Date   

California Vital Records Indexes - County Numbers #general

Ted Gostin
 

There have been several postings lately asking about the county
numbers in the California death index (also used for the birth and
marriage indexes). In particular, there is some confusion over the
use of two different county codes for the four most populous
counties in the state: Alameda, Los Angeles, San Diego and San
Francisco. While I can't provide a complete explanation, I can
debunk a couple of myths and explain how these numbers were
used (although not why).

California began requiring counties to forward copies of their vital
records to the state in 1905. Since that time, the state has
maintained statewide indexes to vital records, some of which are
publicly available. The county in which the event occurred is
identified in these indexes by a two digit numerical code. The
counties were numbered sequentially, in alphabetical order,
starting >from Alameda (01) to Yuba (58). In addition to these
county numbers, the four most populous counties were also given
a second code, using only the decennial numbers starting with 60:
Alameda County - 60, Los Angeles County - 70, San Diego County
- 80, and San Francisco County - 90. Thus, these four counties
have two different county codes, as follows:

Alameda: 01 or 60
Los Angeles: 19 or 70
San Diego: 37 or 80
San Francisco: 38 or 90

The confusion arises because there doesn't seem to be any logic
to the use of these two codes for the four largest counties. While
I'm not sure why two codes were assigned to the counties, or
when, I can say >from experience that there are certain things that
are not true about them.

- They do not represent "city" and "county" codes, as some have
claimed. You will find Los Angeles City deaths, for example,
identified by both the 70 and 19 codes, and deaths in other parts of
the county identified by both codes.

- They do not appear to represent "earlier" and "later" codes, since
the state has alternated their use several times since 1905.

The two sets of county codes for these four counties have been
used as follows:

1905-1939: Only 60, 70, 80 and 90 used. 01, 19, 37 and 38 not
used in the indexes for these years.

1940-1959: Only 01, 19, 37 and 38 used; 60, 70, 80 and 90 not
used in the indexes for these years.

1960-69: Only 60, 70, 80 and 90 used.

1970-79: Both sets of numbers used.

1980-present: Only 01, 19, 37 & 38 used. Decennial numbers (60,
70, 80 & 90) not used in index.

I have examined hundreds of certificates in an attempt to determine
any pattern for the county code number used. It seems to be
somewhat arbitrary. During the decade of the 1970s, it can be
clearly traced to the different "local registration district" codes
being used. Within each county, the state assigned these district
codes for statistical purposes. During the 1970s, different
communities in Los Angeles County had local registration district
numbers starting with either 19 or 70, and this seems to determine
which county code was used in the index. Looking at several
deaths, for example: Burbank local registration district 7097,
deaths in Burbank receive county code 70 in index; Long Beach
local registration district 7052, deaths in Long Beach receive
county code 70 in index; Los Angeles City (after 1974) local
registration district 0190, Los Angeles deaths after 1974 receive
county code 19 in index. Earlier in the decade, most of Los
Angeles also had local registration district number 7097, and these
deaths are identified in the index as county 70.

This explanation doesn't explain the use of 19/70 and the other
pairs in other decades, since the county code used and the local
registration district number don't always match.

One of these days I'll probably find someone in the state who can
provide some explanations for this inconsistent use of the two
codes, but for now, just knowing when the different codes were
used may help some people.


Ted Gostin
Los Angeles, CA
tedgostin@generationspress.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen California Vital Records Indexes - County Numbers #general

Ted Gostin
 

There have been several postings lately asking about the county
numbers in the California death index (also used for the birth and
marriage indexes). In particular, there is some confusion over the
use of two different county codes for the four most populous
counties in the state: Alameda, Los Angeles, San Diego and San
Francisco. While I can't provide a complete explanation, I can
debunk a couple of myths and explain how these numbers were
used (although not why).

California began requiring counties to forward copies of their vital
records to the state in 1905. Since that time, the state has
maintained statewide indexes to vital records, some of which are
publicly available. The county in which the event occurred is
identified in these indexes by a two digit numerical code. The
counties were numbered sequentially, in alphabetical order,
starting >from Alameda (01) to Yuba (58). In addition to these
county numbers, the four most populous counties were also given
a second code, using only the decennial numbers starting with 60:
Alameda County - 60, Los Angeles County - 70, San Diego County
- 80, and San Francisco County - 90. Thus, these four counties
have two different county codes, as follows:

Alameda: 01 or 60
Los Angeles: 19 or 70
San Diego: 37 or 80
San Francisco: 38 or 90

The confusion arises because there doesn't seem to be any logic
to the use of these two codes for the four largest counties. While
I'm not sure why two codes were assigned to the counties, or
when, I can say >from experience that there are certain things that
are not true about them.

- They do not represent "city" and "county" codes, as some have
claimed. You will find Los Angeles City deaths, for example,
identified by both the 70 and 19 codes, and deaths in other parts of
the county identified by both codes.

- They do not appear to represent "earlier" and "later" codes, since
the state has alternated their use several times since 1905.

The two sets of county codes for these four counties have been
used as follows:

1905-1939: Only 60, 70, 80 and 90 used. 01, 19, 37 and 38 not
used in the indexes for these years.

1940-1959: Only 01, 19, 37 and 38 used; 60, 70, 80 and 90 not
used in the indexes for these years.

1960-69: Only 60, 70, 80 and 90 used.

1970-79: Both sets of numbers used.

1980-present: Only 01, 19, 37 & 38 used. Decennial numbers (60,
70, 80 & 90) not used in index.

I have examined hundreds of certificates in an attempt to determine
any pattern for the county code number used. It seems to be
somewhat arbitrary. During the decade of the 1970s, it can be
clearly traced to the different "local registration district" codes
being used. Within each county, the state assigned these district
codes for statistical purposes. During the 1970s, different
communities in Los Angeles County had local registration district
numbers starting with either 19 or 70, and this seems to determine
which county code was used in the index. Looking at several
deaths, for example: Burbank local registration district 7097,
deaths in Burbank receive county code 70 in index; Long Beach
local registration district 7052, deaths in Long Beach receive
county code 70 in index; Los Angeles City (after 1974) local
registration district 0190, Los Angeles deaths after 1974 receive
county code 19 in index. Earlier in the decade, most of Los
Angeles also had local registration district number 7097, and these
deaths are identified in the index as county 70.

This explanation doesn't explain the use of 19/70 and the other
pairs in other decades, since the county code used and the local
registration district number don't always match.

One of these days I'll probably find someone in the state who can
provide some explanations for this inconsistent use of the two
codes, but for now, just knowing when the different codes were
used may help some people.


Ted Gostin
Los Angeles, CA
tedgostin@generationspress.com


Pfalz Germany researcher needed #general

paul klein <pklein@...>
 

I am trying to find someone to do research in the area of Gauersheim,
Alzey, Gaugrehweiler, Bischofsheim.

If you can recommend someone, please reply privately.

Paul Klein
Cleveland, Ohio, US
pklein@stratos.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Pfalz Germany researcher needed #general

paul klein <pklein@...>
 

I am trying to find someone to do research in the area of Gauersheim,
Alzey, Gaugrehweiler, Bischofsheim.

If you can recommend someone, please reply privately.

Paul Klein
Cleveland, Ohio, US
pklein@stratos.net


Re: Mutilation to avoid Conscription #belarus

Andrea Vangor <drav@...>
 

With apologies for a sort of non-contribution to the discussion,
although negative evidence is still evidence: my great-grandfather
left Vitebsk, Russia when he was probably draft age or near to it.
He had been blinded in one eye due to a childhood illness, probably
measles. However, no one in our family ever said or heard anything
to suggest that this was a deliberate injury to avoid the draft...

Andrea Vangor


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: Mutilation to avoid Conscription #belarus

Andrea Vangor <drav@...>
 

With apologies for a sort of non-contribution to the discussion,
although negative evidence is still evidence: my great-grandfather
left Vitebsk, Russia when he was probably draft age or near to it.
He had been blinded in one eye due to a childhood illness, probably
measles. However, no one in our family ever said or heard anything
to suggest that this was a deliberate injury to avoid the draft...

Andrea Vangor


Re: Drafted into the Imperial Russian Army #belarus

farran <farran@...>
 

My grandfather served in the Russian Army. In fact, his photo is in
the Belarus "SIG" newletter, in Logan M. Lockabey 's article of
unknown photos:

http://www.jewishgen.org/Belarus/newsletter/photo2.htm

He is sitting flanked by two standing soldiers [photo # 13]. Logan
and I will soon be writting a story about it. There are two stories
about his service. The better of the two stories has him:
a. becomming a sergent in the calvalry
b. talking his men into a demostration for greater bread rations
c. being sent to prison in Siberia
d. being sent into the front lines during the War of !905 .
e. beign found my his mothaer in Siberia and with her urging
deserting with his five horses
f. He shaves ands dresses as a woman. They take the railroad back
to Polotsk, where his uncle, who just happens to be my
Grandmother's ( his future wife) father pays his way to England.
g. He loved ham--never had it before or after the Army.

This story was told to me by my Grandmother--during my Yiddish school
homework. Surely it was !00% the truth --Would a Bubba lie to a 10
year old?

The second story was told by my grandfather's nephew.
It is very simple. My grandfather finished his tour of duty.
He gathered his three younger brothers and proclaimed that none of them
were ever going to be subjected to horrors of the Russain Army.
They all were going to America.

Bill Farran


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: Drafted into the Imperial Russian Army #belarus

farran <farran@...>
 

My grandfather served in the Russian Army. In fact, his photo is in
the Belarus "SIG" newletter, in Logan M. Lockabey 's article of
unknown photos:

http://www.jewishgen.org/Belarus/newsletter/photo2.htm

He is sitting flanked by two standing soldiers [photo # 13]. Logan
and I will soon be writting a story about it. There are two stories
about his service. The better of the two stories has him:
a. becomming a sergent in the calvalry
b. talking his men into a demostration for greater bread rations
c. being sent to prison in Siberia
d. being sent into the front lines during the War of !905 .
e. beign found my his mothaer in Siberia and with her urging
deserting with his five horses
f. He shaves ands dresses as a woman. They take the railroad back
to Polotsk, where his uncle, who just happens to be my
Grandmother's ( his future wife) father pays his way to England.
g. He loved ham--never had it before or after the Army.

This story was told to me by my Grandmother--during my Yiddish school
homework. Surely it was !00% the truth --Would a Bubba lie to a 10
year old?

The second story was told by my grandfather's nephew.
It is very simple. My grandfather finished his tour of duty.
He gathered his three younger brothers and proclaimed that none of them
were ever going to be subjected to horrors of the Russain Army.
They all were going to America.

Bill Farran


Re: [Re: [query: Anyone else have mtDNA haplotype H with 3 C mutations on 189, 356, 362]] #dna

enipp140@...
 

Judy - you did the dna? I have been thinking about it because I am sure
that I have an asian cross somewhere in there.
What exactly did you find out for your 200+ dollars?

Elaine.
mailto:enipp140@juno.com


DNA Research #DNA Re: [Re: [query: Anyone else have mtDNA haplotype H with 3 C mutations on 189, 356, 362]] #dna

enipp140@...
 

Judy - you did the dna? I have been thinking about it because I am sure
that I have an asian cross somewhere in there.
What exactly did you find out for your 200+ dollars?

Elaine.
mailto:enipp140@juno.com


Passport #belarus

renee1056@...
 

I would like to thank Monika for her answer to my passport delima.
She was nice enough to look at my grandmothers passport for me and
let me know that it is writen in Russian, German, and French.
One mystery solved.

Now on to the next.
Is there anyone that will be reading this posting that can read these
languages and translate it for me. I am at a dead end.
I want to find out what country, and port and ship that they came to
the USA on. They came to USA in 1906.
Thank you in advance for reading and posting this.

Renee Marcus
renee1056@juno.com
researching ZALMINOVICH, FRAYERMAN, Moliva

------------------
MODERATOR NOTE:

JewishGen's VIEWMATE is precisely for posting questions
about translation or reading of difficult texts.
You can find VIEWMATE at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/
-----------------


Belarus SIG #Belarus Passport #belarus

renee1056@...
 

I would like to thank Monika for her answer to my passport delima.
She was nice enough to look at my grandmothers passport for me and
let me know that it is writen in Russian, German, and French.
One mystery solved.

Now on to the next.
Is there anyone that will be reading this posting that can read these
languages and translate it for me. I am at a dead end.
I want to find out what country, and port and ship that they came to
the USA on. They came to USA in 1906.
Thank you in advance for reading and posting this.

Renee Marcus
renee1056@juno.com
researching ZALMINOVICH, FRAYERMAN, Moliva

------------------
MODERATOR NOTE:

JewishGen's VIEWMATE is precisely for posting questions
about translation or reading of difficult texts.
You can find VIEWMATE at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/
-----------------


FW: Re: Mutilation to avoid Conscription #belarus

JSimpson@...
 

Hello List,

I just wanted to add to this that I am also sorry for injecting
any divisive spirit into the forum. It was just totally inappropriate,
and I know better. I consider it an honor to be on this list, to get
the kind of information I am getting, to be able to post queries, and
no one should feel afraid to post anything or any view for fear of
getting "clobbered" as Betsy Brazy put it so eloquently. There is
certainly room for differences, as I am sure that Naomi and myself
have a few, but there should be no room for clobbering.

To quote whoever was the guy who said it "Even if you are right, but
you communicate it in a wrong spirit, you are wrong." And that is not
to say that I think I am totally right. I am probably more of a romantic
when it comes to history than Naomi. Naomi's skeptical side is a side
that I need to embrace to a certain degree, though I don't really want
to. I am in the preliminary stages of writing a book about the life
of my great great grandfather, and I want to give full expression to
the emotional impact of his stories, so that they will grab the reader.
The danger is that I may misrepresent history for the sake of making
an interesting read.

So, thank you Naomi, for your reply, and I really mean that.
I am just a young guy, fresh into all this stuff, and, if I am ever to
succeed in any of my goals, I need to be open to every one's input, no
matter how much it goes against my grain.

And thank you Betsy for reminding us that we are all related. As the
good book says (to sound like Tevye) at the very beginning of all our
geneologies we all find the same set of parents.

Sincerely and sorrowfully,

Joseph Simpson
Glens Falls, NY
Researching Rosenfelds of Brest Litovsk

------------------
MODERATOR NOTE:
This thread is not yet closed,
BUT: Messages and discussion on a more personal
level must in the future be sent privately!
------------------


Belarus SIG #Belarus FW: Re: Mutilation to avoid Conscription #belarus

JSimpson@...
 

Hello List,

I just wanted to add to this that I am also sorry for injecting
any divisive spirit into the forum. It was just totally inappropriate,
and I know better. I consider it an honor to be on this list, to get
the kind of information I am getting, to be able to post queries, and
no one should feel afraid to post anything or any view for fear of
getting "clobbered" as Betsy Brazy put it so eloquently. There is
certainly room for differences, as I am sure that Naomi and myself
have a few, but there should be no room for clobbering.

To quote whoever was the guy who said it "Even if you are right, but
you communicate it in a wrong spirit, you are wrong." And that is not
to say that I think I am totally right. I am probably more of a romantic
when it comes to history than Naomi. Naomi's skeptical side is a side
that I need to embrace to a certain degree, though I don't really want
to. I am in the preliminary stages of writing a book about the life
of my great great grandfather, and I want to give full expression to
the emotional impact of his stories, so that they will grab the reader.
The danger is that I may misrepresent history for the sake of making
an interesting read.

So, thank you Naomi, for your reply, and I really mean that.
I am just a young guy, fresh into all this stuff, and, if I am ever to
succeed in any of my goals, I need to be open to every one's input, no
matter how much it goes against my grain.

And thank you Betsy for reminding us that we are all related. As the
good book says (to sound like Tevye) at the very beginning of all our
geneologies we all find the same set of parents.

Sincerely and sorrowfully,

Joseph Simpson
Glens Falls, NY
Researching Rosenfelds of Brest Litovsk

------------------
MODERATOR NOTE:
This thread is not yet closed,
BUT: Messages and discussion on a more personal
level must in the future be sent privately!
------------------


MIGRATION IN THE 1880S #belarus

Sharpgenie@...
 

Hello to all,

I cannot find any information on my great-grandfather, Elias Silverstein
(Hebrew name Elihu) who states on the 1920 Boston, MA census that he is >from
Grodno and is alien. He arrived in the United States about 1883. I just
recently found my Jewish connection and was wondering if there was any
specific migration route that was used >from Grodno at that time. Any help
would be appreciated.

Pat Bellis Sharp
San Diego, CA, USA
mail to: Sharpgenie@aol.com


Belarus SIG #Belarus MIGRATION IN THE 1880S #belarus

Sharpgenie@...
 

Hello to all,

I cannot find any information on my great-grandfather, Elias Silverstein
(Hebrew name Elihu) who states on the 1920 Boston, MA census that he is >from
Grodno and is alien. He arrived in the United States about 1883. I just
recently found my Jewish connection and was wondering if there was any
specific migration route that was used >from Grodno at that time. Any help
would be appreciated.

Pat Bellis Sharp
San Diego, CA, USA
mail to: Sharpgenie@aol.com


BRISK Yizkor Translation Project #belarus

JSimpson@...
 

Hello all,


I just wanted to make a quick and important announcement. I've
decided to coordinate the Brest Yiskor Book translation project. I hope I am
not getting in over my head, but if this Yizkor book is as great as others
I've seen, I just have to be able to read it (in english), plus I need the
info in there for my book I am writing. If you or someone you know (sounds
like a commercial for insurance) is interested in the Jewish community of
Brest Litovsk (Brest, Brisk, Brzesc nad Bugeum, and however other ways it's
called) please consider donating any amount great or small to the effort.
Per Joyce Field, "The Brest translation fundraising project is now
online at the YB JewishGen-erosity page at
http://www.JewishGen.org/JewishGen-erosity/YizkorTrans.html. You may now
make online contributions to the project or print out the form and submit
contributions by mail, designating the project on the form." Also please
consider an additional amount to JewishGen, which provides administrative
and infrastructure services to the yizkor book project at no cost.


Thanks,

Joseph Simpson
Glens Falls, NY
Researching Rosenfelds in Brest


Belarus SIG #Belarus BRISK Yizkor Translation Project #belarus

JSimpson@...
 

Hello all,


I just wanted to make a quick and important announcement. I've
decided to coordinate the Brest Yiskor Book translation project. I hope I am
not getting in over my head, but if this Yizkor book is as great as others
I've seen, I just have to be able to read it (in english), plus I need the
info in there for my book I am writing. If you or someone you know (sounds
like a commercial for insurance) is interested in the Jewish community of
Brest Litovsk (Brest, Brisk, Brzesc nad Bugeum, and however other ways it's
called) please consider donating any amount great or small to the effort.
Per Joyce Field, "The Brest translation fundraising project is now
online at the YB JewishGen-erosity page at
http://www.JewishGen.org/JewishGen-erosity/YizkorTrans.html. You may now
make online contributions to the project or print out the form and submit
contributions by mail, designating the project on the form." Also please
consider an additional amount to JewishGen, which provides administrative
and infrastructure services to the yizkor book project at no cost.


Thanks,

Joseph Simpson
Glens Falls, NY
Researching Rosenfelds in Brest


Searching for survivors/descendants of SCHORR MISCHEL from Galicia #ukraine

lilian schorr <lilianschorr@...>
 

Dear friends,
I still have the hope to get hints on any relative somewhere in this World.
Please help me. I have posted 4 photos of my father's family all from
Stanislawow-Stryy. My father was born in 1906.
Please have a look at http://www.jewishgen.org.viewmate.toview.html
Go to To View section FILES VM346/347/348/349.
Please contact me directly at lilianschorr@infovia.com.ar
You can also go directly to:
http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/toview109.html#vm346
and please go through the 4 photos.
Do you have relatives >from Stanislawow-Stryy-Lemberg that are over 80?
May be they can remember.
Thank you very much for your help.

Lilian Schorr Landes
lilianschorr@infovia.com.ar

Searching for: SCHORR, MISCHEL >from Stanislawow, Stryy, Lemberg (Lwow),
Vien.
LANDES, BASS, ZEMBER, MEHLER >from Podkamien, Brody, Tarnopol
Lember, Lwow, USA.


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Searching for survivors/descendants of SCHORR MISCHEL from Galicia #ukraine

lilian schorr <lilianschorr@...>
 

Dear friends,
I still have the hope to get hints on any relative somewhere in this World.
Please help me. I have posted 4 photos of my father's family all from
Stanislawow-Stryy. My father was born in 1906.
Please have a look at http://www.jewishgen.org.viewmate.toview.html
Go to To View section FILES VM346/347/348/349.
Please contact me directly at lilianschorr@infovia.com.ar
You can also go directly to:
http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/toview109.html#vm346
and please go through the 4 photos.
Do you have relatives >from Stanislawow-Stryy-Lemberg that are over 80?
May be they can remember.
Thank you very much for your help.

Lilian Schorr Landes
lilianschorr@infovia.com.ar

Searching for: SCHORR, MISCHEL >from Stanislawow, Stryy, Lemberg (Lwow),
Vien.
LANDES, BASS, ZEMBER, MEHLER >from Podkamien, Brody, Tarnopol
Lember, Lwow, USA.