Date   

Pogroms #ukraine

Ida & Joseph Schwarcz <idayosef@...>
 

There is a book in English by Saul Friedman, "Pogromchik" (NY: Hart
Publishing Co,1976) which gives many details about the pogroms and there is
also a bibliography.

Dr.Ida Selavan Schwarcz
Dr.Joseph M. Schwarcz

Arad, Israel


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Pogroms #ukraine

Ida & Joseph Schwarcz <idayosef@...>
 

There is a book in English by Saul Friedman, "Pogromchik" (NY: Hart
Publishing Co,1976) which gives many details about the pogroms and there is
also a bibliography.

Dr.Ida Selavan Schwarcz
Dr.Joseph M. Schwarcz

Arad, Israel


Ukraine Pogroms #ukraine

Ben Zion Shapiro <benzion.shapiro@...>
 

The following is testimony >from my late mother-in-law who came from
Samgorodok in the Ukraine.

The Pogrom

And shortly after this, as I described, my very happy childhood years,
something drastic and something tragic happened, on one Thursday night, on
the thirteenth day of Tammuz, in 1919, when a gang of bandits called
Sokholovtzes came into our town, killed forty-nine people, and amongst them
were my grandfather, grandmother, my father, and my father's brother, my
very young uncle, who had just before this returned >from the war. He was
captured and he spent three, four years in Rumania. Well, everything
remained at a standstill for me and my mother. And in the meantime, I
forgot to mention, that up to eight years of age, I was the only child in
all the family. But when I was eight years old, my little brother Moshe
was born.

So, on the night of the thirteenth of Tammuz, my brother and I and my
mother, and my aunt and her husband remained alive. To describe how it all
happened, I would need a lot more time; but I hope I can make it brief,
and describe a little bit how it was. It was on a Thursday night at nine
o'clock in the evening, and we were all sitting outside, and my father alav
hashalom and my father's brother, plus a few other neighbours have remained
sitting outside, because they were guarding the streets because the gentile
people were attacking our people, and there were burglars every night in
other homes. So they used to sit outside the whole night to watch, not
thinking that the bandits >from other towns will come in and really this
would be more severe than just coming and rob our homes. So, being Thursday
night, and everybody had to get up Friday morning to bake the challahs and
the korzhikes and all the things for the Sabbath, my auntie and my
grandmother and mother all came into the house, and the boys remained
outside. And maybe an hour later we heard some voices that were unfamiliar
to us, we heard voices and we heard shots. And my grandfather stood up
right away to mizrach wall, and started to pray: if he should have to see
trouble...if he should have to see anything on his children...any kind of
trouble, God should help him that he shouldn't live to the morning. And, it
so came to pass, they were killed about ten o'clock in the evening, the
bandits right away opened up fire and killed my father and my father's
brother. They were lying right on the street, there a little near our
house, away >from our house.

And when the bandits have finished their mission, and it was about two
thirty in the morning, and they knew it would soon become daylight, and
they might meet some opposition >from the nearby towns, they started to go
home; and on the way home, because we lived a little bit out of the town,
they stopped off at our place, packed up two or three wagons with goods
that was in my grandfather's home, all sorts of things in the trousseau
that they were keeping for their daughter, for my aunt Yocheved. And after
they packed up this, they killed my grandfather and my grandmother. And so
they were calling to their comrades, "Let's run away because we will all be
lost," and I'll never forget that voice, the way they were on top of that
bridge, and they called in Russian, and they said, "skore ribyata atoka
pedyom" (soon the guys will attack) and they checked out.

I forgot to mention that before they checked out, they came into our house,
on the side of my grandfather's house and wanted to kill my mother, and I
was standing there holding my little brother, who was only about two years
old, not quite two, and begged them to leave her alive, and thank God, they
listened and they left her, and so they left the town. And my mother
started to look around bright and early, b'alot hashachar, she went out to
look for my father, that he is alive. First she searched the garden, the
garden which was so beautiful and full with all kinds of vegetables, and
everything was so peaceful in that meadow there, in the garden. She
wandered through and looked, and called, "Bora, Bora," and there was no
voice >from no one, but our neighbour was hiding himself there, and he said
to her, "I ran away, and your husband was killed. We begged him, we said,
"Boruch, lomir antloifen," that means "let's run away, we have no chance to
remain alive anyways". But my father answered, "I'm in God's hands, how
shall I run away?" And when he was killed, his brother, his young brother,
they also asked him to run away. He said, "If my brother is dead, what do I
have to live for?" So he was killed. So he told my mother where my father
was, and there they were both lying stretched out like dogs in the street.
My grandfather was lying in the front room...in the dining room, what you
would call, and when it came Friday, and we had to bury them, as we know
that in the Old Country you have to bury your dead ones the first day; and
as they were carrying my father and my grandmother out of the house,
somebody started to yell that the bandits have returned, they're coming
back; and right wrapped up in the tallis, they left my grandfather at the
gate, and we all ran away to hide ourselves in some basements...holding my
little brother's mouth that God forbid, he shouldn't open, he shouldn't
cry; he was only a baby, and he wasn't even well then, either.

And so ...I don't know, can't remember too much...we endured, and then
afterwards we had all sorts of encounters with all sorts of gangs that
came. There were the Petlurovtzes , the Machnovtzes, the Sokholovtzes, and
many others whom...at the moment it leaves me, I can't remember.

For one year's time, I did not go into our town. The town was so nearby
that when we stood at our gates, we could see the beginning of it. But I
didn't go out. Nobody. I don't know how we sustained ourselves, how some
food came into us, who brought it in, how and what. And after the year's
time, when I came into town, I thought I was in a strange town; I didn't
recognize this building or that building, and that's how I entered my
future years of life.


Ben Zion and Bunny Shapiro

Toronto, Canada

View our family webpage
<www.familyshoebox.com/family/elisha>
Updated January 11, 2001


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Ukraine Pogroms #ukraine

Ben Zion Shapiro <benzion.shapiro@...>
 

The following is testimony >from my late mother-in-law who came from
Samgorodok in the Ukraine.

The Pogrom

And shortly after this, as I described, my very happy childhood years,
something drastic and something tragic happened, on one Thursday night, on
the thirteenth day of Tammuz, in 1919, when a gang of bandits called
Sokholovtzes came into our town, killed forty-nine people, and amongst them
were my grandfather, grandmother, my father, and my father's brother, my
very young uncle, who had just before this returned >from the war. He was
captured and he spent three, four years in Rumania. Well, everything
remained at a standstill for me and my mother. And in the meantime, I
forgot to mention, that up to eight years of age, I was the only child in
all the family. But when I was eight years old, my little brother Moshe
was born.

So, on the night of the thirteenth of Tammuz, my brother and I and my
mother, and my aunt and her husband remained alive. To describe how it all
happened, I would need a lot more time; but I hope I can make it brief,
and describe a little bit how it was. It was on a Thursday night at nine
o'clock in the evening, and we were all sitting outside, and my father alav
hashalom and my father's brother, plus a few other neighbours have remained
sitting outside, because they were guarding the streets because the gentile
people were attacking our people, and there were burglars every night in
other homes. So they used to sit outside the whole night to watch, not
thinking that the bandits >from other towns will come in and really this
would be more severe than just coming and rob our homes. So, being Thursday
night, and everybody had to get up Friday morning to bake the challahs and
the korzhikes and all the things for the Sabbath, my auntie and my
grandmother and mother all came into the house, and the boys remained
outside. And maybe an hour later we heard some voices that were unfamiliar
to us, we heard voices and we heard shots. And my grandfather stood up
right away to mizrach wall, and started to pray: if he should have to see
trouble...if he should have to see anything on his children...any kind of
trouble, God should help him that he shouldn't live to the morning. And, it
so came to pass, they were killed about ten o'clock in the evening, the
bandits right away opened up fire and killed my father and my father's
brother. They were lying right on the street, there a little near our
house, away >from our house.

And when the bandits have finished their mission, and it was about two
thirty in the morning, and they knew it would soon become daylight, and
they might meet some opposition >from the nearby towns, they started to go
home; and on the way home, because we lived a little bit out of the town,
they stopped off at our place, packed up two or three wagons with goods
that was in my grandfather's home, all sorts of things in the trousseau
that they were keeping for their daughter, for my aunt Yocheved. And after
they packed up this, they killed my grandfather and my grandmother. And so
they were calling to their comrades, "Let's run away because we will all be
lost," and I'll never forget that voice, the way they were on top of that
bridge, and they called in Russian, and they said, "skore ribyata atoka
pedyom" (soon the guys will attack) and they checked out.

I forgot to mention that before they checked out, they came into our house,
on the side of my grandfather's house and wanted to kill my mother, and I
was standing there holding my little brother, who was only about two years
old, not quite two, and begged them to leave her alive, and thank God, they
listened and they left her, and so they left the town. And my mother
started to look around bright and early, b'alot hashachar, she went out to
look for my father, that he is alive. First she searched the garden, the
garden which was so beautiful and full with all kinds of vegetables, and
everything was so peaceful in that meadow there, in the garden. She
wandered through and looked, and called, "Bora, Bora," and there was no
voice >from no one, but our neighbour was hiding himself there, and he said
to her, "I ran away, and your husband was killed. We begged him, we said,
"Boruch, lomir antloifen," that means "let's run away, we have no chance to
remain alive anyways". But my father answered, "I'm in God's hands, how
shall I run away?" And when he was killed, his brother, his young brother,
they also asked him to run away. He said, "If my brother is dead, what do I
have to live for?" So he was killed. So he told my mother where my father
was, and there they were both lying stretched out like dogs in the street.
My grandfather was lying in the front room...in the dining room, what you
would call, and when it came Friday, and we had to bury them, as we know
that in the Old Country you have to bury your dead ones the first day; and
as they were carrying my father and my grandmother out of the house,
somebody started to yell that the bandits have returned, they're coming
back; and right wrapped up in the tallis, they left my grandfather at the
gate, and we all ran away to hide ourselves in some basements...holding my
little brother's mouth that God forbid, he shouldn't open, he shouldn't
cry; he was only a baby, and he wasn't even well then, either.

And so ...I don't know, can't remember too much...we endured, and then
afterwards we had all sorts of encounters with all sorts of gangs that
came. There were the Petlurovtzes , the Machnovtzes, the Sokholovtzes, and
many others whom...at the moment it leaves me, I can't remember.

For one year's time, I did not go into our town. The town was so nearby
that when we stood at our gates, we could see the beginning of it. But I
didn't go out. Nobody. I don't know how we sustained ourselves, how some
food came into us, who brought it in, how and what. And after the year's
time, when I came into town, I thought I was in a strange town; I didn't
recognize this building or that building, and that's how I entered my
future years of life.


Ben Zion and Bunny Shapiro

Toronto, Canada

View our family webpage
<www.familyshoebox.com/family/elisha>
Updated January 11, 2001


Re: Babi Yar #ukraine

Chuck Weinstein <cweinstein@...>
 

Eve Greenfield should not be so surprised that the plaque at Babi Yar
mentioned only Russian citizens and prisoners of war. The fact is,
there was no monument at Babi Yar as late as 1975. The Soviets
consistently refused to admit that Hitler singled out Jews. The logic
was that in the modern socialist state, there are no ethnic or religious
groups, just citizens.

Anatoly Kuznetsov, a Russian, wrote an excellent memoir on life in Kiyiv
during the war. It opens with with his childhood, but he witnessed and
met many of the victims who managed to survive the aktion at Babi Yar as
a 10 year old. The book is entitled Babi Yar, and was in print the last
time I looked.

As far as the Russian front goes, keep in mind, Russian children were
taught that the might of Russia is what destroyed fascism. There was no
mention of the Americans. That has probably changed in the past few
years, but history is generally learned >from the viewpoint of the
teacher.

A Russian Jewish newspaper in San Francisco ran a picture of the new
monument at Babi Yar a couple of years ago. There is a large menorah
over the grave site, erected by the Jews of Kiyiv who survive today. I
am sorry, I don't have the newspaper, but I did see the picture and had
the caption translated to me by a Russian friend. Of course, nothing at
Babi Yar hints to the fact that most of the killers were Ukrainian.

Chuck Weinstein in San Mateo, CA
cweinstein@jewishgen.org


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: Babi Yar #ukraine

Chuck Weinstein <cweinstein@...>
 

Eve Greenfield should not be so surprised that the plaque at Babi Yar
mentioned only Russian citizens and prisoners of war. The fact is,
there was no monument at Babi Yar as late as 1975. The Soviets
consistently refused to admit that Hitler singled out Jews. The logic
was that in the modern socialist state, there are no ethnic or religious
groups, just citizens.

Anatoly Kuznetsov, a Russian, wrote an excellent memoir on life in Kiyiv
during the war. It opens with with his childhood, but he witnessed and
met many of the victims who managed to survive the aktion at Babi Yar as
a 10 year old. The book is entitled Babi Yar, and was in print the last
time I looked.

As far as the Russian front goes, keep in mind, Russian children were
taught that the might of Russia is what destroyed fascism. There was no
mention of the Americans. That has probably changed in the past few
years, but history is generally learned >from the viewpoint of the
teacher.

A Russian Jewish newspaper in San Francisco ran a picture of the new
monument at Babi Yar a couple of years ago. There is a large menorah
over the grave site, erected by the Jews of Kiyiv who survive today. I
am sorry, I don't have the newspaper, but I did see the picture and had
the caption translated to me by a Russian friend. Of course, nothing at
Babi Yar hints to the fact that most of the killers were Ukrainian.

Chuck Weinstein in San Mateo, CA
cweinstein@jewishgen.org


Re: The Petlura Pograms: February 21, 2001 #ukraine

Lenn Zonder <lenwrite@...>
 

Subject: The Petlura Pograms
From: Lenn Zonder mailto:lenwrite@surfree.com
Date: Feb. 22, 2001

I would suggest that those of you who are interested in a real understanding
of what happened in Ukraine between the fall of the Tsar and the rise of the
Soviet Union read "An Echo in My Blood by Alan Weisman, and award-winning
journalist and frequent contributor to National Public Radio, The New York
Times Magazine, and the Los Angeles Times.
About four years ago, Weisman went to Ukraine to revisit Chernobyl and the
aftermath of the plant following its destruction and shutdown.
While in Ukraine he visited the village that his family came >from and
unraveled a mystery of what happened to the family.
Weisman's father, a powerful Minnesota politician in the 1960s, maintained
that his father had been killed by the Communists, and became a staunch
anti-communist. However, Weisman had an enlightening conversation with his
father's estranged brother and begins to trace a string to the real truth.
You might be surprised at some of the things Weisman learned. You will learn
about Petlura, the other former Tsarist officers and the Cossack hordes that
roamed the area and the struggle for power that took place.
You will also learn that many Jews, some in my own family tree, were not so
badly off. They managed large farms, factories and forests. Others were
successful business people, as Grigorivich alleges. But like other Jews
before them, their somewhat privileged lives could be snatched away from
them in a heartbeat, just as soon as anti-Semitism raised its head.
I suggest to everybody interested in this topic to investigate before
rushing to judgement. Like Weisman's father, many people on all sides of the
issue had their axes to grind and their prejudices to follow. Somewhere in
the middleground, as Weisman found out, is where the truth can be found.
Lenn Zonder
Woodbridge, CT.


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: The Petlura Pograms: February 21, 2001 #ukraine

Lenn Zonder <lenwrite@...>
 

Subject: The Petlura Pograms
From: Lenn Zonder mailto:lenwrite@surfree.com
Date: Feb. 22, 2001

I would suggest that those of you who are interested in a real understanding
of what happened in Ukraine between the fall of the Tsar and the rise of the
Soviet Union read "An Echo in My Blood by Alan Weisman, and award-winning
journalist and frequent contributor to National Public Radio, The New York
Times Magazine, and the Los Angeles Times.
About four years ago, Weisman went to Ukraine to revisit Chernobyl and the
aftermath of the plant following its destruction and shutdown.
While in Ukraine he visited the village that his family came >from and
unraveled a mystery of what happened to the family.
Weisman's father, a powerful Minnesota politician in the 1960s, maintained
that his father had been killed by the Communists, and became a staunch
anti-communist. However, Weisman had an enlightening conversation with his
father's estranged brother and begins to trace a string to the real truth.
You might be surprised at some of the things Weisman learned. You will learn
about Petlura, the other former Tsarist officers and the Cossack hordes that
roamed the area and the struggle for power that took place.
You will also learn that many Jews, some in my own family tree, were not so
badly off. They managed large farms, factories and forests. Others were
successful business people, as Grigorivich alleges. But like other Jews
before them, their somewhat privileged lives could be snatched away from
them in a heartbeat, just as soon as anti-Semitism raised its head.
I suggest to everybody interested in this topic to investigate before
rushing to judgement. Like Weisman's father, many people on all sides of the
issue had their axes to grind and their prejudices to follow. Somewhere in
the middleground, as Weisman found out, is where the truth can be found.
Lenn Zonder
Woodbridge, CT.


Hungarian speakers #hungary

Louis Schonfeld <Lmagyar@...>
 

It may be hopeful for some to know the number of Hungarian speakers and
residents of countries outside of North America who are subscribers.
Only total numbers will be shown in the posted tally. Therefore, please
e-mail me privately and I will calculate and post the results to H-sig

Regarding Hungarian language skills please indicate the level of fluency in
the following manner:

Category 1 (lowest level) please write "C". This means you are only
conversant in the language. Your speaking ability
is such that you can navigate throughout Hungary by yourself without
causing a major diplomatic incident. You wouldn't understand very much of a scholarly lecture,
and your reading comprehension is limited to a
Hungarian version of a Dick and Jane reader. You can spell Satoraljaujhely
only because you memorized it. I fit into this category.

Category 2 please write "R". This means you have a 6th grade knowledge of
Hungarian reading and comprehension. You can understand the entirety of a
scholarly lecture except for the "big" words. At one time you were able to
speak freely with the vocabulary of a an eleven year old, but now you
speak Hungarian only with your some of your friends and acquaintances,
especially when attending religious services. If you regularly speak with
your wife in Hungarian, then give yourself an "R" plus. "R" stands for
rusty. "R+" means rusty, but well oiled.


Category 3 please write "F": This means fluent - Hungarian is your "mother
tongue". You speak, read and write the language better than you do English
or any other language. You may not know the meaning of every Hungarian
word, but the same applies to those of us who consider ourselves fluent in
English.


Category 4, the highest level, please write "P"- You are a graduate of a
Hungarian university, or have at least, a master's degree in that language
from any university in the world. You may also be a professional
translator. I only know of one subscriber in our group who is a
professional translator, and that is my good friend Peter Gergay; however,
I don't doubt that there are others as well. "P" stands for professional
("P+" means that your Hungarian language skills have brought you riches
and fame - see Zsa Zsa Gabor)


One additional matter: if you know that you didn't include your full name
(in addition to your e-mail address) on the subscription form for H-sig,
please send me a private e-mail. Jewishgen rules require that full and
true names be included on all the subscription applications.

My e-mail is Lmagyar@en.com or schonfeld@mindspring.com

Thank you for your cooperation and best wishes,

Louis Schonfeld
Cleveland, OH



visit my shtetlsite: www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Mukachevo/
visit our website: www.jewishgen.org/Hungary


Hungary SIG #Hungary Hungarian speakers #hungary

Louis Schonfeld <Lmagyar@...>
 

It may be hopeful for some to know the number of Hungarian speakers and
residents of countries outside of North America who are subscribers.
Only total numbers will be shown in the posted tally. Therefore, please
e-mail me privately and I will calculate and post the results to H-sig

Regarding Hungarian language skills please indicate the level of fluency in
the following manner:

Category 1 (lowest level) please write "C". This means you are only
conversant in the language. Your speaking ability
is such that you can navigate throughout Hungary by yourself without
causing a major diplomatic incident. You wouldn't understand very much of a scholarly lecture,
and your reading comprehension is limited to a
Hungarian version of a Dick and Jane reader. You can spell Satoraljaujhely
only because you memorized it. I fit into this category.

Category 2 please write "R". This means you have a 6th grade knowledge of
Hungarian reading and comprehension. You can understand the entirety of a
scholarly lecture except for the "big" words. At one time you were able to
speak freely with the vocabulary of a an eleven year old, but now you
speak Hungarian only with your some of your friends and acquaintances,
especially when attending religious services. If you regularly speak with
your wife in Hungarian, then give yourself an "R" plus. "R" stands for
rusty. "R+" means rusty, but well oiled.


Category 3 please write "F": This means fluent - Hungarian is your "mother
tongue". You speak, read and write the language better than you do English
or any other language. You may not know the meaning of every Hungarian
word, but the same applies to those of us who consider ourselves fluent in
English.


Category 4, the highest level, please write "P"- You are a graduate of a
Hungarian university, or have at least, a master's degree in that language
from any university in the world. You may also be a professional
translator. I only know of one subscriber in our group who is a
professional translator, and that is my good friend Peter Gergay; however,
I don't doubt that there are others as well. "P" stands for professional
("P+" means that your Hungarian language skills have brought you riches
and fame - see Zsa Zsa Gabor)


One additional matter: if you know that you didn't include your full name
(in addition to your e-mail address) on the subscription form for H-sig,
please send me a private e-mail. Jewishgen rules require that full and
true names be included on all the subscription applications.

My e-mail is Lmagyar@en.com or schonfeld@mindspring.com

Thank you for your cooperation and best wishes,

Louis Schonfeld
Cleveland, OH



visit my shtetlsite: www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/Mukachevo/
visit our website: www.jewishgen.org/Hungary


Help in finding US Naturalization records #hungary

Stiefel Barry <bstiefel@...>
 

Dear H-sig members,

I am writing to ask for help in finding a
Naturalization record. I am searching for Harry
KESTEN's Naturalization record. Harry Kesten was from
"Austria" (US 1920 census) and moved to Lodz, Poland
around 1900, where he married and had children. In
1914 he immigrated to New York City and lived with his
in-laws the SHORER's. I do not know if Harry Kesten
had any siblings or not. After 1920 the rest of his
family came over. I have checked the WWI draft
registration, and he only lists "Austria" as his place
of origin, so the last place I can think to find Harry
Kesten's birth place in Austria is his Nautralization
record. His death certificate does say he was a U.S.
Citizen, and the 1920 census does list him as "PA" in
the process of citizenship. He at first lived on
Delancy Street, and then moved to Willet Street. One
problem that I have had is that there was another
unrelated Harry Kesten in NYC, so I keep on stubmbling
on his record. Any help that you could give me would
be much appreciated.

Sincerely,

Barry Stiefel,
East Lansing, MI

__________________________________________________

mod.- I'm not too sure how this question pertains to H-sig, unless
the writer refers to "Austria" as a misnomer for the Austro-Hungarian
Empire which might offer some hope that Harry Kesten came >from Hungary.LS


Hungary SIG #Hungary Help in finding US Naturalization records #hungary

Stiefel Barry <bstiefel@...>
 

Dear H-sig members,

I am writing to ask for help in finding a
Naturalization record. I am searching for Harry
KESTEN's Naturalization record. Harry Kesten was from
"Austria" (US 1920 census) and moved to Lodz, Poland
around 1900, where he married and had children. In
1914 he immigrated to New York City and lived with his
in-laws the SHORER's. I do not know if Harry Kesten
had any siblings or not. After 1920 the rest of his
family came over. I have checked the WWI draft
registration, and he only lists "Austria" as his place
of origin, so the last place I can think to find Harry
Kesten's birth place in Austria is his Nautralization
record. His death certificate does say he was a U.S.
Citizen, and the 1920 census does list him as "PA" in
the process of citizenship. He at first lived on
Delancy Street, and then moved to Willet Street. One
problem that I have had is that there was another
unrelated Harry Kesten in NYC, so I keep on stubmbling
on his record. Any help that you could give me would
be much appreciated.

Sincerely,

Barry Stiefel,
East Lansing, MI

__________________________________________________

mod.- I'm not too sure how this question pertains to H-sig, unless
the writer refers to "Austria" as a misnomer for the Austro-Hungarian
Empire which might offer some hope that Harry Kesten came >from Hungary.LS


FHL Judaica Index CD #general

Howard Margol
 

It gives me great pleasure to announce the completion, and availability,
of the FHL Judaica Index CD. This CD includes the largest index of Jewish
records, on microfilm, microfiche, and in print, ever compiled and produced
on a CD. The records referred to are in the Family History Library in Salt
Lake City, Utah. Nancy Goodstein, a volunteer at the FHL, spent almost 18
months compiling, updating, and finalizing the index for the CD. The CD
will enable you to pinpoint the exact source of the records you are
interested in.
After that, you can contact your local FHL to order in a copy of the
microfilms, or microfiche, of your choice after finding the correct
film/item number on the CD. Books are not allowed to be transferred.
However, inmost cases, your local library can obtain a copy of the book
from another library via "inter library loan".
The CD contains an index of thousands of records, including hundreds of
records not previously known or publicized. One example is a book
containing an alphabetical list of persons sent to Siberian work camps from
Lithuania, 1941-1952. Identifies the I.D. number, name, father's name,
birth year, date sent, date released or died, and name of camp to which the
person was sent.

Other examples of very valuable records on microfilm include lists of
emigrants NOT sailing on emigrant ships; a list of Jewish returnees; and
list of those held back >from emigration. A list of arriving emigrants
(including a list of those sent by rail to Antwerp, Tetschen, Stralsund and
Vandrup at the outbreak of WW I); emigrants >from Kovno (Kaunas), and
Jewish orphans >from Russia.

A locality index (alphabetical) to Lithuanian Jewish Vital Records as well
as the actual records. Includes all microfilms of records received >from the
Lithuanian Historical Archive as late as January 2001. In short, the CD
contains an index to records >from all over the world.

The CD is available for immediate shipment. The price is $20 if the order
is received or postmarked prior to May 1, 2001 plus $3 S/H in USA & Canada,
$5 S/H to other countries. After April 30, 2001 the price will be $25
plus S/H.
The CD is "searchable" and PC and Mac compatible.

Order your CD! (Some individuals or societies, may want to donate a CD to
their local FHL).
To order, send your check, made payable to IAJGS, to;
Marilyn Natchez, IAJGS Treasurer
PO Box 251683
West Bloomfield, MI 48325-1683
Alternatively, you may pay by VISA or MasterCard. To do this,
send your authorization to charge your card to Marilyn at the mailing
address above or at her e-mail address, MRNatchez@aol.com.
Don't forget to include the Name shown on the card, the Address
as shown on your credit card statement, your Card Number and
its Expiration Month and Year.

Extra! Extra! Extra! - Through the courtesy of IAJGS, the index of
Jewish records in the Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah
will also appear on Jewishgen.org.
Go to the following URL to access the index:

http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/FHLC

Howard Margol
President, IAJGS


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen FHL Judaica Index CD #general

Howard Margol
 

It gives me great pleasure to announce the completion, and availability,
of the FHL Judaica Index CD. This CD includes the largest index of Jewish
records, on microfilm, microfiche, and in print, ever compiled and produced
on a CD. The records referred to are in the Family History Library in Salt
Lake City, Utah. Nancy Goodstein, a volunteer at the FHL, spent almost 18
months compiling, updating, and finalizing the index for the CD. The CD
will enable you to pinpoint the exact source of the records you are
interested in.
After that, you can contact your local FHL to order in a copy of the
microfilms, or microfiche, of your choice after finding the correct
film/item number on the CD. Books are not allowed to be transferred.
However, inmost cases, your local library can obtain a copy of the book
from another library via "inter library loan".
The CD contains an index of thousands of records, including hundreds of
records not previously known or publicized. One example is a book
containing an alphabetical list of persons sent to Siberian work camps from
Lithuania, 1941-1952. Identifies the I.D. number, name, father's name,
birth year, date sent, date released or died, and name of camp to which the
person was sent.

Other examples of very valuable records on microfilm include lists of
emigrants NOT sailing on emigrant ships; a list of Jewish returnees; and
list of those held back >from emigration. A list of arriving emigrants
(including a list of those sent by rail to Antwerp, Tetschen, Stralsund and
Vandrup at the outbreak of WW I); emigrants >from Kovno (Kaunas), and
Jewish orphans >from Russia.

A locality index (alphabetical) to Lithuanian Jewish Vital Records as well
as the actual records. Includes all microfilms of records received >from the
Lithuanian Historical Archive as late as January 2001. In short, the CD
contains an index to records >from all over the world.

The CD is available for immediate shipment. The price is $20 if the order
is received or postmarked prior to May 1, 2001 plus $3 S/H in USA & Canada,
$5 S/H to other countries. After April 30, 2001 the price will be $25
plus S/H.
The CD is "searchable" and PC and Mac compatible.

Order your CD! (Some individuals or societies, may want to donate a CD to
their local FHL).
To order, send your check, made payable to IAJGS, to;
Marilyn Natchez, IAJGS Treasurer
PO Box 251683
West Bloomfield, MI 48325-1683
Alternatively, you may pay by VISA or MasterCard. To do this,
send your authorization to charge your card to Marilyn at the mailing
address above or at her e-mail address, MRNatchez@aol.com.
Don't forget to include the Name shown on the card, the Address
as shown on your credit card statement, your Card Number and
its Expiration Month and Year.

Extra! Extra! Extra! - Through the courtesy of IAJGS, the index of
Jewish records in the Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah
will also appear on Jewishgen.org.
Go to the following URL to access the index:

http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/FHLC

Howard Margol
President, IAJGS


David GROSS and/or Isaac GROSS - From Kozova, Galicia to Brooklyn, NY #general

Ricki L. Zunk <rickiz@...>
 

My pggm was named Ester Fay GROSS. She lived in Kozova, Galicia, in the

1890s and probably through her death. I cannot find any information
about her there. BUT, I know that she had family who immigrated to the
USA and wound up settling in Brooklyn, NY.

With a surname like GROSS it's been very difficult to pin anything down
in Brooklyn. I just received several sets of family naturalization
papers >from the very early 1900s, and they were witnessed an Isaac and a
David GROSS.

Here's what I DO know:

1907 - David Gross lived at 261 Henry St., Brooklyn
1907 - Isaac Gross lived at 12 Pitt----, Brooklyn
1913 - David Gross lived at 667 Fox St., Bronx
1927 - Isaac Gross lived at 950 -------, Brooklyn

I realize that this isn't much to go on, but then again, I've seen you
miracle workers come up with information with much less information.

I've tried writing to everyone I could find through the JGFF, but that's
been fruitless. With GROSS being such a common surname, my only
hope at this time is to connect with someone who might have their
own connection to either of these two men. So, if anyone recognizes
these men by the dates and addresses, please contact me privately
and let's talk.

Thanks,
(Mrs.) Ricki Lynn Randall Zunk
South Florida
<rickiz@mindspring.com>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen David GROSS and/or Isaac GROSS - From Kozova, Galicia to Brooklyn, NY #general

Ricki L. Zunk <rickiz@...>
 

My pggm was named Ester Fay GROSS. She lived in Kozova, Galicia, in the

1890s and probably through her death. I cannot find any information
about her there. BUT, I know that she had family who immigrated to the
USA and wound up settling in Brooklyn, NY.

With a surname like GROSS it's been very difficult to pin anything down
in Brooklyn. I just received several sets of family naturalization
papers >from the very early 1900s, and they were witnessed an Isaac and a
David GROSS.

Here's what I DO know:

1907 - David Gross lived at 261 Henry St., Brooklyn
1907 - Isaac Gross lived at 12 Pitt----, Brooklyn
1913 - David Gross lived at 667 Fox St., Bronx
1927 - Isaac Gross lived at 950 -------, Brooklyn

I realize that this isn't much to go on, but then again, I've seen you
miracle workers come up with information with much less information.

I've tried writing to everyone I could find through the JGFF, but that's
been fruitless. With GROSS being such a common surname, my only
hope at this time is to connect with someone who might have their
own connection to either of these two men. So, if anyone recognizes
these men by the dates and addresses, please contact me privately
and let's talk.

Thanks,
(Mrs.) Ricki Lynn Randall Zunk
South Florida
<rickiz@mindspring.com>


Records look-up website for various cities #general

Hafcjf@...
 

Hi All,

Linda Thorpe Caciola recently wrote in asking where she could obtain a
death record for Elmira, NY. Don't forget to take advantage of Random Acts
of Genealogical Kindness when you need a free or expenses only look-up.
It's a terrific group of volunteers.

http://raogk.rootsweb.com/index.html

Hope this helps someone,

Cathy J. Flamholtz
Lawrenceville, GA
hafcjf@aol.com


Change of address #general

Mum <sneezi@...>
 

Dear Folk:

Due to my eyes and our lest then best television, I must change my email
address to ejkllj@yahoo.com

So good-by to sneezi then to ejkllj.

Thanks,
Edna McDonald.

MODERATOR NOTE: Please be sure to change your subscription information and
listings in JGFF and FTJP.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Records look-up website for various cities #general

Hafcjf@...
 

Hi All,

Linda Thorpe Caciola recently wrote in asking where she could obtain a
death record for Elmira, NY. Don't forget to take advantage of Random Acts
of Genealogical Kindness when you need a free or expenses only look-up.
It's a terrific group of volunteers.

http://raogk.rootsweb.com/index.html

Hope this helps someone,

Cathy J. Flamholtz
Lawrenceville, GA
hafcjf@aol.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Change of address #general

Mum <sneezi@...>
 

Dear Folk:

Due to my eyes and our lest then best television, I must change my email
address to ejkllj@yahoo.com

So good-by to sneezi then to ejkllj.

Thanks,
Edna McDonald.

MODERATOR NOTE: Please be sure to change your subscription information and
listings in JGFF and FTJP.