Date   

SCHULTZ from Jeralm Czechoslovakia, perhaps Brazil #general

David Lewin <davidlewin@...>
 

Any one out there familiar with SCHULTZ >from Jeralm, Czechoslovakia?

Am ;looking for a part that which may have moved to Brazil before World War
2 started:

Emma (Emnika Mimi) SCHULTZ
daughter of Karel and Irma SCHULTZ
born in Jeral approx 1930
Last heard of in Prague

Please contact me privately
David Lewin
London
davidlewin@bigfoot.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen SCHULTZ from Jeralm Czechoslovakia, perhaps Brazil #general

David Lewin <davidlewin@...>
 

Any one out there familiar with SCHULTZ >from Jeralm, Czechoslovakia?

Am ;looking for a part that which may have moved to Brazil before World War
2 started:

Emma (Emnika Mimi) SCHULTZ
daughter of Karel and Irma SCHULTZ
born in Jeral approx 1930
Last heard of in Prague

Please contact me privately
David Lewin
London
davidlewin@bigfoot.com


Jewish vitals in "Roman Catholic" records #poland

garymaher@...
 

In my experience, which is limited to Northeastern Poland, the 1808-1825
or so vital records listed as "transcripts" of Roman Catholic records in
the LDS catalog nearly always include Jewish records. The trick is to
look for the records that conspicuously start in 1808 and end in 1827 or
so. (The Jewish records always seem to end in 1825, with the non-Jewish
records continuing for a couple of years.) Now if only the JRI-PL
database was searchable by given name and patronymic . . .

Gary Maher
NJ / USA

On Wed, 07 Feb 2001 00:00:44 -0600 "JRI-Poland digest"
<jri-pl@lyris.jewishgen.org> writes:
There are 1820 Jewish vital records in the Zamosc Roman Catholic
Parish Records in the
FHL.
There are other RC films with Jewish vital records prior to 1826,
________________________________________________________________
GET INTERNET ACCESS >from JUNO!
Juno offers FREE or PREMIUM Internet access for less!
Join Juno today! For your FREE software, visit:
http://dl.www.juno.com/get/tagj.


JRI Poland #Poland Jewish vitals in "Roman Catholic" records #poland

garymaher@...
 

In my experience, which is limited to Northeastern Poland, the 1808-1825
or so vital records listed as "transcripts" of Roman Catholic records in
the LDS catalog nearly always include Jewish records. The trick is to
look for the records that conspicuously start in 1808 and end in 1827 or
so. (The Jewish records always seem to end in 1825, with the non-Jewish
records continuing for a couple of years.) Now if only the JRI-PL
database was searchable by given name and patronymic . . .

Gary Maher
NJ / USA

On Wed, 07 Feb 2001 00:00:44 -0600 "JRI-Poland digest"
<jri-pl@lyris.jewishgen.org> writes:
There are 1820 Jewish vital records in the Zamosc Roman Catholic
Parish Records in the
FHL.
There are other RC films with Jewish vital records prior to 1826,
________________________________________________________________
GET INTERNET ACCESS >from JUNO!
Juno offers FREE or PREMIUM Internet access for less!
Join Juno today! For your FREE software, visit:
http://dl.www.juno.com/get/tagj.


Zaslav, Volynia, Ukraine #ukraine

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@...>
 

I am pleased to share the complete listing of names and towns from
the All-Russia Directory ("Vsia Rossia"), 1895 listing for the town
of Zaslav (Volynia, Ukraine):

http://www.kazez.com/~dan/0207.zaslav1895.html

All work with the original Russian was done by Zinoviy Krayterman.
My great thanks to Mr. Krayterman!

For more information on this resource, please see here:

http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/vsiaweb.htm

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@mail.wittenberg.edu>
Springfield, Ohio USA

Poland (Czestochowa-Przyrow-Mstow-Janow-Plawno-Radomsko-Piotrkow-Zgierz)
Ukraine (Zaslav-Mikolayev-Krasilov-Medvedovka-Proskurov-Mogilev)
Istanbul, Aleppo, Rhodes
http://userpages.wittenberg.edu/dkazez/fam/ent/fam.html


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Zaslav, Volynia, Ukraine #ukraine

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@...>
 

I am pleased to share the complete listing of names and towns from
the All-Russia Directory ("Vsia Rossia"), 1895 listing for the town
of Zaslav (Volynia, Ukraine):

http://www.kazez.com/~dan/0207.zaslav1895.html

All work with the original Russian was done by Zinoviy Krayterman.
My great thanks to Mr. Krayterman!

For more information on this resource, please see here:

http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/vsiaweb.htm

Daniel Kazez <dkazez@mail.wittenberg.edu>
Springfield, Ohio USA

Poland (Czestochowa-Przyrow-Mstow-Janow-Plawno-Radomsko-Piotrkow-Zgierz)
Ukraine (Zaslav-Mikolayev-Krasilov-Medvedovka-Proskurov-Mogilev)
Istanbul, Aleppo, Rhodes
http://userpages.wittenberg.edu/dkazez/fam/ent/fam.html


Railroads of Russia #general

SANDI ROOT
 

Two years ago or so, there was an article, or a link to an article, posted
on the discussion group relating to the railroads of Russia and how the
powers-that-be unwittingly contributed to the exodus of their Jewish
population in the late-19th century. It showed the railway lines in colors
that represented the years of completion and the towns they connected.

I would appreciate it if someone could help me re-find that article.

A Grateful Sandi Root
Guadalajara, Mexico
roadrunr2@usa.net

MODERATOR NOTE: All messages posted after September 1993
can be found in JewishGen Discussion Group Archives at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.isa?jg~jgsys~archpop


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Railroads of Russia #general

SANDI ROOT
 

Two years ago or so, there was an article, or a link to an article, posted
on the discussion group relating to the railroads of Russia and how the
powers-that-be unwittingly contributed to the exodus of their Jewish
population in the late-19th century. It showed the railway lines in colors
that represented the years of completion and the towns they connected.

I would appreciate it if someone could help me re-find that article.

A Grateful Sandi Root
Guadalajara, Mexico
roadrunr2@usa.net

MODERATOR NOTE: All messages posted after September 1993
can be found in JewishGen Discussion Group Archives at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.isa?jg~jgsys~archpop


Re: Certainty of fatherhood #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 


It does seem to be true, however, that for a very long time--I don't know
enough to say how long--Jews have divided themselves into kohanim, levi'im,
and yisraelitim, and handed down these identities in a patrilineal way.
Genetics can cast light on the accuracy of genetic and cultural transmission
of these groups and on their genetic relationships to each other, as well as
on the relationships of sephardim to ashkenazim, Jews to other Semitic
peoples, and Jews to the host population of countries where they lived.
Tradition cannot be used to formulate theories, but it can sometimes be used
to formulate hypotheses.

Alan Wachtel
Palo Alto, California
Wachtel@aol.com
Dear Alan,

Now _this_ I agree with entirely. And I wasn't at all surprised by the
kohanim experiment results -- except that Iwould remind everyone that there
was a specific question of interpretation of the results, namely as to
whether went back more than 2500 years or less than 2,500 years.

What difference does it make? A very big difference indeed.

There is a scholarly controversy as to whether the Aaronide priesthood
already existed and functioned during the time of the first Temple (roughly
between 1000 and 500 BCE) or only during the econd Temple period (roughly
500 BC to 70 CE). No scholar disagrees with their existence during the
second Temple period, but there's a big difference of opinion on the first
Temple period, and a great deal hangs on it, because of the dispute about
whether the priestly material in the Bible dates >from before or after the
Babylonian Exile. If post-exilic, it was probably heavily influenced by
the sacrificial cults of Babylonian and Zoroatrian Persian priests; but if
pre-exilic, it could be a native Israelite product uninfluenced from
outside.
And that's exactly the question that the experiment could not answer,
because the time frame was such that the margin of error could place the
common ancestry either before or after the Exile.

A great pity, because people have different agendas; some traditionalists
wish desperately to "prove" that the Aaronides did operate in the first
Temple (and even in the 40 year wandering in the wilderness, of course, as
presented in Leviticus) while the "minimalists" (who are hostile to the
notion of the antiquity of Jewish roots in Palestine) are equally desperate
to "prove" that the Jewish presence in Palestine only started centuries
later (i.e. that Jews are outsiders to Palestine in the first place! ). But
perhaps a more refined version of the experiment can be done later on that
can pin things down more precisely.

Judith Romney Wegner


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Certainty of fatherhood #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 


It does seem to be true, however, that for a very long time--I don't know
enough to say how long--Jews have divided themselves into kohanim, levi'im,
and yisraelitim, and handed down these identities in a patrilineal way.
Genetics can cast light on the accuracy of genetic and cultural transmission
of these groups and on their genetic relationships to each other, as well as
on the relationships of sephardim to ashkenazim, Jews to other Semitic
peoples, and Jews to the host population of countries where they lived.
Tradition cannot be used to formulate theories, but it can sometimes be used
to formulate hypotheses.

Alan Wachtel
Palo Alto, California
Wachtel@aol.com
Dear Alan,

Now _this_ I agree with entirely. And I wasn't at all surprised by the
kohanim experiment results -- except that Iwould remind everyone that there
was a specific question of interpretation of the results, namely as to
whether went back more than 2500 years or less than 2,500 years.

What difference does it make? A very big difference indeed.

There is a scholarly controversy as to whether the Aaronide priesthood
already existed and functioned during the time of the first Temple (roughly
between 1000 and 500 BCE) or only during the econd Temple period (roughly
500 BC to 70 CE). No scholar disagrees with their existence during the
second Temple period, but there's a big difference of opinion on the first
Temple period, and a great deal hangs on it, because of the dispute about
whether the priestly material in the Bible dates >from before or after the
Babylonian Exile. If post-exilic, it was probably heavily influenced by
the sacrificial cults of Babylonian and Zoroatrian Persian priests; but if
pre-exilic, it could be a native Israelite product uninfluenced from
outside.
And that's exactly the question that the experiment could not answer,
because the time frame was such that the margin of error could place the
common ancestry either before or after the Exile.

A great pity, because people have different agendas; some traditionalists
wish desperately to "prove" that the Aaronides did operate in the first
Temple (and even in the 40 year wandering in the wilderness, of course, as
presented in Leviticus) while the "minimalists" (who are hostile to the
notion of the antiquity of Jewish roots in Palestine) are equally desperate
to "prove" that the Jewish presence in Palestine only started centuries
later (i.e. that Jews are outsiders to Palestine in the first place! ). But
perhaps a more refined version of the experiment can be done later on that
can pin things down more precisely.

Judith Romney Wegner


Free Foreign Language Translation Website #galicia

Suegerber@...
 

To everyone linguistically challenged (like me. . . .):

If you need help with foreign language translations, the main languages --
including German and Russian -- can be translated to and >from English
through the following website:

http://www.babelfish.com/Languages/English/EnglishMain.shtml

Choose your language
and click on: "machine translation"
Then you can go to a number of websites
including this free website:

http://www.freetranslation.com/

Sorry -- no Polish or Hungarian

Susan Gerber Weisfeld
NY

Looking for: BENEDIG, GERBER, JOSEPHER, BLOCH (Julia and Moses)


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Free Foreign Language Translation Website #galicia

Suegerber@...
 

To everyone linguistically challenged (like me. . . .):

If you need help with foreign language translations, the main languages --
including German and Russian -- can be translated to and >from English
through the following website:

http://www.babelfish.com/Languages/English/EnglishMain.shtml

Choose your language
and click on: "machine translation"
Then you can go to a number of websites
including this free website:

http://www.freetranslation.com/

Sorry -- no Polish or Hungarian

Susan Gerber Weisfeld
NY

Looking for: BENEDIG, GERBER, JOSEPHER, BLOCH (Julia and Moses)


Re: Certainty of fatherhood #general

Wachtel@...
 

In a message dated 01-02-06 17:15:44 EST, Judith Romney Wegner
(jrw@Brown.edu) writes:

<< Whatever the actual historical truth, it clearly is not a good idea to
take such biblical statements at face value, treating them as scientific
facts that can be used to buttress (or even formulate) scientific theories
about how much genetic connection we should expect to find between the two
Israelite castes known as Kohanim and Levi'im, or between those two on the
one hand and plain "Israelites" on the other hand. >>

I agree with Judith, and didn't mean to give a different impression; I even
referred to Aaron as a possibly mythical figure. Genetic research
suggests--and I emphasize that this is a very preliminary and tentative
conclusion--that present-day kohanim have a common ancestor who lived roughly
3,000 years ago. This ancestor can fancifully be called Aaron (just as
anthropologists have named a remote female ancestor Eve), but that doesn't
establish the truth of any of the biblical stories.

It does seem to be true, however, that for a very long time--I don't know
enough to say how long--Jews have divided themselves into kohanim, levi'im,
and yisraelitim, and handed down these identities in a patrilineal way.
Genetics can cast light on the accuracy of genetic and cultural transmission
of these groups and on their genetic relationships to each other, as well as
on the relationships of sephardim to ashkenazim, Jews to other Semitic
peoples, and Jews to the host population of countries where they lived.
Tradition cannot be used to formulate theories, but it can sometimes be used
to formulate hypotheses.

Alan Wachtel
Palo Alto, California
Wachtel@aol.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Certainty of fatherhood #general

Wachtel@...
 

In a message dated 01-02-06 17:15:44 EST, Judith Romney Wegner
(jrw@Brown.edu) writes:

<< Whatever the actual historical truth, it clearly is not a good idea to
take such biblical statements at face value, treating them as scientific
facts that can be used to buttress (or even formulate) scientific theories
about how much genetic connection we should expect to find between the two
Israelite castes known as Kohanim and Levi'im, or between those two on the
one hand and plain "Israelites" on the other hand. >>

I agree with Judith, and didn't mean to give a different impression; I even
referred to Aaron as a possibly mythical figure. Genetic research
suggests--and I emphasize that this is a very preliminary and tentative
conclusion--that present-day kohanim have a common ancestor who lived roughly
3,000 years ago. This ancestor can fancifully be called Aaron (just as
anthropologists have named a remote female ancestor Eve), but that doesn't
establish the truth of any of the biblical stories.

It does seem to be true, however, that for a very long time--I don't know
enough to say how long--Jews have divided themselves into kohanim, levi'im,
and yisraelitim, and handed down these identities in a patrilineal way.
Genetics can cast light on the accuracy of genetic and cultural transmission
of these groups and on their genetic relationships to each other, as well as
on the relationships of sephardim to ashkenazim, Jews to other Semitic
peoples, and Jews to the host population of countries where they lived.
Tradition cannot be used to formulate theories, but it can sometimes be used
to formulate hypotheses.

Alan Wachtel
Palo Alto, California
Wachtel@aol.com


1858 Gazetteer #lithuania

SVass@...
 

Purely for your information, I am providing some data >from an old gazetteer I found in my local LDS Family History Center. It may provide background
information for you

Sam Vass, Kent, WA, USA

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: A Complete Pronouncing Gazetteer or Geographical Dictionary of the World Edited by J. Thomas, MD and T. Baldwin assisted by several other gentlemen Philadelphia, JB Lippincott & Co. 1858

Shavli, Chavli, or Schawli a town of Russian Poland, government of Vilna, 50 mile SSW of Mitau on the route to Kovno

Kreuzburg or Kreutzburg a strongly fortified town of Russia, government of
Vitebsk on the Duna 52 miles west of Rezhitea, population 2000 It has a
palace.

Note: Smiltene was not listed confirming information >from an old travel guide stating that it was chartered in 1882.


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania 1858 Gazetteer #lithuania

SVass@...
 

Purely for your information, I am providing some data >from an old gazetteer I found in my local LDS Family History Center. It may provide background
information for you

Sam Vass, Kent, WA, USA

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: A Complete Pronouncing Gazetteer or Geographical Dictionary of the World Edited by J. Thomas, MD and T. Baldwin assisted by several other gentlemen Philadelphia, JB Lippincott & Co. 1858

Shavli, Chavli, or Schawli a town of Russian Poland, government of Vilna, 50 mile SSW of Mitau on the route to Kovno

Kreuzburg or Kreutzburg a strongly fortified town of Russia, government of
Vitebsk on the Duna 52 miles west of Rezhitea, population 2000 It has a
palace.

Note: Smiltene was not listed confirming information >from an old travel guide stating that it was chartered in 1882.


Re: Is Tilsit in Lithuania?? #lithuania

MWhippman@...
 

I can only speculate but there is a Talsen in what is now Latvia but was then Courland. Courland was a German speaking enclave ruled by the Baltic Germans even though at the time it formed part of the Russian Empire. It had a long boundary with Kovno Gubernia. This may be a clue as to the family references to Germany. Many Lithuanian Jews made their way to Courland as it was out of the Pale of Settlement. Just a suggestion but try the All Latvian Database.

Good Latvianluck in your searches.

Constance Whippman [All Latvian Database co-ordinator]
emailing >from London


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: Is Tilsit in Lithuania?? #lithuania

MWhippman@...
 

I can only speculate but there is a Talsen in what is now Latvia but was then Courland. Courland was a German speaking enclave ruled by the Baltic Germans even though at the time it formed part of the Russian Empire. It had a long boundary with Kovno Gubernia. This may be a clue as to the family references to Germany. Many Lithuanian Jews made their way to Courland as it was out of the Pale of Settlement. Just a suggestion but try the All Latvian Database.

Good Latvianluck in your searches.

Constance Whippman [All Latvian Database co-ordinator]
emailing >from London


Gesher Galicia Renewals #galicia

Peter Zavon <pzavon@...>
 

Dear Members of Gesher Galicia,

By now you have received your computerized renewal letter for the
2000-01 Gesher Galicia membership year. Please remit your updated
and/or corrected contact and research information with your dues
promptly. The 2001 edition of the Gesher Galicia Family Finder is in
the process of being updated and you will want your information to be
correctly included.

If you have any important changes to your contact or research
information and you think it might not get here in time via the postal
mail, especially if you live overseas, feel free to send the changes to
me by e-mail at this address.

Peter Zavon, Editor
Gesher Galicia Family Finder
Penfield, NY
pzavon@Rochester.RR.Com

Shelley K. Pollero, Coordinator
Gesher Galicia
Severna Park, MD
rkpollero@starpower.net


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Gesher Galicia Renewals #galicia

Peter Zavon <pzavon@...>
 

Dear Members of Gesher Galicia,

By now you have received your computerized renewal letter for the
2000-01 Gesher Galicia membership year. Please remit your updated
and/or corrected contact and research information with your dues
promptly. The 2001 edition of the Gesher Galicia Family Finder is in
the process of being updated and you will want your information to be
correctly included.

If you have any important changes to your contact or research
information and you think it might not get here in time via the postal
mail, especially if you live overseas, feel free to send the changes to
me by e-mail at this address.

Peter Zavon, Editor
Gesher Galicia Family Finder
Penfield, NY
pzavon@Rochester.RR.Com

Shelley K. Pollero, Coordinator
Gesher Galicia
Severna Park, MD
rkpollero@starpower.net