Date   

Castle Garden #belarus

Jack R. Braverman <jbraverman1@...>
 

One of the best and most easy-to-read books about immigration (including
the crossing
conditions) is _Ellis Island_ by Wilton S. Tifft, Contemporary Books, 199=
0.
Lot'sa good pix.

Anyway, Castle Garden opened in 1885 on a narrow strip of landfill on the=

southwestern tip of
the Battery. Originally it was a fort, and then it was converted into an
opera house. (Jenny Lind
sang there.) Near the end of the 19th century, it became obvious that the=

facility was not large
enough to handle the thousands of arriving people, so the Secretary of th=
e
Treasury, in 1890,
assumed control of all immigration matters in NYC. The search for a bette=
r
place began, and
ended at Ellis Island.

Castle Garden was closed in 1890. Temporary examination arrangements were=

made at the Barge
Office in Lower Manhattan's Battery Park. The first passengers came throu=
gh
on April 19, 1890.

Ellis Island opened in 1892.

* * * * *

The Barge Office had been maintained for first class and cabin class
passengers, who did not get
processed with the hoi polloi at Castle Garden. This separation was
maintained after Ellis Island
was opened. The first two classes were generally examined on the boats an=
d
then taken off to be
put ashore on the docks of NYC directly.

Since the Passenger Lists were made up by the shipping company before the=

ship reached the
U.S., first and cabin class names appear at the beginning of each List,
even though they did not
pass through Ellis Island.

* * * * *

It's entirely possible that your ancestors did not come through Ellis
Island, as such. Before you
buy one of those memorial bricks at the National Park, better check the
arrival dates.


Jack Braverman
Cleveland OH


Trans-Atlantic Crossings #belarus

Larry Freund and Gloria Berkenstat Freund <glory1@...>
 

Many immigrants who began their trip to North America in Russia and Europe
made stops of varying length and for various reasons in Britain (traveling,
for example, >from Hamburg to London, then later >from Liverpool to New York).
And some of them made use of a London institution called The Poor Jews'
Temporary Shelter. An online database with the names of the people who
stayed there is available at
http://chrysalis.its.uct.ac.za/shelter/shelter.htm

The information in the database can at least suggest the date of an
immigrants' arrival in Britain. I was skeptical about the utility of this
listing, but became a believer when I found my grandfather's name among the
temporary shelterees.

Larry Freund
glory1@worldnet.att.net
New York, NY


Belarus SIG #Belarus Castle Garden #belarus

Jack R. Braverman <jbraverman1@...>
 

One of the best and most easy-to-read books about immigration (including
the crossing
conditions) is _Ellis Island_ by Wilton S. Tifft, Contemporary Books, 199=
0.
Lot'sa good pix.

Anyway, Castle Garden opened in 1885 on a narrow strip of landfill on the=

southwestern tip of
the Battery. Originally it was a fort, and then it was converted into an
opera house. (Jenny Lind
sang there.) Near the end of the 19th century, it became obvious that the=

facility was not large
enough to handle the thousands of arriving people, so the Secretary of th=
e
Treasury, in 1890,
assumed control of all immigration matters in NYC. The search for a bette=
r
place began, and
ended at Ellis Island.

Castle Garden was closed in 1890. Temporary examination arrangements were=

made at the Barge
Office in Lower Manhattan's Battery Park. The first passengers came throu=
gh
on April 19, 1890.

Ellis Island opened in 1892.

* * * * *

The Barge Office had been maintained for first class and cabin class
passengers, who did not get
processed with the hoi polloi at Castle Garden. This separation was
maintained after Ellis Island
was opened. The first two classes were generally examined on the boats an=
d
then taken off to be
put ashore on the docks of NYC directly.

Since the Passenger Lists were made up by the shipping company before the=

ship reached the
U.S., first and cabin class names appear at the beginning of each List,
even though they did not
pass through Ellis Island.

* * * * *

It's entirely possible that your ancestors did not come through Ellis
Island, as such. Before you
buy one of those memorial bricks at the National Park, better check the
arrival dates.


Jack Braverman
Cleveland OH


Belarus SIG #Belarus Trans-Atlantic Crossings #belarus

Larry Freund and Gloria Berkenstat Freund <glory1@...>
 

Many immigrants who began their trip to North America in Russia and Europe
made stops of varying length and for various reasons in Britain (traveling,
for example, >from Hamburg to London, then later >from Liverpool to New York).
And some of them made use of a London institution called The Poor Jews'
Temporary Shelter. An online database with the names of the people who
stayed there is available at
http://chrysalis.its.uct.ac.za/shelter/shelter.htm

The information in the database can at least suggest the date of an
immigrants' arrival in Britain. I was skeptical about the utility of this
listing, but became a believer when I found my grandfather's name among the
temporary shelterees.

Larry Freund
glory1@worldnet.att.net
New York, NY


HEADS UP, Moving Day for JewishGen! #general

Carol Skydell <cskydell@...>
 

For immediate release to all mailing lists and discussion groups:

Lyris (our mailing list program) will be brought down at 9 a.m. central
time Wednesday Feb 14th as part of the JewishGen move to new facilities.
This means that no mail will be going in or out for any of the JewishGen
SIGs, Research or Study Groups or any of the hosted organizations mailing
lists. The JewishGen Discussion Group is also involved.

The physical move for all the equipment will take place beginning about 11
a.m. on Wednesday, and while we estimate somewhere between two and four
hours downtime, there is no way to be certain. One thing we do know for
certain and cannot emphasize strongly enough.

Not only was this an unanticipated move, therefor **unbudgeted** there has
been an extraordinary 33% increase in usage over the last few months. Last
year we were all exhilerated and tremendously gratified at seeing a fairly
constant monthly hit rate of 3 million visitors to the JewishGen website .
The January 2001 stats showed nearly 4 million hits....3,962,394 to be
exact!

Numbers like that indicate that increased bandwidth will be needed very
soon in order to keep our JewishGen information highway open and available
to all as a public service.

If you have not made a donation to JewishGen recently, **now** is the time.
We need to pay for the move, we need to be able to pay for whatever
technical support will be required to get us up and running at our new
location, our monthly costs will be rising based on the need for increased
bandwidth....what else can we list to encourage our user base to become
part of our financial support base. Less than 2500 financial supporters
cannot continue to hold up 10 times their number in the user base.

So, we urge that those of you who have never ever donated whatever you can
afford to keep JewishGen alive and viable, please, do it now.

http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/Operations.html

Many thanks for your anticipated support

Carol

Carol Skydell, Vice President JewishGen Operations


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen HEADS UP, Moving Day for JewishGen! #general

Carol Skydell <cskydell@...>
 

For immediate release to all mailing lists and discussion groups:

Lyris (our mailing list program) will be brought down at 9 a.m. central
time Wednesday Feb 14th as part of the JewishGen move to new facilities.
This means that no mail will be going in or out for any of the JewishGen
SIGs, Research or Study Groups or any of the hosted organizations mailing
lists. The JewishGen Discussion Group is also involved.

The physical move for all the equipment will take place beginning about 11
a.m. on Wednesday, and while we estimate somewhere between two and four
hours downtime, there is no way to be certain. One thing we do know for
certain and cannot emphasize strongly enough.

Not only was this an unanticipated move, therefor **unbudgeted** there has
been an extraordinary 33% increase in usage over the last few months. Last
year we were all exhilerated and tremendously gratified at seeing a fairly
constant monthly hit rate of 3 million visitors to the JewishGen website .
The January 2001 stats showed nearly 4 million hits....3,962,394 to be
exact!

Numbers like that indicate that increased bandwidth will be needed very
soon in order to keep our JewishGen information highway open and available
to all as a public service.

If you have not made a donation to JewishGen recently, **now** is the time.
We need to pay for the move, we need to be able to pay for whatever
technical support will be required to get us up and running at our new
location, our monthly costs will be rising based on the need for increased
bandwidth....what else can we list to encourage our user base to become
part of our financial support base. Less than 2500 financial supporters
cannot continue to hold up 10 times their number in the user base.

So, we urge that those of you who have never ever donated whatever you can
afford to keep JewishGen alive and viable, please, do it now.

http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/Operations.html

Many thanks for your anticipated support

Carol

Carol Skydell, Vice President JewishGen Operations


Reasons behind name changes #ukraine

Carlos Glikson
 

The posting of a summary of reasons behind name changes in the Belarus SIG,
brought new mails with added reasons.

Florence Elman mentioned this question appears to be "a basic question that
everyone doing genealogy seems to ask" and suggested posting the summary to
the Ukraine SIG too.

Different times, areas, and circumstances, and also different >from the
unfairly blamed clerk in Ellis Island! Here is an additional summary of
comments in the Belarus SIG . More varied facts and theories mentioned in
mails for name change reasons - some better known, others not so much:

+Merely a transliteration of the true surname into another language

+With the lack of a long history of surnames, aliases were "no big deal"

+Changed the name to something else: maybe other family names - a maiden
name, the married name of a niece or sister, etc.

+Cases in which it turned out that the "original" surname in fact was the
maiden surname of a grandmother, great-grandmother, etc in the family

+It wasn't uncommon for Jewish men to adopt their wife's surname if she came
from a more prominent family, perhaps a wellknown Rabbinic family.
+It was changed to avoid military service.

+Giving sons to families who only had daughters, the sons adopted the new
family names, and thus were exempt under the oldest son rule.

+Changed his name at some stage on the trip over in fear of the long arm of
the czar's law

+People immigrating after obtaining a false passport.

+Anyone could buy a passport of a deceased person.... rather than wait and
go through all the red tape of getting one of their own.

+Mother dressing son as a young girl to get him out of the country, thereby
avoiding being drafted. This meant they had to get a passport for him - a
false one.

+Finding out that they could not get not get an American Visa to enter the
USA with their Russian passport, since at that time the US did not recognize
the Bolschevik government as legitimate. Then obtaining a third country
passport by paying off (for example, a political figure in Romania), and
with that obtaining an American Visa (changing the origin information for
the place where they bought their passports).

+Discussing this beforehand and all deciding to use a same name, maybe of
someone in the US they knew with that name, either related or not.

+Relatives who already were in the US paying the tickets for their relatives
in Russia to come to the US. When the emigrants came to the outgoing port ,
finding that the tickets were issued in the name of the relatives in the US
and therefore the emigrants travelled on the surname of their American
relatives.

+Members of the family immigrating earlier, then sending for the rest of the
family and telling them what name to use.

+Kept the false name until they had it "legally" changed back when they
obtained citizenship.

+After some years in the new country people changing their surname because
the old one was hard to pronounce, hard to spell, or just sounded too
Russian/Jewish etc.

+Fear of rejection when looking for work for being a little 'Jew-girl'

+The new name was a nicer-sounding name for America, the immigrant thought
it sounded nicer or more English.

These reasons could also help to look into other cases and pinpoint the
reason for the change in names.

Carlos Glikson
Buenos Aires, Argentina
e-Mail cglikson@iname.com

Searching for:
GLIKSON, GLICKSON, GLUCKSOHN, GLUECKSOHN (Suwalki, Marijampole, Augustow,
Sejny,Sopotkin) - ALPEROVICH, ALPEROWICZ (Kremenchug, Vilno) - POKROISKY,
POKROJSKI, POKROY (Suwalki, Seirijai) - HOLLANDERSKY, HOLLENDERSKI,
HOLLANDER (Suwalki, Seirijai, Lomza) - TARNOPOLSKY, TARNOPOL (Kremenchug,
Kharkov) - FELCHINSKY (Kremenchug, Vilno) - KARP (Grodno) - GOLUMBIEWSKY,
GOLOMB (?) - KRASNAPOLSKY (?)


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Reasons behind name changes #ukraine

Carlos Glikson
 

The posting of a summary of reasons behind name changes in the Belarus SIG,
brought new mails with added reasons.

Florence Elman mentioned this question appears to be "a basic question that
everyone doing genealogy seems to ask" and suggested posting the summary to
the Ukraine SIG too.

Different times, areas, and circumstances, and also different >from the
unfairly blamed clerk in Ellis Island! Here is an additional summary of
comments in the Belarus SIG . More varied facts and theories mentioned in
mails for name change reasons - some better known, others not so much:

+Merely a transliteration of the true surname into another language

+With the lack of a long history of surnames, aliases were "no big deal"

+Changed the name to something else: maybe other family names - a maiden
name, the married name of a niece or sister, etc.

+Cases in which it turned out that the "original" surname in fact was the
maiden surname of a grandmother, great-grandmother, etc in the family

+It wasn't uncommon for Jewish men to adopt their wife's surname if she came
from a more prominent family, perhaps a wellknown Rabbinic family.
+It was changed to avoid military service.

+Giving sons to families who only had daughters, the sons adopted the new
family names, and thus were exempt under the oldest son rule.

+Changed his name at some stage on the trip over in fear of the long arm of
the czar's law

+People immigrating after obtaining a false passport.

+Anyone could buy a passport of a deceased person.... rather than wait and
go through all the red tape of getting one of their own.

+Mother dressing son as a young girl to get him out of the country, thereby
avoiding being drafted. This meant they had to get a passport for him - a
false one.

+Finding out that they could not get not get an American Visa to enter the
USA with their Russian passport, since at that time the US did not recognize
the Bolschevik government as legitimate. Then obtaining a third country
passport by paying off (for example, a political figure in Romania), and
with that obtaining an American Visa (changing the origin information for
the place where they bought their passports).

+Discussing this beforehand and all deciding to use a same name, maybe of
someone in the US they knew with that name, either related or not.

+Relatives who already were in the US paying the tickets for their relatives
in Russia to come to the US. When the emigrants came to the outgoing port ,
finding that the tickets were issued in the name of the relatives in the US
and therefore the emigrants travelled on the surname of their American
relatives.

+Members of the family immigrating earlier, then sending for the rest of the
family and telling them what name to use.

+Kept the false name until they had it "legally" changed back when they
obtained citizenship.

+After some years in the new country people changing their surname because
the old one was hard to pronounce, hard to spell, or just sounded too
Russian/Jewish etc.

+Fear of rejection when looking for work for being a little 'Jew-girl'

+The new name was a nicer-sounding name for America, the immigrant thought
it sounded nicer or more English.

These reasons could also help to look into other cases and pinpoint the
reason for the change in names.

Carlos Glikson
Buenos Aires, Argentina
e-Mail cglikson@iname.com

Searching for:
GLIKSON, GLICKSON, GLUCKSOHN, GLUECKSOHN (Suwalki, Marijampole, Augustow,
Sejny,Sopotkin) - ALPEROVICH, ALPEROWICZ (Kremenchug, Vilno) - POKROISKY,
POKROJSKI, POKROY (Suwalki, Seirijai) - HOLLANDERSKY, HOLLENDERSKI,
HOLLANDER (Suwalki, Seirijai, Lomza) - TARNOPOLSKY, TARNOPOL (Kremenchug,
Kharkov) - FELCHINSKY (Kremenchug, Vilno) - KARP (Grodno) - GOLUMBIEWSKY,
GOLOMB (?) - KRASNAPOLSKY (?)


HEADS UP, Moving Day for JewishGen! #ukraine

Carol Skydell <cskydell@...>
 

For immediate release to all mailing lists and discussion groups:

Lyris (our mailing list program) will be brought down at 9 a.m. central
time Wednesday Feb 14th as part of the JewishGen move to new facilities.
This means that no mail will be going in or out for any of the JewishGen
SIGs, Research or Study Groups or any of the hosted organizations mailing
lists. The JewishGen Discussion Group is also involved.

The physical move for all the equipment will take place beginning about 11
a.m. on Wednesday, and while we estimate somewhere between two and four
hours downtime, there is no way to be certain. One thing we do know for
certain and cannot emphasize strongly enough.

Not only was this an unanticipated move, therefor **unbudgeted** there has
been an extraordinary 33% increase in usage over the last few months. Last
year we were all exhilerated and tremendously gratified at seeing a fairly
constant monthly hit rate of 3 million visitors to the JewishGen website .
The January 2001 stats showed nearly 4 million hits....3,962,394 to be
exact!

Numbers like that indicate that increased bandwidth will be needed very
soon in order to keep our JewishGen information highway open and available
to all as a public service.

If you have not made a donation to JewishGen recently, **now** is the time.
We need to pay for the move, we need to be able to pay for whatever
technical support will be required to get us up and running at our new
location, our monthly costs will be rising based on the need for increased
bandwidth....what else can we list to encourage our user base to become
part of our financial support base. Less than 2500 financial supporters
cannot continue to hold up 10 times their number in the user base.

So, we urge that those of you who have never ever donated whatever you can
afford to keep JewishGen alive and viable, please, do it now.

http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/Operations.html

Many thanks for your anticipated support

Carol

Carol Skydell, Vice President JewishGen Operations


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine HEADS UP, Moving Day for JewishGen! #ukraine

Carol Skydell <cskydell@...>
 

For immediate release to all mailing lists and discussion groups:

Lyris (our mailing list program) will be brought down at 9 a.m. central
time Wednesday Feb 14th as part of the JewishGen move to new facilities.
This means that no mail will be going in or out for any of the JewishGen
SIGs, Research or Study Groups or any of the hosted organizations mailing
lists. The JewishGen Discussion Group is also involved.

The physical move for all the equipment will take place beginning about 11
a.m. on Wednesday, and while we estimate somewhere between two and four
hours downtime, there is no way to be certain. One thing we do know for
certain and cannot emphasize strongly enough.

Not only was this an unanticipated move, therefor **unbudgeted** there has
been an extraordinary 33% increase in usage over the last few months. Last
year we were all exhilerated and tremendously gratified at seeing a fairly
constant monthly hit rate of 3 million visitors to the JewishGen website .
The January 2001 stats showed nearly 4 million hits....3,962,394 to be
exact!

Numbers like that indicate that increased bandwidth will be needed very
soon in order to keep our JewishGen information highway open and available
to all as a public service.

If you have not made a donation to JewishGen recently, **now** is the time.
We need to pay for the move, we need to be able to pay for whatever
technical support will be required to get us up and running at our new
location, our monthly costs will be rising based on the need for increased
bandwidth....what else can we list to encourage our user base to become
part of our financial support base. Less than 2500 financial supporters
cannot continue to hold up 10 times their number in the user base.

So, we urge that those of you who have never ever donated whatever you can
afford to keep JewishGen alive and viable, please, do it now.

http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/Operations.html

Many thanks for your anticipated support

Carol

Carol Skydell, Vice President JewishGen Operations


Re: SIMONS= SHIMON? #ukraine

NFatouros@...
 

In her message of 2-12-01 Anne Blanchard asked what her family surname
might have been, having been told by relatives that it may have been
pronounced something like "cheman."

Perhaps the original name was really SHIMON, which can be a first or last
name.


In Russian "cheman" means "shaman," but possibly the name SIMONDs was a
Anglication of the biblical "Simon" or "Shimon."


Naomi Fatouros (nee FELDMAN)
Bloomington, Indiana
NFatouros@aol.com
Researching: BELKOWSKY, Odessa, Berdichev; FELDMAN, Pinsk; SHUTZ, SCHUTZ,
Shcherets; LEVY, Mulhouse;SAS, Podwolochisk; RAPOPORT, Tarnopol; BEHAM,
Salok, Kharkov.


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: SIMONS= SHIMON? #ukraine

NFatouros@...
 

In her message of 2-12-01 Anne Blanchard asked what her family surname
might have been, having been told by relatives that it may have been
pronounced something like "cheman."

Perhaps the original name was really SHIMON, which can be a first or last
name.


In Russian "cheman" means "shaman," but possibly the name SIMONDs was a
Anglication of the biblical "Simon" or "Shimon."


Naomi Fatouros (nee FELDMAN)
Bloomington, Indiana
NFatouros@aol.com
Researching: BELKOWSKY, Odessa, Berdichev; FELDMAN, Pinsk; SHUTZ, SCHUTZ,
Shcherets; LEVY, Mulhouse;SAS, Podwolochisk; RAPOPORT, Tarnopol; BEHAM,
Salok, Kharkov.


Uman #ukraine

Merrill Paletz <mpaletz@...>
 

If anyone has any luck obtaining records >from Uman, please let me know.

Merrill Paletz <mpaletz@erols.com>


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Uman #ukraine

Merrill Paletz <mpaletz@...>
 

If anyone has any luck obtaining records >from Uman, please let me know.

Merrill Paletz <mpaletz@erols.com>


Re: Gesher Galicia Renewals #galicia

Harvey Kaplan <harvey@...>
 

I have just sent off my renewal >from here in Scotland. It's a shame that
those of us in other countries can't pay by credit card (like with the
Litvak SIG), as it cost me $45 instead of $27 to send a bank draft!

best wishes

Harvey Kaplan

Glasgow, Scotland

TROPP, STORCH - Kolbuszowa, Cmolas


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: Gesher Galicia Renewals #galicia

Harvey Kaplan <harvey@...>
 

I have just sent off my renewal >from here in Scotland. It's a shame that
those of us in other countries can't pay by credit card (like with the
Litvak SIG), as it cost me $45 instead of $27 to send a bank draft!

best wishes

Harvey Kaplan

Glasgow, Scotland

TROPP, STORCH - Kolbuszowa, Cmolas


Re: Finding town in galicia #galicia

Phyllis Kramer <phylliskramer1@...>
 

Randy Merlino is looking for a shtetl
>from Galicia, supposedly within 20 kilometers of Krakow. It
is a village named "Bajestic" or "Britchik".
These two towns quoted do not "sound" alike, but here's what i
did....

(1) I looked for a town which had a Jewish Population...I tried
the JGFF using the DM soundex for the two towns above....no hits.

(2)On the Shtetl Finder, I located Krakow (lat/long 5005 1955)

(3)Then requested all the towns within 25 km >from that lat/long
which started with a B.

(4)Looking through the resultant list, i found two which were
similar enough to test

(5)I returned to JGFF for the 2 towns, and found that one had
quite a few Jewish researchers......BISKUPICE

So that's my guess......
I believe someone more aware of Polish pronounciation, could do a
better job locating the town.

Regards,
Phyllis Kramer phylliskramer1@att.net

Searching...
KRAMER, BEIM, WISNER >from JASIENICA ROSIELNA (Galicia)
STECHER, STECKLER, TRACHMAN, GOETZ, KORNREICH >from ZMIGROD,
DUKLA, RYMANOW (Galicia)
SCHEINER, SCHIMMEL, KANDEL >from DUBIECKO, STRZYZOW (Galicia)
LINDNER, EICHEL, BERLIN >from ROHATYN (Galicia, now Ukraine &
Iasi, Romania)
GUMBRECHT, ZIEGLER, PANTELEON >from HANNOVER (Germany)


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re:Finding town in galicia #galicia

Phyllis Kramer <phylliskramer1@...>
 

Randy Merlino is looking for a shtetl
>from Galicia, supposedly within 20 kilometers of Krakow. It
is a village named "Bajestic" or "Britchik".
These two towns quoted do not "sound" alike, but here's what i
did....

(1) I looked for a town which had a Jewish Population...I tried
the JGFF using the DM soundex for the two towns above....no hits.

(2)On the Shtetl Finder, I located Krakow (lat/long 5005 1955)

(3)Then requested all the towns within 25 km >from that lat/long
which started with a B.

(4)Looking through the resultant list, i found two which were
similar enough to test

(5)I returned to JGFF for the 2 towns, and found that one had
quite a few Jewish researchers......BISKUPICE

So that's my guess......
I believe someone more aware of Polish pronounciation, could do a
better job locating the town.

Regards,
Phyllis Kramer phylliskramer1@att.net

Searching...
KRAMER, BEIM, WISNER >from JASIENICA ROSIELNA (Galicia)
STECHER, STECKLER, TRACHMAN, GOETZ, KORNREICH >from ZMIGROD,
DUKLA, RYMANOW (Galicia)
SCHEINER, SCHIMMEL, KANDEL >from DUBIECKO, STRZYZOW (Galicia)
LINDNER, EICHEL, BERLIN >from ROHATYN (Galicia, now Ukraine &
Iasi, Romania)
GUMBRECHT, ZIEGLER, PANTELEON >from HANNOVER (Germany)


Seeking KONRAD; what is a "stancir"? #galicia

Carol Cohen <cgandhc@...>
 

Years ago my gg Aunt told me that her family lived on a stancir in Romny.
I know that they raised geese and sold the feathers for pillows and
comfortors. I have never been able to find the meaning of stancir. Does
anyone have any ideas?

Also, I have found my first KONRADs (Maria and Senta) on the unclaimed
Swiss bank account list. Is anyone else researching KONRAD. Jewish Gen's
Family Finder doesn't have anyone but me.

Thanks,

Carol Cohen
<cgandhc@ont.com>

Researching:

from Kosova and Tarnopol: SASS, WALDMAN, WEISBACH, KONRAD, SCHMERLE,
TEITELBAUM, SCHMERLE, SCHLEICHER, LUBISCH, PERLMUTTER
from Bendery: KOGAN, AZEROVICH
from Romny: POLIAKOV, AXELROD, MATLIN, GUDZIK, SONOVICH, MILOSLOVSKY
from Mogilev Podolsky: ROSENFELD, WEISSMAN
Carol Cohen
cococo@ont.com
Dallas, TX USA


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Seeking KONRAD; what is a "stancir"? #galicia

Carol Cohen <cgandhc@...>
 

Years ago my gg Aunt told me that her family lived on a stancir in Romny.
I know that they raised geese and sold the feathers for pillows and
comfortors. I have never been able to find the meaning of stancir. Does
anyone have any ideas?

Also, I have found my first KONRADs (Maria and Senta) on the unclaimed
Swiss bank account list. Is anyone else researching KONRAD. Jewish Gen's
Family Finder doesn't have anyone but me.

Thanks,

Carol Cohen
<cgandhc@ont.com>

Researching:

from Kosova and Tarnopol: SASS, WALDMAN, WEISBACH, KONRAD, SCHMERLE,
TEITELBAUM, SCHMERLE, SCHLEICHER, LUBISCH, PERLMUTTER
from Bendery: KOGAN, AZEROVICH
from Romny: POLIAKOV, AXELROD, MATLIN, GUDZIK, SONOVICH, MILOSLOVSKY
from Mogilev Podolsky: ROSENFELD, WEISSMAN
Carol Cohen
cococo@ont.com
Dallas, TX USA