Date   

Email Address for Vilna's Jewish Museum #lithuania

Debbie Berliner <berliner@...>
 

For any of you who have been trying to contact Rachel Kostanian at the
Vilna Gaon Jewish State Museum, their email address recently has changed.
The new address for the museum is:

jmuseum@delfi.lt

Debbie Berliner
Fortuna, CA
berliner@humboldt1.com


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Email Address for Vilna's Jewish Museum #lithuania

Debbie Berliner <berliner@...>
 

For any of you who have been trying to contact Rachel Kostanian at the
Vilna Gaon Jewish State Museum, their email address recently has changed.
The new address for the museum is:

jmuseum@delfi.lt

Debbie Berliner
Fortuna, CA
berliner@humboldt1.com


Hesel, Gesel and Iosel #lithuania

DrWASaxton@...
 

Fellow Litvaks:

Once again, I have received translated, document-based information >from the
Lithuanian archives which identifies the given names of two of my ancestors
as "Iosel" where I have absolutely confirmed that their names were "Hesel" - "Gesel" in Russian. What is it about the original writing and/or translation of this name that causes this situation to occur so often?

Bill Saxton
Boca Raton, Florida


Emigration from the Russian Empire #lithuania

Andrea Vangor <drav@...>
 

Would the person who sent me a message to request a look-up in Ira Glazier's volume 6 please send me that message again, privately.

Andrea Vangor


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Hesel, Gesel and Iosel #lithuania

DrWASaxton@...
 

Fellow Litvaks:

Once again, I have received translated, document-based information >from the
Lithuanian archives which identifies the given names of two of my ancestors
as "Iosel" where I have absolutely confirmed that their names were "Hesel" - "Gesel" in Russian. What is it about the original writing and/or translation of this name that causes this situation to occur so often?

Bill Saxton
Boca Raton, Florida


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Emigration from the Russian Empire #lithuania

Andrea Vangor <drav@...>
 

Would the person who sent me a message to request a look-up in Ira Glazier's volume 6 please send me that message again, privately.

Andrea Vangor


RV: Can you help with my Galizianer Family? #poland

lilian schorr <lilianschorr@...>
 

Dear SiG Reserches,
I have posted 4 photos of my father's family >from Galizia. Please see
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ in the "To View" section - as files
VM265/266/267/268.

Whatever the information, please contact lilianschorr@infovia.com.ar

Thank you very much.

Lilian Schorr Landes
lilianschorr@infovia.com.ar


JRI Poland #Poland RV: Can you help with my Galizianer Family? #poland

lilian schorr <lilianschorr@...>
 

Dear SiG Reserches,
I have posted 4 photos of my father's family >from Galizia. Please see
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/ in the "To View" section - as files
VM265/266/267/268.

Whatever the information, please contact lilianschorr@infovia.com.ar

Thank you very much.

Lilian Schorr Landes
lilianschorr@infovia.com.ar


Finding Maps... #general

Pamela Weisberger <thewks@...>
 

Dear Genners:

In the past few days there have been several queries/contributions about
maps, so I thought I'd provide info on a wonderful resource (which you may
already know about): The New York Public Library Map Division Room (at
Fifth Ave.& 42nd St.). While a personal visit is ideal, they have a web
site:

www.nypl.org/research/chss/map/map.html

which provides a search engine for their maps of cities, countries, etc.
(There is also the libary's online card catalog: catnyp.nypl.org) which
may provide useful information. Once you discover what you want many of
these maps can be ordered and sent to you (for just their copying/mailing
cost.)

Many years ago I discovered an incredible set of Hungarian Military Maps
there which carry the following designation:

K.u.k. militar-geographisches Institut
Nach Aufnahme 1884/Nachtr 5 II 1908
Nach Zerchenschlassel 1894

While I cannot translate (but would welcome feedback)--nor could the
librarian--so I don't know for what purpose, or how, these maps were made,
they are so enlarged (ratio 1:75:0000) that they show the smallest
villages detailed with every road, and every house (!) lining the streets
(in little black dots) so that you can truly get a sense of the size
village your ancestors might have lived in, as well as their proximity to
other small villages. Additionally, these maps carry the "original" name
of many towns (before prefixes were added to many in Hungary) as well as
many town which are now part of Ukraine.) Because there is one,
huge "guide" map broken into many sections, you must first find the
general location of the town you're looking for so that the staff can copy
(and enlarge) that particular microfilm for you. (I'm not sure if they
have an index, but the maps are identified by the two largest towns
contained in them ,for example "Kis-Varda and Vasaros-Nemeny" or "Csap."

So..it may be a bit of work, but these are an amazing research tool for
those of us with Hungarian ancestors. And, for those researching other
countries, my guess is there are many more treasures to discover at the
NYPL. (In some cases the map room staff will even allow you to photograph
their maps!)

The phone number of the map division room is: 212-930-0587, and I have
found the librarians on staff to be incredibly helpful when it comes to
research questions.

Pamela Weisberger
thewks@hotmail.com
Santa Monica, CA


Search For Poland Warsaw Surname #poland

NZF860@...
 

I am trying to research my family tree. I have found that the family name
FERSZTAND is very uncommon. I managed to find the birth record of an ancestor named Abram-Reuben Fersztand on the JRI-Poland database search. I know the family lived in Warsaw. Beyond this I haven't been able to find any other information. I request that any one who has any information concerning this surname, to please E-mail me. Thank you very much for your help.

Mr. Frankel (Fersztand)
NZF860@aol.com

MODERATOR'S NOTE: This is a good time to remind everyone to make sure to check the JewishGen Family Finder (and then register the names and towns you're searching.)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Finding Maps... #general

Pamela Weisberger <thewks@...>
 

Dear Genners:

In the past few days there have been several queries/contributions about
maps, so I thought I'd provide info on a wonderful resource (which you may
already know about): The New York Public Library Map Division Room (at
Fifth Ave.& 42nd St.). While a personal visit is ideal, they have a web
site:

www.nypl.org/research/chss/map/map.html

which provides a search engine for their maps of cities, countries, etc.
(There is also the libary's online card catalog: catnyp.nypl.org) which
may provide useful information. Once you discover what you want many of
these maps can be ordered and sent to you (for just their copying/mailing
cost.)

Many years ago I discovered an incredible set of Hungarian Military Maps
there which carry the following designation:

K.u.k. militar-geographisches Institut
Nach Aufnahme 1884/Nachtr 5 II 1908
Nach Zerchenschlassel 1894

While I cannot translate (but would welcome feedback)--nor could the
librarian--so I don't know for what purpose, or how, these maps were made,
they are so enlarged (ratio 1:75:0000) that they show the smallest
villages detailed with every road, and every house (!) lining the streets
(in little black dots) so that you can truly get a sense of the size
village your ancestors might have lived in, as well as their proximity to
other small villages. Additionally, these maps carry the "original" name
of many towns (before prefixes were added to many in Hungary) as well as
many town which are now part of Ukraine.) Because there is one,
huge "guide" map broken into many sections, you must first find the
general location of the town you're looking for so that the staff can copy
(and enlarge) that particular microfilm for you. (I'm not sure if they
have an index, but the maps are identified by the two largest towns
contained in them ,for example "Kis-Varda and Vasaros-Nemeny" or "Csap."

So..it may be a bit of work, but these are an amazing research tool for
those of us with Hungarian ancestors. And, for those researching other
countries, my guess is there are many more treasures to discover at the
NYPL. (In some cases the map room staff will even allow you to photograph
their maps!)

The phone number of the map division room is: 212-930-0587, and I have
found the librarians on staff to be incredibly helpful when it comes to
research questions.

Pamela Weisberger
thewks@hotmail.com
Santa Monica, CA


JRI Poland #Poland Search For Poland Warsaw Surname #poland

NZF860@...
 

I am trying to research my family tree. I have found that the family name
FERSZTAND is very uncommon. I managed to find the birth record of an ancestor named Abram-Reuben Fersztand on the JRI-Poland database search. I know the family lived in Warsaw. Beyond this I haven't been able to find any other information. I request that any one who has any information concerning this surname, to please E-mail me. Thank you very much for your help.

Mr. Frankel (Fersztand)
NZF860@aol.com

MODERATOR'S NOTE: This is a good time to remind everyone to make sure to check the JewishGen Family Finder (and then register the names and towns you're searching.)


Re: Places named "SOLEC" in Poland #poland

Stanley Diamond
 

In a message dated 1/9/2001 8:27:42 PM EST, mendelssohn@worldonline.fr writes:

<<< Looking for a place named "Solec", in Poland in a good road-atlas, I found many places named Solec (9 !!!) and I also learned that in Warszawa, there is not only a "Solec Street", along the Wisla, but also a part of the city which is named "Solec" (south of Jerozolimskie street, sud-east of the city):
it was the cyrkuli VII in 1870 (?) and I am not surprised that my
gggrandfather, who was corntraider and shipowner had lived..near the Wisla and the harbour.

I would like to get answers to the following questions:
1.Do you know if the word "Solec" has any meaning in Polish? (is it related with trade or market ?)
2.Do you know what was the number of the "cyrkuli" (district) corresponding to tis part of Warszawa before 1870?(around 1853-55)
2.Do you know a burg or a city named Solec, in Poland ,which would have
had a jewish population and which would have been divided through a Polands partition (1772,1793,1795, or 1815) between Prussia and (russian)Poland ? I heard in my family that many Mendelssohns lived in a town named Solec and that some of them became "prussian" and the others "polish": I don't know if it is true but a precise map of different patitions of Poland would help me
a lot! Is it possible to find such maps on the Web?
Thanks in advance for any help.
Kind regards,
Florence Mendelssohn, Paris (France)>>>

Here is one possibility regarding Solec and the Wisla River:

While listed in "Where Once We Walked" (WOWW) as "Solec"
with the Latitude/Longitude of 51 08 / 21 46, the town at this
location is, in fact, Solec nad Wisla. It is 8 km ESE of Lipsko
and about 56 km WSW of Lublin.

According to WOWW, the town had 898 Jews in 1921.

There are no Mormon microfilms of Jewish vital records for this
town. However, the Jewish Birth, Marriage and Death records
from 1866 to 1897 are available at the Radom branch of the
Polish State Archives.

These records will eventually be indexed by JRI-Poland and
searchable on the Internet but only after a volunteer Archive
Coordinator comes forward to lead the project to index all the
Jewish vital records in the Radom branch. The records of the
following twenty-six towns are kept in the Radom branch:

Bialobrzegi
Ciepiel
Drzewica
Glowacz
Gniewosz
Gowarcz
Granica
Grajec
Ilza
Kazan
Klw w
Kozienice
Lipsko
Magnuszew
Mogielnica
Nowe Miasto nad Pilica
Przysucha
Przytyk
Radom
Rycyw
Sienno
Solec nad Wisla
Szydlowiec
Warka
Wolan w
Zwolen

For more information on the indexing of the records in the Polish
State Archives, and the role of the Archive Coordinator, please go
to the JRI-Poland web site at www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl and click
on the link for "Polish State Archives."

Finally....
according to Miriam Weiner's "Jewish Roots in Poland," all the post-
1897 records for Solec nad Wisla are available at the Civil Records
Office (Urzad Stanu Cywilnego) in the town hall. They are for the
years 1898 to 1910 and 1921 to 1940.

Stanley Diamond
Project Coordinator, Jewish Records Indexing - Poland


JRI Poland #Poland Re: Places named "SOLEC" in Poland #poland

Stanley Diamond
 

In a message dated 1/9/2001 8:27:42 PM EST, mendelssohn@worldonline.fr writes:

<<< Looking for a place named "Solec", in Poland in a good road-atlas, I found many places named Solec (9 !!!) and I also learned that in Warszawa, there is not only a "Solec Street", along the Wisla, but also a part of the city which is named "Solec" (south of Jerozolimskie street, sud-east of the city):
it was the cyrkuli VII in 1870 (?) and I am not surprised that my
gggrandfather, who was corntraider and shipowner had lived..near the Wisla and the harbour.

I would like to get answers to the following questions:
1.Do you know if the word "Solec" has any meaning in Polish? (is it related with trade or market ?)
2.Do you know what was the number of the "cyrkuli" (district) corresponding to tis part of Warszawa before 1870?(around 1853-55)
2.Do you know a burg or a city named Solec, in Poland ,which would have
had a jewish population and which would have been divided through a Polands partition (1772,1793,1795, or 1815) between Prussia and (russian)Poland ? I heard in my family that many Mendelssohns lived in a town named Solec and that some of them became "prussian" and the others "polish": I don't know if it is true but a precise map of different patitions of Poland would help me
a lot! Is it possible to find such maps on the Web?
Thanks in advance for any help.
Kind regards,
Florence Mendelssohn, Paris (France)>>>

Here is one possibility regarding Solec and the Wisla River:

While listed in "Where Once We Walked" (WOWW) as "Solec"
with the Latitude/Longitude of 51 08 / 21 46, the town at this
location is, in fact, Solec nad Wisla. It is 8 km ESE of Lipsko
and about 56 km WSW of Lublin.

According to WOWW, the town had 898 Jews in 1921.

There are no Mormon microfilms of Jewish vital records for this
town. However, the Jewish Birth, Marriage and Death records
from 1866 to 1897 are available at the Radom branch of the
Polish State Archives.

These records will eventually be indexed by JRI-Poland and
searchable on the Internet but only after a volunteer Archive
Coordinator comes forward to lead the project to index all the
Jewish vital records in the Radom branch. The records of the
following twenty-six towns are kept in the Radom branch:

Bialobrzegi
Ciepiel
Drzewica
Glowacz
Gniewosz
Gowarcz
Granica
Grajec
Ilza
Kazan
Klw w
Kozienice
Lipsko
Magnuszew
Mogielnica
Nowe Miasto nad Pilica
Przysucha
Przytyk
Radom
Rycyw
Sienno
Solec nad Wisla
Szydlowiec
Warka
Wolan w
Zwolen

For more information on the indexing of the records in the Polish
State Archives, and the role of the Archive Coordinator, please go
to the JRI-Poland web site at www.jewishgen.org/jri-pl and click
on the link for "Polish State Archives."

Finally....
according to Miriam Weiner's "Jewish Roots in Poland," all the post-
1897 records for Solec nad Wisla are available at the Civil Records
Office (Urzad Stanu Cywilnego) in the town hall. They are for the
years 1898 to 1910 and 1921 to 1940.

Stanley Diamond
Project Coordinator, Jewish Records Indexing - Poland


Motherbook #hungary

Judith A. Bacskai <jbacskai@...>
 

Dear Tom and H-SIG members,
A small addition to Tom's note on the useful data available in the
Hungarian Jewish vital records. Not only the name of the "sandek" ("koma"
in Hungarian) is shown as part of a record, but his occupation is often
listed as well. That's how I found out that my ggf was listed at times as
"metszo" (="mohel", I believe), and as cantor in other records. Quite an
amazing find, considering that I knew absolutely nothing about him beside
his name.
Good luck, everyone,
judy B.


Re: * Magyarositas = Hungarization (a bit long) #hungary

Janos Bogardi / Radix <janos@...>
 

Hello listers,

Incidentally I am also working on making this book available for computer users.

Should any of you be interested, please contact me off-list.

All the best,

Janos Bogardi / Radix.

PLEASE SEE MODERATOR NOTE 2 BELOW....

Subject: Re: * Magyarositas = Hungarization (a bit long)
From: tom klein <tom_klein@tvo.org>
Date: Sun, 7 Jan 2001 23:23:28 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

the book in question was published over 100 years ago, so i would assume that it is in the public domain by now. would it be feasible to convert it to a database and possibly make it available online? (that would solve the problem of cross-referencing.)

does anyone have the facilities to scan and ocr a microfilm? (assuming that the mormons' microfilm is reasonably legible.)

...... tom klein, toronto
------------------------------------------------------
See moderator's note below for further information.

--------------------------------------------------------
Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@uol.com.br> wrote:

[snip!]

As for registers about name Hungarization, >snip>
Szazadunk Ne'vva'ltoztata'sai (this century's changes of names)
a book published by Viktor Hornyanszky in 1895
which contains thousands of surnames of people who "hungarized" their
names >from 1800 to 1893. This is a real jewel for the genealogist but
[snip!]

mod.- Jewishgen and H-sig, working together, have hired a researcher
based in Budapest to digitize this book and do the same for other
important documents related to Jewish family history. The Hornyanszky
book and the books by Fenyes (see H-sig archives -search for Fenyes) are
the first <snip>

moderator note2 and questions:


I wrote the following on my "Research Trip Report" date 9/27/2000:


"Finally, regarding the topic of name changes, in the Szechenyi Hungarian
National Library I found a book in the non-circulating book room titled
Szasadunk Nevvaltoztatasai 1800-1893, call number /1/171/40. It was
published in 1895 and is similar to the name change registration books
mentioned previously. This is a small format book of 253 pages and has a
brown cover. Two pages >from the book would fit on a letter sized page. The
size and number of pages would make this book amenable for photocopying."

IS THIS THE BOOK published by Viktor Hornyanszky, referred to above?
ALSO, PLEASE BE AWARE THAT there were semi-annual publications listing
names changes. How do these books fit into plans for distribution?: Will
the data in them be included as well?

As reported in my message of 9/27:

"...a soft cover large format book titled Kimutatas- Az 1910 evi I.
feleben engedelyezett nevvaltoztatasokrol (rough translation:
Announcement - for 1910 (part I) permission given to change family names)
his is an alphabetical listing with the following column headings
(followed by a sample listing) 1. Eredeti Vezeteknev (Adler, Samuel) 2.
Felvett uj vezeteknev (Balog)3. A csaladfo es gyermekeinek - subheading a.
polgari allasa (hentes which means butcher. b.lakhelye (Budapest) c.
szuletesi heye / eve (Szentpeter/1874 - this is birthplace and year of
birth) d. vallasa (izr.)4. trans.-registration number (171252). This file
had volumes 1 & 2 for 1910. There must be additional books such as these
for different years. I would think that these books could also be found in
Budapest libraries and archives. These books would be a valuable addition
to our research tools."

MY FINAL QUESTION HERE IS has the work of Agnes Varkany been published and
what does her research entail?

Quoting >from the same report:

"There is a well known archivist in Budapest by the name of Agnes Varkany
who is researching these books..."
LS


Hungary SIG #Hungary Motherbook #hungary

Judith A. Bacskai <jbacskai@...>
 

Dear Tom and H-SIG members,
A small addition to Tom's note on the useful data available in the
Hungarian Jewish vital records. Not only the name of the "sandek" ("koma"
in Hungarian) is shown as part of a record, but his occupation is often
listed as well. That's how I found out that my ggf was listed at times as
"metszo" (="mohel", I believe), and as cantor in other records. Quite an
amazing find, considering that I knew absolutely nothing about him beside
his name.
Good luck, everyone,
judy B.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: * Magyarositas = Hungarization (a bit long) #hungary

Janos Bogardi / Radix <janos@...>
 

Hello listers,

Incidentally I am also working on making this book available for computer users.

Should any of you be interested, please contact me off-list.

All the best,

Janos Bogardi / Radix.

PLEASE SEE MODERATOR NOTE 2 BELOW....

Subject: Re: * Magyarositas = Hungarization (a bit long)
From: tom klein <tom_klein@tvo.org>
Date: Sun, 7 Jan 2001 23:23:28 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

the book in question was published over 100 years ago, so i would assume that it is in the public domain by now. would it be feasible to convert it to a database and possibly make it available online? (that would solve the problem of cross-referencing.)

does anyone have the facilities to scan and ocr a microfilm? (assuming that the mormons' microfilm is reasonably legible.)

...... tom klein, toronto
------------------------------------------------------
See moderator's note below for further information.

--------------------------------------------------------
Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@uol.com.br> wrote:

[snip!]

As for registers about name Hungarization, >snip>
Szazadunk Ne'vva'ltoztata'sai (this century's changes of names)
a book published by Viktor Hornyanszky in 1895
which contains thousands of surnames of people who "hungarized" their
names >from 1800 to 1893. This is a real jewel for the genealogist but
[snip!]

mod.- Jewishgen and H-sig, working together, have hired a researcher
based in Budapest to digitize this book and do the same for other
important documents related to Jewish family history. The Hornyanszky
book and the books by Fenyes (see H-sig archives -search for Fenyes) are
the first <snip>

moderator note2 and questions:


I wrote the following on my "Research Trip Report" date 9/27/2000:


"Finally, regarding the topic of name changes, in the Szechenyi Hungarian
National Library I found a book in the non-circulating book room titled
Szasadunk Nevvaltoztatasai 1800-1893, call number /1/171/40. It was
published in 1895 and is similar to the name change registration books
mentioned previously. This is a small format book of 253 pages and has a
brown cover. Two pages >from the book would fit on a letter sized page. The
size and number of pages would make this book amenable for photocopying."

IS THIS THE BOOK published by Viktor Hornyanszky, referred to above?
ALSO, PLEASE BE AWARE THAT there were semi-annual publications listing
names changes. How do these books fit into plans for distribution?: Will
the data in them be included as well?

As reported in my message of 9/27:

"...a soft cover large format book titled Kimutatas- Az 1910 evi I.
feleben engedelyezett nevvaltoztatasokrol (rough translation:
Announcement - for 1910 (part I) permission given to change family names)
his is an alphabetical listing with the following column headings
(followed by a sample listing) 1. Eredeti Vezeteknev (Adler, Samuel) 2.
Felvett uj vezeteknev (Balog)3. A csaladfo es gyermekeinek - subheading a.
polgari allasa (hentes which means butcher. b.lakhelye (Budapest) c.
szuletesi heye / eve (Szentpeter/1874 - this is birthplace and year of
birth) d. vallasa (izr.)4. trans.-registration number (171252). This file
had volumes 1 & 2 for 1910. There must be additional books such as these
for different years. I would think that these books could also be found in
Budapest libraries and archives. These books would be a valuable addition
to our research tools."

MY FINAL QUESTION HERE IS has the work of Agnes Varkany been published and
what does her research entail?

Quoting >from the same report:

"There is a well known archivist in Budapest by the name of Agnes Varkany
who is researching these books..."
LS


Family in Kharkov #general

marilyn feingold <marife@...>
 

I have family by the name of Kroopover, Sokolovsy and Pekarsky from
Kharkov. Do these names sound familiar to anyone? My grandfather's sister
married and lived there until the family lost contact during WW II. Are
their archives that might be helpful to me:

Marilyn Feingold, Atlanta Georgia


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Family in Kharkov #general

marilyn feingold <marife@...>
 

I have family by the name of Kroopover, Sokolovsy and Pekarsky from
Kharkov. Do these names sound familiar to anyone? My grandfather's sister
married and lived there until the family lost contact during WW II. Are
their archives that might be helpful to me:

Marilyn Feingold, Atlanta Georgia