Date   

Litmanovitch and Bresler connection. or Krownenberg families in #general

Erez Litmanovitch <erez@...>
 

Hi all

I am trying to find out what is the source of my surename.
The original name was bresler and it belongs to my father's grandfather.
He was died young in Wialun (poland) his name was Eliyau Moshe, my father
name.
His son, my grandfather was born in 1910 in wialun and moved after that to
lodz, to his uncle. there he probably replaced his name to litmanovitch.
I guss that was his uncle naem but i am not sure. so i am actually looking
for the litmanovitch family that has somerelation ship with the
litmanovitch family (maybe sister if my father's grandfather)...

from my grandmother side (of my father) (zrychki) i have until year 1830.
That tree was build by my relative in Brazil.

So can soem one help me

Erez Litmanovitch


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Litmanovitch and Bresler connection. or Krownenberg families in #general

Erez Litmanovitch <erez@...>
 

Hi all

I am trying to find out what is the source of my surename.
The original name was bresler and it belongs to my father's grandfather.
He was died young in Wialun (poland) his name was Eliyau Moshe, my father
name.
His son, my grandfather was born in 1910 in wialun and moved after that to
lodz, to his uncle. there he probably replaced his name to litmanovitch.
I guss that was his uncle naem but i am not sure. so i am actually looking
for the litmanovitch family that has somerelation ship with the
litmanovitch family (maybe sister if my father's grandfather)...

from my grandmother side (of my father) (zrychki) i have until year 1830.
That tree was build by my relative in Brazil.

So can soem one help me

Erez Litmanovitch


Re: St. Michaels Hungary #general

Vivian Kahn
 

Szigetszentmiklos is located on Csepel-sziget, the long island in the
Danube (Duna) southwesterly of Budapest. There's also a
Kunszentmiklos farther south of Budapest.

Vivian Kahn, Oakland, CA

BAAL/BERKOVITS/BERKOWITZ/GROSZ/ROTH/Orasu Nou, Rom. (Ujvaros,
Hung.); Seini, Rom. (Szinervaralja, Hun), Vamfalu, Hung. (Vama, Rom.)
BERKOWITS/Craciunesti, Rom. (Tiszakaracsonfalva, Hun.).
KAHN/KAHAN/KOHN/FRIEDMAN/ZEGAL/Sighet, Rom.(Maramarossziget, Hun), London
MOSKOVITS/MOSKOWITZ/MOSS, Ostrov (Kisozstro), Sobrance, Bunkocz, Ungvar
Michalovce, Munkacs,Washington Heights, Queeens, and other NYC

Subject: St. Michaels Hungary
From: Stephanie Weiner <laguna@sciti.com>
Date: Wed, 31 Jan 2001 07:29:27 -0800

Dear Genners,

My mother's oldest brother was born in Europe in 1895, and word-of-mouth
within the family indicates the town name as St. Michaels (in modern
Hungarian Szentmiklos), Hungary. My grandmother's brother-in-law was
then living in Budapest. So I thought this town might be located
somewhere nearby -- but I don't find anything comparable on current
maps. Any suggestions?

Stephanie Weiner
Mt. Laguna, CA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: St. Michaels Hungary #general

Vivian Kahn
 

Szigetszentmiklos is located on Csepel-sziget, the long island in the
Danube (Duna) southwesterly of Budapest. There's also a
Kunszentmiklos farther south of Budapest.

Vivian Kahn, Oakland, CA

BAAL/BERKOVITS/BERKOWITZ/GROSZ/ROTH/Orasu Nou, Rom. (Ujvaros,
Hung.); Seini, Rom. (Szinervaralja, Hun), Vamfalu, Hung. (Vama, Rom.)
BERKOWITS/Craciunesti, Rom. (Tiszakaracsonfalva, Hun.).
KAHN/KAHAN/KOHN/FRIEDMAN/ZEGAL/Sighet, Rom.(Maramarossziget, Hun), London
MOSKOVITS/MOSKOWITZ/MOSS, Ostrov (Kisozstro), Sobrance, Bunkocz, Ungvar
Michalovce, Munkacs,Washington Heights, Queeens, and other NYC

Subject: St. Michaels Hungary
From: Stephanie Weiner <laguna@sciti.com>
Date: Wed, 31 Jan 2001 07:29:27 -0800

Dear Genners,

My mother's oldest brother was born in Europe in 1895, and word-of-mouth
within the family indicates the town name as St. Michaels (in modern
Hungarian Szentmiklos), Hungary. My grandmother's brother-in-law was
then living in Budapest. So I thought this town might be located
somewhere nearby -- but I don't find anything comparable on current
maps. Any suggestions?

Stephanie Weiner
Mt. Laguna, CA


Re: Drafted into the Imperial Russian Army #belarus

mjssds@...
 

MY GGF was drafted into the Reserves and served for many years. His papers had the official stamp of Pruzhana, his draft number and the service obligation etc. He had those papers when he died at 94 in 1954. He never mutilated himself, deserted etc. and he was an infantryman which is the worst. A copy of his papers have been air mailed to Israel and will soon be on the Pruzhana site for all to see. He would have qvelled.
My brother and I were in the military and I am proud of the fact that I am a combat veteran. Many of our ancestors were brave and honourable men and those of you who have them as your ancestors should be justly proud of them.
When I was in the US Army in Germany in the 60s we had a New Years service in the Nurnberg Palace of Justice, near where the trials were held. We were joined by members of the Nurnberg jewish community including an older man without an arm. When asked if he lost his arm in the Holocaust he became highly insulted and said he had lost it in defense of the Fatherland in WW1.
Bottom line. We are a lot tougher than you think and the partisans and Israelis weren't the first fighters, your ancestors were.

Steve Sperman
New City, New York

Searching:Seletsky and Chachaha in Pruzhana(Pruzhany), Belarus

Searching
New City, NY 10956


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: Drafted into the Imperial Russian Army #belarus

mjssds@...
 

MY GGF was drafted into the Reserves and served for many years. His papers had the official stamp of Pruzhana, his draft number and the service obligation etc. He had those papers when he died at 94 in 1954. He never mutilated himself, deserted etc. and he was an infantryman which is the worst. A copy of his papers have been air mailed to Israel and will soon be on the Pruzhana site for all to see. He would have qvelled.
My brother and I were in the military and I am proud of the fact that I am a combat veteran. Many of our ancestors were brave and honourable men and those of you who have them as your ancestors should be justly proud of them.
When I was in the US Army in Germany in the 60s we had a New Years service in the Nurnberg Palace of Justice, near where the trials were held. We were joined by members of the Nurnberg jewish community including an older man without an arm. When asked if he lost his arm in the Holocaust he became highly insulted and said he had lost it in defense of the Fatherland in WW1.
Bottom line. We are a lot tougher than you think and the partisans and Israelis weren't the first fighters, your ancestors were.

Steve Sperman
New City, New York

Searching:Seletsky and Chachaha in Pruzhana(Pruzhany), Belarus

Searching
New City, NY 10956


Escaping the Russian Military #belarus

buffmufin
 

I have been reading this thread with interest because my grandfather
"deserted" the Russian Army about 1906 and arrived in the US about 1907. We
had always heard family tales that my ggf (born 1871) had come to the US on
someone else's papers. We didn't know whose, but assumed it was >from a
brother or other relative who remained in Belarus. On a tape-recorded
interview with my grandmother (his daughter) back in the 1980's (when she was
in her 80's) she recounted some stories >from back when the family lived in
Vetka.
She told of how after the Russo-Japanese War ended, her father and others
were allowed to return home to their families before having to return to
service. This would have been about 1905-6. She remembers her father
coming home and leaving his tall military hat outdoors so as not to frighten
the young children. When it was time to return to service, he and another
Jewish man decided they didn't want to, as the war was over, no more need to
fight. So they didn't. When my great-grandmother heard that the other man
was picked up, she had family members "hide" my great-grandfather till they
could spirit him out of the country.
We knew when my grandfather arrived in the US, and on which ship, since I
have his original citizenship certificate >from 1924, and was easily able to
obtain his declaration and petition. We checked the ship manifest and did
not find my ggf at all. Imagine our surprise however, when we took a closer
look on the photocopied the Certificate of Arrival that came copied to the
same page as his petition and declaration and noticed that he came under a
completely different name!!! His true name was Getzel Kossoi, and he arrived
under the name NOSSEN ORDIMOW!
We don't know who NOSSEN ORDIMOW was, but we noted >from re-examining the
ship manifest that my ggf travelled with another fellow aboard ship named
ORDIMOW (much younger) and the manifest has them going to different places
when they arrived in NY. What was interesting though, is that NOSSEN ORDIMOW
listed his contact in the US as a brother named KOSSOI and he listed his home
as Vetka!! The other ORDIMOW fellow was >from a different town, and was
coming to another relative, totally unknown to our family.
To date I have found nothing that reconciles KOSSOI to the ORDIMOW alias,
no declaration by my ggf that he used this name in coming over, or even any
ties to anyone named ORDIMOW. Just the certificate of arrival.
And his Petition and Declaration do not show that his name was officially
changed when he was naturalized.
So the mystery continues. It's too bad that families back then did not
talk much about their prior lives! Research would be a lot easier!

Carol Kunkis Cohn
Newport Beach, CA

Researching:
KOSSOI, PEVTSOV, SKOLNIKOF in Vetka/Chechersk/Zagor'ye, Belarus;
SCHRIER, PACHTER, RABER in Yarmolinitz/Kamenets-Podolskii, Ukraine;
KUNKIS, LEHMAN in Glubokoye, Belarus


HIAS records #general

Jeff Malka <malkajef@...>
 

Was HIAS existing and active in 1900?

If so, would there be HIAS records available about persons who went through
them either in NYC or in Philadelphia and where could one search through
them?

Thanks.

Jeff Malka <malkajef@orthohelp.com>
"Resources for Sephardic Genealogy" website:
http://www.orthohelp.com/geneal/sefardim.htm


Belarus SIG #Belarus Escaping the Russian Military #belarus

buffmufin
 

I have been reading this thread with interest because my grandfather
"deserted" the Russian Army about 1906 and arrived in the US about 1907. We
had always heard family tales that my ggf (born 1871) had come to the US on
someone else's papers. We didn't know whose, but assumed it was >from a
brother or other relative who remained in Belarus. On a tape-recorded
interview with my grandmother (his daughter) back in the 1980's (when she was
in her 80's) she recounted some stories >from back when the family lived in
Vetka.
She told of how after the Russo-Japanese War ended, her father and others
were allowed to return home to their families before having to return to
service. This would have been about 1905-6. She remembers her father
coming home and leaving his tall military hat outdoors so as not to frighten
the young children. When it was time to return to service, he and another
Jewish man decided they didn't want to, as the war was over, no more need to
fight. So they didn't. When my great-grandmother heard that the other man
was picked up, she had family members "hide" my great-grandfather till they
could spirit him out of the country.
We knew when my grandfather arrived in the US, and on which ship, since I
have his original citizenship certificate >from 1924, and was easily able to
obtain his declaration and petition. We checked the ship manifest and did
not find my ggf at all. Imagine our surprise however, when we took a closer
look on the photocopied the Certificate of Arrival that came copied to the
same page as his petition and declaration and noticed that he came under a
completely different name!!! His true name was Getzel Kossoi, and he arrived
under the name NOSSEN ORDIMOW!
We don't know who NOSSEN ORDIMOW was, but we noted >from re-examining the
ship manifest that my ggf travelled with another fellow aboard ship named
ORDIMOW (much younger) and the manifest has them going to different places
when they arrived in NY. What was interesting though, is that NOSSEN ORDIMOW
listed his contact in the US as a brother named KOSSOI and he listed his home
as Vetka!! The other ORDIMOW fellow was >from a different town, and was
coming to another relative, totally unknown to our family.
To date I have found nothing that reconciles KOSSOI to the ORDIMOW alias,
no declaration by my ggf that he used this name in coming over, or even any
ties to anyone named ORDIMOW. Just the certificate of arrival.
And his Petition and Declaration do not show that his name was officially
changed when he was naturalized.
So the mystery continues. It's too bad that families back then did not
talk much about their prior lives! Research would be a lot easier!

Carol Kunkis Cohn
Newport Beach, CA

Researching:
KOSSOI, PEVTSOV, SKOLNIKOF in Vetka/Chechersk/Zagor'ye, Belarus;
SCHRIER, PACHTER, RABER in Yarmolinitz/Kamenets-Podolskii, Ukraine;
KUNKIS, LEHMAN in Glubokoye, Belarus


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen HIAS records #general

Jeff Malka <malkajef@...>
 

Was HIAS existing and active in 1900?

If so, would there be HIAS records available about persons who went through
them either in NYC or in Philadelphia and where could one search through
them?

Thanks.

Jeff Malka <malkajef@orthohelp.com>
"Resources for Sephardic Genealogy" website:
http://www.orthohelp.com/geneal/sefardim.htm


1930/40s Europe #belarus

spirit-images <spirit-images@...>
 

My family would never talk to me about were we originated >from for years and
years. It was too difficult for them. I never understood why my roots
were surrounded by such silence. I finally found information piece by
piece, like a puzzle with missing parts. Much of our family came from
Simnas, Lithuania. They started coming in the early 1900's and continued
until the late 1930s.

My grandfather was the one of the first to arrive in the United States and
sent for as many relatives as he could. He would help them financially,
give them jobs and let them stay at his house until they found their way in
this new land.

My cousin lived in Simnas until she was 11 years old. She still remembers
what it was like to live there. She said that you never knew if someone
would have it in their mind to come over to your house one day and kill you.
What fear must have lived inside people then! My uncle (her father)referred
to Hitler as that man! It was a trying 23 day trip for them >from Simnos to
NY. There is a newspaper article I have >from Dec 15, 1939. My uncle who
spoke with an interpreter told of how he saw a group of Jewish refugees from
Germany huddled in the mud at the border of East Prussia and Lithuania.
They were driven away >from one country and refused admittance to the other.
He also saw a Jewish man thrown >from the window of the train his family was
on which carried 300 Lithuanian solders and 12 Jews. After a rail trip to
Estonia, the family crossed the Baltic sea to Stockholm, Sweden where they
booked passage for New York on wintry seas.

My great grandmother Had come over in the 1930's, but then wanted to return
to Lithuania because her son still lived there. Unfortunately, shortly
after she arrived, her son came to the US and left her behind. She then
tried to return here, but it was too late. Around 1942 all contact from
Simnas stopped. My grandfather finally contacted some non Jewish neighbors
in Simnas to find out what had happened to the rest of our family.

He was told that the ones who had money were sent to Siberia. The rest were
rounded up and marched to an open grave where they were shot and buried. My
great grandmother was among them, as well as other members in our family.
No one in our family who lived in Simnas was left....

I hear that there is now a monument in Simnas erected in that very place to
honor those who were executed on that day in 1942. Thank goodness for those
who were able to make it out in time! If the sadness and pain did not run
so deep in my family then I might have been able to talk to my grandfather
years ago when he was alive and learn family history first hand.

Ava Sweeney
Durham, NC

Lasdaisky, Berman - Lithuania
Sulkowitch - ?Lithuania, Poland
Shershevsky - Bitten


early zionist records? #general

Jeff Malka <malkajef@...>
 

I have reason to believe that my maternal ancestors were part of the early
Romanian settlements (Rosh Pina) in Palestine in the 1880s. Does anyone
know if there are records that can be accessed that would give lists of
names of these early settlements and or information about them?

Thanks.

Jeff Malka <malkajef@orthohelp.com>
"Resources for Sephardic Genealogy" website:
http://www.orthohelp.com/geneal/sefardim.htm


Belarus SIG #Belarus 1930/40s Europe #belarus

spirit-images <spirit-images@...>
 

My family would never talk to me about were we originated >from for years and
years. It was too difficult for them. I never understood why my roots
were surrounded by such silence. I finally found information piece by
piece, like a puzzle with missing parts. Much of our family came from
Simnas, Lithuania. They started coming in the early 1900's and continued
until the late 1930s.

My grandfather was the one of the first to arrive in the United States and
sent for as many relatives as he could. He would help them financially,
give them jobs and let them stay at his house until they found their way in
this new land.

My cousin lived in Simnas until she was 11 years old. She still remembers
what it was like to live there. She said that you never knew if someone
would have it in their mind to come over to your house one day and kill you.
What fear must have lived inside people then! My uncle (her father)referred
to Hitler as that man! It was a trying 23 day trip for them >from Simnos to
NY. There is a newspaper article I have >from Dec 15, 1939. My uncle who
spoke with an interpreter told of how he saw a group of Jewish refugees from
Germany huddled in the mud at the border of East Prussia and Lithuania.
They were driven away >from one country and refused admittance to the other.
He also saw a Jewish man thrown >from the window of the train his family was
on which carried 300 Lithuanian solders and 12 Jews. After a rail trip to
Estonia, the family crossed the Baltic sea to Stockholm, Sweden where they
booked passage for New York on wintry seas.

My great grandmother Had come over in the 1930's, but then wanted to return
to Lithuania because her son still lived there. Unfortunately, shortly
after she arrived, her son came to the US and left her behind. She then
tried to return here, but it was too late. Around 1942 all contact from
Simnas stopped. My grandfather finally contacted some non Jewish neighbors
in Simnas to find out what had happened to the rest of our family.

He was told that the ones who had money were sent to Siberia. The rest were
rounded up and marched to an open grave where they were shot and buried. My
great grandmother was among them, as well as other members in our family.
No one in our family who lived in Simnas was left....

I hear that there is now a monument in Simnas erected in that very place to
honor those who were executed on that day in 1942. Thank goodness for those
who were able to make it out in time! If the sadness and pain did not run
so deep in my family then I might have been able to talk to my grandfather
years ago when he was alive and learn family history first hand.

Ava Sweeney
Durham, NC

Lasdaisky, Berman - Lithuania
Sulkowitch - ?Lithuania, Poland
Shershevsky - Bitten


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen early zionist records? #general

Jeff Malka <malkajef@...>
 

I have reason to believe that my maternal ancestors were part of the early
Romanian settlements (Rosh Pina) in Palestine in the 1880s. Does anyone
know if there are records that can be accessed that would give lists of
names of these early settlements and or information about them?

Thanks.

Jeff Malka <malkajef@orthohelp.com>
"Resources for Sephardic Genealogy" website:
http://www.orthohelp.com/geneal/sefardim.htm


Family stories of army service and immigration #belarus

Richard.Sapon-White@...
 

I am compelled by recent postings to share my family stories of army service
and immigration.

My family is >from Pogost, near Slutsk, in Belarus. My aunt, Henrietta
PLOTKIN BERLIN (1895-1988), told me many family stories of life in Pogost, a
town she left when she was 5. Some were personal recollections and some
were stories she undoubtedly had heard family members repeat many times.

Her great uncle, Yechiel SIEGEL, was taken into the Russian Army during that
part of the 19th century when 25 years service was mandatory. Taken away
when still just a boy, he remembered his town of origin and made his way
back there at the end of his term of service. At that point he was an "old
man" (probably in his 30's?) with practically no Jewish education. The
community took care of him, providing him with an occupation (water-carrier)
and a wife (an older, "undesirable" woman). He did penitence for his many
years of eating non-kosher food by using a rock as a pillow. My Aunt
Henri(etta) said he used to tease her about sleeping on a feather pillow -
wasn't she afraid of waking with a feather in her ear - how uncomfortable
that must be!

My grandfather, Zalman (later Samuel) PLOTKIN, also served in the Russian
Army, but much later in the 1800's. He served 7 years (about 1888-1895 - my
uncle was born in 1888 and his sister in 1895) and was offered a post in St.
Petersburg at the end of his term of service, but would not have been
allowed to bring his family to be with him. He chose instead to return to
Pogost.

In 1899, Zalman emigrated to the U.S. He sent money back to the family so
that in 1901 his wife and three children could come join him. According to
the family story, my uncle's birth had not been registered and therefore he
did not officially exist. Consequently, the family had contracted with an
"agent" to take them across the border during the night. The story
continues that they were supposed to meet the agent in the woods somewhere.
In the forest, my grandmother found an interesting trail made of wooden
planks and iron rails and decided to follow it for a ways. The agent found
them and told them to get off the railroad tracks, they could be killed.
Evidently, my grandmother had never seen a train before and did not
recognize the tracks. At a later point in the story, she saw a bunch of
little houses in a neat row one night, only to discover them gone in the
morning. Again, this had been a train. One of the first nights of their
journey, they stayed in a house where the residents were celebrating Purim.
Ignored by their hosts and wanting to feed her three young children, my
grandmother grabbed the tablecloth and threatened to pull it off if she and
her children didn't get something to eat immediately.

I won't go into all the rest of the story, but will say that shortly after
their arrival in the U.S. the family celebrated Pesach - and the
significance of having left a land of oppression for a land of opportunity
was not lost on any of them. Knowing that they had celebrated Purim in the
old country and Passover here, and my aunt's age at the time, enabled me to
send for their ship's passenger list.

Richard Sapon-White
Corvallis, OR
Richard.Sapon-White@orst.edu


Belarus SIG #Belarus Family stories of army service and immigration #belarus

Richard.Sapon-White@...
 

I am compelled by recent postings to share my family stories of army service
and immigration.

My family is >from Pogost, near Slutsk, in Belarus. My aunt, Henrietta
PLOTKIN BERLIN (1895-1988), told me many family stories of life in Pogost, a
town she left when she was 5. Some were personal recollections and some
were stories she undoubtedly had heard family members repeat many times.

Her great uncle, Yechiel SIEGEL, was taken into the Russian Army during that
part of the 19th century when 25 years service was mandatory. Taken away
when still just a boy, he remembered his town of origin and made his way
back there at the end of his term of service. At that point he was an "old
man" (probably in his 30's?) with practically no Jewish education. The
community took care of him, providing him with an occupation (water-carrier)
and a wife (an older, "undesirable" woman). He did penitence for his many
years of eating non-kosher food by using a rock as a pillow. My Aunt
Henri(etta) said he used to tease her about sleeping on a feather pillow -
wasn't she afraid of waking with a feather in her ear - how uncomfortable
that must be!

My grandfather, Zalman (later Samuel) PLOTKIN, also served in the Russian
Army, but much later in the 1800's. He served 7 years (about 1888-1895 - my
uncle was born in 1888 and his sister in 1895) and was offered a post in St.
Petersburg at the end of his term of service, but would not have been
allowed to bring his family to be with him. He chose instead to return to
Pogost.

In 1899, Zalman emigrated to the U.S. He sent money back to the family so
that in 1901 his wife and three children could come join him. According to
the family story, my uncle's birth had not been registered and therefore he
did not officially exist. Consequently, the family had contracted with an
"agent" to take them across the border during the night. The story
continues that they were supposed to meet the agent in the woods somewhere.
In the forest, my grandmother found an interesting trail made of wooden
planks and iron rails and decided to follow it for a ways. The agent found
them and told them to get off the railroad tracks, they could be killed.
Evidently, my grandmother had never seen a train before and did not
recognize the tracks. At a later point in the story, she saw a bunch of
little houses in a neat row one night, only to discover them gone in the
morning. Again, this had been a train. One of the first nights of their
journey, they stayed in a house where the residents were celebrating Purim.
Ignored by their hosts and wanting to feed her three young children, my
grandmother grabbed the tablecloth and threatened to pull it off if she and
her children didn't get something to eat immediately.

I won't go into all the rest of the story, but will say that shortly after
their arrival in the U.S. the family celebrated Pesach - and the
significance of having left a land of oppression for a land of opportunity
was not lost on any of them. Knowing that they had celebrated Purim in the
old country and Passover here, and my aunt's age at the time, enabled me to
send for their ship's passenger list.

Richard Sapon-White
Corvallis, OR
Richard.Sapon-White@orst.edu


Re: belarus digest: January 31, 2001 #belarus

Sylvia Schildt <creativa@...>
 

By the way, FYI, KAC is the Polish way to spell KATZ

Sylvia Schildt


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: belarus digest: January 31, 2001 #belarus

Sylvia Schildt <creativa@...>
 

By the way, FYI, KAC is the Polish way to spell KATZ

Sylvia Schildt


Re: Mutilation to avoid Conscription #belarus

Adam Katzeff <adam.katzeff@...>
 

Dear all,

There seems to be many confusions whether the stories about mutilation to
avoid conscription to the Czar's army is true or false, but as many others I
have a similar story in my family:

My great-grandmother (b. 1877), who came >from a shtetl in the Vitebsk-area
had a younger beloved brother who to avoid being conscripted cut of one of
his hands. Because of this he got blood-poisond and died. It's said that my
great-grandmother mourned his death all through her life. Based on the
birthyear of my ggm, I think the story could have taken place around the
time of the Russian-Japanese war in 1904-05. So, we are not talking about
the awful period pre 1855 when Jews could be conscripted for 25 years
military service. We though know that many Jews fled the Russian empire to
avoid being sent to the Russian-Japanese war.

False or true? I don't know!

Best regards

Adam Katzeff
Malmoe, Sweden

adam.katzeff@mail.bip.net

Researching:
LEVINTAL / LEVINTHAL: Surazh+Vitebsk+Yanavichy, Belarus
NEMTSOV / NEMZOFF: Vitsebsk, Belarus; Sweden; Denmark
NEMCHENKO / NEMCHENOK / NEMTSCHENKO: Mstislavl+Surazh+Vitsebsk+
Yanavichy, Belarus; St Petersburg, Russia; Sweden
NIVOROSHKIN / NEWOROSCHKIN / NIVAROSCHKIN / NIWOROSCHKIN:
Astrouna+Surazh, Belarus; Rostov-na-Donu, Ukraine; Sweden; Denmark; New
York, NY, USA


Re: Help in finding Los Angeles towns by # #general

Scott D. Groll
 

Hopefully, this will put this question to rest. I believe that the (19)
refers to Los Angeles City, in particular, while the (70) refers to
elsewhere in Los Angeles County.

Scott Groll
sgroll@ix.netcom.com