt/M, Koenigsberg, Amsterdam, N.Carolina); BERNET,
BERNERT, JONDORF(Frensdorf, Bamberg, Nurnberg); FEUCHTWANGER
(Schwabach, Hagenbach & Fuerth); KONIGSHOFER (anywhere); BERG, WOLF(F),
(Demmelsdorf & Zeckendorf); Shim`on GUTENSTEIN (Bad Homburg ca 1760);
FRENSDORF/ER (anywhere); MAINZER (Lorsch); anyone in Ermreuth or Floss;
GOLDSCHMIDT (B. Homburg, Hessdorf). ALTMANN (Silesia); TIMMENDORFER


Re: Kraukawice #general

NFatouros@...
 

In her 3-6-01 message Jessica Tropp said she could not find the town of
"Kraukowice," Galicia, anywhere and she asked whether it was the same as
"Krakow."

My 1962 Columbia-Lippincott Gazetteer referred me >from its entry for
"Krakowiec" (there was none for "Kaukowice") to its entry for "Krakovets."
There it said that Krakovets is in the west Lvov oblast,on the Polish
Border. It is ten miles west of "Yavorov" [or 'Jaworow"] In 1931 it had a
population of 1,706, which did sawmilling and raised or processed grain.

Chester G. Cohen also has an entry for Krakowiec, but it is listed under
his entry for Krakovitz. He says it is east of Yaroslav, lists the names f
some subsribers to a book, and adds that a Rabbi Yitzchak Yehoshua Kluger
(b.1867) was the town's rabbi.

The name of the town also appears several times in Suzan Wynne's "Finding
Your Roots in Galicia."

Naomi Fatouros (nee FELDMAN)
Bloomington, Indiana
NFatouros@aol.com
Researching: BELKOWSKY, Odessa, Berdichev; FELDMAN, Pinsk; SHUTZ, SCHUTZ,
Shcherets; LEVY, Mulhouse;SAS, Podwolochisk; RAPOPORT, Tarnopol; BEHAM,
Salok, Kharkov.
03-07-01


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: The Rashi Connection/Correction #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 3/6/2001 11:24:31 PM Eastern Standard Time, dver@yucs.org
cites me:

<<
> ==I don't think that's borne out by the facts. 5 generations a century
> suggests that the average age of a parent when a child was born was 20.
> That is most ulikely; even 4 generations would suggest an average age of
> 25 at the birth of a child. >from the data I have collected (back to the
> 16th/17th century, in Germany) the avergae age would have been more like
> 33, or three generations per century.

and responds:
. . . The following is conjecture on my part. You have been warned.
Your data going bach to the 16th and 17th centuries is not necessarily
valid for the earlier centuries.
==Not necessarily--which is why I defined it carefully

I am writing in detail here because it is often necessary to guess an age
of parenthood (or of the father's and grandfather's date of birth) and
there are many facors involved in this estimation. And, as explained
below, men were likely to become fathers somewhat earlier in Eastern
Europe where the Jews were usually welcomed by the princelings and had no
need to accumulate personal wealth before they could marry.

Marc DVer continues:
. . . Its reasonable to assume that the
traditions of marrying early, that were seen in Litvish country for the
longest times, would have been prevalent in the 10th and 11th century
German communities.
==Nothing reasonable in this argument. I think you will find that early
marriages in Litta started only after the area fell under Russian rule and
Jewish boys were forcibly conscripted into the army to "Russianize" them

. . . This is based on the cultural differences between the
Jews of the earlier and later time periods. Though very traditional in
both periods, the cultural environment in Germany in the later parts of
the millennium, especially starting in the 17th century, would have
brought about a more "modern" approach to Judaism. That would have
caused an increase in the marrige age. However, in earlier times, the
Jewish community was more isolated >from the Gentile community. Such
separation would have increased the practice of traditional Judaism, with
a resultant earlier marrige age.

==Jews, except for the select few, were isolated >from the non-Jewish
culture and values. Significant cultural "modernization" started only
after 1805 (Napoleon).

==The Mishna in "Avot" (ca 200 CE) states "when a boy is 18 he is ready
for marriage," i.e. 18 is the minimum age. This obtained in the Hold
Land, during a period of relative stability and security with Jews still
firmly settled in rural areas, living on family land.

==even assuming that the average age at marriage in Western/central Europe
was 18, the oldest child in a family would be born when the father was 19
years old, the youngest when he was 45. That gives us an average age of
father at birth of child as 32.

==However, life for Jews in the Germanic region was far >from tranquil
after the first crusade. Jews were continuously driven out of one town,
or one region, after another (which is the reason why so many of them
migrated eastward). Before he could marry, a young man would have to
establish himself financially, and pay a considerable sum in "protection"
money to the local princeling or bishop. Very often a son had to wait
until his father was dead before he could obtain the right to live in his
village.

==The oldest son would be more likely to be given the opportunity to marry
young, and if his fatherr was a rabbi, he too might become a rabbi and
marry fairly young, but only *after* he was ordained and earned a
reputation. Younger sons had to struggle to have the means to support a
family--and were often not allowed by community pressure to marry until
they had "married off" all their sisters.

==An examination of rabbinic family trees going back to Rashi would give
some indications of how many generations passed between, say 1000 and
1600. When you do that, however, remember that these lists will give you
mostly the rabbis in each generation and these would marry at a much
younger age than their brothers. So when we count generations, this
rabbinic descent is a significant underestimation of the average age of a
father at the son's birth and an overestimation of the average number of
generations per century.

Happy Purim to all

Michael Bernet, New York

WOLFF (Pfungstadt, Frankfurt/M, Koenigsberg, Amsterdam, N.Carolina); BERNET,
BERNERT, JONDORF(Frensdorf, Bamberg, Nurnberg); FEUCHTWANGER
(Schwabach, Hagenbach & Fuerth); KONIGSHOFER (anywhere); BERG, WOLF(F),
(Demmelsdorf & Zeckendorf); Shim`on GUTENSTEIN (Bad Homburg ca 1760);
FRENSDORF/ER (anywhere); MAINZER (Lorsch); anyone in Ermreuth or Floss;
GOLDSCHMIDT (B. Homburg, Hessdorf). ALTMANN (Silesia); TIMMENDORFER


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Kraukawice #general

NFatouros@...
 

In her 3-6-01 message Jessica Tropp said she could not find the town of
"Kraukowice," Galicia, anywhere and she asked whether it was the same as
"Krakow."

My 1962 Columbia-Lippincott Gazetteer referred me >from its entry for
"Krakowiec" (there was none for "Kaukowice") to its entry for "Krakovets."
There it said that Krakovets is in the west Lvov oblast,on the Polish
Border. It is ten miles west of "Yavorov" [or 'Jaworow"] In 1931 it had a
population of 1,706, which did sawmilling and raised or processed grain.

Chester G. Cohen also has an entry for Krakowiec, but it is listed under
his entry for Krakovitz. He says it is east of Yaroslav, lists the names f
some subsribers to a book, and adds that a Rabbi Yitzchak Yehoshua Kluger
(b.1867) was the town's rabbi.

The name of the town also appears several times in Suzan Wynne's "Finding
Your Roots in Galicia."

Naomi Fatouros (nee FELDMAN)
Bloomington, Indiana
NFatouros@aol.com
Researching: BELKOWSKY, Odessa, Berdichev; FELDMAN, Pinsk; SHUTZ, SCHUTZ,
Shcherets; LEVY, Mulhouse;SAS, Podwolochisk; RAPOPORT, Tarnopol; BEHAM,
Salok, Kharkov.
03-07-01


Searching for BERNSTEIN #general

mhcs2@...
 

I am searching for the grandchildren of Morris and Rose Bernstein who
lived in Glens Falls, New York and were partners in a junk business with
Louis Kaplan around the turn of the century. The following were their
children:
Abraham born in Pennsylvania in 1892
Anna born in New York 1895
Samuel, born in New York in 1898

Children were raised in Glens Falls, NY. Abraham joined the Navy and by
1920 lived in New YOrk City, as did Anna. Samuel headed Union Waste and
Metal Corp in Glens Falls in 1924, resided in NY in 1925. Rose Bernstein
the mother lived in New YOrk City by 1924.

Does anyone know the grandchildren of Abraham, Anna and/or Samuel?

Any clue would be appreciated. Rose Bernstein was the sister of Louis
Kaplan.
Thank you in advance.
Marcia Silberfarb
Bethesda, Maryland


I want add some. Sergei ( Moscow, Russian searching\translating ). #general

Sergei Komarov <komarov_sergei@...>
 

Dear friends!
Letters started go in, I shell try answer everybody privetly.
I want add some.

1. Tell me please exactly if you can speak Russian, my native language.
Some people add some sentensis on Russian, it's very pleasure for me, but
I need to know what language you prefer.

2. Please, write me some short information about youself in case you want
I tell it when I phone your relative. May be some info that you mind have
to help him remember about you are, may be some facts, more than the
surname the only. But if you haven't more, I shall try help you also.

3. I'm sorry my bad English. Who correct my mistakes, I thank you.

4. For my own searching in NY:

As I know now ( and it's the fine result to my search !) by the help of
the conferens, my father Goseph(Iosif)Gegerman worked in the newspaper
"Der Algemeiner Zhournal" in NY during 5 years 1974-1979. He went into US,
Chicago on feb.1974 and became the citizen of US aprocsimally 1981. As he
was writing me he was a reporter in the department of letters. He also
wrote the book named "Invasion penguins to Chicago", some verses and the
play. When he died 1989, his friend Anatoliy Binshtok went to Moscow, we
met, and he gave me the book. But the book and the address of Bishtok ( he
alive know )was lost. May be you mind such people or people who worked
with my father in newspaper.

Thank you.
Sergei. Moscow. Write privetly komarov_sergei@mail.ru or prokat@comtv.ru