Date   

Re: online phone book #belarus

Schelly Dardashti <dardasht@...>
 

Wow!
I'm glad so many people have had great success with it.
I, however ironically, have not been able to get
anything >from it: Turning translit on and off,
resetting browser, inventing spellings of TALALAI/Y
which is a very phonetic name even in Russian! --
absolutely zilch, bupkas, kloom, heech, nada, etc.
Steve Gold suggested they might have unlisted numbers.
Don't think it works that way in former USSR, but who
knows? I KNOW there are several branches in each of
St.P and Moscow, so something should come up (I already
have information, am in contact with them, but am
looking for more) in one or both of them.
Oh well.
When Michael Gavrilovich who told me about it gets back
from St. Petersburg to his school in Illinois, he will
figure it out, unless someone else can try typing in
variants of TALALAI in English or Russian and
forwarding me the list if any information is
forthcoming.
Best wishes, and I am really glad that it works for
others.
Schelly Talalay Dardashti
Tel Aviv
dardasht@barak-online.net


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: online phone book #belarus

Schelly Dardashti <dardasht@...>
 

Wow!
I'm glad so many people have had great success with it.
I, however ironically, have not been able to get
anything >from it: Turning translit on and off,
resetting browser, inventing spellings of TALALAI/Y
which is a very phonetic name even in Russian! --
absolutely zilch, bupkas, kloom, heech, nada, etc.
Steve Gold suggested they might have unlisted numbers.
Don't think it works that way in former USSR, but who
knows? I KNOW there are several branches in each of
St.P and Moscow, so something should come up (I already
have information, am in contact with them, but am
looking for more) in one or both of them.
Oh well.
When Michael Gavrilovich who told me about it gets back
from St. Petersburg to his school in Illinois, he will
figure it out, unless someone else can try typing in
variants of TALALAI in English or Russian and
forwarding me the list if any information is
forthcoming.
Best wishes, and I am really glad that it works for
others.
Schelly Talalay Dardashti
Tel Aviv
dardasht@barak-online.net


Righteous Gentile Candidates #belarus

Louis A Fine <loufine@...>
 

Dear Belarusans,

A short time ago one of my neighbors told me of her family's activities
during WWII.
The family consisted of Auke HARTSTRA, his wife Anna KOEN, their
daughters Anna Maria b.1920 and my neighbor Tine (now Olson) b.1930.

Two houses away >from the Hartstra family, at either #50 or 42
Voortsweg, Enschede Netherlands, lived a Jewish family, named Ausen
(Aussen). The family consisted of the senior Aussen, their son and his
wife and their toddler/preschooler, red-haired son.
One day members of the Resistance told the Hartstras the Nazis were
coming that night to round up Jews and for them to warn the Ausens. The
Ausens refused to believe them, but Tine requested that the little Ausen
boy be allowed to stay in their home ONE night. Permission was granted.
Circa 3 or 4 am the Nazis came in trucks and took the Ausen family, never
to return. Some of the Hartstra neighbors were Nazi collaborators and
they feared for the boy's life. Consequently he was taken by the
Resistance to live with a farm family outside of Enschede. Tine believes
he was probably adopted.
Another part of the Hartstra's history relates another set of
neighbors. Late 1942 or early 1943 the Hartstra's moved to Delden. Next
door lived a family named COHEN: Mr/Mrs. COHEN and the husband's brother.
The Cohen's ran a butcher shop in town. Again the Resistance told the
Hartstra's the Nazis were about to round up Jews. The Cohens listened to
the Hartstra's and went to live with the mother of Tine's
brother-in-law: Mr/Mrs Henry LAST ala Anne FRANK. Last in Dolphia & ran
a barber shop in Glanerbrug.
The Hartstras took as much of the Cohen's equipment and furnishing as
they could, stored them their attic and post war, the Cohen's recovered
their goods. As a result, the Cohen's were able to re-open their butcher
shop in Delden. their daughter married and the couple ran a butcher shop
in Hengelo.
In my opinion, the Hartstra family, Tine being the sole survivor,
deserves to be awarded the status of Righteous Gentile. However the above
requires substantiation and validation >from someone other than Tine. IS
THERE ANYONE OUT THERE WHO KNOWS ANYTHING ABOUT THESE FAMILIES?

If so, please contact me privately ASAP.

Louis A. Fine
University Place WA-U.S.A
E-mail <loufine@juno.com>


Belarus SIG #Belarus Righteous Gentile Candidates #belarus

Louis A Fine <loufine@...>
 

Dear Belarusans,

A short time ago one of my neighbors told me of her family's activities
during WWII.
The family consisted of Auke HARTSTRA, his wife Anna KOEN, their
daughters Anna Maria b.1920 and my neighbor Tine (now Olson) b.1930.

Two houses away >from the Hartstra family, at either #50 or 42
Voortsweg, Enschede Netherlands, lived a Jewish family, named Ausen
(Aussen). The family consisted of the senior Aussen, their son and his
wife and their toddler/preschooler, red-haired son.
One day members of the Resistance told the Hartstras the Nazis were
coming that night to round up Jews and for them to warn the Ausens. The
Ausens refused to believe them, but Tine requested that the little Ausen
boy be allowed to stay in their home ONE night. Permission was granted.
Circa 3 or 4 am the Nazis came in trucks and took the Ausen family, never
to return. Some of the Hartstra neighbors were Nazi collaborators and
they feared for the boy's life. Consequently he was taken by the
Resistance to live with a farm family outside of Enschede. Tine believes
he was probably adopted.
Another part of the Hartstra's history relates another set of
neighbors. Late 1942 or early 1943 the Hartstra's moved to Delden. Next
door lived a family named COHEN: Mr/Mrs. COHEN and the husband's brother.
The Cohen's ran a butcher shop in town. Again the Resistance told the
Hartstra's the Nazis were about to round up Jews. The Cohens listened to
the Hartstra's and went to live with the mother of Tine's
brother-in-law: Mr/Mrs Henry LAST ala Anne FRANK. Last in Dolphia & ran
a barber shop in Glanerbrug.
The Hartstras took as much of the Cohen's equipment and furnishing as
they could, stored them their attic and post war, the Cohen's recovered
their goods. As a result, the Cohen's were able to re-open their butcher
shop in Delden. their daughter married and the couple ran a butcher shop
in Hengelo.
In my opinion, the Hartstra family, Tine being the sole survivor,
deserves to be awarded the status of Righteous Gentile. However the above
requires substantiation and validation >from someone other than Tine. IS
THERE ANYONE OUT THERE WHO KNOWS ANYTHING ABOUT THESE FAMILIES?

If so, please contact me privately ASAP.

Louis A. Fine
University Place WA-U.S.A
E-mail <loufine@juno.com>


Re: Online Phone Book #belarus

Joelrat@...
 

For all those interested in contacting people found in the phone directories
-

Someone had posted a message either here or on the LitvakSIG Digest a long
time ago telling of the existence of this online phonebook. I, like many
others, had found potential relatives. In any case, I found 5 listings for a
rare surname, which, in our family, we believe would all be related. I wrote
to all 5 in Russian, with only the address information returned by the phone
directory. I received responses >from 4 of the 5 people contacted and, as it
turns out, I was able to verify relations with 3 of the 4. The fourth one
traced their ancestry to the same town [Dvinsk], but to a different
progenitor [possibly a brother or cousin of my known relative].

Based on this experience, I encourage any of you who have found potential
matches to explore these possibilities. If the name you are searching for is
very common like KAGAN, good luck!

Joel Ratner
Coordinator, Vilna District Research Group


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: Online Phone Book #belarus

Joelrat@...
 

For all those interested in contacting people found in the phone directories
-

Someone had posted a message either here or on the LitvakSIG Digest a long
time ago telling of the existence of this online phonebook. I, like many
others, had found potential relatives. In any case, I found 5 listings for a
rare surname, which, in our family, we believe would all be related. I wrote
to all 5 in Russian, with only the address information returned by the phone
directory. I received responses >from 4 of the 5 people contacted and, as it
turns out, I was able to verify relations with 3 of the 4. The fourth one
traced their ancestry to the same town [Dvinsk], but to a different
progenitor [possibly a brother or cousin of my known relative].

Based on this experience, I encourage any of you who have found potential
matches to explore these possibilities. If the name you are searching for is
very common like KAGAN, good luck!

Joel Ratner
Coordinator, Vilna District Research Group


wire transfer of money to Belarus #belarus

Jack Blagman <jackbee21@...>
 

I periodically send money to Belarus. Banks here in California charge
from $75 to $100 for small amounts, less than $250.00. I found that a
safe, simple method is through Western Union and alternately Money
Gram. Western Union will take your amount, charge about $17.50 or $18
dollars thereabouts and will forward it to Belarus, contacting your
party with a phone advisory that money awaits them. For a resident to
pick up the money, there are a number of safeguards. You can include a
question that only the authorized party can answer, a passport must be
presented by the recipient and there is a control number you can
forward. Western Union has offices in most cities and even residents of
small towns have access to WU by traveling by bus for half hour or so to
any big city. Money gram, slightly cheaper, does not have offices as
wide spread. There is a tax on whatever you send, (to the individual)

A word of caution: mailing money, checks or anything of value is not
suggested. Aside >from uncertainty of arrival, mail or letter box thefts
are common in poor countries like Belarus.

FYI

Jack Blagman
Mission Viejo, CA


Belarus SIG #Belarus wire transfer of money to Belarus #belarus

Jack Blagman <jackbee21@...>
 

I periodically send money to Belarus. Banks here in California charge
from $75 to $100 for small amounts, less than $250.00. I found that a
safe, simple method is through Western Union and alternately Money
Gram. Western Union will take your amount, charge about $17.50 or $18
dollars thereabouts and will forward it to Belarus, contacting your
party with a phone advisory that money awaits them. For a resident to
pick up the money, there are a number of safeguards. You can include a
question that only the authorized party can answer, a passport must be
presented by the recipient and there is a control number you can
forward. Western Union has offices in most cities and even residents of
small towns have access to WU by traveling by bus for half hour or so to
any big city. Money gram, slightly cheaper, does not have offices as
wide spread. There is a tax on whatever you send, (to the individual)

A word of caution: mailing money, checks or anything of value is not
suggested. Aside >from uncertainty of arrival, mail or letter box thefts
are common in poor countries like Belarus.

FYI

Jack Blagman
Mission Viejo, CA


View Mate VM243 #belarus

Mpcamitta@...
 

Dear genners,
I've posted a photo that belonged to my maternal grandparents. The
people in this photo might or might not be members of my BASSEIN,
KAGAN/COHEN, GUREVICH/HOROWITZ, PALEY, RODMAN or TONIS families, however I
suspect that the seated man was named Jacob LIEBERMAN. I don't know if he
was related to me or not. The photo was taken in 1909 in New York City at
the Paley Photography Studio. It is inscribed to Rokhil: Remember
Kreslavka, Donya, Yacov and Silya. Are any of these faces or names familiar
to you? If so, please respond privately.
Sincerely,
Miriam Camitta
Wynnewood, PA


Belarus SIG #Belarus View Mate VM243 #belarus

Mpcamitta@...
 

Dear genners,
I've posted a photo that belonged to my maternal grandparents. The
people in this photo might or might not be members of my BASSEIN,
KAGAN/COHEN, GUREVICH/HOROWITZ, PALEY, RODMAN or TONIS families, however I
suspect that the seated man was named Jacob LIEBERMAN. I don't know if he
was related to me or not. The photo was taken in 1909 in New York City at
the Paley Photography Studio. It is inscribed to Rokhil: Remember
Kreslavka, Donya, Yacov and Silya. Are any of these faces or names familiar
to you? If so, please respond privately.
Sincerely,
Miriam Camitta
Wynnewood, PA


View Mate file VM243 #belarus

Mpcamitta@...
 

Dear genners,
These photographs belonged to my maternal grandparents'. They may or may not
be family members of the BASSEIN, COHEN/KAGAN, PALEY, RODMAN, SOLOW,
GUREVICH/HOROWITZ and TONIS families. Do you recognize any of them?
They can be viewed at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/
Thanks for helping. Please respond privately.
Sincerely,
Miriam Camitta
Wynnewood, PA


Belarus SIG #Belarus View Mate file VM243 #belarus

Mpcamitta@...
 

Dear genners,
These photographs belonged to my maternal grandparents'. They may or may not
be family members of the BASSEIN, COHEN/KAGAN, PALEY, RODMAN, SOLOW,
GUREVICH/HOROWITZ and TONIS families. Do you recognize any of them?
They can be viewed at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/
Thanks for helping. Please respond privately.
Sincerely,
Miriam Camitta
Wynnewood, PA


Re: One story behind the age changes #general

Prof. Slifkin <slifkin@...>
 

There is no ban on first cousins marrying each other among
Orthodox Jews. Uncles can even marry nieces and although
it is illegal in many countries I know people who went
abroad to marry their nieces.


only thing that they had to be careful of was that the
bride and groom were not first cousins. Even this
became a problem, because people were driven
from "shtetel to shtetle" as the Czar or Cossacks went
on rampages (Pogroms), or anti-semitism became so
threatening, as in Poland, and especially Galicia, that
flight was imperative. Thus, family ties were lost, and
later it was found that indeed first cousins did marry,
albeit unknowingly. This may well explain some of the
genetic diseases common to Jews of Eastern
European "origin".

Professor M A Slifkin userid: slifkin@mail.jct.ac.il
Jerusalem Israel


Canadian Immigration Records #general

greystoke@...
 

The Canadian Archives website provides detailed information on how to
access immigration records, border crossings and passenger lists.  They
offer some level of researcher services.  There is also an online
database covering the years 1925-1935 - searchable by surname, given
name, ship,  port of arrival, year of arrival.  It can take a bit of
time and sometimes imagination on how names might have been spelled but
it works.
 
http://www.archives.ca/exec/naweb.dll?fs&;02020204&e&top&0
 
Best of luck
 
Lucy Walker
Toronto
greystoke@attcanada.ca
 
VOLKOVICH / ZAIDMAN  (Odessa)  BULBIER (Kishinev)  GOLD / SMILOVICI
(Iasi Roumania) SCOP (Pulin)
EJNECHOWICZ / CHENNOCOVICH / HENNICOVICH / WEINSTOCK  (Opatow, Poland)
GOTLIEB (Radom, Poland)
PLASHIEWSKI  (Charsznica, Poland) ELBAUM (Kielce, Poland)


Re: Age changes #general

Cyndee Meystel <cmeys@...>
 

Sally's comments about 1st cousins, etc. marrying are very correct.

I once spoke on Jewish geneology to an Orthodox Jewish women's organization.
I asked the women present if anyone could name all 8 of her husband and her
great-grandparents. One woman (a member of a very prominent Chassidic
rabbinic family -- daughter of a famous Rebbe) tentatively raised her hand,
and said that she could name all of their great-grandparents, but between
her and her husband, they only had 5 (not 8)! -- because of so many relative
marriages!

Cyndee Meystel
Chicago, IL

--
NOTICE: The e-mail address is deliberately incorrect. Delete "nospam" from
the e-mail address to reply.
cmeys@nospamearthlink.net

In Jewish law, marriage between first cousins is very legal. It is even
legal for an uncle to marry a neice. First cousin marriages were
extremely common, and not because the families didn't know they were
related. The parents of first cousins are brothers and sisters! It had
nothing to do with losing touch and moving around. If you look at a
stable population, first cousin marriages are very common. Check out my
family tree for many examples!


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: One story behind the age changes #general

Prof. Slifkin <slifkin@...>
 

There is no ban on first cousins marrying each other among
Orthodox Jews. Uncles can even marry nieces and although
it is illegal in many countries I know people who went
abroad to marry their nieces.


only thing that they had to be careful of was that the
bride and groom were not first cousins. Even this
became a problem, because people were driven
from "shtetel to shtetle" as the Czar or Cossacks went
on rampages (Pogroms), or anti-semitism became so
threatening, as in Poland, and especially Galicia, that
flight was imperative. Thus, family ties were lost, and
later it was found that indeed first cousins did marry,
albeit unknowingly. This may well explain some of the
genetic diseases common to Jews of Eastern
European "origin".

Professor M A Slifkin userid: slifkin@mail.jct.ac.il
Jerusalem Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Canadian Immigration Records #general

greystoke@...
 

The Canadian Archives website provides detailed information on how to
access immigration records, border crossings and passenger lists.  They
offer some level of researcher services.  There is also an online
database covering the years 1925-1935 - searchable by surname, given
name, ship,  port of arrival, year of arrival.  It can take a bit of
time and sometimes imagination on how names might have been spelled but
it works.
 
http://www.archives.ca/exec/naweb.dll?fs&;02020204&e&top&0
 
Best of luck
 
Lucy Walker
Toronto
greystoke@attcanada.ca
 
VOLKOVICH / ZAIDMAN  (Odessa)  BULBIER (Kishinev)  GOLD / SMILOVICI
(Iasi Roumania) SCOP (Pulin)
EJNECHOWICZ / CHENNOCOVICH / HENNICOVICH / WEINSTOCK  (Opatow, Poland)
GOTLIEB (Radom, Poland)
PLASHIEWSKI  (Charsznica, Poland) ELBAUM (Kielce, Poland)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Age changes #general

Cyndee Meystel <cmeys@...>
 

Sally's comments about 1st cousins, etc. marrying are very correct.

I once spoke on Jewish geneology to an Orthodox Jewish women's organization.
I asked the women present if anyone could name all 8 of her husband and her
great-grandparents. One woman (a member of a very prominent Chassidic
rabbinic family -- daughter of a famous Rebbe) tentatively raised her hand,
and said that she could name all of their great-grandparents, but between
her and her husband, they only had 5 (not 8)! -- because of so many relative
marriages!

Cyndee Meystel
Chicago, IL

--
NOTICE: The e-mail address is deliberately incorrect. Delete "nospam" from
the e-mail address to reply.
cmeys@nospamearthlink.net

In Jewish law, marriage between first cousins is very legal. It is even
legal for an uncle to marry a neice. First cousin marriages were
extremely common, and not because the families didn't know they were
related. The parents of first cousins are brothers and sisters! It had
nothing to do with losing touch and moving around. If you look at a
stable population, first cousin marriages are very common. Check out my
family tree for many examples!


Re: Dollar Wire Transfers to Belarus #belarus

Herbert Maletz <herbmal@...>
 

Thanks for your message. I have used Western Union and
it is perfect for some of my purposes, however I also have
a situation where funds must be sent to a bank which is the
basis for my message.

Herb Maletz, Staten Island


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: Dollar Wire Transfers to Belarus #belarus

Herbert Maletz <herbmal@...>
 

Thanks for your message. I have used Western Union and
it is perfect for some of my purposes, however I also have
a situation where funds must be sent to a bank which is the
basis for my message.

Herb Maletz, Staten Island